17 Burst results for "Sarah Wyman"

"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

01:35 min | 2 months ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

"If you're fascinated by the history of cold war like we are then your luck next week. We're staying behind the iron curtain. But this time we're going to east germany or even the berlin wall was not enough to keep levi's jeans out of the country to people that they had the commercials. Where exactly the way we wanted to be and they were where we want to be saw. The easiest way to be a little bit of this american clooney's were to wear levis and check it out. The american national exhibition in moscow makes a return appearance. Special things this week to. Dave wyman that sarah's grandfather. He told us to look into the story a couple of months ago. Thanks also to david. Woodruff clermont darris tyler murphy. At insider the family of roger enrico and the folks at the foreign policy association kindly allowed us to use portions of don kindle you also heard news coverage from the ap british pathy an abc news. This episode was reported and produced by sarah wyman. Julia press and me. charlie herman. Sound design is by bill moss. Music is from audio network. John laura and casey holford composed our theme. Our editor is michaela. Bligh dan bobkov is the podfather. Sarah wyman is our producer brought to you by his a production of insider. This episode was brought to you by mastercard to learn more visit mastercard dot us slash digital doors..

sarah wyman Dave wyman Bligh dan bobkov bill moss Woodruff clermont roger enrico east germany levi clooney tyler murphy berlin casey holford moscow abc Julia press michaela charlie herman david
"sarah wyman" Discussed on Proof

Proof

02:42 min | 8 months ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on Proof

"For his descendants to go to college already, there are twelve recipients they're also plans to build a memorial park named after him near the Jack Daniel's distillery. What is done for my family is? Let the world know. Who near screen is so. Fine Waiver in my book has a Rockstar. Sometimes it takes a person from the outside to rediscover truths and uncover new ones that were always there, but just needed more attention and today thanks to the creation of uncle, nearest whiskey near story is one more people will like the here, because in the world of whiskey and Bourbon the good story, and is important as the actual. Drink itself especially when it's an important one. One. It's odd to say it this way, but it's it whiskey with a mission behind it, and I think that it will continue to be that long long long after I'm gone every time, someone orders Jack. Daniel's Tennessee whiskey. They're helping to keep his memory alive. That's been the case for more than one hundred fifty years. Font is creating the same legacy for nearest green. Everyone, I wanNa let you know this is the last episode of our. Let's call it winter season. Thank you so much for listening. And just you know we are already hard work on several news stories, and we'll be back with a full season very shortly, but until then be sure to keep an eye out for some bonus, content and other stories. We're going to be publishing in the coming. Coming weeks, we think you're really like them. Don't forget. We love hearing from you. You can reach us in so many different ways. There's the brought to you by facebook group. There's email bt, Y, BE AT BUSINESS INSIDER DOT com. There's twitter you can even call and leave a message at six, four, six, seven, six, eight, four, seven seven seven. Share any thoughts you have about the show or Or tell us about brands in your life or ask a customer service question that we just might answer on air and if that isn't enough, wait, there's more subscribe to our newsletter for more about the stories you've heard on this podcast for the latest updates on the stories were working on and for some behind the scenes photos from our production process, and please stay safe and stay healthy thanks. Thanks for listening this episode was produced by me with Julia Press and Sarah Wyman special thanks to any Dula and Clare Bandera. Bill Moss is our sound engineer. who makes these episodes sound so darn good music is from Audio Network John Galore and Casey Holford composed our theme. Our editor is Michaela Blind and Sarah Wyman is our show runner brought to you. By is a production of insider audio..

Jack Daniel Sarah Wyman Bill Moss Rockstar facebook Clare Bandera Michaela Blind Tennessee Julia Press Casey Holford editor John Galore engineer.
"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

02:06 min | 10 months ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

"In the world of whiskey and Bourbon the good story in these important as the actual drink itself especially when it's an important one. It's odd to say it this way but it's a whiskey with a mission behind it and I think that it will continue to be that long long long after. I'm gone every time someone orders Jack. Daniel's Tennessee whiskey. They're helping to keep his memory alive. That's been the case for more than one hundred and fifty years font is creating the same legacy for nearest green everyone. I want to let you know this is the last episode of our. Let's hell it winter season. Thank you so much for listening and just you know. We are already hard at work on several news stories and we'll be back with a full season very shortly but until then be sure to keep an eye out for some bonus content and other stories. We're going to be publishing in the coming weeks. We think you really liked them. Don't forget we love hearing from you. You can reach us in so many different ways. There's the brought to you by facebook group there's email bt. Y BE AT BUSINESS INSIDER DOT com. There's twitter you can even call and leave a message at six four six seven six eight four seven seven seven share any thoughts you have about the show or tell us about brands in your life or ask a customer service question. That was just my answer on air. And if that isn't enough wait there's more subscribe to our newsletter for more about the stories you've heard on this podcast for the latest updates on the stories. We're working on and for some behind the scenes photos from our production process. And please stay stay healthy. Thanks for listening. This episode was produced by me with Julia. Press and Sarah Wyman special. Thanks to any of Dula and Clara Vendettas. Bill Maas is our sound engineer. Who makes these episodes sound? So darn good. Music is from audio network. John Galore and Casey Holford composed our theme. Our editor is Michaela. Blind and Sarah. Wyman is our show. Runner brought to you by is a production of insider audio..

Sarah Wyman Bill Maas facebook Jack Daniel Tennessee Wyman Casey Holford John Galore Michaela Dula Clara Vendettas editor Julia engineer
"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

06:18 min | 11 months ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

"We're back in our New York studio far away from the warmth and the beaches Hawaii. What are you talking about Charlie? I can still taste the salt in the Air Julia. So what is next? So I want to introduce Sam Crozier. She's a good friend of mine from college and the minute she heard I was doing the story. She was excited to show me the world of spam through her is. She actually grew up near Honolulu and she's part Japanese part native Hawaiian so for her spams popularity epitomizes that multicultural aspect of herself and of Hawaii. It's not really linked to any ethnic identity. It's not really linked to any racial identity. It just linked to Hawaii itself and she told me she has particularly strong memories of growing up eating spam in the form of Masugi. Which again is that seaweed wrapped rice ball topped with spam. You've kind of the Hawaii. Pb AND J. Lucky we kind of be the thing that people would bring in their lunchboxes. Everybody would have spam Lewis vs and your juice boxes and your apple in other words spam to be was just another food. Fuelling Sam's hopscotch games and trips across the monkey bars. Something she didn't really think twice about until she left Hawaii to go to boarding school in Massachusetts when she was thirteen. You know when you're in Hawaii and you're growing up with it it becomes like your meat and potatoes. You're just like Oh like what we have once you step away you're like oh my gosh like. I miss that. That was so good and I think that that is where it's become like Hawaii. Pride thing but she does not expect spam to stay. Hawaii's best kept secret forever after all she seen people on the mainland claim once overlooked Hawaii foods as their own. Before I mean. Just look at POCA bowls. Do you think that? Spend MISSISSIPPI. Is The hipster food tomorrow? I one hundred percent do like it's not even that hard of a flavor palate to understand. It's really just good once. You have a spouse to be like you like you get it. This was something that I'd been hearing throughout my reporting I needed to try it to really get it and I wasn't just a Masugi Newbie. I never actually tried spam at all so I asked Sam if we could take a trip to her kitchen. How much does it can't spam cost? Oh probably like a dollar to a paid five twenty nine for this. Wow New York New York city man there gentrifying fan. We started with making a marinade. Okay so we need a quarter cup. Boisture SAUCE OH QUARTER Cup. Soya sauce a half cup. Sugar a half cup sugar. Yeah Sugar and show you well yes sweeter than I realized free one. The sauce was ready. It was time to get spamming the moment of truth you do the honors Julia. Okay I guess Bam Cam it's pinker than I imagined. Yeah it's it's I feel like maybe the color of Baloney it's like uncooked bacon. Yeah but it's like it's already pre cooked. That's very confusing to me. It looks like this. It's like a pink gelatinous mound. Yeah I think it gets less mushy when you cook. It becomes a little bit like the sauce. Like caramelized little bit. Doubtless groundlessly then came the best part. Sam has this Masugi Mold. It's the exact shape of a slice of spam and once we'd cooked up some rice and egg we cut the egg into spam sized pieces. Put the mold on top of a piece of seaweed and pop. Tell the ingredients in. Oh it's so cute. I done all this research and reporting and thinking about spams history but spam the actual food had felt totally distant until I was face to face with it. Sam's kitchen in a way it was kind of like another tale of two spans I grew up knowing spam based entirely on what I'd heard about it to spam cats dogs and even though I'd never tasted it I had a really strong opinion. I didn't know what it was thought that it was probably gross and it was funny and I would never choose to eat it and that experience of knowing spam as this cultural icon is so different from how my friends Sam grew up. She brought spam on picnics eight at her grandma's house. She pulled it out of her lunchbox at school. It was time for me to get to know spam for what it really is not just what I'd heard about it. In other words it was time to eat. Honestly the flavor isn't even very strong of spam. Really Young I mean. There's so much in their egg. The rice it feels like really tacoma balanced meal in there and this is working but with like a sweet soy aftertaste. Do you like it go. Julia press is a producer at brought to you by. We're working on an exciting episode for April Fool's Day. And we want to hear from you. What are your favorite stories about brand name companies and pranks jokes? I'm old enough to remember. Crank calling people and asking do you have Prince Albert in a can even though I had no idea what Prince Albert was. Got Your own story. Share leaves a voicemail at six four six seven six eight four seven seven seven four. Send A voice memo recording to be t Y BE AT INSIDER DOT COM. This episode was reported and produced by Julia. Press with Sarah Wyman and me Charlie Hermit special thanks to make Ohio Shida Thomas Gabbara and Julia mates thanks also to Brian Olsen and Brian Lewis and Hormel Bill. Maas are sound engineer music from audio network. Casey Holford and John delory composed our theme. Our editor is Michaela. Bligh Sarah Wyman. Is Our show. Runner brought to you by production of insider audio..

Sam Crozier Hawaii Julia press New York Air Julia Charlie Hermit Brian Lewis Bligh Sarah Wyman Honolulu POCA bowls Pb Prince Albert Masugi Massachusetts tacoma apple MISSISSIPPI Maas Casey Holford
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"And many of the Tigers fans are convinced that the tides will not turn until they find the statue and make their immense to Colonel Sanders. Their tides in the other types in rivers to two rivers have tied. They have currents currents colonels this. Okay. And so finally in two thousand nine we have an update on this story after a quarter of a century in watery grave or Saka has solved. The mystery of the missing Colonel son does the Kentucky Fried Chicken mascot, hold down of the tomboy river in the center of the city during cleanup full river. The city of Sokha was like doing some remodeling, and they were working on a project near the river. And they had a diver in the water who's working on construction. And he found something buried in the bottom in the mud of the river. And at first he thought it was a barrel. And then he was worried it might be like corpse, but they took it out of the water. And they realized that what they'd uncovered was the torso of the statue of Colonel Sanders from twenty years ago. So they have this big fanfare, they pull the whole statue out of the river. There's a literal unveiling with like performers cameras, flashing everywhere. The Colonel does not look like he's in good shape. He is still smiling that missing his left hand. Exactly. He's missing his left hand. And so some fans think that that's why the Tigers still have yet to make to another championship. But the team hasn't finished in last place in their league since the statue's been found. So make of that. What you will? It sounds like the hustle puff play second place or nothing. We have they found the hand they still looking I imagine they're still looking I think some of the urgency's gone away because they've found most of the statue in that feels like enough, you know, they're on the up and up again. Now, they're at least not combating this curse. Now. They're just having all the normal problems that baseball teams have when they're bad. There's not like this doom hanging over them. But personally, I don't think finding the hand would hurt. So where's the Colonel now? So the Colonel has been taken the regional KFC where it was stolen from doesn't exist anymore. So they took it to a KFC that's really near the. Stadium where the Tigers play and you can still visit there today. All right. Well, the Kentucky Fried curse undone somewhat. We've learned a lot today. Producer, Sarah, Wyman and Sally Herships. Thank you. Thank you. Taught. As always, please leave us a review and raiding on apple podcasts. It really helps new listeners find the show, and if you have comments and story ideas, send them over to household name at insider dot com. This episode was produced by Sally Herships, and Sarah Wyman with Amy for Dula and a measure Akkas and me our editor is John Palmer sound design original music by John to Lor and Casey Holford special. Thanks to the Japan center for international exchange. The foreign press center, Japan, he go gillum and Yoko Tani translations were read by Clinton dire. Rich Villani grant Flanagan shivani Gonzales alley where Christian to win. Meg tech men fuller. Lauren Thompson and Celia ska viral. The executive producers of household name art, Chris Bannon, Jedi rattle it and me. We're back in a few weeks. Household name is production of insider audio. And. Stitcher. Household. Name will be coming back with more episodes in January. This is success. We'll be back soon to we're making some changes to the show that I'm really excited about.

tomboy river Tigers Colonel Sanders Sarah Wyman Sally Herships KFC Japan Sokha Lauren Thompson Kentucky Casey Holford Yoko Tani apple Chris Bannon Rich Villani executive Dula Producer editor Clinton
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"In Japan. Christmas has been around in Japan. In case, you didn't know since missionary started showing up in the country in the mid fifteen. Hundreds wasn't just a Colonel no wasn't just a Colonel. Although this predates him by a few years, then fast forward to the last century Christmas makes a comeback. Back. Thanks to KFC. So around all the same time that the stuff is happening with KFC in the nineteen seventies department stores were figuring out that Christmas could be a really big marketing tool. So they take on the tradition of decorating for Christmas. And in some cases, they hit it right on Rudolph's red nose. And in some cases, they were awful little bit one of my favorite things from the interview that we did with Russell belco that professor in Canada who can be neatly studies. Japanese Christmas, one of my favorite stories that he tells is about this Italian Christmas tradition translated by Japanese department stores and gone a little wrong. And so for example, if she in Japanese department store the Christmas tree decorated with red women's underwear, apparently they had heard or read than Italy. It's good luck around that time of year too. Have red underwear that you're wearing but they got a little bit wrong and put it on on the Christmas. Tree that I saw one of the major department stores in Asaka though. It was good luck for the tree. I can't depending then one of my other favorite moments. Russell belco talks about what which I guess, it makes a lot of sense. When you think about it? Imagine we have Jesus Santa and Colonel Sanders all men all with beards, and that leads to the potential for some kind of big confusion or the greatest crossover event in history. Supposedly one of the department stores in Tokyo trying to get Easter right? Put up across with Santa Claus on it. And so they they had some of the right concept foot that we would find that obviously bizarre. This only lasted a few days before they were told and took it down. Bottom line. Many Japanese people really get familiar with Christmas through marketing, they have appropriated the holiday says Russell Balch, but they have also totally made at their own. Alright. Well, next up, Sarah Wyman, esteem producer. What do you have for us? I actually have no idea what you're about to say the I'm excited. Okay. I have a baseball story for you in hang with me because it's actually about KFC. So baseball has been in Japan since the nineteen twenties. They have professional league. Just like we do in the US. I have questions here as a non sports ball fan. Do we play them like the? American teams say sports ball. Yes. I think every once in a while they're like exposition games, which are done just to kind of make baseball bigger deal worldwide like up the profile of the sport. But no, they're not playing in like are leagues or World Series as Japanese teams are staying in Japan for the most part for the most part. I'm with you. I'm with you. Great. So our story is about a team called the hunchine Tigers. And for the first sixty years that they were in this league. They'd been there almost since it started in the nineteen twenties. They just hadn't done very, well they've gotten close to winning the championship a couple of times, but they never actually done it until nineteen eighty five. When finally they have this blockbuster season. That's the year they make it to Japan's championship series the World Series of Japan. They beat their arch rival to get there. And it was all very exciting. And it's thanks largely to the player who actually came from the US named Randy bass. Nice. Randy bass Randy bass, like one of those names you've come up with if you're like trying to come up with an American name. He's their first basement, and let me tell you. He was kind of knocking it out of the park in Japan's league like home runs like home runs hit good four of them in this season in nineteen eighty five which just to put that in your frame of references non-sports people in queue that was one short of the record that year. That sounds like that sounds like a lot of home runs like fifty four. I mean. Yeah. It's a lot of home runs in. He becomes this kind of national hero for Japan..

Japan hunchine Tigers Randy bass Russell belco KFC US Sarah Wyman Colonel Sanders Russell Balch professor in Canada Rudolph baseball Asaka Tokyo Jesus Santa Italy producer
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"And we were in a position where we very quickly raised the money with a lot of hair on the business went through this massive public trial sold the assets. And that was all just a great challenge that I think we were ultimately really successful with considering the headwinds was the river point during that time where you felt stretched too thin like as the support for everyone. Yeah. No. I I would not be truthful. If I didn't say that it was it was an around the clock experience. But I I it was so exciting. I wouldn't trade it for the world. You know? I I didn't think oh I've I have another eighteen hour day. It was just I was completely in the moment. Yeah. How'd you find like an? Excitement motivational side to it. When there's like. I dunno in some ways it's like a dark time for the company as well. Like how how did you process that? Well, I think you need to think about it as solving a really complex puzzle with one hand tied behind your back. And then it becomes a difficult yet fun and challenging exercise. And you know, the hard part was just having a lot of the entire company relying on a successful outcome and wanting very much to make good on the promise that we would give everyone a safe place at the end of this. You know, the jobs would be saved all of that that that was the part that was weighing on me. But otherwise, you know, it it's a puzzle. And it's like a a difficult problem that a business needs to solve and you need to untangle it. And when you think, okay, we're almost out of solutions, you find that you can come up with something else, and you can get some more time, or, you know, more money or something to to extend yourself until you get to the to the spot where you feel okay, you've done it. And at this point, how do you personally define success? You know on a personal level. I think it is being really excited about getting every day and coming and coming to work for the beast. It is about making an impact with our stories and getting them out to a lot of people. And then getting them to understand that. That's what we do and come back for more and looking overall at your career to what is the main driver for you. If for me in working in media, it is about telling important stories, it's it's about getting information out and helping to advance the thinking of voters and people who need to make decisions in their lives or people who buy products, or you know, rely on companies that we report on Oliver stories just help people go through their lives being better informed. And that's really important to me. What advice would you give to someone who wanted to? Take a career path like yours. I would say be open to serendipity and be open to kind of unexpected chances. And if you if there's if if you're excited about them, I think pursue pursue and nontraditional path and see where it takes you. I think the biggest trick is to keep yourself open. It's like have conversations be out, there explorer things that you know, you you might not think you'd ever do talk to people about what motivates them understand what they love about their jobs and figure out if there's something for you there. I think just having that network. I mean networking is such a cliche, but it is hammered home again. And again because it really is important to just be open yourself that as far as the decision making process, you know, that that's like really personal depending on what you want to do. But you need to. I have the options you need to have things come to you in your orbit, and you can make that happen. Well, thank you so much. Thank you. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider, our shows produced by Animas rackets and Sarah Wyman dam Bobkov is our executive producer. And I'm rich felonious before you go Heather Dietrich has one more fun fact to share. So I moved a lot in my life when I showed up at college and in the dorm orientation, there was two truths in ally. And one of my truths was that I'm eighteen years old. And I moved eighteen times. My dad was in the tech industry..

executive producer Heather Dietrich Sarah Wyman Oliver eighteen years eighteen hour one hand
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"Featuring celebrities like Drake Lil Wayne in marriage, a blanche these days Larry runs his company on his own. But when he was starting out at twenty years old, he was working with a friend. He had just lined up a deal with basketball wives, star dre Machel, but his business partner didn't want to get on board with his way of running the show. So Jeremy show came down to one get the hand nails done. We go to the Salone on my. You'll look let's go have no on a hand knows. He he he he didn't really want to. So I paid for it wanted dinner told them, let's go have he didn't want to pay for it. I'm twenty and he was like like Fosse she has me at a time and he don't wanna go half on. So I paid for it and pretty much at the end of that trip. They told me it was like, you know, what all the city. Been to you took care of his more older. You've been to you being the youngest is just like they were impressed by into that business partner that you started off with that not work out because he warned seeing we had two different visions. And I say my book is like when you align yourself, somebody got to believe in the same things like you'll have to got like share some of the same vision that we didn't, you know? So we worked together for three full years. I'm thankful for that situation. Because it told me so much good do, but you know, just had two different visions. And I think it was best that we part ways. And let me tell you when we did it was on it was on. Because when when you have a business, you gotta understand that, you know, it's not all about what you want. Also by what they want not saying, it's not good to have been on it because you can go further together, then you can on your own, but I like took off. Thanks for listening to this is success. Our shows produced by Amazon rackets and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob, cough is our executive producer. And I'm rich baloney. All those clips you heard today are from episodes. You can find our feet, check them out. And make sure you subscribe while you're there. We'd also appreciate it. If you could leave us a rating and review both really helping people find the show we'll be back next week with daily CEO Heather Dietrich for she got a formal job offer at Gawker she had to do a week long trial. The only problem she already had a fulltime job. Very intrepid Lee went into my boss's office at Hearst and decided I was going to ask him. Can I try out another job for a week? And if it doesn't work out can I come back and have this job. Still a really outrageous staff. Staff. This is success is a production of insider audio.

partner Larry dre Machel Drake Lil Wayne basketball Fosse Jeremy Heather Dietrich executive producer Amazon Sarah Wyman Bob CEO Hearst Lee twenty years
"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on Household Name

"About NASA Debrecen, plus we'll check in with Robert again and hear more stories from the promo in house of space wonders stay with us. With us today on our journey of space. Exploration is Dave Moshe. Who is insiders what space space correspondent, I think you can just call me the resident nerd at insider. That'd be good title. Dave Moshe resident nerd at insider. And today, I'll be talking about Tang and its association with NASA. Alright. And then we also have with us our producers and America's Hello. And today, I'm going to be talking about KFC and NASA mysterious and Sarah Wyman. Hi, I'm here to tell you a story about a worm and a Meatball. Actually, it's about Nastase logo. And to help me tell the story I called up a guy named Hamish Smyth Hamish is a graphic designer. He's worked on a ton of really cool projects in New York City. And also he really likes NASA. It's nasa. Like, it's so cool. It's you these doing space stuff. It's awesome. Right. So Hamish explained to me but back when NASA was. Founded in nineteen fifty eight people had bigger things to worry about than logos and graphics like Russia had just launched the satellite Sputnik. We'll be spice Douglass Edwards report. Until days ago that zone, but never been heard on this earth, which really took the American populace by surprise to Newell. What about the vital question that everybody is thinking about why? And how did the Russians beat us to the drill? It also freaked out the executive branch like the president was losing his gourd. So they founded a new agency NASA, and they had one of their employees just draw up a logo. So this is the Meatball. You can see it's the same logo. Nasa has today. And it's like a big blue circle. There's there's like an orbiting thing in the middle. There looks very space-age there. Lots of stars in the background a lot going on this logo. We have stars. You have lines. You have circles you have. Yeah. It's it's a messy logo. It's very razzle dazzle if I can put it that way. It looks like something maybe an engineer would have designed or third grader. Great engineer, and it's it's kind of fun and whimsical, which I think was exciting for a lot of the people who worked there because they as kids had grown up kind of in love with the idea of space exploration and excited about the idea of exploring the universe and going up to space and rocket ships and this logo looks like all of that excitement like all of that childish glee, but as you pointed out like in terms of graphic design, it's not an awesome logo, the owed one consists of numerous very odd to printed accurately, especially using government printing technology at the time logos have to do all kinds of stuff. You have to put them on. Stationary. You put them on pens that you can hand out to people at conferences in Nasr's case, you have to stencil it onto rocket ships and this logo is just not good for any of those things. You don't really see that very well at. Mile out on an aircraft or something in part of this. Logos job is to be on rocket ships and satellites in space, and like it isn't super often that you're getting a nice close up. You know, those are things that are meant to be seen from faraway. Ideally, you know, by Russian people, I guess like also trying to fly into space. We're very far behind you. You're Soviet space. Like, you gotta know what spacecraft you're dealing with. And it just looks like kind of blobby blobby is not the message that the American government was trying to send out about their space. A graphic designer like Hamish Smyth would never have come up with anything that looked remotely like this. But I would not try and design a rocket and they shouldn't try and design a logo. So by the nineteen seventies were like coming out of the space race, we've been to the moon, and then on the fiscal side of things the US economy is taking its first big downturn since World War Two. And so people are starting to question masses. Funding shuttle program was wildly the budget, and they weren't launching nearly as many as they were planning on launching people are saying like what's the point of funding?.

NASA Hamish Smyth Dave Moshe Russia Tang Debrecen American government KFC New York City engineer US Douglass Edwards America Robert Nastase Newell Sarah Wyman Nasr
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"That you need in order to get unstuck because I think that that's also a reality of running a business is that there are places when you're stuck. It's like a department that stock. It's a. You know leader that stock or it's a team that stuck. And I think that it's our jobs to really help people get unstuck. And I think that you know, I delete we wanna make all the right decisions so we don't have to encounter those difficult conversations in moments or have to take difficult measures to do something to make a change. But inevitably you're not doing good job unless you're fucking up, you know a little bit and it's like you kind of need to be out there. You know, you gotta get your hands dirty a little bit. You have to just like, see what you are made of and what the team is made of and like what is possible. Because otherwise it's just becomes this very generic, very safe, very predictable kind of time line. And that doesn't interest me at all. And I don't think interests a lot of people that are drawn to startups and drawn to building things in what some advice that you give to someone just starting out who would wanna have a career like yours? Well, I mean, I think that. I think it really starts with putting your ego side. I think that I had very, very big ambitions that I was going to be an editor right out of college. I had to be an assistant for a very long time. I didn't get my first official editor job toes twenty-six that felt late to me, and I was really scared that I was falling behind, but you know, the way that my trajectory really unfolded was that I ended up working for other publishing executives in a supportive role learning about the business until the right opportunity opened up for me, which happened to be a gourmet magazine to me. I think you have to be willing and open minded and kind of do anything. And like I said. When it came to city magazine when it came to starting refinery, I am very much a proponent supporter of believer of trusting your gut interviewing as Guinness, just like dating. It's like really. Paying attention to can I see myself here? Is this something like I'm gonna really feel regret if I don't get this job or if I don't go out for this job. I think the other thing is is when someone comes into your midst that has experienced that you really admire like just go out of your way to ask, you know, even if you can have like twenty minute conversation with them, and that's just what you have to do. I cannot tell you how many people I have called emailed or cold called over the last twenty five years. People have admired many of them never responded, which is totally fine. But some of them did respond. Those of the sort of encouraging moments that remind you, you're on the right path and that you have to keep tapping those kinds of people in order to propel yoursel Ford 'cause we don't do it alone. I mean, I guess if you're like a novelist or something, you do it alone. If it most of us, you know, we need other people. You know, we depend on each other. When you remember that you really become tremendously respectful and appreciative of what other people bring into your life and what you, you know, in turn bring to theirs. Well, thank you so much, Christine. You, thanks for having me. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider. Our shows produced by Anna Mazza rackets and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob cough is our executive producer in. I'm rich Valona before you go, we'll check in with Christine Barbara one more time to see how our interview could have been very different..

Christine Barbara Guinness editor Valona Bob cough Anna Mazza city magazine Ford executive producer Sarah Wyman official twenty five years twenty minute
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"The capital they need to start and scale, their company is harder to get. If you're in these, what some call flyover country. And as a result, there's a huge brain drain where people who grow up in those places end up leaving. So how do we slow that brain drain? So keep more people are able to stay where they want to stay and and even how to trigger boomerang people left now, feel like maybe it's time to come back. Maybe it's time to come home when you look at your entire career and then where you are now. How do you personally define success? I think it's about impact and and I do have a desire to have a broad impact. And so trying to kind of reach more people more places, whether it be with the internet or more recently with the rise rested, it's trying to have the broadest possible impact. And I wanted try to. Maximize the impact I have. And so I tend to pick bigger problems and try to have kind of a bigger impact. I recognize when you do that, they are also bigger risks. Some of the things we try to do not be successful. I understand that. But I think you know for me, it's how do you make sure you are doing everything can to make the world a better place and try to you kind of looked up as many people and communities as possible, and you spent years mentoring entrepreneurs, it's something that you still regularly do, but is there maybe a Goto piece of advice that you would give to someone who just wants to have a career like yours. Ultimately comes down to people and teams that entrepreneurship is a is a team sport. It's not about any one person that you know the founding CEO tends to get most of the attention, but it really is a team effort that certainly the case with a also case with all the companies that were involved in as investors. So recognizing that team dynamic and trying to make sure you have the right mix of skills and perspectives on the team is important and the other related point, and there's an African proverb, I, I love what you want to go quickly. You can go alone. You wanna go far, you must go together and going far going together means partnerships. And so that partnership, our intention, I think is very important. It's all about relationships. It's ultimately comes down to people whether the individual people on your team or the people you need to work with the stabbing partnerships or the people you need to increasingly work with in the third wave that are going to impact policy regulators, other folks. If you get the people right. I think you know almost anything is possible if you don't get the people. Right. I'd argue nothing is possible. Well, thank you very much. Thank you. Great. To be with you. Thanks for listening to this is success from business inside and our shows produced by Animas Iraqis and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob cough is our executive producer. I'm rich fluid before you go, we've got a glimpse at who Steve case may have been. Had he pursued a different passion. I almost went into the music business. If I hadn't gone into the, you know, the technology business is really quite smitten in my high school and some college years. And you know, did some concert promotion other other sorts of things. So I I could have gone into that. Were you in a band? I was in a band, although I, it was not a particularly successful. Dan, what kind of music was with two different bands? One was called the and the other was called the vans, and I was the the, the low is pretty good name. And I was the lead singer, but couldn't really sing. So I decided that was not a great career move next week on the show. We've got refinery twenty nine CEO Christine barberie. Initially, the idea of building a media startup sounded like the last thing she'd want to do, but she decided to hear a pitch from her soon to be co founders over drinks. I literally left those Margaritas with Philip in Justin, and I was like, oh my God, I have to do this subscribe to. This is success in apple podcasts or wherever you listen to catch that episode and explore are archived. Please leave us a rating and writer review. It helps others find the show. This is success is a production of insider audio..

CEO Bob cough Christine barberie apple Sarah Wyman Philip writer Steve Dan executive producer Justin
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"And under delivering on that service. I think that's I, we see this as just a huge opportunity and as someone who's building his own business and someone who's served the longtime and a big corporation looking at all of this, how do you personally define success? Some people have that barometer where it's about money, and I could not tell you asked me a gun to my head right now and said, what's the value of your stake in I ex, I would miss it. I would be wrong. I don't know. So that tells me it's not about money. I think success is about building a company that lasts that people are proud to work at that my kids to work at some day in that's not measured in dollars. I think success is having a balance between what's important to you inside of work and what's important to you outside of work. And I think some amount of balance meaning that the most important thing. In my life is not just work. I think people equate success to work. I actually don't. I learned the lesson early that identifying yourself too much with one thing in a way sets you up to be dramatically disappointed. At some point. If I defined, you know my life around. I XE at some point in time I might not be the right leader for I x. And so I would step down if the company believe there was a better leader step down tomorrow. If the company honestly believed that there was a better personally, the company I would do it, and I actually think that's what makes our company work. I'm the leader because I think I'm the best person for the job. I'll hire people that I think are more talented than me, and I'll be very candid with people. I'm friends with about whether they're doing a good job or not. It's a business, but it's not the only thing in my life. It's certainly not the most important thing in my life. So I think successes are really, really broad term. And I think it's actually important to ask yourself that question as. As an individual because you can start to line up the things that you do on a daily basis behind what your, what your view successes, Brad, thanks for talking to me. Cool. Also. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider or shows produced by Animas rackets and Sarah Wyman dim. Bobkov is our executive producer and I'm rich felonious for you go, we've got a glimpse at something. Most people don't see with cats Yama. His romantic said, I've played the piano is five years old. I wrote a song for our wedding. That's pretty cool. Yeah. And our our ten year anniversary is on September twentieth it was the weekend. Leeann went bankrupt. So yeah, that was an interesting time to get married. But yeah, I played the piano, longtime, write music, and I do that. You write a song for the ten year anniversary. I did not. It's not too late. Yeah, I know. Don't hear that. Barnaby too high because there will be no song coming. Yeah. Next week on the show. We've got Steve case through his venture capital firm revolution is trying to help the US ease into the next wave of internet companies as the founder of AOL. He's done this before critics lot. He was naive back. Then somebody go the trouble buying a personal computer, so they can like type of message on a keyboard to somebody when you know, pick up the phone call somebody I by. That's not gonna ever subscribed visit success in apple podcasts or wherever. You listen to catch that episode and explore our Arca, please leave us rating and writer review. It helps others find the show. This is a production of insider audio.

Barnaby executive producer Brad Sarah Wyman Leeann apple writer US AOL Steve founder ten year five years
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"Provide for them. So it's like your habits into this. I'm happy. I couldn't be happier just to see a mom happy. See my grandmother, happy. My big sister. I grew up in a family of women, a mama system, grandmother and me being only man being the youngest of my siblings. My me and my sister, she's a little older than me woman take care of me my whole life. You know? So like now that I'm older, I make sure that I do what I can't take care. I kinda just took things into my own ends, and my family heard, I heard when things didn't go away from it when they go, mom wheel, my grandmother, my sister way, you know. It didn't go away. Why? Because when they hurting and you're gone up in a household with our women, no, you want them to be happy. And so I just did my best to make sure that you know we can get out those holes, those situations. You know. So it seems like to get back to this idea of gambling to that you kind of want to put yourself in these situations where you're having all of this pressure on your because that's like what our sure, yes pressure has allowed me to grow Mike, my friend, my friend, my cousin, Cleveland, my older cousin, Chicago. He told me like when they was years years back having a talk and he was like, I was just talking about how stressed out I was is so much on my bag. Family stuff. We gotta help out do this. And he was like us. If the same thing as motivating you. Like, why are you so eager to get rid of the same thing as motivating? So I was so eager to get rid of our problems, financial problems to where I don't have the problems any more, but he's like, this is the same thing that's propelling you while you just trying to take it away. And I'm like, you know what? You're right. If I'm motivated by all of this that's going on while I'm eager to take away. You know, even though are the restaurants doing well, my family's who much better that on eliminate all the problems, you know. So still motivated and eager to, you know, continue to grow so that we can be in much better position. You know? And what advice would you give to someone who wants to have a career like your say, stay persistent, you know, all osbournes. I definitely say stay persistent because you know you're gonna fail. Life is not meant to be pretty is meant to be a bumpy road, you know, if it was smooth and if it was easy, I don't think we'll free successes much, but to stay persistent even when you fell. Whenever things are going away when you know you having those those dark days win for. Like the the way the world is on your shoulders. You know, just keep going because at the end, each tunnel, there's like, you know. And I think just my persistence helped me get to our met, you know, a not taking. No, you know, I'm very like, you can't tell me. No, like I gotta go get it, you know guy too. So you know, don't don't do things just for the dollar. You know, you gotta gotta do it because you love it and to see how can eventually make you money. So persistence and. Thanks so much. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider. Our shows produced by Animas rackets and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob cough is our executive producer in. I'm rich felonious before you go, we'll check in with Larry, Maura one last time. It's learned something about him. He says, most people are shocked to discover everybody thinks they socialite that love the spotlight, and I might the complete opposite people just think I'm just this this hour going. I'm very outgoing, but I'm just as a turn up guy. You know, who likes to listen to all this party music. Now, listen to Oran be like mellow things like the chill and outside of events. Like I don't like to go to club unless it's like going check out some clubs to bring back some stuff to the city, you know? Yeah. So I'm definitely not not a. I'm not the guy like those though. So next week on the show, we've got Brad cats, Yama co, founder and CEO of. Stock exchange x, the unlikely hero of the Michael Lewis bestseller flash boys in the middle of his research and his writing..

Larry founder and CEO Oran Michael Lewis Cleveland Sarah Wyman Chicago Bob cough Mike Brad executive producer Maura
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"Strong and healthy and growing for the next generation. I think that's extremely important to everything that we do. And like I say, we always look at everything with a long term focus as opposed to what might be, you know, a short term when personally, I would say success to me is finding satisfaction in what I'm doing and feeling like I have an impact, whether it's on the company on the community or on the people that we work with inside the organization or customers outside of the organization. I feel like when they feel good about their job and good about where the company's going to me, I feel good that I'm doing my job, a thick. We didn't. We didn't collaborate on this to me and my interpretation of of success. And that's on a personal level. And it's it's an abstract sort of a philosophical view of it. It's completely satisfaction whether it's overcoming a challenge, whether it's seeing the reaction from a consumer who is just tried our brand or seeing the reaction from a consumer who has come to visit us for the first time in Pottsville, and they may have traveled a long way, and I think surrounding ourselves with with talented and trustworthy people is is completely key to in obtaining that success as an individual in and that in itself inspires open an open environment where there is a lot of collaboration, and when I sit in a room and I can see where we've come together as a group and collaborated on something and have made it work like I, I get extreme satisfaction out of that. It feels really good to know you have that support. And I think we're very lucky to, you know, to be a sixth generation family businesses, unbelievable. But you know, we're four women in the six generation and for our company, this is the first time the business will will go from father to daughters. So I think when you we look around and you see, you know, I get to work every day with my three sisters. That is that is very satisfying. What advice would you give to someone who wants to have a career like yours? Not necessarily in brewing, but just this type of Lega executive role. I would say, you know, if you're coming into a family business, I would say, you know, you absolutely have to roll up your sleeves and learn from the bottom up and earn earn respect along the way. I think that's extremely important. I think if you're coming into a family business outside experiences is extremely helpful as well. And I would say, you know, always persevered, don't let people, you know. Let you talk yourself out of something just always stay committed to what your end goal is and always have a plan. I think that was how we were raised though, too is, you know, just knowing our dads strong work ethic and going back to his days when he was running his beer distributorship. And you know, I, I remember as a as a child, he come home, he'd take his nap and I would ride back with them on the beer truck like bouncing up the road and and and just watching the looking back on it now and observing the the customers that came in and he then moved on and transition to a different beer distributorship. And he still get the same customers in and it was the relationships that were built. So it's it's working hard, establishing relationships and, and with that, I think comes success will make you so much. Thank you so much, Jennifer. Thank you for having us here. She had the opportunity. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider. Our shows produced by Anna Mazarakis in Sarah Wyman dim Bobkov is our executive producer in, I'm rich Falloon before you go, we've got an extra look at what Jenin Wendy angling were into before they started making beer. We've, we all grew up the four of us participating in some sort of athletics. So I continued that through college and I still try and maintain some level of physical activity, whether it's running or whatever..

Jennifer executive producer Pottsville executive Anna Mazarakis Falloon Jenin Sarah Wyman
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"So I decided to give back the love to all these dresses and to create a line. That would be more affordable, but sill as a Ford -able as it may be, it is not affordable enough in order to cater every brides that wants to be without like compromising the brand. Exactly. So it would have to be something that really brings the product to as many brides as can be that that is what I would love to do. As an extent we're talked about the struggles that you had personally overcoming those challenges. When you look at your career and growing your business, what would you say the biggest challenge you've overcome in that sense? Professionally has been. I think the biggest challenge is learning how to with my ego. Asides. I think creators. Have a lot of ego because you need ego in order to be innovative in order to be creative in order to become a one of a kind. But then you need to turn. That into something positive because ego has two aspects. One is positive. It pushes you. It, it gives you the drive to become successful, and the other aspect is negative. It makes you think that you are above everyone and that it's all about you. Until the day I die. I will always do my best to put my ego aside. It's about my bride. It's about my customer. It's being thankful to every opportunity I have in life. I don't take anything for granted. So's the way that you've learned to deal with is trying to find that remind yourself of the appreciation. Absolutely. If a bright tells me that she wants to change a dress, she doesn't like my dress, of course, the first reaction, why doesn't she like my dress comes along with my dress. I'm one of the biggest designers in the world's, but then I make sure that I hear her because it is her dress, not migrants. I am here to make her drink come true. And to make her feel as beautiful as I can make her feel on her wedding day. So it's really not about me. How do you personally define success? I personally define success by what we leave in this world. After we're gone, how we impact others, how we influence others, how we empower others. And success for me is I, I hope and I wish that my legacy will continue long after I'm gone. I truly look back at my life and I thank the tough moments more than I thank the good moments. I truly believe that what didn't kill me made me stronger and brought me to this point in life where I have earned the right to help others make a change. And and it all happened together. It was side by side. It was my personal life and my career life. I remember moments where I, I heard a bright talking about her own story. I was strong for her, but I would go in the back of the store and burst in tears because it reminded me of my story. It brought everything back. But you know what? Nobody promised us a rose garden. And the beauty in life is that if you are true to yourself and you walk your path. You can. You can create quite a beautiful garden. We all have the ability to do that. Well, thank you very much. Thank you so much rich. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider. Our shows produced by Animas rackets and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob cough is our executive producer in. I'm rich Falloon before you go, we've got something about Pnina tornado. You won't learn on say yes to the dress. If you ask the people that work for me, I'm the weirdest boss in the world. Like in my business, you cannot eat a banana. Why? Because I can faint if I. If I smell banana. So I was on the live show in Miami morning show..

Bob cough Ford Sarah Wyman Falloon Miami executive producer
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"And you can't even understand that until you're like in the trenches of it. So if you're not so over the top passionate about it, like it will never work. And then I would say like being really open to feedback and and being receptive and making sure the people around, you know that you're receptive. I mean, the the thing I hate the most is like, yes, people like the last thing and I like probably every founder and leader feels this way like you don't ever want people around you just telling you what they think you want to hear. It's like nothing drives me more crazy. I want you to tell me the truth I want to know and I don't wanna be shielded from things either. I want to hear if something's going on one of our stores like I kind of like makes my team a little crazy when clients directly Email me something that happened 'cause they're like, why are they doing the founder of the company? I'm like, why. Wouldn't they Email the? I wanna know everything. I want to know the truth. I want to know things that are going on in my company, and, and so you know, if you surround yourself with people who are like going to give it to you straight, I think you're going to be so much more successful so that you really know it's going on. And I think a lot of people find themselves like, you know, in environment that's not like that, you know or them themselves are not, you know, open to feedback and you don't really want to hear the bad stuff like you gotta hear the bad stuff, you know, in order to to be great much. Yeah, thank you for having fun. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider. Don't forget to listen and subscribe to our other podcasts household name here. The surprising stories behind big brand names. This is success is produced by Animas rackets and Sarah Wyman. Dam. Bobkov is our executive producer and I'm rich felonious next week. We're going to revisit some of our favorite answers to the question at the heart of our series. How do you personally define success? Its impact hitting goals that I set for myself nattering to hear that more. Make sure you subscribe to our show and while you're at it, give us a rating and leave review letting us know what you think. This is success is a production of insider audio.

founder executive producer Sarah Wyman
"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"sarah wyman" Discussed on This Is Success

"Like that's really been a key to my success over the last ten years has been like saying yes to business that I didn't know how is gonna handle and figuring it out. We talked about, like at that point, how you define success when you were desperate while at this point, when you're at the peak of your success, how do you define it now? You know, now I define success by by hitting goals that I set for myself and it's not about money, right? It's not about lifestyle. It's not about building a bigger team or anything. It's that I set goals for myself and I write them down every year. And if I hit those goals, I've been successful that year. If I don't hit those goals and I failed that year, that way success isn't this big, lofty thing that's up there in the clouds and you know. No, it's not just like I'm gonna be billionaire like that's, that's stupid, right? That's there's no plan of action. That's that set there. There's nothing that drives me crazy or than someone who comes to me says, know I'm an entrepreneur, this do this is what I sail. I sell this. I do this building this company, Mike. Okay. What you last week while I was in Hampton's last week, but golf on Sunday, but like Monday through Friday noon. Like if you want to build your own business, you do it seven days a week. I did not take a single day off for three years, and it's easy for me to say now really, really hard to do, and it's really hard for a lot of people to do as well shift to figure out what you really really want and stick to it. The other thing I would say is you don't have to do it by yourself when you start. That's probably a mistake that I made. I think it would have grown faster, but I started by myself because I didn't stick. I didn't have that stick to to real estate. I didn't really know that that's what I wanted to do is kind of weird. I didn't see myself as being a real estate broker. I didn't even like real estate brokers, and so I was doing other things at the same time. If I may be worked on someone else's team. If I had maybe worked for another company, if I'd maybe learned by watching successful people do what they do instead of just trying by myself to do it would have been better. Well, thank you so much. I really appreciate Hank you for having me. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider. We have one more inside fact about Ryan, sir, hint to share with you, but I, our shows produced by Animas rackets and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob is our executive producer in. I'm rich felonious few like our show. There's something you can do to really help us though it just a second and give us rating and leave us reviewed a, tell us what you think about the show. Both of these help new people find the series which lets us keep making great episodes for you. For you go, we asked Ryan sir hand to tell us a fun fact about himself. Something most people probably don't know when I first came to New York City. I was on a soap opera. I did as row turns Evan Walsh. The fourth most people don't know which is kinda weird as to how my life has turned out is I got on that show by winning in internet reality TV show called in turn, and it was on CBS dot com. And I auditioned for this internet reality show to find the next soap star where they took twelve actors into a loft in Brooklyn, and we had to fight to the death every day through some sort of audition like the dying, audition, the crying, audition, the love, seeing audition in somehow I made it to the end and I won and it was on the internet and that's how I got onto that show. And then years later, I find myself as a real estate agent who's back on reality TV. I'll be back in two weeks with another episode of this is success. Next week you're going to get something a little bit different in your feet, and it's going to be the first episode of business insiders, new podcast, household name. Here's a quick preview. The.

Mike Ryan Bob CBS Brooklyn New York City Hampton Hank Evan Walsh Sarah Wyman executive producer three years seven days ten years two weeks