35 Burst results for "Sarah What"

No Taste for Zero Waste

Slate's Dear Prudence

05:29 min | 22 hrs ago

No Taste for Zero Waste

"Hello and welcome back to the dear prudence show once again and as always. I am your host dear prudence also known as daniel m lavery with me in the studio this week. Is sarah hoagie or based in toronto. Canada sarah welcome to the show off. Thanks it's been a while it's been a few years. It's been a long time and last time weirdly. I didn't get to see your face in this time i do. Even though both times we were not in the same room. Yeah i mean it's it's really nice. I'm looking into your eyes. it's crazy. I it feels very you. I feel very close to you. I'm admiring eyebrows. Saw their powerful. I will not stop. I will praise your eyebrows for the entire. Oh my god yeah. Thank you so much. I love your shirt. Thank you for having such create eyebrows. Let's tell everyone how to live their lives and Just generally how to do better. Yeah i'm good at that. I'm good at time people what to do. You often do that to me via text. And i've always really enjoyed it so i'm just looking forward that other people get to have a chance to experience for themselves today. Would you read our first letter. Please alright subjects clean plate club dear. Prudence was raised in a zero waste environment. Where everything was composted recycled she now trying to implement policy in our own home. I try to waste as little as possible but occasionally i don't like something. She cooks or get fully. She gets extremely upset. When i was food i started secretly throwing it away. I feel like a child. When i do this and i keeping secrets. I also hate feeling pressure to eat food. I don't like or that. I'm not hungry for. I don't want to treat our future children this way. I want them to feel comfortable staying there. Done my wife. Also several pounds overweight. And i think a large part of this is due to her inability to just walk away from food. She's mentioned a desire to get more in shape but doesn't seem to draw the connection between her clean plate habits and her weight challenges at the same time. I don't want children to become food. Obsessed or worried about their weight. The seems like a fraud situation angles. What should i do agree. That seems fraught. There is a lot here. There's like maybe nine different questions. I the one thing. I wanted to start with although i realize it's not the most important issue is a while back. I was no longer going to be taking questions where people would write in and described their spouse x number of pounds overweight. Because people i have noticed. Have a real fondness forcing exactly how many pounds they think their spouses overweight. And they've always got it like ooh. I know within two pounds what the number is yet. It's really weird to see several pounds overweight because like that's very hard to notice. Yeah that's like probably pretty well within a range and human beings exists in rain. I don't know like to me. It feels like if you happen to think she should weigh three pounds less than you know what i mean. It feels very rachel mcadams and mean girls. Like i wanna lose three pounds. It's very specific. Yeah so i would just say. Don't worry about that one. Let that one go one solution to not liking what. Your wife cooks and feeling like a child is cooking yourself. I don't that's that's insane from this that this person's wife is always cooking because that was the vibe. I got the. I was like she cooks. I don't yeah. I mean it does seem like it's i mean if you don't like what someone is cooking you can easily just not eat or cook yourself or even at the very least i'll make my own food. Yeah you do that. And i'll do this kind of thing. But i i do think it is just a bit odd like how much control the someone have over you throwing away food or not you can. You can just do it right. I mean the thing was. She gets really upset when i waste food which i get. You don't want your wife to feel extremely upset. But she's also not gonna die if she gets upset so if you were to say i love you so much. I am not hungry for this anymore. Either put it in the fridge and eat it the next day leftovers. That's one common solution. There's so many solutions. Let her be upset and declined to secretly. Throw it to the dog later. That's that's not gonna work for you. I feel like maybe they. They don't understand the concept of leftovers perhaps but also another thing you can do is i. Don't know maybe ask her to make less food. I mean like it's like it's like meals have to come in one portion. That's the only portion you can ever make for. Whatever meal like. they're adaptable. But i do think there are so much more here because it's it does seem like you know maybe there is some type of eating habit thing that is a part of it which also i don't think is someone's problem to solve for someone else And i don't think having a fight about wasting food is the way to support someone who might have some sort of food issues or right and i think i wanna have patients for both of these people because it seems a little clear to me that they both have some food issues. Which i mean. Who doesn't also but i don't wanna say that is just like we all have food issues so these are just yours and you can't do anything about it so much as you know. It seems like the letter writer feels a certain degree of if someone else's upset with you about food you have to fix it

Daniel M Lavery Sarah Hoagie Toronto Sarah Canada Rachel Mcadams
Coldplay's second album won 3 Grammys

Sarah and Vinnie

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

Coldplay's second album won 3 Grammys

"In August of 2000 to a rush of blood to the head is Cold Place, Second studio album. In addition to being critically acclaimed, the album brought Home three Grammy's best alternative album, Best rock performance and Record of the Year for the song Clocks. Many, many songs were written for the album and others were written and held for album. Three. Many were scrapped and some were reworked until the album had a sound they thought sounded different from their successful first album.

Grammy
Dallas Cowboys coach Mike McCarthy smashed watermelons with sledgehammer ahead of win vs. Vikings

Dan Barreiro

00:35 sec | 1 d ago

Dallas Cowboys coach Mike McCarthy smashed watermelons with sledgehammer ahead of win vs. Vikings

"Heard about the mike mccarthy The mike mccarthy gimmick. I don't know if i did dot com tom appel. Sarah has been reporting it today that the night before the game gattis wacky and tim brewster like fashion. Mike mccarthy brought out a sledgehammer and a bunch of watermelons and started smashing the water. Yes he did. Hob saudi dot com. He wouldn't make up a story like that doubting coach. That's what he did. Apparently smash watermelons like gallagher to emphasize their objectives. Players roared then responded with an inspired win in minnesota.

Mike Mccarthy Tom Appel Gattis Tim Brewster Sarah Gallagher Minnesota
We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:00 min | 2 d ago

We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

"So denise. I want to start by asking you to cover the early history of thanksgiving were all taught. From a very early age that the pilgrims landed in plymouth and shared a feast with the native americans living in the area. How close is that accurate. What's so interesting about thanksgiving as we celebrated versus thanksgiving as it has been on this planet for much longer. I'm always fascinated about how traditions and practices evolved the concept of gratitude and giving thanks has been around basically as long as humans have walked the earth. The word thanksgiving and even the practice of thanksgiving has been around for centuries before even conception of the united states of america. Yes the pilgrim's did land at plymouth. Yes the pilgrim's did have a meal with the woman. Og indians was. That proclaimed a thanksgiving now. When thanksgiving became a federal holiday in the united states of america was that event singled out as the reason for establishing that holiday. Now i want to be clear. I am not putting anything out there. That other people haven't said for a while and what's really interesting. I think is that every year. You'll see these. Hey here's the real. This part of thanksgiving and i think part of the reason. Is we tell these stories. We tell this. Essentially two kids in school and then later on when they get into high school or college or whatever we don't necessarily re contextualised and give them the full story so every year it's almost necessary that we keep trotting these things out and contextualisation of history is so important to really kind of look at everything that went into a particular event and thanksgiving again. Like i said you know. I am not the first person to come out. And say yeah. That's not exactly how it happened. But what i'm interested in. And what was one of the linchpins at making me want to do. The book we gather together was the ageless. Timeless concept gratitude view stevens. I'm and author here in madison wisconsin. And i'm thankful for men. Women working press in use of the people. The you don't have a great thanksgiving. There is an alternate true factual story about thanksgiving and gratitude and harvest festivals. And all of those things. And how. The actual holiday came to be in america and evolve and erica so i thought was an alternate entry and wouldn't that be fun and i'm interested. How thanksgiving celebrations changed in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. So a lot of what thanksgiving is rule out of things like harvest festivals. Which again go way. Way back thanksgiving's were often religious practices in various parts of the world. You would set aside a day sometimes for fasting and humiliation as they would say to give thanks for could be particular event. When i was working on we gather together. I came across some really interesting articles including some archives from the atoms stanley. john adams. John quincy adams. Abigail adams and john adams writes in his diary thanksgiving for the repeal of the stamp act. So like that was something. You would have a thanksgiving for declare thanksgiving for thanksgiving's for various wins in battle or days of general thanksgiving or like. I said fasting and humiliation so those sorts of advance existed outside of north america. What we now consider the continental united states they existing europe and those traditions were obviously brought over when people came over but the concept of having days set aside for saying thank. You is something that goes back a very very long time. Tell us about. Sarah josefa so sarah of a hail was so compelling to me because she was a young woman born in the early nineteenth century actually of the eighteenth century. She had no formal schooling but her parents instilled in her a deep deep love of reading and learning and she was obsessed with the written word. She married a man who shared her love of all these things. They used to have study hour together in the evenings. She lost him fairly early on in their marriage and so she was a widowed mother of five children and because of her desire to write ended up becoming one of the most influential editors in the nineteenth century. She edited to popular women's magazines. The american ladies magazine and then go. Jeez ladies magazine which was one of the most popular magazines in the nineteenth century. And just to be able to do that to me whether thing but what really moved me about her was that she had all of these things that she needed not wanted but like needed to do for herself and her children but she still found time to raise money for people who have less than she did and to bring people's attention to causes she thought worthy and her ten city was just. I mean seriously. I was interviewing her thinking good. What have i been doing with my time. You know how i feel like. I'm talking to her. You know when. I am interviewing her. I'm looking at what she wrote. I'm looking at what she was quoted as saying. I'm looking at the book she put out. I'm looking at the end. Policies that she curated

United States Plymouth Women Working Press John Adams Denise Sarah Josefa Abigail Adams Stevens John Quincy Adams Erica Madison Wisconsin Stanley American Ladies North America Sarah Europe
G-20 Summit Opens With Calls For United Response To Pandemic

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 3 d ago

G-20 Summit Opens With Calls For United Response To Pandemic

"Held virtually is the Corona virus pandemic overshadows this year's gathering. Saudi Arabia, which assumed the G 20 presidency this year, is the host of the virtual summit that is bringing together leaders from the world's most developed economies. The pandemic has deeply affected the world's wealthiest nations, with nine G 20 countries, ranking highest globally, for the most cases recorded the U. S. Tops the list. Three g 20 leaders have been infected by the coronavirus President Donald Trump, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Brazilian President Diable Sonar. Oh, the virus shows no signs of abating and has claimed more than 1.3 million wives worldwide. I'm Sarah

Saudi Arabia Donald Trump Boris Johnson Sarah
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 5 d ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 5 d ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
Miami’s Jackson Health System will be among first to receive Pfizer coronavirus vaccine

The South Florida Morning Show

01:11 min | 6 d ago

Miami’s Jackson Health System will be among first to receive Pfizer coronavirus vaccine

"The us death toll from coronavirus has reached two hundred fifty thousand but we have a vaccine and two hospitals in south florida receiving it. I don't usually get the ever. Get the flu vaccine. But i would probably get this vaccine. This kobe thing is no joke. You seen kovin toes. Oh god oh no. Don't go there. it's so bad anyway. but this band name covert does have to be a punk band. Yes is vaccine. Will be available at miami's jackson memorial hospital and also Fort lauderdale's memorial regional medical center. And this is the chief of critical medicine at memorial. His name is dr sarah alley and he warns. The vaccine is not a magic bullet. I think that the initial that is reported from the vaccine is very encouraging. However i think that's only one piece of the puzzle. Okay you know. What does the public any good to drop water on this right down. Shut off pretty amazing that it's come out so quickly. It's a it's incredible. It's one of our greatest american accomplishments. Not ever forget that so it should be available to people over sixty five down. The higher end mental also healthcare workers initially

Memorial Regional Medical Cent Dr Sarah Alley Jackson Memorial Hospital South Florida Kobe FLU Fort Lauderdale Miami United States
Trump fires cyber-security agency chief

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

00:43 sec | Last week

Trump fires cyber-security agency chief

"And yeah and other trending news. Donald trump fired the department of homeland. Security cyber chief who oversaw security and guarded against fraud and foreign interference of the firing comes after christopher cribs the director of cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency at the department of homeland security issued a statement that the general election was the most secure in american history. So he got fired. Yeah so he's cha minimal people left to be fag. Really fire bad. Yeah sarah it really is right now right now. yeah yeah.

Department Of Homeland Christopher Cribs Cybersecurity And Infrastructu Donald Trump Department Of Homeland Securit Sarah
Video gaming can benefit mental health, find Oxford academics

Sarah and Vinnie

01:50 min | Last week

Video gaming can benefit mental health, find Oxford academics

"Have been doing this not four hours a day. I don't have four hours to do anything. But they say you're not wasting four hours a day playing video games. You're devoting four hours a day to your wellness. Really? Who came? This is from a study out of Oxford University. They're legit. They are Playing video games can be good for your mental health Researchers found people who played video games at a better sense of well being than people who didn't They specifically tested something called Animal Crossing for Nintendo and found quote If you play four hours a day of animal crossing, you're much happier human being I don't know that game. I don't either kind of played on my phone. Don't know, but I don't. I don't want to. Actually, I just pulled off all my games. I don't The only thing I do know. Is that okay? By with pencil I don't do it on my phone. I, uh I had our our Xbox burned out during one of the power turn offs, which, by the way, I'd really like to bag up the burned out X box and drop it off at the PGA. Any store wherever that is getting crazier by burned out my burned out X boxes for you. Thanks a lot. Nothing. And I went about a new one. Because the truth is, I actually do like doing a little race car at night. I like it, but that's what it was like this. I'm looking animal crossing here. They're going to cook something. Using squash and pumpkins. He not, uh, that looks like kid game E. I was gonna say looks little slow Pace for me. Yeah, that what I'd be into But you know what kids? I'll tell you that that Minecraft is the dumbest piece of garbage. I agree. And the kids love it. They're my kids are still on it. They're still on it all the time. Meet their friends. Yes, they meet their friends on there. They go to concerts on there. It's crazy.

Oxford University Nintendo PGA
Scooter Braun reportedly sells Taylor Swift’s masters for over $300M, star responds

Sarah and Vinnie

02:54 min | Last week

Scooter Braun reportedly sells Taylor Swift’s masters for over $300M, star responds

"And a half ago. It was a big brouhaha. And Scooter Bron. Became the enemy to 15 year old girls everywhere by buying up Taylor Swift's catalog. Well, he bought. Didn't he buy the record company and that those Masters stuff went with it right Big machine label group. It included Taylor Swift's first six albums, and he paid about $300 million total for it. So he just turned around and sold. Apparently just the Taylor Swift stuff, the six the rights to the first six records by themselves. He retains all the other stuff and continues to make money off this catalog that he just sold Um, in a deal worth over $300 million already. Like you got the other thing for free and wait a minute. So you're saying he sold her? Catalog but keeps a percentage of the profits. Yes, and he and keeps big machine label group, right. Wow. Yeah, Just those six albums. $300 million. She's bummed as you might imagine, Uh, she says she's been trying to buy back her Masters for the past year. But Bron made silly demands that she couldn't meet. The company that bought Taylor's music is called Shamrock Holdings, and they reached out to Taylor, hoping to work with her. Like, Hey, maybe we can work something out. But because of the terms of the sale, Scooter Braun still profits off those masters for several more years. So Taylor won't work a shamrock. Instead, she's continuing. She's actually I believe begun this process. Already. She's re recording all her first records, so I don't know if that includes some kind of reimagining or they'll be extra stuff on there. How that allow work. But she's re recording that and that then she'll own those masters and she can continue to make money off those. Um she says that in that way she could regain some kind of control over that. She says the process has been both exciting and creatively fulfilling. No, that's what she's up against. I know we work with record companies a lot, and I don't know. The extent of any of these deals, but it does seem wrong. That an artist somehow doesn't own their art. That seems wrong like that's there's a Clear problem in the contract writing deal there that somehow you don't own your own art. Well, then I guess it's I guess it's that you sold it for the support of the record company. I just don't know. I don't know them. Like at least seems like you should retain a piece of that, like a like a 51% of that or something. I mean, look, if banks he paints something and and sells it to someone else, they 100% own it like I don't know. Does he retain any rights to that? Can they reproduce it? Like what is the I don't know. I don't know what our deal was. And she was a kid. So who knows? How screwed over she got? I don't know.

Taylor Swift Taylor's Music Shamrock Holdings Scooter Braun Taylor Bron
Exciting Prospects on show as Jumps Racing really starts!

The Final Furlong Podcast

02:14 min | Last week

Exciting Prospects on show as Jumps Racing really starts!

"Pencil full of lead so there would have been arguing that the potato race was the race of cheltenham but latest exhibition gets beaten I'm very biased. Here i love this source and Therefore i need to get your unbiased opinion on him. I will just say this before you start off. He jumped impeccably. Know that my say say i totally agree that yeah definitely teach face confidence for this. Wholesomeness performance He finished the ground. Didn't they eat junk so much. Snicker down we in his chasing debut. Galway which he wants a clearly. He's improved again here and he saito the way to the line and he was always going to make off into shape as so fall proved to be the case in. Rachel always looks so much. More comfortable bar included relates exhibition. She had a hands buried in the back of the hoses. Next down the back straight. Whereas brian kupa had his obeys benson this half themes ads late his exhibition long strides. Just even hold his position. Say you need from quite out late. Sex addition wasn't going as well as pencil leads and pencil full alleged. Got in a little tight to the side. Lives but rachel game squeeze after that and he found plenty as we so she knew she had plenty left and upstream malls. This should be more to come. Still and maestra too. I think you've been irish national coming in on this. Spring could be the prophet race the missiles they season with the records and offices have in the race. So that was the instant soul to the law. On that got. You know he likes. The heavy grounds. Knows what he's gonna need to spring ground but he just has kind of profiling father thank oxley long way away even further away than the bench. Come onto the bridge that animates exhibition as he. Just he just didn't look entirely fee down the back straight Debrecen kuprin eludes as he needs. Plenty father as well as we know. But i just think he's been beaten by rainy. Nice little sarah. She don't think he's going to go down as beaten. Eight to eleven favourite. He was actually that disgrace. I do think pennsylvania is really nice.

Brian Kupa Cheltenham Saito Galway Benson Rachel Kuprin Oxley Sarah Pennsylvania
Obama says social media companies 'are making editorial choices, whether they've buried them in algorithms or not'

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:22 min | Last week

Obama says social media companies 'are making editorial choices, whether they've buried them in algorithms or not'

"Truth decay. I see that happening on a number of levels right now if you turn on different news organizations. They're not delivering news. They're delivering disinformation. Depending on who you're watching and that's really growing spreading and then i just land flatly on facebook where i feel a growing number of americans get their information there and that's truth and it seems to me to be very dangerous. It is very dangerous and you know he has President obama has very specific words for social media companies. He says they're not to blame entirely for this truth. Decay as he calls it. They're not to blame for every ailment in our political system but he says that the time has passed do for them to start acknowledging that they're not as they often argue. They're not just the phone company right That they're not just carrying messages back and forth between people that that embedded in their algorithms story choices. That's the way he put it to me. I thought it was a very good way to put it That that that the that facebook and other companies are sorting information and pushing certain kinds of information and repressing other kinds of information. And so you think that they play a civic role that they're not playing now and but but that's an accelerate as he says are something that exacerbates A deeper problem. Which is cultural norms. Right and in his book. I mean one of the interesting things. His book is that he traces his gradual awakening that something different is occurring in this country and he puts the You know he says. Sarah palin is the first indicator of this in two thousand eight hanes Crowd size not not to harp on crowd size. Which is an issue. We always talk about these days. He he saw mccain's crowd size. Saw palance crowd size saw that. She was appealing to a different kind of emotional impulse. native is Resume and said something is going on here and only later did we all realize that left unchecked An accelerated by social media and by another media ecosystem. You know this. This needs to This leads to some serious problems.

Facebook Barack Obama Palance Sarah Palin Mccain
How to Avoid Deadly Weather-Related Accidents with Rob Mark

Aviation News Talk podcast

04:08 min | Last week

How to Avoid Deadly Weather-Related Accidents with Rob Mark

"Today of course. We're going to talk about that via far into imc It's it's not a new Reason at all that people are hurting themselves in airplanes In fact it's been around for quite a long time. I just finished in fact writing a story for flying magazine. That'll be out. I believe next issue About via far. And i m seeing and of course we all know what happens. People fly into whether that they have no business. Being in but big question is why so. Maybe that's some of what we're going to talk about today while everything we're talking about today is certainly weather related. And the unfortunate thing about via far into imc accidents is that ninety percent of them. Fatal which makes them the most lethal of any kind of an accident. So if you're gonna have an accident don't have a fear foreign to die. mc accident. I did a study years ago where i looked at via foreign. Imc accidents over a ten year period. And i was wondering do instrument pilots also have them. The answer was yes so they have them at a somewhat lower rate and i think There were certainly times. When i was not current as an instrument pilot and so i would fly via far and you've just got to maintain those normal via far visibility cloud clearance minimums otherwise even if our pilots could find themselves Going into imc and having an accident. Well i think that when we we are training pilots Will often ask them. Okay give me. The cloud clearances for For via far won't see five hundred of below a thousand above two thousand horizontally from you got it baby but the question is does a pilot really understand what that looks like. When they're flying via far how do they. How do they tell. When they're five hundred feet below or a thousand above or two thousand feet horizontally from because most of us never really get up there in those kinds of conditions to say okay. Here's what those minimums look like. And unfortunately i think that People fly into whether and then they say oh my gosh in the first thing they do is always look down and looking down does nothing more then make the situation worse because you're in the clouds there is no down there is no up. There's no left and right An unless you're really current on instruments up you're gonna lose control of the airplane so the key is is some good risk management to make sure that you don't fly when those conditions are possible or that you give them a very very wide birth which of course we're gonna find in this accident Today this pilot did not give the weather at all yeah. I've had at least two times. That i can remember in my forty years of flying where i went to from via far into. Imc one case was at night. And boy. I was working absolutely as hard as i could to avoid. The clouds were in a metro area. Things were reasonably well lit with the surface lighting and yet we still found ourselves in a cloud. There are times when it's just virtually impossible to see the cloud no matter what you do now. A particular case. We were very close to francisco bay. So i knew that a slight turn to the right. Put me over the water. Push for a little bit pop back out of the cloud but yeah pilots set and really need to kind of anticipate win. This might happen and have a good strategy for how to avoid it now. A great strategy. Especially for people with an autopilot. Snap the autopilot on and then do a one eighty. That's true and and of course. I don't think we're going to know in this particular accident yet whether the pilot used the autopilot or not He certainly never used the the shoot in the sarah's so again we know where this was going. And i think that sometimes when we train students as well that we're not clear with them about the fact that if you do this you will not only hurt yourself. You can possibly kill yourself in anybody in the airplane along with you. I

IMC Francisco Bay Sarah
Houston country star Doug Supernaw dies of cancer at age 60

Bloomberg Intelligence

00:25 sec | Last week

Houston country star Doug Supernaw dies of cancer at age 60

"Music star has died, Sarah Bartlett reports. She loved life rhythm. Doug Supernaw was 60 years old and had been battling stage four cancer since 2019 Supernaw had several hits in the nineties, having released four studio albums with songs, including Reno, and I don't Call him Daddy. Supernaw was placed in hospice care last month and passed away Friday at his Texas home. A

Sarah Bartlett Supernaw Doug Supernaw Cancer Reno Texas
An index of small-cap stocks just notched its first record-high close since 2018

Bloomberg Businessweek

02:40 min | Last week

An index of small-cap stocks just notched its first record-high close since 2018

"Look at some of the stocks on the move and the sectors of the move on Carol Master along with Bloomberg News process that reporter Sarah Pounds Act, both of us in our Bloomberg Interactive Brokers studio. Let me just do big picture. Definitely risk on trade 473 names in the S and P 500 higher today 31 lower to unchanged And if I take a look at those major industry groups in the S and P 500, there are 11 all of them up. For the day energy at the top of the pack of 3.8%, followed by real estate of about 2.3 bottom of the pack information technology, but still up about 9/10 of a percent Sarah Ponds Act, Man, It wasn't the week. Well, maybe it's starting more like the week. It's ending. More like the week it started. See, that's what kind of weak it's been, and there's been a lot of stuff in the middle, right. We have come full circle. Granted, Today's moves were not as drastic or as large as Monday's, but they were reminiscent of them in the middle of the week. We saw that Monday rotation, Fayed was attacked, Take the lead once again. That was not the case today. At the end of the day, we just heard it. Russell 2000 more than 2.3% today at a record high. This is the first record high for the Russell since 2018. We had not seen it. It really is. It's been got. It's getting close, right and just never breaks it right, exactly exactly have been getting close. But we have not been able to see small caps really breakthrough. While today was the day also a record high for the S and P 500 today, as well as the equal weight version of the S and P, So we're seeing breath come into this market. Well, that's what I was going to say. What's the significance about the small caps in the large caps right to see the Three indexes that you just put it point out there all hit records. So the idea is that sure you can see the SNP it records. You can see the NASDAQ hit records, but they're very, very top heavy. So what that means is that it's really representative of just a few stocks, many of them tech thing, names all year long pulling higher seeing Russell 2000 at record seeing the equal weight version of the S and P. It records What this shows you is that it's not just a couple of stocks pulling you hire. Rather, it is many more and you are seeing more participation, which is seen as a healthy climb. What's the fundamentals behind it? You know, it's a great question. So a lot of hope this week on the optimism over the visor vaccine is truly It's unbelievable. When you see these stark comparisons between the Fizer vaccine news, then you see Record covert 19 cases. You see restrictions coming in what the reality is and what investors are saying is that the vaccine news helps you look beyond all of this. That helps you realize that there will be an end. At some point. I hear it all The time. Markets are forward looking mechanism, and that's exactly what they're trying to do what you got visibility right? And even if it's still a few months away, or maybe it's into next year well into next year. At least we have an idea of when this will end versus some of the conversations we had earlier this year when we like We don't know. We just don't know

Carol Master Sarah Pounds Bloomberg Interactive Brokers Russell Bloomberg News Fayed SNP
Trivia With Rickey Thompson And Denzel Dion

Ask Me Another

05:10 min | Last week

Trivia With Rickey Thompson And Denzel Dion

"Ricky thompson denzil dion. Her best friends and they're known for their videos on tiktok youtube and instagram. And not your average. Just kinda throwaway videos. These are high production lip sync videos with costumes and choreographed dance moves. I mean they're incredible and they also host a new spotify podcast. We said what we said. Ricky thompson and denzil dion. Hello welcome you. I've been enjoying so much of all the stuff that you guys do that. Visual and video. And you know you're so successful at a visual format why go to just audio. I'm i think that we just really wanted to switch it up like everything video for like all of our career so like lists are with video. There's nothing's going on. A lot of people really talks. Oh here the message Obviously with videos which teams do are youtube at ten minutes is just like you know people just get so caught up with audio judges here and you're listening so i feel like we really wanted to show another side of us for audio bitten. Just because he talked ally right. You can just get to converse like you are hanging out you know and you were saying you know th the videos are sort of demand a different kind of attention and i just have to save. I am so dazzled by the production value that you bring to those with the costuming ming unreal. I mean how how much time goes into everyone on every time we do like thirty minutes before we do it solo which he gets my place. I'm getting the things today place and then we studied the choreography minutes. And keep doing it and doing that until the video is so. It's not prying not at all works. It works okay. Well let's let's get to some games. You wanna play some games some games. How do you feel about competition tablets. Perfect so this. This is the deal with this game taking a cue from movies like battleship clue. We have imagined what it would sound like if other table. Top games were adapted to be movies. Okay so jonathan will perform a scene and your job is just to tell us what game is based on okay. Ricky this one is for you. Here's your first one. This wooden windowless tower needs to be taller. But sir we're running out of material. Just take what you need from the middle and put it on the top. My hand is shaking. The whole thing is gonna fall. Who okay. I did it. Oh i know this game. Gosh oh i'm going blank right now on. My value does does bill. Which i thought he was talking to you because he knows it but he doesn't. Can you describe you described the game. Yes it's the game you know you build up the little blocks and if somebody pulls out in the middle oh yes yes yes all right denzel. Here's one for you. My queen the white riders approach. Their horses are moving in some sort of l. shape. I've never seen before. What news of the bishops. They've been captured your majesty so it's up to me you know. I was upon once. But now i can travel in any direction. Any distance. there. Weakling of a king is really for a reality. Check mate this is this is yes yes yes you know. In the film version of that timmel tate shell may would be up for rook. I being talks. I don't know that he'd be all right. And this one is and this one is ricky another hot night alone in the big city nights like these. You wonder if you're the only one in this crazy house of cards called life. Who's working with a full deck just in the numbers are lining up getting close to the big man at the top. That's when this dame shows up real card queen a diamond in the rough some nights. You wonder if you're the only one playing by the rules some nights you wonder if you're the only one playing at all. Oh my goodness. I'm so bad okay. A target muscle. Can i say solitaire.

Ricky Thompson Denzil Dion Youtube Instagram Ricky Jonathan Timmel Denzel
Barack Obama's new memoir 'A Promised Land' discusses rise of Donald Trump and marriage with Michelle

CNN Political Briefing

01:48 min | Last week

Barack Obama's new memoir 'A Promised Land' discusses rise of Donald Trump and marriage with Michelle

"A- promised land. That's the title of former president obama's new memoir remember. This is just part one. Because he couldn't get it all written in time so he split up into two parts but we are starting to see what he is writing about in this book and cnn obtained a copy of the book and my colleagues jeff zeleny and america and others poured through it and one of the big headlines that is emerging from the former president's memoir is how directly he deals with the issue of race and the rise to the trump era in other words. Barack obama who doesn't really talk about his race and its impact on american society. All that much really addresses in this memoir. He's very being. As the first black president sitting in that oval office he believes allowed millions of americans to be spooked by that and that was something. Donald trump understood that there would be millions. americans spooked. That black man was present united states and exploited it and played it to his political advantage. That is what obama thinks. The whole birther controversy was about he thinks that palin sarah palin being put on john mccain's ticket in two thousand eight was the beginning of this of taking what were sort of fringe off the read corners of the republican firmament in the country and bringing it front and center and that his being the first black president allowed that to happen because there were people like donald trump wanting to exploit those very racial and racist fears. I many in this country. It's just a fascinating. Read to see obama talking in these terms but this comes out at a time where we're seeing. How race played into this year's election. And the here obama talk about this in a way that quite frankly he hasn't talked about before is pretty fascinating.

Jeff Zeleny Barack Obama Donald Trump United States CNN Oval Office Sarah Palin John Mccain Palin
"sarah what" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

03:14 min | 3 months ago

"sarah what" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"Bought pigtails at the farmer's market once they were recommended as treats for my dogs. Then thought they looked like albino Man areas never bought them again. Well. Ah, I'm saving lots in some areas. Hair, nails, gas, dining out social activities, but spending it all in crazy sales. I just want a pair of Jimmy Choo shoes for $200 that 75% off. Wow. Well, Even Jimmy Choos got to stay afloat. You gotto review one Jimmy Choos in the future. You got to buy some Jimmy Choos now. Well, the problem with this purchase that she's made and I understand you know you're a grown up so you won't grow because you're already grown up s o the But you also have new shoes You're not gonna wear anywhere for may be a while. But when you can, you're going tohave. Jimmy Choo's sure you know what if you were in your money You can spend it any way you want to. We're not going to say I was saying anything. I might actually very judgy. Very opinionated. Absolutely try for 15 says. My hobby is dining out in another pastime is going to bars with friends between those and not using uber three times a week. I'm saving a ton of money that's right, forgot get getting to and from all those places. Uh huh. Are also saving on son. You know that you've got my fun account over here. That's All stocked up boring here. 916 says. I buy smoked turkey tails or next to simmer and my soul food dishes like collard greens. Traditionally, we use salted pork for flavor, but it's so unhealthy anyway, when you read that story about the woman in Ohio I thought maybe her pack a turkey tails was Hold on. I have it here. I just Oh, ah! Her pack of turkey tales had a random neck in it because Turkey next do look like a pack of D's. That is true. When you pull out the guts, you know that they put in a little bag inside that, usually the next in there all the giblets whatever they're called, and that neck is bogus looking. It really does look like somebody's Playing. L O. L is popular and Southern dishes. Yeah. Story was out of Ohio, though, but okay, I mean, people move, right? You're right. You know people who enjoy what they enjoy, and they they need turkey tales to cook it than Going to buy a pack of those 707 says Sarah What's the book about Dragons? You were talking about yesterday? My nine year old is reading the Wong. The Wongs in is fire. And now I'm concerned because I thought it was suitable for kids. I don't know that one. It's called It's called tooth and claw. And I was one of the books that Bella had in her bedroom in the twilight sequel from Edwards, Point of view, called Midnight Sun and It's it.

Jimmy Choos Ohio Turkey Wong Bella Sarah What Edwards
"sarah what" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"sarah what" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Hello, sarah. What would you like to say quickly? Organization of Truckee organization owners and need to get together with all the trucking companies Turkey companies need to get organized. And like one thing I've heard about truckers have to wait in line for warehouses on. Okay. Come up with some kind of a skit with. He come up to the where else can you drop your your trailer? And you pick up go no longer waiting. Millennials. Jim, do you know any millennials twenty-something early thirties? All right. Would they put up with any of that? Ask them that would be interesting. Instruments single engine plane license and work with an instructor in. That's something else. To start their own schools. Not depend on independent schools. Don't give a cripple they want. Well, they trust me the ones that are operated in Hauser worse than some of the many of those that are out independent. But you're right now a lot of these big companies work in concert with the independence pay the kids tuition and get them up in the in the in the truck in six weeks time, and it's just not enough training. And again, you gotta look at it. How am I going to get the money to be a truck driver in? That's your model just run them through school and put him up. You ain't no chance you might as well. Shut your doors is a trucking company. I don't care how big yard you're gonna have to change and change radically. If you and this is one of the reasons, by the way, you hear so much push for Thomas Thomas Thomas because they don't wanna put up with this. They don't wanna change. It's benefited the trucking companies to a great degree to go this business model the last twenty five or thirty years they wanted to continue and they wanted to deal with truck drivers because they look at truck drivers as a necessary evil rather than a valued asset. We gotta go to another break sly. We got your next America's truck in that work. Seventy seven percent of rural counties of fishing primary.

Thomas Thomas Thomas Turkey companies Truckee sarah instructor Jim America Seventy seven percent thirty years six weeks
"sarah what" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Michigan economic Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state. Learn about the best state to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. There's a new trend to combat the lack of privacy in some offices with open floor plans. Phone booths kind of without the phones. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, there's a growing backlash to those open office floor plans, the privacy pod as Sarah needle men of the Wall Street Journal tells us these enclosures are becoming quite the hotspot, Sarah, what do they look like. Wow. They really vary. Some of them are resemble traditional phone booth. And even have that the look of the famous ones in England that are cherry red others are more space age like they look like little spaceships, but mostly they're glass enclosures, they're small they may have a little table at a stool or bench. So how many people could get in there? Well, most of them are designed for one person. But there are larger ones that can accommodate two. Or even I've seen a couple of two six you'll see in the workplace are so a single person. Pas or the two person pots, Sarah when did this concept begin? And what kinds of companies are using them? Put it this way in two thousand fifteen a single bootmaker participated in the neon Neo contra in Chicago for the commercial design industry, and this year, there were more than a dozen. So this is a trend that's been. Growing us over the past three years or so and you'll see them in mostly crucial workplace offices where there are open floor plans, and employee's are working very closely next to one another without any sort of partitions or or very small partition. All right, so Sarah, what are people using them for? Well, I mean, the these are meant for a private phone call. So if you have some personal matter to take care of you don't want your colleagues hearing, you would go into these pods. But people are starting to use them for more than just that purpose. They're doing their jobs in the pods because the open floor plans are too distracting. So they're holing up in the pods. Most of them have signs them player. Sign saying up to thirty minutes, you'll see people in there for way pass that amount of time because they're so engaged in their day to day work. Bringing their laptops, some even little brass stack with them and just sort of about we're speaking with Sarah Nadelmann of the Wall Street Journal about the privacy pod at workplaces, sir. I know you talked to a lot of people who are using them. And they had to go to great lengths to snag one at their job. Can you talk about some of the people you spoke with, you know, they're very popular and companies may have only a couple of pods compared with possibly hundreds of employees. So sacking an empty one can be hard. And yeah, people are using them for more than just phone calls. They're doing their jobs, and then and so I, you know, some people are going to great lengths to get them. There camping outside the podge waiting for one to open up. One woman told me that she resorted to bribery. She knocked on the door, the colleague Whitten side, the booth this one she had a good reply, and and jokingly said, I'll play your contracts. I and the key was you give me your booth this. This was an attorney mentioned said you have to be quick flooded or good news. Here to get inside one. This weekend's Jennifer Kushinka with Wall Street Journal reporter, Sara Nadelmann thirty minutes now after the hour on this.

Sarah Nadelmann Wall Street Journal Jennifer Kushinka Michigan economic Development Corporati bribery Chicago Whitten England Sara Nadelmann attorney reporter thirty minutes three years
"sarah what" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state. Learn about the best state to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. There's a new trend to combat the lack of privacy in some offices with open floor plans. Phone booths kind of without the phones. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, there's a growing backlash to those open office floor plans, the privacy pod as Sarah Nadelmann of the Wall Street Journal tells us these enclosures are becoming quite the hotspot, Sarah, what do they look like they look like. Well, they really vary. Some of them are resemble traditional phone booth. And even have that the look of the famous ones in England that are carry red others are more space age like they look like little spaceships. But my friends are glass enclosures, they're small they may have a little table at a stool or bench. So how many people could get in there? Well, most of them are designed for one person. But there are larger ones that can accommodate two or even I've seen a couple of up to six, but then we'll see in the workplace are. So a single person positive that Cooper's pots, Sarah when did this concept's begin? And what kinds of companies are using them? Put it this way in two thousand fifteen a single booth maker participated in the Neons, Neo konczal in Chicago for that commercial design industry, and this year, there were more than a dozen. So this is a trend that's been growing. Just over the past three years or so and you'll see them in mostly traditional workplace offices where there are open floor plans, and employee's are, you know, working closely next to one another without any sort of partitions or or very small partition. Alright so Sarah, what are people using them for? Well. I mean, the these are meant for try this phone call. So if you have some personal matter to take care of need don't want your colleagues hearing, you would go into these pods. But people are starting to use them for more than just that purpose. They're doing their jobs in the pods because the open floor plans are too distracting. So they're holding up in the pods. Most of them have signs a lot of employer put signs saying up to thirty minutes. You'll see people in there for way pass that amount of time because they're so engaged in their day to day work, bringing their laptops. Some even little brass back with them and just sort of camp out. We're speaking with Sarah Nadelmann of the Wall Street Journal about the privacy pod at workplaces. Sorry. I know you talked to a lot of people who are using them. And they had to go to great lengths to snag one at their job. Can you talk about some of the people you spoke with, you know, they're very popular and companies may have only a couple of pods compared with and possibly hundreds of employees, so sacking empty one can be hard. And yeah, people are using them for more than just phone calls. They're doing their jobs in them. And so I, you know, some people are going to great lengths to get them. There camping outside the pod waiting for one to open up. One woman told me that she resorted to bribery. She knocked on the door, the colleague Whitten side, the booth this one she had a good repair with and and jokingly said, you know, I'll play your contracts I in the key with you give me your booth this. This was an attorney, and then she said you have to be quick flooded or good negotiator to get inside. One. This weekend's Jennifer Kushinka with Wall Street Journal reporter, Sara Nadelmann thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Radio. Be good morning. I'm Eric like a president Donald Trump's former warrior Michael Cohen admitted yesterday he perceived a Moscow real estate deal on the president's behalf during the heat.

Sarah Nadelmann Wall Street Journal Jennifer Kushinka Development Corporation Michigan Chicago England Sara Nadelmann president Donald Trump attorney bribery Cooper Eric reporter Moscow Whitten Michael Cohen thirty minutes
"sarah what" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"Trashing you run to the toilet like, a grown up Oh my God yes we're talking about Cal, I met one of the teachers there at an event and she's a huge fan of Sarah What does she, teach she's the field hockey head coach Her name is Sally Something. To, do with lenox. Nope not gonna happen Oh my. God they. All do they love the cat now so much. John Riley is not a fan of that cat how long has she had the cat since she moved? In, with the cat Or March maybe show is comes home late and makes noise, wakes up he can't terminate? Lot. Of crying Lada, crying that's a. Lot of like this paper. Due tomorrow. I'm just about to start it I knew it's. Eleven pm in your lights are already off but could you help me yeah A lot of? That My needs to talk Louis oh my God What does that mean? What does that mean don't. Don't tell. That one that's boy you've. Come in here I've missed. Some of the best Well who knows that story because he. Comes to my, house every, week so, the kids you know he's like? What's going on with the roommate In, here and, then we laugh about it here Can you go? Back to his dorm with the Asian kid rooms he can't go back there, either surrendered his spot in the door We signed. A two year lease for this place Let's wait how. You get rid of that girl well. Or not you're stuck right hitting the rental rules Comes. Home every night right no he, is home for the summer and he spends, his weeks there, he wants he wants to join some said I'm. Gonna try and come homeless this? Year and I'm thinking. I'm hoping it was join some clubs and stuff why don't you. Join a fraternity don't join a fraternity He's nice little. Frat boy yeah not that says? Reaction this very nice I'm against them to why, because no. Good. Comes from well look I. Don't, know all the fraternities you're sure sure Great things. That happened in Jordan Linda Linda. Linda the networking part is really great you're absolutely chaos that. Goes on behind it that can be detrimental to guessing he's, not, looking for the frat that that, does beer. Bonds Sure Animal science clubs never gets any. Stores Richard You didn't do any? Stories, yeah Are you talking about I mean it's. Been an hour and a. Half we've been on. The air we haven't done? Any Stories. Personal star I think? Riley should, join alpha delta PHI no he's not. Gonna join any frats fraternity. Berkeley go on Sunday You guys. Are so dead again your reaction I don't, like, that reaction from. You to well we don't. Like you thanks Charlie is, coming back to the. Bay.

John Riley Jordan Linda Linda Sarah What Sally Berkeley Cal Linda hockey Louis Charlie Richard two year
"sarah what" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on WRVA

"Great Okay so far I'm right. With you because the the feeling of, eternal joy, and bliss would after awhile I, suppose Sort of, sort of And I guess that. Sounds kind of sacrilegious it does Is? Be almost. Boring in other words you tire of it I did I tired of it because in. Certain, levels, it was exhausting, because it was never ending he no there. Was nothing but that there was. No other emotion expressed it was always joy. And bliss Wonderful Lloyd's it. Great yeah so it and I had. An idea that, it doesn't matter on? A personal. Level you know if I it didn't matter if I was there or if I wasn't. There this, light was always, going to be in eternal joined list you're. Welcome to come welcome to go Exactly And so that was just. Wonderful So and then, you. Know. And, I remember. Thinking, wow okay well all right well I'm leaving now and I kind of went, rather quickly back down the tunnel and I paused this is kind of now we're kind of, near the end of this here My. Last, little experience but there was a doorway near the end of the tunnel that, was actually near the entrance where where I came in and this doorway looked out onto space And there were galaxies and stars and, planets and it was utterly silent and utterly serene and seemed you know if you could go out and float on that forever and be kind of numbly happy Pretty much eternally and there's also central adventure to though like if you, went out there you'd become like a Voyager in the, in the, galaxy right and I kind of hovered on this doorway and another little being came up And started talking to me About what my options were at this point and through. The opening of the doorway I could hear, voices that were saying comeback Sarah What about? Vein which, is my son's name and I got very annoyed with them because I thought why, are they bothering me about my son of course I am. Aware that I'm going to be returning to my son and my body, but I could hear them kind of clamoring through the doorway and so I spoke with this little other being at, the store way and we were, talking and suddenly it was kind of, like, the, doorbell with the other world where a voice said if you pass through this door you can't come back and I thought okay well. I really don't wanna go out there right, now And so I walked myself back through the doorway came and suddenly I was back in my body I was, in a really brightly lit hospital, bed and there were all these tubes, sticking, into, man I had a respirator and my face and My body was humming. With power it was just full of electric city, but I couldn't move it at all because at. That point I was pretty much completely paralyzed And. And yet also you know I was, full of joy I had no fear. Of death I had all this wonderful truth about myself And I couldn't. Move and I couldn't communicate it to anyone At, all you could could you couldn't even write them I actually at that point it seemed like being in the hospital bed and being in, my body? And. Being so heavy was was the abnormal part you know yes, and I really didn't want to be there, for, a, moment but then. I settled into the fact that oh well, here I was and then as the feeling. Of electricity faded then I got a wonderful feeling of pain so I knew I was back in my body because it hurt And? It's understandable, considering the extent of my in how long was it before you were able to either write or talk talking took a month a month, because I? Was. On the respirator for almost that whole month because my lungs, had really been pretty.

Sarah What Lloyd
"sarah what" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on About to Review

"Crazy wig i'm interested for that movie let's go for it yeah so i liked her character the most as much as w should had the cool calm demeanor which i love him and shows like suits and white collar and i just i love that charismatic candidates yeah do you watch the library in judgment and that he's still hasn't worked to atlanta so this is why that is fair to be judged fair i think you that i'm behind on suits so their whole oh but i liked one in sandra bullock's lines where she gets out of prison she calls her old partner cate blanchett and she was like kate kate was like where are you going to go she's like forty five dollars i can go anywhere right and then you see how she goes to the hotel she starts getting this room she starts getting makeup i loved that aspect of this show that was great i love that whole sequence someone's going to try that and go to jail yes percents yeah they did a great job establishing the resourcefulness in the capability like her as a character you know like okay cool i can see you're pulling this off and even that calm conversation she has with the ceo actually leaving about how end of the deal i was like oh and is that she's having a conversation the one that one of the lines that i liked in the film with talked behind the man she was like like we need to be unseen in like people don't see women so that was it was very own the news but it's but i've always thought it was so true yeah but we need more female assassin films because people will dismiss women at the drop of a hat so you could easily slip in and out of a place and people will be like oh she's just a cute girl and that's does no way she could have done this which we have talked a little bit about this because i talked about it after the screening with one of our fellow critic sarah what is fascinating is when they were doing ghostbusters and remaking out with an all female cast the uproar the fervor from all the geeks are like how dare you blah blah and they were just so.

sandra bullock cate blanchett kate kate ceo w atlanta partner sarah what forty five dollars
"sarah what" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"That it doesn't mean anything doesn't indicate a real caller but is still information when an answer is returned when your phone company queries that database and information is returned your phone company will pay a small fee to that database for that information the caller id database then sends that backup to the entity that controls the number who then in turn passes compensation along to the scammer who is their customer sounds like these scams are getting increasingly complicated so how much money are scammers actually making this the thing to keep in mind about this is that this is not a big payday for them this is more offsetting the cost of actually executing all the calls so you know like one company that we found advertisers the ability to blast outlook six million calls a minute so once you get to scale these little fractions of pennies can really add up in a big way but this is just a sort of helps offset the broader cost of a robo calling campaigner an illegitimate robocall in campaign i should say it's not something that you know is their bread and butter it just makes it easier to to do and sort of greece's the wheels sarah what about spoofing is that related to the scam so spoofing for those of you who aren't familiar is is where a caller will fake number so they could fake legitimate number and illegitimate number they're just using technology to sort of make up and fill at number and they will likely pick one that is near you in terms of an area code that's called neighbor spoofing to encourage you to pick up so that's a little different than what we're describing here but that to be clear is definitely the most prominent sort of scammer robocall type that's going on now that impacts both mobile phones and landlines okay so back to this particular scam how do we stop it usually we're told not to answer the phone so is there anything call recipients can do here the main thing is don't answer the phone and don't call back in some cases these scammers want to know that they've reached a working number or a human that's potentially going to be responsive down the road so you're likely opening yourself up to more phone calls if you answer and show them that there's a living breathing.

greece
"sarah what" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Dollars a year at least ten people injured thousands of accu eight after a refinery explosion in superior wisconsin cleveland browns took oklahoma qb baker mayfield as the first overall pick in the nfl draft and what the university of utah has installed for students a little weepy about their final exams that story in about twenty minutes ronnie jackson the white house physician who has now withdrawn his name from consideration as secretary of veterans affairs regularly handed out the sleep drug ambien and the alertness drug providential to west wing officials traveling on overseas flights his nomination has inadvertently exposed the widespread use of sleep and alertness drugs among government officials from the white house and state department to the pentagon and congress itself more from sarah carlin smith healthcare reporter at politico sarah what have you found what my colleagues and i have discovered over the past couple of days is that perhaps jackson's behavior wasn't as unusual as you may think or at least that it's fairly common in military circle state department maybe high level white house officials even members of congress people that you of travel all over the goal for what regularly frequently to use in particular they think there may be health that can help you get awake after one travel kinda compensate for their hectic work schedule so it seems like a much more kind of widespread perhaps problem of you know people really turning to drugs because of their work schedules and work responsibilities so you focused on too in the story ambien and pro vigil explain what each does ambien.

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"sarah what" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"We are america's first news this morning with gordon deal picture being with us on this friday april twenty seven gordon deal jennifer kushinka some of our top stories and headlines the leaders of the two koreas agreed to formally end the korean war and to denuclearize the peninsula actor and comedian bill cosby found guilty of sexual assault amazon is raising the price of its prime membership to one hundred nineteen dollars a year at least ten people injured thousands evacuated after a refinery explosion in superior wisconsin cleveland browns took oklahoma qb baker mayfield as the first overall pick in the nfl draft and what the university of utah has installed for students a little weepy about their final exams full of that story in about twenty minutes ronnie jackson the white house physician who has now withdrawn his name from consideration as secretary of veterans affairs regularly handed out the sleep drug ambien and the alertness drug providential to west wing officials traveling on overseas flights his nomination has inadvertently exposed the widespread use of sleep and alertness drugs among government officials from the white house and state department to the pentagon and congress itself more from sarah carlin smith healthcare reporter at politico sarah what have you found than i have discovered over the past couple of days is that perhaps jackson's behavior wasn't as unusual as you may think or at least that it's fairly common in military circles state department maybe high level white house officials even members of congress people that you will travel all over the gopher work perhaps regularly frequently to use in particular sleeping pills or maybe health that can help you get awake after one travel to kinda compensate for their hectic work schedule so it seems like a much more kind of widespread perhaps problem of you know people really turning to drugs because of their work schedules and work responsibilities so you focused on too in the story ambien and provo jill explain what each does amblin is medicine.

sleeping pills congress politico sarah carlin smith ronnie jackson university of utah nfl wisconsin bill cosby gordon america jennifer kushinka reporter pentagon white house secretary baker mayfield oklahoma amazon
"sarah what" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Deal being with us on this friday april twenty seven gordon deal jennifer kushinka some of our top stories and headlines the leaders of the two koreas agreed to formally end the korean war and to denuclearize the peninsula actor and comedian bill cosby found guilty of sexual assault amazon is raising the price of its prime membership to one hundred nineteen dollars a year at least ten people injured thousands evacuated after refinery explosion in superior wisconsin cleveland browns took oklahoma qb baker mayfield as the first overall pick in the nfl draft and what the university of utah has installed for students a little weepy about their final exams full of that story in about twenty minutes ronnie jackson be white house physician who has now withdrawn his name from consideration as secretary of veterans affairs regularly handed out the sleep drug ambien and the alertness drug providential to west wing officials traveling on overseas flights his nomination has inadvertently exposed the widespread use of sleep and alertness drugs among government officials from the white house and state department to the pentagon and congress itself more from sarah carlin smith healthcare reporter at politico sarah what have you found mcalinden i have discovered over the past couple of days is that perhaps jackson's behavior wasn't as unusual he may or at least that it's fairly common in military circles state department maybe high level white house episode even members of congress people that you will travel all over the goal for work perhaps regularly frequently to news in particular sleeping pills or maybe health that can help you get awake after one travel kinda compensate for their hectic work schedule so it seems like a much more kind of widespread perhaps problem of you know people really turning to drugs because of their works federal responsibility so you focus on too in the story ambien and provo jill explain what each does ambien is as medicine.

reporter congress politico sarah carlin smith ronnie jackson university of utah nfl wisconsin bill cosby gordon sleeping pills jennifer kushinka pentagon white house secretary baker mayfield oklahoma amazon assault
"sarah what" Discussed on I Do Podcast

I Do Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on I Do Podcast

"Citing life like right now we're in costa rica we've traveled but that's just kind of almost like what we're used to and then so we don't get out of our comfort zone we're kind of homebodies we're fine with staying home watching netflix we have a two year old too so it makes it harder but but i think that's something sarah what do you think twenty eighteen we make an effort yeah the first thing we knew said skydiving i was like okay i don't wanna do that but i want to do cage swimming with sharks oh yeah let's do it crazy so the planning those activities during those activities talking about it afterwards again you're gonna feel like you're madly newly in love with each other and what you said is what most couples do they stuck in a rut because they like habit and so couples go to the team restaurant order the same jenner they sit there and there's not a lot of novelty going on so it's really important to do those novel exciting activities that again you haven't done before all right well that's news to me cage diving sarah wants to do it so i'm already excited or feeling you know that the juices gone yeah like exciting so you're exactly what successful couples do they manage to keep doing that now are there any couples that struggle with no in your article you wrote that there will be times where couples will struggle because they have different attachments styles and that can affect their intimacy in the relationship so do you think you can maybe talk a little bit about that because i think that can maybe help couples who have an issue with intimacy just because they are different when it comes to how they see intimacy in the relationship.

costa rica netflix jenner sarah two year
"sarah what" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"That it was fusion gps being paid by the clinton campaign they didn't want to tell us that for a long time and that it was bought and paid for by hillary and the money's used from her campaign and the money she was controlling it the dnc and we discovered oh by the way it became according to the grassley grand memo became the bulk of information in the application for the first fis a warrant on carter page trump associate an opposition campaign in the lead up to a presidential election and then it was renewed four times based on unverified salacious information that was put out there i mean it's unbelievable to me and we learned from the pfizer court decision itself that was unsealed that there was definitely abuse of the fis the process including by the fbi who gave private contractors act unlimited access to raw fights impel down i mean in that same data sarah what you're gonna what are you gonna say he's absolutely right on that i mean look they're gonna be looking at the extent of abuse by the fbi by the bureau in the fifth court not just carter page but how far did this go and the those were revealed in documents by the fisk fisk court went after the obama administration and and reprimanded them for their behavior and and what they did with the fisk by and including the fbi and how they were sharing information with contractors that weren't even cleared to have this information and how they expanded under obama these rules for sharing information and the.

dnc trump fbi fisk fisk court obama administration fisk obama clinton hillary grassley carter pfizer court
"sarah what" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Yeah finally after a year we found out that it was fusion gps being paid by the clinton campaign they didn't want to tell us that for a long time and that it was bought and paid for by hillary and the money she used from her campaign and the money she was controlling it the dnc and we discovered oh by the way it became according to the grassley grand memo became the bulk of information in the application for the first pfizer warrant on carter page at trump associate an opposition campaign in the lead up to a presidential election and then it was renewed four times based on unverified salacious information that was put out there i mean it's unbelievable to me and we learned from the pfizer court decision itself that was unsealed that there was definitely abuse of the fire the process including by the fbi who gave private contractors act on women's had access to raw by entail yeah i mean sarah what are you gonna what are you gonna say he's absolutely right on that i mean look they're gonna be looking at the extent of abuse by the fbi by the bureau in the fifth court not just carter page but how far did this go and those were revealed in documents by the fisk i mean the fifth court went after the obama administration and and reprimanded them for their behavior and and what they did with the fist by and including the fbi and how they were sharing information with contractors that weren't even cleared to have this information and how they expanded under obama these rules for sharing information and the unmasking of americans i think we forget that is where this all started i mean and this is where it might end we have to find out why people like samantha power we're at masking three hundred over three hundred people in the last year determined it was a three hundred and fifty percent increase in just one year wasn't it that's absolutely true with three hundred three hundred and fifty percent increase from when they first from two thousand thirteen on when the laws were changed in the last year it increased exponentially which is when we saw samantha powers' when that was revealed that there were over three hundred unmasking done by her alone one every day until she left office which was.

dnc fbi obama administration obama samantha power clinton hillary grassley carter trump pfizer court sarah fifty percent one year
"sarah what" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Smartphone for work in the mid2000s chances are you had one of these a crack berry at the time it was the king of mobile messaging devices the blackberry aka crack perry was ubiquitous but then came to the wave of iphone samsung galaxy and messaging platforms like what's up and facebook messenger and with their arrival blackberry sales plummeted and now in an effort to stop the bleeding blackberry suing facebook saying that it will well basically invented modern messaging claiming that facebook is ripping off its inventions like notification icons and more heater delve deeper into the suit bloomberg intelligence has met larson who covers tech litigation and also with a sarah frier of course who covers facebook so sarah what led up to this so blackberry as the company has been focusing a little bit more and try to get revenue from he is opposed to its business would you knew what has declined to tan said business which as you know it has declined revenue is on the up it up and maybe they have a chance here with facebook which certainly has money so case the theory has over forty thousand patents third of a very broad patent portfolio they been active in the space for a long time one of the patents at issue here was filed in 2003 so we're looking at pre smartphone era i pee this is foundational the questions just what's the incremental value of that you know fifteen years later it's they're likely seeking pretty high royalties and so you know the question is how much is this actually worth to to a company like facebook that continues to innovative put out new products with with direct messaging services i mean this isn't going on for years as i mentioned to their blackberries business model his change they've gotten out of hand sets and they're looking more at brand licensing software licensing and it licensing so.

perry facebook larson sarah frier bloomberg tan fifteen years
"sarah what" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on KOIL

"It now i as they sarah what else could you tell us that's it yeah and i think the important thing too is to remember that it's not just peter struck and lisa page this keeps coming back i mean this is what we have as far as the bulk of evidence that we're seeing from these text messages that were released uh by the inspector general in the doj but there were other people involved and just chairman good luck brought this up you know former fbi director colmey there should be a request tioning of combing because colmey testified that he didn't make a decision until after he interviewed hillary clinton but it appears that he was not being forthright in maybe even apparently lying i mean they would have to question him again because he made that decision wavy four if we look at the documents they were making changes we before the even interviewed hillary clinton so it appeared his decision was already made i would like to see him requests and i also think and i know andrew mccabe it's been interviewed a boot behind closed doors and end in front of congress but i would like to know what you andrew behaves a deputy director andrew mccabe israel role was in this because i mean the buck stops there the buck stops at colmey and andrew mccabe office so what we're seeing involved in what did they know i'm hearing all kinds of rumblings that they know a lot more than what's been out there in public so we need to have these answers because this is about an election this is about the american people this is about our our our scales of justice and this is about the fbi whose main role is to be objective and seek the facts and what we're seeing here appears to be a concerted effort by members within the fbi to two basic we change the results of a of of an election on is also i possibly even uh release you know of criminality and behaviour within the clinton's server investigation i mean there is a wide here and i think the american people really sean deserves some answers the biggest fear i have chairman good luck my last question to you is that yeah i think that this was all designed and and a phone the dossier bought and paid for by one candidate was designed to influence at election and that same dossier was.

text messages doj colmey hillary clinton congress deputy director fbi sarah peter lisa chairman director andrew mccabe andrew andrew mccabe israel sean
"sarah what" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sarah what" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Sara murray is out front sarah what is going on here well erno certainly at the white house for more details but it looks a little bit like a game of semantics here i mean maybe he saying that they didn't speak directly to see bannon and said there were conversations with steve bannon lawyer or maybe you're saying that the white house hasn't officially asserted executive privilege but here's what we do know that steve bannon was behind closed doors he was testifying for nearly six hours and throughout their testimony he took breaks and while they were taking breaks his lawyer would confer via telephone with the white house counsel's office about what steve bannon was allowed or not allowed to say and we come back with the guidance that bannon could not talk about anything that had to do with the transition or anything that had to do with his tenure in the white house and in fact when sarah sanders the press secretary was answering questions about bannon's appearance today she didn't dispute the notion that these phone calls we're going back and forth instead she said it was totally normal for that to be happening take a listen this process that is typically followed sometimes they actually have a white house attorney present in the room this time it was something that was relayed via phone and again was following standard procedure for instance like this so what we know is that the white house has been working behind the scenes to limit what some of these witnesses we'll talk about when they go behind closed doors but you know a kind of remains unclear what happens next in all of this we did see corey lou endow cki he was on the hill today when he was asked again behind closed doors about anything that had to do with his time since leaving the presidential campaign he punted but he said that he was unprepared to answer the committee's questions the white house in view of this is there doing nothing wrong that there simply simply maintaining precedent democrat see it as an effort to muzzle important witnesses one thing about steve bannon is appearance he certainly left that room infuriating lawmakers on both sides of the aisle right some for her.

Sara murray white house steve bannon press secretary presidential campaign executive sarah sanders attorney corey lou six hours