17 Burst results for "Sarah phantom"

"sarah phantom" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | Last month

"sarah phantom" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You so much for sharing your thoughts and feelings with us today. Oh, yeah, thanks that This'd is all things considered from NPR news. Missouri has made some unwelcome headlines as a state with one of the lowest corona virus vaccination rates. It is not a nowt wire, though just about 8% of the nation's tens of millions of people have received their first vaccine dose. Sarah Phantom of ST Louis. Public Radio reports vaccinating 328 million people is an enormous challenge and one that states seem ill equipped to do efficiently. All across the country, Patients are scrambling to get a coveted Corona virus vaccine. The national rollout is simultaneously sluggish and chaotic. Most states have received a little federal guidance on distribution. That means clinics, hospitals and health departments are competing for irregular shipments of the vaccine. And at the end of the line patients like Andy Stites are left confused and frustrated states has serious health issues and spent the last year very afraid. News. The vaccine team was like really exciting because, okay, great we're going to have something that can lead to prevent infection in some way, shape or form. States lives in Missouri, and in mid January, he and other people with chronic health conditions became eligible to receive the Corona virus vaccine. On a tip from a friend. He finally got an appointment at a local hospital. But soon after he got another message, his appointment had been canceled and then to get that cancelation was really, really dejected. William Gholston is a governance studies fellow at the Brookings Institution, he says while Washington helped companies develop the vaccines, it hasn't focused as much effort on distributing them. The states, in turn, were left mostly on their own to take it. From there. This is a situation that requires quasar wartime level mobilization. In order to deal with it quickly and fairly..

Missouri Andy Stites William Gholston NPR Sarah Phantom Brookings Institution ST Louis Washington
"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | Last month

"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

"Much for sharing your thoughts and feelings with us today. Oh, yeah, thanks that This'd is all things considered from NPR news. Missouri has made some unwelcome headlines as a state with one of the lowest corona virus vaccination rates. It is not a nowt wire, though just about 8% of the nation's tens of millions of people have received their first vaccine dose. Sarah Phantom of ST Louis. Public Radio reports vaccinating 328 million people is an enormous challenge and one that states seem ill equipped to do efficiently. All across the country, Patients are scrambling to get a coveted Corona virus vaccine. The national rollout is simultaneously sluggish and chaotic. Most states have received a little federal guidance on distribution. That means clinics, hospitals and health departments are competing for irregular shipments of the vaccine, and at the end of the line patients like Andy Stites are left confused and frustrated. States has serious health issues and spent the last year very afraid, new said That seeing team was like really exciting because Okay, great. We're going to have something that can't least prevent infection in some way, shape or form. States lives in Missouri, and in mid January, he and other people with chronic health conditions became eligible to receive the Corona virus vaccine. On a tip from a friend. He finally got an appointment at a local hospital. But soon after he got another message, his appointment had been canceled and then to get that cancelation was really, really dejected. William Galston is a governance studies fellow at the Brookings Institution, he says while Washington helped companies develop the vaccines, it hasn't focused as much effort on distributing them. The states, in turn, were left mostly on their own to take it. From there. This is a situation that requires quasar wartime level mobilization in order to deal with it quickly and fairly..

Missouri William Galston NPR Andy Stites Sarah Phantom Brookings Institution ST Louis Washington
"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | Last month

"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

"The state can on Lee Phil around a third of those orders. I heard it called yesterday at the Hunger Games of Health Department, which is kind of what it feels like. Kelly Volmer is the director of the Jefferson County Health Department, just south of ST Louis. No matter how good you are in health Your heart you're trying to be and do the right thing. It just people are getting pulled in a lot of directions, And unfortunately, that's slowing the process down. Woolmer calls the vaccination effort fragmented one that's confusing for providers in patients alike. She says. Different sites or counties have different eligibility requirements, and someone who's eligible in one county may not be eligible in another. The vaccinators have been someone independent of each other. And so there hasn't been this coordinated. Rollout, former says a centralized system for appointment sign ups and dosage sharing would help just look at West Virginia, which has relied on a network of independent pharmacies with centralized leadership from its governor's office to vaccinate residents. It's vaccination rate is among the nation's highest. Dr. Ruth Kericho, a nurse practitioner and infectious disease professor at the University of Louisville, says giving people the shot just takes a long time does not like just giving a flu shot. It is a lot more complicated paperwork. The assessment. You know, all of the documentation that has done the handling and the vaccines are finicky. They don't come in pre filled syringes, like others. They need to be kept cold, Super cold. In the case of the Fizer vaccine, they take a long time too thought out. And once the vials are open, they need to be used up quickly. And maybe the biggest hurdle is that drug companies aren't yet producing enough doses and a state's struggle with distribution. It could be months before many patients will receive that coveted shot. For NPR News. I'm Sarah Phantom in ST Louis thistles, all things considered from NPR news. You're listening to KCRW in. This is moments of serenity with me. Garth Trinidad. Stress is normal..

Woolmer NPR News Jefferson County Health Depart Health Department Kelly Volmer ST Louis Lee Phil Garth Trinidad West Virginia flu Dr. Ruth Kericho director Sarah Phantom University of Louisville professor
"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:25 min | Last month

"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

"They showed this is the true side who Chaney was. But in reality in Philadelphia, when the White press would write horrible things about Cheney he environment to his 4:35:30 a.m. practices in North Philly, a Madonna Bull hall so they get a sneak peek into a national power. No one speaks about those moments of John Chaney. But the city knows it. Well, Tyler Times is a staff writer for the Ringer. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and feelings with us today. Oh, yeah. Thanks for that. This'd is all things considered from NPR news. Missouri has made some unwelcome headlines as a state with one of the lowest corona virus vaccination rates. It is not a nowt wire, though just about 8% of the nation's tens of millions of people have received their first vaccine dose. Sarah Phantom of ST Louis. Public Radio reports vaccinating 328 million people is an enormous challenge and one that states seem ill equipped to do efficiently. All across the country, Patients are scrambling to get a coveted Corona virus vaccine. The national rollout is simultaneously sluggish and chaotic. Most states have received a little federal guidance on distribution. That means clinics, hospitals and health departments are competing for irregular shipments of the vaccine, and at the end of the line patients like Andy Stites are left confused and frustrated. States has serious health issues and spent the last year very afraid. News. The vaccine team was like really exciting because, okay, great. We're going to have something that can't least prevent instruction in some way, shape or form. States lives in Missouri, and in mid January, he and other people with chronic health conditions became eligible to receive the Corona virus vaccine. On a tip from a friend. He finally got an appointment at a local hospital. But soon after he got another message, his appointment had been canceled and then to get that cancelation was really, really dejected. William Galston is a governance studies fellow at the Brookings Institution, he says while Washington helped companies develop the vaccines, it hasn't focused as much effort on distributing them. The states, in turn, were left mostly on their own to take it. From there. This is a situation that requires quasar wartime level mobilization in order.

John Chaney William Galston Missouri Andy Stites Madonna Bull hall national power Philadelphia NPR Brookings Institution Cheney Philly Sarah Phantom Tyler Times staff writer ST Louis Washington
"sarah phantom" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:09 min | Last month

"sarah phantom" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Sharing your thoughts and feelings with us today. Oh, yeah, thanks that This'd is all things considered from NPR news. Missouri has made some unwelcome headlines as a state with one of the lowest corona virus vaccination rates. It is not a nowt wire, though just about 8% of the nation's tens of millions of people have received their first vaccine dose. Sarah Phantom of ST Louis. Public Radio reports vaccinating 328 million people is an enormous challenge and one that states seem ill equipped to do efficiently. All across the country, Patients are scrambling to get a coveted Corona virus vaccine. The national rollout is simultaneously sluggish and chaotic. Most states have received a little federal guidance on distribution. That means clinics, hospitals and health departments are competing for irregular shipments of the vaccine, and at the end of the line patients like Andy Stites are left confused and frustrated. States has serious health issues and spent the last year very afraid. News. The vaccine team was like, really exciting because, okay, great. We're going to have something that can't least prevent instruction in some way, shape or form. States lives in Missouri, and in mid January, he and other people with chronic health conditions became eligible to receive the Corona virus vaccine on a tip from a friend. He finally got an appointment at a local hospital. But soon after he got another message, his appointment had been canceled and then to get that cancelation was really, really dejected. William Galston is a governance studies fellow at the Brookings Institution, he says while Washington helped companies develop the vaccines, it hasn't focused as much effort on distributing them. The states, in turn, were left mostly on her own to take it. From there. This is a situation that requires quasar wartime level mobilization in order to deal with it quickly and fairly. Each state device its own vaccine distribution plan with.

Missouri Andy Stites William Galston NPR Sarah Phantom Brookings Institution ST Louis Washington
"sarah phantom" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:10 min | Last month

"sarah phantom" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Much for sharing your thoughts and feelings with us today. Oh, yeah. Thanks. This'd is all things considered from NPR news. Missouri has made some unwelcome headlines as a state with one of the lowest corona virus vaccination rates. It is not a nowt liar, though just about 8% of the nation's tens of millions of people have received their first vaccine dose. Sarah Phantom of ST Louis. Public Radio reports vaccinating 328 million people is an enormous challenge and one that states seem ill equipped to do efficiently. All across the country, Patients are scrambling to get a coveted Corona virus vaccine. The national rollout is simultaneously sluggish and chaotic. Most states have received a little federal guidance on distribution. That means clinics, hospitals and health departments are competing for irregular shipments of the vaccine, and at the end of the line patients like Andy Stites are left confused and frustrated. States has serious health issues and spent the last year very afraid. News. The vaccine team was like really exciting because, okay, great. We're going to have something that can't least prevent instruction in some way, shape or form. States lives in Missouri, and in mid January, he and other people with chronic health conditions became eligible to receive the Corona virus vaccine. On a tip from a friend. He finally got an appointment at a local hospital. But soon after he got another message, his appointment had been canceled and then to get that cancelation was really, really dejected. William Gholston is a governance studies fellow at the Brookings Institution, he says while Washington helped companies develop the vaccines, it hasn't focused as much effort on distributing them. The states, in turn, were left mostly on their own to take it. From there. This is a situation that requires quasar wartime level mobilization. In order to deal with it quickly and fairly. Each state devised its own vaccine distribution plan with chronically underfunded health departments leading the way. It's sometimes a slapdash effort, with states deciding weekly shipments for hospitals, mass vaccination events and local health departments. They don't get regular amounts, and that leads to appointments like Andy Stites being canceled. In Missouri. There are hundreds of vaccinators applying to receive doses every week. The state can on Lee Phil around a third of those orders. I heard it called yesterday the hunger Games of Health Department, which is kind of what it feels like Kelly Volmer is the director of the Jefferson County Health Department, just south of ST Louis. No matter how good you are in hell Your heart you're trying to be and do the right thing. It's just people are getting pulled in a lot of directions, and unfortunately, that's slowing the process down. Vollmer calls the vaccination effort fragmented one that's confusing for providers in patients alike. She says. Different sites or counties have different eligibility requirements, and someone who's eligible in one county may not be eligible in another. The vaccinators have been someone independent of each other. And so there hasn't been this coordinated. Rollout, former says a centralized system for appointment sign ups and dosage sharing would help just look at West Virginia, which has relied on a network of independent pharmacies with centralized leadership from its governor's office to vaccinate residents. It's vaccination rate is among the nation's highest. Dr. Ruth Kericho, a nurse practitioner and infectious disease professor at the University of Louisville, says giving people the shot just takes a long time does not like just giving a flu shot. It is a lot more complicated paperwork. The assessment. You know, all of the documentation that has done the handling and the vaccines are finicky. They don't come in pre filled syringes, like others. They need to be kept cold, Super cold. In the case of the Fizer vaccine, they take a long time too thought out. And once the vials are open, they need to be used up quickly. And maybe the biggest hurdle is that drug companies aren't yet producing enough doses and a state's struggle with distribution. It could be months before many patients will receive that coveted.

Andy Stites Missouri Health Department ST Louis Vollmer William Gholston NPR Jefferson County Health Depart Sarah Phantom Brookings Institution West Virginia Washington Lee Phil flu Kelly Volmer Dr. Ruth Kericho University of Louisville director professor
"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:01 min | 10 months ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Not at all because they're still here doing the same thing. The same exact thing did peaceful protests became dangerous protesters shot fireworks toward officers and used bats, hammers and rocks to break the police departments windows police used stinging gas to disperse the crowd for NPR news. I'm Sarah. Phantom in Ferguson Missouri. The mayor of Atlanta says President Trump's comments in tweets are inflaming violence as protests continue. Alex Helmick of member station W. A. B. E. has more president. Trump has blamed democratic governors and mayors for not being tough enough on demonstrators and threatening that the federal government including the use of the military is an option Atlanta mayor. Kisha bottoms told CBS's face. The Nation that the president is making the situation worse. We are beyond the tipping point in this country and his. His rhetoric only inflames that, and he should just sometimes stop talking bottoms also said she had no faith in the Department of Justice, which is investigating the case of Marbury the black jogger killed by two white men in south Georgia. who weren't arrested until a video of the shooting went viral for NPR news I'm Alex Helmick in Atlanta across the Atlantic Ocean demonstrators in London Berlin and Copenhagen took to the streets today in solidarity with American protesters..

President Trump Kisha bottoms Atlanta president Alex Helmick NPR Atlantic Ocean Ferguson Missouri Phantom Marbury London Berlin CBS Department of Justice Copenhagen Georgia. W. A. B. E.
"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:08 min | 10 months ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR. News I'm Barbara. Klein protests were peaceful in Minneapolis overnight. After National Guard, troops joined local and state police in a show of force to quell earlier violence over the death of George, Floyd and unarmed black man in police custody, but Minnesota Governor Tim. Walz says his St, state needs to make far more fundamental changes. We don't just right near the top on educational attainment. We ranked in the top on on personal incomes on home ownership on life expectancies things that this and one that came out a while back we. We ranked second in a survey of the fifty states second. In happiness behind Hawaii. But if you take a deeper look and peel it back, which this week is peeled back. All of those statistics are true if you're white. If you're not. We rank near the bottom. The Minnesota Governor spoke this morning. Protests turned violent in Ferguson Missouri last night. Some demonstrators threw fireworks and rocks at the city's police headquarters Sarah Phantom of Saint. Louis public radio reports the evening recall the twenty fourteen protests there after a black eighteen year old was killed by a white police officer. Hundreds gathered in Ferguson to protest police killings of black people sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis six years ago, similar protests in a heavy police response followed the shooting death of Michael Brown. Lauren Davis of nearby Belleville. Illinois says she feels a little has changed since Brown die.

George Floyd Minneapolis Minnesota Lauren Davis Michael Brown NPR Walz Governor Tim Ferguson Missouri Ferguson National Guard Klein Sarah Phantom Belleville Hawaii Illinois officer Louis
"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:50 min | 10 months ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Pepper <Speech_Music_Female> spraying protesters <Speech_Music_Female> and making arrests. <Speech_Music_Female> Some <Speech_Music_Female> marchers retaliated <Speech_Music_Female> by smashing <Speech_Music_Female> up police fans <Speech_Music_Female> and setting them on fire <Speech_Music_Female> for NPR <Speech_Female> news. <SpeakerChange> I'm <Speech_Male> gwen Hogan in Brooklyn. <Speech_Male> Test <Speech_Male> turned violent and <Speech_Male> Ferguson Missouri <Speech_Male> with demonstrators <Speech_Male> throwing fireworks <Speech_Male> and rocks <Speech_Male> at the city's police <Speech_Male> headquarters. <Speech_Male> Sarah Phantom <Speech_Male> with Saint <Speech_Male> Louis public radio <Speech_Male> reports evening. <Speech_Male> Recall the two thousand <Speech_Male> fourteen protests <Speech_Male> after a <Speech_Male> black eighteen year <Speech_Male> old was <Speech_Male> killed by a white police <Speech_Male> officer. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hundreds gathered <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in Ferguson <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> protests police killings <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of black people <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sparked by the death <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of George Floyd in Minneapolis. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Six years ago similar <Speech_Female> protests in a heavy <Speech_Female> police response <Speech_Music_Female> followed the shooting. Death <Speech_Female> of Michael Brown. <Speech_Female> Lauren <Speech_Female> Davis of nearby Belleville <Speech_Female> Illinois says <Speech_Female> she feels a little <Speech_Female> has changed <SpeakerChange> since <Speech_Music_Female> Brown died. <Speech_Music_Female> Not at all because <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> they're still here doing the same <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thing. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> The same <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> exact thing of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> peaceful protests <Speech_Female> became dangerous as <Speech_Female> some protesters <Speech_Female> shot fireworks <Speech_Female> officers <Speech_Female> and used bats <Speech_Female> hammers rocks to <Speech_Female> break the police departments <Speech_Female> windows. <Speech_Female> Police used stinging <Speech_Female> guests to disperse <Speech_Female> the crowd <Speech_Female> for NPR news. <Speech_Female> I'm Sarah Phantom <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> in Ferguson <Speech_Male> Missouri <Speech_Male> listening to <Silence> NPR news. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> A riot <Speech_Male> broke out last <Speech_Male> night. Near the Alamo <Speech_Male> in San Antonio <Speech_Male> after clashes <Speech_Male> between <Speech_Male> George Floyd protesters <Speech_Male> counter <Speech_Male> protesters <Speech_Male> and police. <Speech_Male> Texas public radio's <Speech_Male> G Jalil. <Speech_Female> Medeiros <SpeakerChange> was there. <Speech_Female> Protesters <Speech_Female> stood toe to <Speech_Female> toe with police officers. <Speech_Female> At the Alamo <Speech_Female> officers made <Speech_Female> breath arrests <Speech_Female> and fired tear gas <Speech_Female> and non-lethal <Speech_Female> pellets and bullets <Speech_Female> into crowds. Who <Speech_Female> threw water bottles at the <Speech_Female> police? <Speech_Female> San Antonio President <Speech_Female> trump patent <Speech_Female> was at the scene <Speech_Female> where police stood <Speech_Female> in front of armed militia <Speech_Female> members who <Speech_Female> guarded a monument <Speech_Female> by the Alamo. That <Speech_Male> was graffitied <SpeakerChange> Friday. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> When <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you have your back towards <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people that aren't doing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a peaceful protests <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and they have weapons <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> aimed at us it's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sparks up with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> type of anger <Speech_Music_Male> sparks different types of <Speech_Music_Male> violence that <Speech_Music_Male> is inherited <Speech_Music_Male> inside <Speech_Music_Female> of our brains <SpeakerChange> inside <Speech_Female> of our lives. <Speech_Female> Police escorted <Speech_Female> militia members <Speech_Female> away from the area <Speech_Female> while demonstrators <Speech_Female> continue to pack <Speech_Female> the plaza <Speech_Female> vandalizing and looting <Speech_Female> nearby stores <Speech_Female> late into the <Speech_Female> night. I'M JULIA <Speech_Female> DOT <SpeakerChange> is in <Speech_Male> San Antonio. <Speech_Male> President trump is <Speech_Male> retreating <Speech_Male> from efforts to <Speech_Male> reschedule a group <Speech_Male> of Seven summit <Speech_Male> meeting. The <Speech_Male> meeting had been scheduled <Speech_Male> for March <Speech_Male> but it was called <Speech_Male> off because of the coronavirus <Speech_Male> pandemic. <Speech_Male> The president <Speech_Male> had hoped to hold <Speech_Male> the meeting next month <Speech_Male> but he told reporters <Speech_Male> this weekend <Speech_Male> that he will delay it <Speech_Male> until this fall <Speech_Male> after Canadian. <Speech_Male> Prime Minister <Speech_Male> Justin. Trudeau said <Speech_Male> there were too many <Speech_Male> health related <Speech_Male> questions <Speech_Male> and German chancellor. <Speech_Male> Angela Merkel said <Speech_Male> she would not attend <Speech_Male> the president <Speech_Male> also said he <Speech_Male> wants to expand <Speech_Male> the group's membership <Speech_Male> to potentially include <Speech_Male> Russia Australia <Speech_Male> South Korea <Speech_Male> and India <Speech_Male> on trial Snyder NPR news.

NPR San Antonio George Floyd Sarah Phantom Ferguson President Missouri officer president gwen Hogan Angela Merkel Snyder NPR Belleville Brooklyn. Trudeau Michael Brown. Brown
"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on KCRW

"You for Tuesday has come and gone and the democratic race is still very much up in the air today on The New Yorker radio hour will take stock of what a contested convention between Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders might mean for the Democrats divided party at the park is divided at the convention never has one in American politics I'll talk with Michael Kazin and with Amy Davidson Sorkin about the state of the race and the ideological conflict in the party plus the science fiction writer William Gibson talks about the end of the future how often do you hear the phrase the twenty second century so here we no longer have that shipped cultural anticipation that we took for granted through most of the twentieth century William Gibson on climate change and its prophetic new novel agency that's all ahead on the New Yorker radio hour live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein senator Kamilla Harris is endorsing former vice president Joe Biden for the democratic nomination as Franco or Dona as reports Harris is the latest former presidential candidate to throw our support to Biden senator Harris says she'll do everything in our power to help buying when in a statement she said quote there's no one better prepared than Joe to steer our nation through these turbulent times and restore truth honor and decency to the oval office has ended her own presidential campaign late last year she joins PPD judge better Rourke Amy Klobuchar and Mike Bloomberg who have all endorsed by then in the past week Biden thanked her for her support via Twitter touting her career fighting for those who have been left behind Biden is consolidating support among a growing list of prominent Democrats after a wave of primary victories that resurrected his campaign Franco or down yes NPR news civil rights leader Jesse Jackson is supporting Bernie Sanders bid for the nomination Sanders lags Biden in support among black Americans Jackson is well known among older African Americans he's due to appear with Sanders in Michigan today Missouri is reporting its first case of corona virus a young woman who'd been in Italy Sarah phantom of St Louis public radio reports the woman had recently returned from studying abroad in Italy one of the countries with a large number of coronavirus cases the woman notified local health authorities after she became sick with respiratory problems and a high fever she and her family are currently in isolation at their home the woman is expected to recover Missouri department of health and senior services director Randall Williams says because the case was contracted abroad Missourians are still at low risk this is not community transmitted this was and what we've been looking for which is travel acquired state officials have only tested at twenty six people in Missouri for the virus for NPR news I'm Sarah Fenton in Saint Louis an estimated sixteen million people in northern Italy are on lockdown as the number of coronavirus cases spikes there this weekend that's a quarter of the country's population museums and schools across the nation are closed the B. B. C.'s Bethany bell reports from Bologna this is a significant step pop by the Italian government in an attempt to try and stop the spread of the corona virus planes and trains services are still running but.

"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Barbara Klein senator. Kamala Harris is endorsing former vice president. Joe Biden for the Democratic nomination as Franco or DONAS REPORTS. Harris's the latest former presidential candidate to throw her support to Biden Senator Harris. She'll do everything in her power to help Biden win in a statement she said quote. There's no one better prepared than Joe to steer our nation through these turbulent times and restore truth honor and decency to the Oval Office. Harris ended her own presidential campaign late last year. She joins Buddha. Judge Beto O'Rourke Amy Klobuchar and Mike Bloomberg who have all endorsed by in the past week. Biden thanked her for her support via twitter touting her career fighting for those who've been left behind biden consolidating support among a growing list of prominent. Democrats after a wave of primary victories that resurrected his campaign. Franko or Donas. Npr News Civil Rights leader. Jesse Jackson is supporting Bernie Sanders bid for the nomination Sanders Lags Biden and support. Among black-americans. Jackson is well known older African Americans. He's due to appear with Sanders in Michigan. Today Missouri is reporting. Its first case of Corona virus. A young woman who'd been in Italy. Sarah Phantom of Saint Louis public radio reports. The woman had recently returned from studying abroad in Italy. One of the countries with a large number of coronavirus cases. The woman notified local health authorities after she became sick with respiratory problems and a high fever. She and her family are currently in isolation at home. The woman is expected to recover Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Director. Randall Williams says because the case was contracted abroad missourians are still at low risk. This is not community transmitted missiles. And what we've been looking for which is travel a car. State officials have only tested at twenty six people in Missouri for the virus for NPR news. I'm Sarah Phantom in Saint Louis. An estimated sixteen million people in northern Italy are on lockdown as the number of corona virus cases. Spikes there this weekend. That's a quarter of the country's population museums and schools across the nation are closed the BBC's Bethany Bell reports from Bologna..

Joe Biden Senator Harris Italy Bernie Sanders Jesse Jackson Sarah Phantom NPR Missouri Saint Louis senator Judge Beto O'Rourke Barbara Klein vice president Missouri Department of Health Washington Franco Donas Amy Klobuchar
"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston passengers aboard a cruise ship off. The coast of California are expected to disembark on Monday after nearly two weeks. See The trump administration announced on Friday that twenty-one passengers traveling on the grand princess tested positive for corona virus. The ship is scheduled to dock in the port of Oakland on Monday. Thirty five hundred people from fifty. Four countries are aboard the ship. Missouri has recorded its first case of corona virus. Sarah Phantom from Saint Louis public radio reports. A young woman has tested positive for the illness which has spread to more than a dozen. Us States the woman had recently returned from studying abroad in Italy. One of the countries with a large number of corona virus cases. The woman notified local health authorities after she became sick with respiratory problems and a high fever. She and her family are currently in isolation at home. The woman is expected to recover Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Director. Randall Williams says because the case was contracted abroad missourians are still at low risk. This is not community transmitted. This was what we've been looking for which is travel acquired. State officials have only tested twenty-six people in Missouri for the virus for NPR news. I'm Sarah Phantom in Saint Louis lawmakers and Virginia have passed new gun restrictions limiting purchases to one per month and requiring background checks for all gun sales. Roberta Rodin with member station BPM reports. The legislation is in response to a mass shooting in Virginia Beach last summer. A bill sponsored by Democratic delegates Yuan Ward of Hampton would make it illegal for dealers to sell or rent a gun without running a criminal background check. Virginia Democrats initially wanted background checks for firearm transfers as well but that was blocked by the more conservative. Democrats both houses also agreed to restore a law from the nineteen nineties restricting gun purchases to one per month. The two bills are the last of a series of gun control measures that Democrats set out to pass this year after winning total control of the state legislature last November. All of the legislation still needs to be signed by Governor Ralph Northam for NPR news. I'm Roberta role. Dan in Richmond. The president of Turkey has been invited to Brussels for talks amid escalating tensions Teri Schultz reports. Both Turkey and the European Union are accusing each other of violating a two thousand sixteen migration pact. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. His borders with the EU after its leaders refused to pay him more than the six billion euros that had been agreed to in exchange for blocking migrants and refugees from leaving Turkey. You foreign policy chief. Joseph Burrell says Erta ones threats are unacceptable way to push for further support. It's unclear what's on the table for negotiations. The Monday talks. That's Teri Schultz reporting from Brussels. You're listening to NPR news in Washington former Democratic presidential contender Kamala Harris. Who's endorsing former vice president? Joe Biden for the nomination. The California senator announced her support for Biden in an online video. Today one.

NPR President Recep Tayyip Erdogan Turkey Teri Schultz Sarah Phantom Saint Louis Missouri Virginia Washington Brussels Joe Biden California European Union Us Oakland Windsor Johnston Governor Ralph Northam Roberta Rodin vice president
"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly Dulles dot com slash fast. Live from NPR news in Washington on trial. Snyder police are not speculating on a motive for yesterday's mass shooting at a public utility center in Virginia Beach impure, Serra, mccamman, reports a gunman killed at least twelve people and injured several others before dying in a shootout. With police officers governor Ralph Northerns that this is a horrific day for the Commonwealth of Virginia, and expressed his deepest condolences and prayers for the families of those who left home and will not return. SE put along with him were a local congresswoman, Elaine, Luria, and the city's mayor and police chief, the police chief says now a dozen victims in this mass shooting. In addition to the shooter who was killed by police during an exchange of fire that he described as a long gun battle between the shooter and officers. Chief Jim Cervera said, quote, I have a number of officers who are processing through what could best be described as a war zone. Severe describes the suspect as disgruntled. He says the thirties, know who he is. But are not ready to name him publicly, and even then will only do so once surveyor says a focus now should be on the dignity and respect for the victims and their families. President Trump weighing in on the political crisis in Britain ahead of his state, visit their next week, the BBC's Jessica Parker reports at Trump has told a British newspaper his preferences in the race to lead the conservative party, a characteristic, defiance of diplomatic convention. President Trump has waited right into the debate about who should succeed to resume as prime minister in an interview with the sun. He says that the former foreign secretary Boris Johnson would be excellent that he is a good guy and a talented person. He will say says he likes another contender Jeremy hunt, but he's less warm about Michael gov, suggesting that the environment secretary was wrong to apparently, describe the president's approach to Iran. Ah sabre-rattling to Missouri now where the state's sole remaining clinic that provides. Abortion will remain open, for now the Saint Louis Planned Parenthood clinics license had been set to expire midnight, but a Saint Louis publicradio Sarah phantom reports, a Circuit, Judge has granted a temporary restraining order. That keeps it in place state didn't for new, the clinics annual license after several physicians who worked there declined to be interviewed as part of a state inspection, planned Parenthood's, lawyers say the physician feared prosecution and estate with restrictive abortion laws. The clinic's medical director David Eisenberg says in granting this motion the court sent the state a message that abortion is legal and access is necessary, your department of health and senior services is supposed to promote and protect the hell of Missouri's forcing them to leave the state for routine care is the exact opposite of that mission. The judge will consider planned Parenthood's request for a preliminary injunction next week for NPR news. I'm Sarah phantom in Saint Louis, and you're listening to NPR news. Lawmakers in the West Virginia Senate are set to consider a long sweeping and controversial education, Bill today. They missed it of West Virginia, public broadcasting reports teachers and other school employees are planning to be at the state capital in Charleston to rally against the proposal, the Republican led West Virginia, Senate is hoping to quickly pass a one hundred and forty four page Bill that would overhaul the state's public education system, a draft version of the measure ties teacher and service personnel, pay raises to charter schools, the withholding of pay during a strike in a change in how layoffs would be considered West Virginia educators, went on a two day strike earlier this year, they successfully rallied against Bill with many of the same provisions with classes now out for the summer union leaders say they will be back again to try to stop what they call tax on public education, US education secretary Betsy DeVos tweeted Friday morning, her support of Republican lawmakers and their push for school choice proposals like charter schools. For NPR news. I'm Dave missed each in Charleston West Virginia acting Defense Secretary, Patrick Shanahan, speaking out on China Shanahan has told an annual security conference in Singapore this weekend at the US will no longer tiptoe around Chinese behavior. In Asia, the speech was Shanahan's, first major once taking over at the Pentagon, January pope Francis in Romania today, tens of thousands on hand as he visited one of the country's most famous shrines on the second day of his trip. It's been raining in Romania, the bad weather forced supposed to change his travel plans, instead of taking a helicopter to the shrine and Transylvania the pope had to take a three hour car trips to the mountains to get there. I'm Dr Snyder NPR news.

NPR secretary West Virginia President Trump Charleston West Virginia Dr Snyder Sarah phantom Dulles International Airport president Bill Saint Louis Planned Parenthood Missouri Virginia Beach Virginia Patrick Shanahan Romania Washington US
"sarah phantom" Discussed on Up First

Up First

11:46 min | 1 year ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on Up First

"Missouri's last health clinic that provides abortions is within days of losing its license. If it does Missouri would become the only state in this country without an abortion provider. Right. And unless a court steps in the state's health department probably won't renew that clinics license it expires on Friday. Now Planned Parenthood runs the center in Saint Louis. There president Leana wen told NPR they've been fighting to keep it open. We have complied with every single regulation that politicians have thrown our way. But the goal post keeps on changing, and this most recent goalpost is potentially subjecting, physicians and training residents fellows to criminal prosecution that goalposts she's referring to is this requirement that clinicians submit to questioning in order to get the clinics license renewed. So why is that interview a problem, Sarah phantom of Saint Louis public radio has been covering this story? Good morning. Hello. Would you explain why? Why it is that some people at this clinic, simply do not want to submit to questioning the reasons why aren't one hundred percent clear, as far as what their motivations are Planned Parenthood. Representatives yesterday said that they asked the state, if what was said during those interviews could potentially be used against the clinicians, either through board review or through criminal proceedings. And the state said it couldn't rule it out. Also, several of the clinicians, who work there aren't technically, Planned Parenthood employees, they're independent trainees, or residents that simply work there. So Planned Parenthood said that it couldn't compel them to be interviewed even if they wanted to do that. They don't have the power to do it. But it doesn't sound like they really want to compel people to be interviewed because they're suspicious. If that's the right word as to what the motives of Missouri health officials would be for asking a bunch of questions. Is that right? Right. Missouri hasn't necessarily been a super friendly state for abortion rights activists. And so, I think they want to tread carefully. And when the state tries to explain why they want the interviews other than that there's a regulation that allows it, what -cation the state gift. What is their concern? So according to court filings, the state wants to investigate certain deficiencies in the clinic, but beyond that, the state was very vague on why they wanted to conduct those interviews. We'll you mentioned that Missouri is not a super friendly state for people who provide abortions or people who support abortion rights, and that certainly was underlined the other day when the governor signed a Bill, one of a number of similar pieces of legislation across the country, a Bill that bans abortions in not quite all but nearly all cases is there a connection between that legislation. And this impasse with the last clinic, that is still open in Missouri. Well, I think there's sort of two parts of the same zeitgeist that law that you mentioned doesn't go into effect until August. So it's not a direct effect, but it's part of this larger anti-abortion movement happening in Missouri. And the governor in many members of the legislature have been really tough on abortion through these sorts of regulations, and Mike Parsons, Republican, who said he wants to make Missouri the most pro life state in the country and abortion rights supporters say the increased regulations on these clinics like these annual inspections are away to further that agenda. So if this clinic loses its license to perform abortions, what is the situation in Missouri the next day? So the abortion clinic in question is planned a Planned Parenthood clinic, but it's specifically made for what they call reproductive health services notably abortions. But there are other planned Parenthood's throughout the Saint Louis area in Missouri that provide non abortion services like STD's testing and birth control. And those services for now would remain unaffected and second. This is the last clinic in Missouri that provides abortion. So a lot of people in Missouri would be forced to go out of state if they wanted to get one and in Saint Louis, we're right across the river from Illinois. So I can see many residents here, traveling across the river to a clinic in the eastern suburbs. But that leaves out a lot of people in the center of the state and getting abortion for them could mean having to drive a nearly four hundred mile round trip to Kansas or Illinois. And that's tough on people without access to transportation or childcare or people who can't get off work. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me of Saint Louis. Public radio. the tornadoes that swept through eastern Kansas last night. We're just the latest severe weather for that region. That's right. A series of storms also flooded rivers parts of the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma have gone underwater governor Kevin stood is relying on levees very old levies to keep the damage from getting worse. We've just got to pray for no rain no worth. And when keep getting rain into that watershed, there'd be some serious problems NPR's Frank Morris is in Tulsa covering the story. Hey there, Frank. Hi steve. What are you been seeing, well, the rivers, of course, really high their number of homes and businesses flooded. I mean, in the hundreds and people are just on pins and needles here watching these levees start to deteriorate the seventy year old levees that have been under pressure for days and days. Now, you just said start to deteriorate. We heard yesterday on NPR news from the mayor of Tulsa who said. While they've never been tested like this, but they're holding are you saying, there are now some signs of weakness. I, I don't think that the signs of weakness have have ramped up significantly, but they are leaking. And, and the water is just seeping through underneath some of these levees and causing all kinds of problems for businesses and homes in the you know, in the shadow of these things and nearby. The, the, the ground is just turning to a kind of slurry in some places because the water is, there's been so much pressure on these levees for days now. And it's, it's just gonna stick for days longer. What are you hearing from some people that you talk with their also? Well again, they're the people are taking this pretty seriously, especially folks who live and work down in what would be the shadow of these levees if the sun was shining yesterday, I was down in an industrial part of sand springs, Oklahoma. That's a sort of a working class suburb, just west of Tulsa, right? Downstream from this keystone dam, where the corps of engineers is releasing huge amounts of water, two hundred and seventy five thousand cubic feet per second. And I spoke with thou Silcock shoot. She was rushing around to get her stuff out the implements of this business out of a warehouse. Evacuating. Here's rising behind us. It's coming up under the concrete. It's getting wetter and wetter. She's talking about water just bubbling up from the concrete bubbles coming up through the concrete as the water comes up and destroys the, the business, not a thing you really want to want to save. Franken wanna ask about something else. I know your hometown is Kansas City. Weren't there tornadoes in Kansas City last night, there were two ATO's in near Kansas City. Kansas City itself didn't get hit Lawrence took a pounding Bonner springs. Kansas Lynnwood looks terrible. You has some of the kind of damage. Of just clearing the foundations in, in Lynnwood, some extent neclear help how strong those buildings where to begin with in the pictures, but the tornado looked to be about a mile wide last night. And so it was very serious about two dozen tornadoes reported yesterday mainly in Kansas, best to your friends and relations there, Frank, thanks so much. You bet. Steve. Standing in line to vote has become much less of an ordeal than it used to be you get this new state in the two thousand sixteen election averaged await time longer than twenty minutes. That's according to the elections performance index from MIT one big reason for this is a new technology called electron electric poll books. But now there are some questions about how secure that technology really is NPR's miles. Parks covers voting, and election security, and goodness. You have a lot to cover miles. There's a lot no ought to mind, this technology, that's supposed to make everything better. How's it work? So basically, you think about the old days and you walk in your community center, and somebody opens this huge binder of names. They find your name they check you off. This is basically that process only electric either on a laptop or on a tablet like an ipad. Okay. This is seen that in a voting station. Exactly. I mean, well, the technology is taken off almost more than fifty percent of voters, who vote in person. In twenty twenty are going to sign in using this technology. The problem is that this technology also raises a lot of tough security questions. Because in a lot of case it's, it's either directly or indirectly connected to the internet. Oh, which means that. A particularly clever hacker, my find some way in their right? We know that voting machines themselves are one of the big selling points is that they are never connected to the internet. But these machines 'electronic pull books, a lot of their benefits which there are a myriad of benefits. There you if a voter is in the wrong location, and the they go to sign in on one of these a poll worker can using this machine. Tell them where they're right. Voting location is if a voter tries to vote twice in a in a place where you can vote at different jurisdictions. It will be able to catch that by talking to the other electronic poll books in that district, the election supervisor's love this technology. They say it cuts down on voting times, and it cuts down on on human error, and on. On the amount of paperwork that election supervisors have to do, but that can also be a problem because these elections supervisors who love this technology. They're supposed to be the ones who are asking the really tough questions. And a lot of security experts. I've talked to are not convinced that those tough questions have been asked as this technology has truly started to take over. Well, help me out here, let's look at this from an election supervisors perspective. You said the actual voting machine is not connected to the internet, the tablet, where people are checking off names is connected to the internet. But the tablet just has of public information list of registered voters. Right. So what are the stakes here? Right. The biggest thing is that whether it's due to technical malfunction whether it's due to poor poll, worker, training, or whether in this worst case scenario, cyber attackers able to get in there and make some mischief happened miss with who's registered, and who's exactly you could see a situation where this can really screw up day of election voting and we've seen this in, in real life. You look back at twenty eighteen John, I did a story yesterday. On all things considered about Johnson county, Indiana, which basically saw the company that was maintaining these pull books, not provide enough bandwidth, and it meant that in person voting on election day froze from eight AM when people are trying to go right before work all the way through lunchtime. That leads to delays in it leads to people not voting. Well, so the technology that supposed to shorten the line in that case anyway, lengthened.

Missouri Tulsa NPR Kansas Saint Louis Kansas City Oklahoma Frank Morris steve Sarah phantom president Mike Parsons Leana wen keystone dam Lynnwood Illinois
"sarah phantom" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Ladies and gentlemen. I wanna thank the people of Illinois on the night of rods. First statewide victory. People were already talking about a run for president, but when the FBI started recording his calls it was like a slow motion car crash. I've got this thing and. Download public official a now wherever you get your podcasts. Waiting full. Sound opinions. Everyone's a critic. So now it's time to hear what you have to say. Messages. My name's Christie lateness calling from canal Fulton Ohio and listening to your segment on rock fans not being the same without one of their key members. Oh, you were making a good point about imagining Fleetwood MAC, thought Stevie nicks, irks, Buckingham, which I totally agree with, well, just hoping to hear you mentioned something about how the doors simply to not continue to be the doors without Jim Morrison. This is the. They tried go on, you know, but they found it impossible to do. So thank you for listening to my point of view catch later by. Chris calling from New York City, early enjoyed this week's episode with Sharon van, Etten, great, but the subject of my call has nothing to do with that. So I've been listening to this artist MMA, do Mukthar probably butchered that name. But anyway, he's a twat gets harvest from new year in northern Africa. The away. Guy shreds. The music is really, unlike anything I've, I've listened to recently with the exception of maybe Krung bean. They have a little similarity in terms of the, the Qatar tones that are us. Yeah he had two or three sets at jazz fest in New Orleans this year. Anyway. Give give him a chance. Check him out. He's a credible guitarist and and behind this. Great love the show. Guys taking these. My name is Russell. I'm from my expert on North Carolina. I'm comment on music is therapy and definitely many, many times been songs from U2. Bob Dylan uniting that has helped me to Dr times and encouragement key press, and I've often say that she failing down now. Something like the staple singers and fat don't make feel better. You're probably thinking. It's, it's, it's thank thanking. Hi, this is Sarah phantom from Saint Louis Missouri calling about your recent episode on space songs. I just wanted to give my opinion. I'm sure you're getting a lot of opinions about that episode my favorite song about space is Gil Scott Heron's Whitey on the moon because I've been thinking about it a lot. Hot wanna know, Taunus no lights. But what is on the moon? I wonder why you up in me, why it is on the moon. Why was already giving him fifty weekend? Now white is on the moon. Taxes taken hold. Damn check the Jukka make me a nervous wreck the price. You must and now Amazon looking at going into space. It just seems like there are a lot of problems on earth that could be solved with all the money that we're putting into private space travel, and sort of a different vibe than a lot of space on a lot of wonder obviously, when you look into space, but I think you can also look into space and see problems here on earth as well. So thanks so much for the show. I really appreciate it. I. I. No more messages to share your opinions on sound opinions. Call eight eight eight five nine eighteen hundred we'll be back next week on sound opinions from WBZ Chicago and distributed by PR ex.

FBI Russell Gil Scott Heron president Illinois New Orleans Bob Dylan Stevie nicks official canal Fulton Ohio Jim Morrison WBZ Chicago New York City Christie North Carolina Qatar Amazon Fleetwood Sharon van Africa
"sarah phantom" Discussed on Heartland Radio: Presented by The Pat McAfee Show

Heartland Radio: Presented by The Pat McAfee Show

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on Heartland Radio: Presented by The Pat McAfee Show

"Some kid has fucking party had a star tac i'm like yo that phone dude i bought a star tack for forty dollars hooked jordan bought a homeless guy forty dollars smartphone in the store so that's basically the star tight like original flipping dope flip would it had like the cool the first psychic it's when you pull the dope ground for you have to pull up the antenna yeah all that fun and then it's like every every every caught phone you ever saw that's right dude that was that was back in the day i think was leading desert up one ida sarah phantom i had a razor so for the departed they had those good phones for texting oh really yeah i used against somebody one of the first phones i think we ever tracked on our own it was it was a phone used to call a courthouse in nashville tennessee knoxville tennessee one of the deal and they threatened called in a bomb threat and we end up tracking the that phone down for the tennessee people and basically that guy was supposed to court date in that court house and it wasn't gonna make us a called a bomb threat court down for the day so we jacking they're like the phones in indianapolis so we go to check it and we get to the hood dude to projects like we are deep in the fucking hood and it summertime everybody's our side yeah so is all these dudes hanging out doing something front of the building they're like throwing dies or something and we're like all right think it's one of those guys it's right over there right so we're like yeah but we have to determine you know which of the guys got it and they're not just gonna fuck fucking talk to us.

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"sarah phantom" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"sarah phantom" Discussed on 1A

"So what do you think when the national media covers saint louis they might be missing and what do you wish that they knew about our community he gave before you answer that i am curious though give me your name again please sarah phantom sarah when your friends in indianapolis found out you were moving to saint louis and they were worried what exactly were they worried about i think they were worried about how dangerous the city was i think they worried that i might that i might get hurt or that it was some sort of an of to indianapolis credit this was not everybody it was certain people that make okay we'll just go now they were they were worried that i think they were worried that it was sort of riot filled dangerous violent city is this like post ferguson preconceptions i think absolutely i think because that's when saint louis when the national media covers saint louis it's because of those problems which i absolutely think are worth covering and we cover them here at saint louis public radio but do you feel like the city is misrepresented or what do you wish that people knew about living here that they might be missing gape i that's a good question i don't know that i could speak to that exactly that the size being misrepresented i will say you know growing up in saint louis and being politically involved i have to say it's a pretty to me it's been a really great place to to kind of grow up in agent because a lot of the issues you said which aren't always flattering but but they are fascinating things to be.

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