17 Burst results for "Sarah Varney"

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:30 min | Last month

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Peter O Dowd. And I'm Tanya. Mostly this is here and now and we want to follow up on a story that made national headlines nearly six years ago, a police shooting in a Houston hospital that nearly killed a 26 year old patient. In developing news. A man from mission is recovering tonight after being shot by an off duty police officer in Houston. The family of 26 year old Alan Peon says he is now conscious and breathing action force. Nestor Ma. Today journalist Sarah Varney revisits the story to examine how a family is forever changed by a case like this. Sarah is a health policy correspondent for Kaiser Health News, and she joins us now welcome. Oh, thanks for having me. Let's first talk about the PM family. There's Harold P. And he's a Haitian immigrant, an internal medicine physician in Texas. His wife, Paloma is an immigrant from Mexico and their three sons are Christian Allen and Dominic. What did you learn about the parents? Initial ideas when they immigrated here about American life? So Harold Pan. He was born in Haiti to a quite wealthy family. You know, his father went from being a judge in Haiti to getting a job working the elevator up Rockefeller Center in New York City. His wife joined him a few years later. And then eventually, Harold and all of his brothers and sisters moved to New York. In heralds view, racism did not exist. It wasn't a part of his childhood. After Paloma. She had grown up in Mexico near Vera Cruz and did not experience racism per se, she says. But both of them had this earnest belief in the American ideals of meritocracy that if you come to the United States, and you work hard that there will be nothing in your way to succeed. European centers on the couple's son, Allen, and what happened to him five years ago. He's bipolar and would sometimes have delusions. During one hospital stay in Houston, His delusions escalated. Take us from there. Yeah, So Alan had just transferred to a school in Houston, and he was starting to feel agitated. He had been hospitalized a number of years before for what they believed was a bipolar disorder. But he had never had an official diagnosis. So he started feeling agitated. He started having these delusions, and he knew enough to drive himself to the hospital in Houston. He was driving kind of Out of control. He crashed his car when he got the hospital parking lot. They did admit him. They never actually gave him a psychological evaluation. They never prescribed him any kind of anti psychotic medication. The next morning, When Harold and Paloma arrived at the hospital, they wanted to get him some treatment. So they were. They left the hospital for about a half an hour to go back to the hotel room and regroup. And during that time, Alan Became delusional again and he wandered into the hallway and the nurses called Crisis Code and these two off duty police officers from the Houston police Department responded. They went into the room closed the door behind them. There were no doctors, no nurses, no hospital staff with them except for these police officers and the police officer said in their statements that Allen became hostile that he was acting like a Tasmanian devil. They tased him. And when they say that when they're tasing didn't work. One of the police officers took out his gun and shot Alan through the chest, narrowly missing his heart. Um, this nearly killed him. His parents returned back to the hospital to find that Allen was in IC ICU and that he had been shot and they had a very difficult time over the next couple days. Getting an answer as to what had happened. This was huge news. When it happened. It made national headlines. Alan faced charges after the shooting. How and why did this happen? He did face charges. I mean, they charged him everything from reckless driving, coming into the parking lot to assaulting a police officer. Here we are. Six years later, he's still involved in a lawsuit against the hospital and the hospitals. Continues to maintain that if an episode like this happen again, they would do the exact same thing. So this is, of course, Allen's and the whole family's great frustration is that it just stunned them and force them to confront what they believed was the racist motivation behind the shooting itself. And just the treatment of the family. You know, as you mentioned Harold himself as a physician. Two of the three brothers, Dominic and Christian are either in medical school or have just graduated from medical school. They have an uncle who is a prominent pulmonologist, also in the McAllen area. So these are people who are used to being respected in hospitals, and they found themselves just thrown into this alternate reality in which nobody could give them a straight answer, and nobody could help them understand what had happened in that room. This is where you pick up the story because you write that the shot fired into Allen's chest would extinguish the pans family's belief that diligent high achievers could outwit the racism that shadows the American promise. Equality would not be a choice left up to the trio of ambitious boys. They've gone on from this point to Somewhat reluctant activists. Can you tell us more about that? Yeah, Obviously, Paloma and Harold individually have their own notions of what it meant to be here in the United States and to be putting their roots down here and each of the boys So each of the men the young men had their own reactions to this for Christian who is the oldest pay on and son? His reaction was immediate that we should not be quiet about this that we should use what happened to Alan to advocate for change in the health care system. Allen was much more reluctant about this. He struggles with mental illness, but he was showing up going on Dr Oz or having to go do another speech at another medical school. And while he wants to do those things he also wants to and sometimes just retreat inside himself. You live his life away from The responsibility that he survived. So Alan feels that he has this burden because he survived. And so many other black men have not survived their encounters with police that he has to, in a sense, kind of make good on this survival and Christian talks about how he doesn't want Alan to feel like a prop. He doesn't want other people to think he's using Allen as a prop. You know, there's no doubt that he is earnest and wants to make these changes in the health care system and more broadly in our society, But he's conflicted about what he should do with Allen's. Story since it didn't actually happened to him per se. And he's still battling that still to this day, you know, One of the things I write about in the piece is a few months after the shooting. Allen was back in McAllen, Texas, and Christian called the whole family up to New York City for this rise up October march against police brutality, really the first time that the family had come together and very publicly joined in with all these other families that have been touched by police brutality. Each of them really had their own experience with it. You know for Christian. He was really clear that he wanted to be there. But then, when he heard some of the described this in the piece that there's a chant breaks out of F the police and Christian feels that this isn't the tone. We should be setting. So he wades into the crowd and he gets into this argument with a white family. That's their whose child had actually been shot in the head by the police. And he's begging them to please let's change the chant and Christian in his own mind is thinking at the time as his 2015..

Peter O Dowd New York Sarah Varney United States Alan Peon Sarah Harold Mexico Harold Pan Tanya Haiti Harold P. Texas Dominic Alan Christian Allen Vera Cruz Paloma Allen 2015
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Same thing, so none of them wanted to work with me or anything. So I just had to give the first payment on each bill so that they wouldn't send me to collection because they kept sending me sending me bills. She never did get the Corona virus test since it seemed useless after she recuperated, and she didn't trust that her insurance company would pay the bill. Kaiser Health News. I'm Sarah Varney. If you have a shocking medical bill that you want us to look into Goto, NPR's shots blogged and tell us all about it. Bob Dylan was known as the voice of his generation. But at this point he's speaking to several generations. With his latest album, Dylan has become the first artist to have a top 40 new album in every decade since the sixties. The album Rough and rowdy Ways came out earlier this month. November Suits 23 Let's revisit a few highlights. In the sixties, Dylan captured eight top 40 albums from a friend. Is blowing in the wind and cirie is blown. He had 14 in the 19 seventies. Seven in the eighties. Four in the nineties, and we start to hear the Bard's voice get older and a little grab lier. Going into the 21st century. Dylan had seven top 40 albums in the odds. And nine in the 2010 minutes, West town told Shit. Now this latest album is his first forthis decade. But don't forget we've just begun the decades because This is NPR news, commuting with some Bob Dylan right there. It's 7 19 on sweetie. Here's Joe with a look at the Oakland commuted to 5 89 80 split, but you break down 5 80 westbound at 9 80 just coming off a 24 to 9 80 just reported there a couple of minutes ago. In San Jose, a crash blocking Elena, 80 south founded Coleman. The right lane is blocked over.

Bob Dylan NPR Kaiser Health News Sarah Varney San Jose Joe Elena Oakland Coleman
"sarah varney" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KCRW

"Angeles, 53 right now in Santa Barbara and in San Bernardino, so it is 64. Time is 507 case here. W It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, China did not even have to begin enforcing a new law to make changes. In Hong Kong. The central government just passed the national security law in Beijing and in Hong Kong. Pro democracy leaders are already stepping away from politics. This new law criminalizes a lot of dissent and changes the way that the centers would be put on trial. All of this affects a coastal territory that is supposed to have some autonomy. Dating back to its time as a British possession. NPR's Emily Fang is following this from Beijing. Hi there, Emily. Hey, Steve, is it understood exactly what's in the law. Yeah, That's the thing. Beijing passed this law about nine hours ago, but they still have not provided us a public draft of the law, meaning Hong Kong people are supposed to follow a lot that they haven't read yet. But broadly, we know that this law would allow Beijing not Hong Kong to Judge case's deems relevant to national security and that Beijing will set up its own security body on Hong Kong soil to collect intelligence and investigate such cases. This was a high B, secretive and accelerated process for passing what is a very significant piece of legislation. I talked to Wilson Lung earlier today He's a council member of Hong Kong's Bar Association. And that's you know, just completely contrary to the notions of law that we had in Hong Kong, which is the law as a accessible, transparent process. Where before you in AC alof, you discuss it. You get the draft only bait. It. Instead. What Beijing did was they bypassed Hong Kong's legislative legislature? Completely it hen picked which representatives to consult and simply imposed the law. Hong Kong is too badly supposed to follow. You mentioned that that Beijing will have its own course courts for cases that are of interest to Beijing so people will not be getting into the independent courts they've had since British times. And that they thought they were promised. Until I believe 2040 2047 does this break the promise of some autonomy for Hong Kong? Of course, Beijing says that this upholds that principle of semi autonomy but in practice yes, it breaks that promise. This law shows that Beijing's legal dictates now supersede Hong Kong's own rule of law whenever Beijing decides that issue falls under the umbrella of national security. I also talked to Alan Long. He's former chair of Hong Kong Legal Bar Association. He's now a pan democratic politician. He says that this national security law creates a parallel legal procedure in Hong Kong that's run by Beijing and Beijing. Only Once you are a national security suspect. Then you will be put into that system, which would be mend by special branch within the Hongkong Police. Your case will be prosecuted by a special department within the Department of Justice. And you will be tied by some handpicked judges. The law is expected to be effective as of tomorrow July 1st, which not coincidentally, is the anniversary of Hongkong's handover as a British possession to a Chinese territory. So we shall see if there are protests tomorrow have officials said how strictly they're going to enforce this new law. No, it is unlikely that Beijing would sweep up everyone it deemed subversive and one go, but we have seen a massive chilling effect in Hong Kong civil society already Within hours of the law being passed to opposition political parties said they were going to voluntarily disband because they thought operating under such conditions was too dangerous. You've seen people deactivate many of their online social media accounts because they fear their political post may be used against them. And sales of anti surveillance software to jump over Chinese Internet censors have gone way up. And I guess if people did protest tomorrow, they would risk being arrested under this new system. Right. They face much higher legal penalties. Now Hong Kong police have always been much more strict and enforcing anti protests techniques. The U. S. Britain, other Western countries have spoken up in criticism of this national security law. The U. S. Has actually put sanctions visa restrictions on Chinese officials who curtail Hong Kong's freedoms. Beijing has hit right back and said it'll curtail visas for Americans who behave egregiously towards Hong Kong. NPR's Emily Fang in Beijing. Thanks. Thanks, Steve. When the White House in Congress passed Corona virus aid packages. They promise that sick people would not get stuck with the bills from Cove in 19 tests that has not turned out to be entirely true. Every month. We take a look at medical bills for our bill of the month. Siri's today a woman from Southern California who did everything she was supposed to do. Sarah Varney, a senior correspondent with Our partner, Kaiser Health News brought us this story. Follow your doctor's orders. That's exactly what Carmen Quintero did when she developed a racking cough on March 23rd and was sent home from work. I went to work and I was sick, so they sent me home. They told me. I couldn't come back until I was tested until something said that I didn't have the virus. Montero is 35 she and her girlfriend live in Corona, California, east of Los Angeles. In a house packed full of four generations. She's a supervisor at a warehouse that distributes and 95 masks and essential business during the pandemic. They call my primary doctor. She's even told me it seems like you have the covert 19 symptoms, so I need you to go to the nearest hospital..

Hong Kong Beijing Hong Kong Legal Bar Associatio Steve Inskeep Emily Fang NPR News NPR California Angeles China Santa Barbara Noelle King Department of Justice San Bernardino Hongkong Police Bar Association
"sarah varney" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KCRW

"Their very own main thing at visit main dot com. Christine commandos here once again in for Holly Adams who has a look at traffic right now. What's happening Christine? Hey there, Steve if you're around commerce on the five southbound at slauson, there's a brushfire on the right shoulder at stop and go from the one oh one. They're also in Glendora. We have a Sigler that's at the to ten westbound after grand avenue KCRW traffic is brought to you by brilliant earth. All right Christine. Thank you. And do we still have that? I hate to put you on the spot. But the verragio I'm close still seeing that closure at Alva Arado between third and Beverly. Yes, Beverly so that's the West Lake in Angelino heights echo park area. Just west of downtown LA. We'll keep you updated and that's of concern because we have a dodgers game too. So a lot of traffic through that area. Five twenty KCRW. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang. Shapiro today. President Trump put forth a new idea for how to deal with. Overflowing. Immigrant detention centers, send detainees to so-called sanctuary cities. Let's take a moment to look at the conditions for detainees in one of those facilities. The auto Llanto ice processing center, it's a prison like facility, north of San Bernardino, California. Disability rights group says it's failing to provide adequate mental health care to detainees reporter, Sarah Varney tells us more and just a warning. This story contains mention of suicide it's Saturday morning. The women that contrast family are in a rush making tamales tacos to replace the income of Jose, contrary us who has been held at 'Adelante since last June. Jose's daughter Giselle drives around in an aging minivan collecting food orders I hospital than a car wash. A local Bank. What solo boy, oh, Jesus father cross illegally from Guatemala twenty five years ago? He worked.

Christine Jose Glendora Holly Adams Alva Arado Elsa Chang dodgers Angelino heights Sigler President Trump Beverly NPR San Bernardino LA Guatemala Steve Sarah Varney Shapiro
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the island's department of family to care for their relatives in the days after hurricane maria emergency calls from these homes ford in but no one in the government had a complete list of the homes or knew where they were some operators of the homes failed so badly to care for their patients they're being prosecuted by the us department of justice glory mar and do heart is secretary of the department of family in puerto rico she says the island's government and its elderly population have been starved of resources one of the main things that developed from the hero kane is that everyone confronted reality are elderly population that is something that we always deal with but it was evidence to everyone size is so this is a call for help funds we need more ways to help them with hurricane season underway here many puerto ricans are anxious and afraid they are still repairing power lines and roofs and still trying to recover from the wreckage of hurricane maria affected back in air mariela miranda called us after we finished reporting the story she was shaken up maria solaar the stroke victim who lived quietly by the river with her husband had died i'm not sure how much longer i can do this she said for the pbs newshour in kaiser health news i'm sarah varney in cast any air puerto rico thank you for that terrific reporting and speaking of puerto rico we want to update a story that has gone viral online and in social media about a woman who was harassed for what she wore the video shot by a twenty four year old latina woman wearing a shirt with the words puerto rico and an image of its flag was made as she was setting up a picnic in forest preserve in cook county illinois last month she was repeatedly berated by a man and asked a nearby police officer for help the officer was accused of standing by let's show some of that video but i it's worth noting puerto rico is a us territory in puerto ricans are us citizens you should not be in the united states yes i am phil can you please get away from me get away from me wearing officer officer i feel highly uncomfortable can you are you listening officer as you can see the police are not even he's not even grabbing him like he's this guy is just walking up to me he basically got in my face damn near almost touched me this is what i'm wearing guys cook county officials say they are now investigating the officers conduct it turned out the man who yelled at the woman was intoxicated he was arrested and charged with assault and disorderly conduct.

officer illinois maria solaar secretary assault phil united states puerto rico ford cook county sarah varney hurricane maria puerto ricans kane twenty four year
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i'm noel king hurricane maria hit puerto rico more than six months ago and for people living on tight budgets the storms economic aftermath has been an enormous challenge reporter sarah varney went to a suburb of san juan and met a retired man who is living day to day straddled across a spiritual maldonado's backyard in bayamon puerto rico is a nagging reminder of hurricane maria is destructive power broke off from branch branches has thickest to tree and i got the two in miami rats scurry from under the down tree preventing maldonado from hanging his laundry to get the tree removed he has to show up in person at a local government office but the diabetic ulcers on his feet make it painful to walk that's why i have to walk thinking step six months after the storm the daily indignities are piling up after a lifetime of work in the states picking corn and asparagus and processing chickens in poultry plants maldonado receives two hundred and eighty dollars a month in social security he gets eighty nine dollars a month in food stamps or about three dollars a day some corn beef can spaghetti's maldonado opens the cupboards in his tidy kitchen when i asked him what he usually nixed for himself he looks wistful when i have enough food when i do my groceries eggs and bread and coffee and juice for breakfast would make spaghetti sauce or some sort of salad maybe a little dessert but in truth the oven is unplugged there is no juice or eggs or lettuce it's been months since he's had fresh vegetables in the house there's very little then i kinda go on a diet my own may died it was hard enough for the sixty five year old retiree to fill his cupboards before the storm but now eight groups are winding down there donations and he has to find money for bottled water into replaces refrigerator that was ruined during the hurricane he'll.

sarah varney maldonado bayamon puerto rico hurricane maria puerto rico reporter san juan miami six months eighty nine dollars sixty five year eighty dollars three dollars
"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For people living on tight budgets the storms economic aftermath has been an enormous challenge reporter sarah varney went to a suburb of san juan and met a retired man who is living day to day straddled across berto maldonado's backyard in bayamon puerto rico is a nagging reminder of hurricane maria is destructive power broke off from branch but the franchise has thickest to treat rats scurry from under the down tree preventing maldonado from hanging his laundry to get the tree removed he has to show up in person at a local government office but the diabetic ulcers on his feet make it painful to walk that's why i have to walk thank you step six months after the storm the daily indignities are piling up after a lifetime of work in the states picking corn and asparagus and processing chickens in poultry plants maldonado receives two hundred and eighty dollars a month in social security he gets eighty nine dollars a month in food stamps or about three dollars a day some corn beef spaghetti's maldonado opens the cupboards in his tidy kitchen when i asked him what he usually makes for himself he looks wistful when i have enough food when i do my groceries i have eggs and bread and coffee and use for breakfast i would make spaghetti or some sort of salad maybe a little dessert but in truth the oven is unplugged there is no juice or eggs or let us it's been months since he's had fresh vegetables in the house there's very little then i kinda go on a diet my own may day it was hard enough for the sixty five year old retiree to fill his cupboards before the storm but now eight groups are winding down there donations and he has to find money for bottled water into replaces refrigerator that was ruined during the hurricane he'll wait for his next social security check to buy groceries and i'm waiting till the temps so i could go do my grocery shopping again i find a way to get there i would have food again enough to make a three meals lunch breakfast and dinner keeping up his diet isn't simply about staving off hunger diabetes is consuming his foot and unless he eats healthy and takes his insulin he'll have to get his foot amputated he stores his.

sarah varney bayamon puerto rico hurricane maria reporter san juan berto maldonado eighty nine dollars sixty five year eighty dollars three dollars six months
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i'm no l king hurricane maria hit puerto rico more than six months ago and for people living on tight budgets the storms economic aftermath has been an enormous challenge reporter sarah varney went to a suburb of san juan and met a retired man who is living day today straddled across a spiritual maldonado's backyard in bayamon puerto rico is a nagging reminder of hurricane maria is destructive power pre broke off from ranch but the franchise has thickest to treat i got the two rats scurry from under the down tree preventing maldonado from hanging his laundry to get the tree removed he has to show up in person at a local government office but the diabetic ulcers on his feet make it painful to walk that's why i have to warn thinking step six months after the storm the daily indignities are piling up after a lifetime of work in the states picking corn and asparagus and processing chickens in poultry plants maldonado receives two hundred and eighty dollars a month in social security he gets eighty nine dollars a month in food stamps or about three dollars a day some corned beef can spaghetti's maldonado opens the cupboards in his tidy kitchen when i asked him what he usually nixed for himself he looks wistful when i have enough food when i do my groceries i have eggs and bread and coffee and juice for breakfast would make spaghetti or some sort of salad maybe a little dessert but in truth the oven is unplugged there is no juice or eggs or let us it's been months since he's had fresh vegetables in the house there's very little then i kinda go on a diet my own may die it was hard enough for the sixty five year old retiree to fill his cupboards before the storm but now eight groups are winding down their donations and he has to find money for bottled water into replaces refrigerator that was ruined during the hurricane he'll wait for his next social security check to buy groceries and i'm waiting killed attempts to go do my grocery shopping again say if i find a way to get there and also would have food again enough to make a three meals lunch breakfast and dinner keeping up his diet isn't simply about staving off hunger diabetes is consuming his foot and unless he eats healthy and takes his insulin he'll have to get his foot amputated he stores his.

sarah varney maldonado bayamon puerto rico hurricane maria puerto rico reporter san juan six months eighty nine dollars sixty five year eighty dollars three dollars
"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Confidence this is morning edition from npr news i'm david green noel king hurricane maria hit puerto rico more than six months ago and for people living on tight budgets the storms economic aftermath has been an enormous challenge reporter sarah varney went to the suburb of san juan and she met a retired man who's living day to day straddled across a spiritual maldonado's backyard in bayamon puerto rico is a nagging reminder of hurricane maria is destructive power see that broke off from ranch ranchers has thickest to treat and i got the two rats scurry from under the down tree preventing maldonado from hanging his laundry to get the tree removed he has to show up in person at a local government office but the diabetic ulcers on his feet make it painful to walk that's why i have to walk thank you six months after the storm daily indignities are piling up after a lifetime of work in the state speaking corn and asparagus and processing chickens and poultry plants maldonado receives two hundred eighty dollars a month in social security he gets eighty nine dollars a month in food stamps or about three dollars a day some corn beef spaghetti's maldonado opens the cupboards in his tidy kitchen when i asked him what he usually knicks for himself he looks wistful when i have enough food when i do my groceries eggs and bread and coffee and juice for breakfast would make spaghetti or some sort of salad maybe a little dessert but in truth the oven is unplugged there is no juice or eggs or let us it's been months since he's had fresh vegetables in the house very little then i kinda go on a diet my own may die it was hard enough for the sixty five year old retiree to fill his cupboards before the storm but now eight groups are winding down their donations and he has to find money for bottled water into replaces refrigerator that was ruined during the hurricane he'll wait for his next social security check to buy groceries and i'm waiting till the temps so i could go do my grocery shopping again say if i find a way to get there and that's when i would have food again enough to make a three meals lunch breakfast and dinner keeping up his diet isn't simply about staving off hunger diabetes is consuming his foot and unless he eats healthy and takes his.

sarah varney san juan maldonado bayamon puerto rico hurricane maria npr david green puerto rico reporter knicks six months two hundred eighty dollars eighty nine dollars sixty five year three dollars
"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Insulin he'll have to get his foot amputated he stores his insulin in the broken fridge pharmacist said that it could be started dark place for a couple of weeks ideally insulin should be kept cool but brooklyn refrigerators and lack of power in many homes in puerto rico post grim hazards for the island's soaring population of diabetics visiting nurse leslie robust shows up for her monthly visit to maldonado's home she examines the three inch long gaping wound on his foot they sit at the kitchen table under a painting of the last supper and sift through piles of paperwork for an upcoming cataract surgery unsee the facts as will medical robots tells him that the free medical transportation service at the government made available to large numbers of people after the storm is expiring soon and he'll no longer qualify for free rides what robots doesn't say is that the visiting nurse program that was paid for by the government is shutting down to and it's unclear how much longer she can help him i'm sarah varney in bayamon puerto rico sarah varney reports for our partner kaiser health news all right it's time for story core on this friday and today a story about a little girl who went by the name of tubby in the spring of nineteen fifty kate johnston was thirteen living in upstate new york she wanted nothing more than to play little league baseball but in those days that was absolutely out of the question k recently sat down with her husband cy at story core one day my mother was brady my hair we're sitting at the kitchen table and my brother walked out the door with his baseball bat he was going to practice i started crying and i said to my mother i'm just as good as him i wish i could play so she said why don't you just go and try out and i said okay well cut off my brains and she did so i ran into my brother's room got up his slacks put on a baseball cap and signed up as tubby johnston no i wasn't surprised i knew i was good and i had gone so far but i was scared of course that might find out and tell me i couldn't play so after several practices i talked to the coach his reaction.

leslie maldonado sarah varney kate johnston new york baseball brooklyn puerto rico bayamon puerto rico partner kaiser health brady tubby johnston three inch one day
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News i'm david green and i'm noel king hurricane maria hit puerto rico more than six months ago and for people living on tight budgets the storms economic aftermath has been an enormous challenge reporter sarah varney went to the suburb of san juan and she met a retired man who's living day to day straddled across a spiritual maldonado's backyard in bayamon puerto rico is a nagging reminder of hurricane maria is destructive power pre broke off from ranch franchise has thickest to treat i got the two rats scurry from under the down tree preventing maldonado from hanging his laundry to get the tree removed he has to show up in person at a local government office but the diabetic ulcers on his feet make it painful to walk that's why i have to walk thinking six months after the storm the daily indignities are piling up after a lifetime of work in the states picking corn and asparagus and processing chickens in poultry plants maldonado receives two hundred eighty dollars a month in social security he gets eighty nine dollars a month in food stamps or about three dollars a day some corn beef can spaghetti's maldonado opens the cupboards in his tidy kitchen when i asked him what he usually makes for himself he looks wistful when i have enough food when i do my groceries eggs and bread and coffee and juice for breakfast i would make spaghetti or some sort of salad maybe other little dessert but in truth the oven is unplugged there is no juice or eggs or let us it's been months since he's had fresh vegetables in the house there's very little then i kinda go on a diet my own may die it was hard enough for the sixty five year old retiree to fill his cupboards before the storm but now eight groups are winding down their donations and he has to find money for bottled water into replaces refrigerator that was ruined during the hurricane he'll wait for his next social security check to buy groceries and i'm waiting till the temps go do my grocery shopping again if i find a way to get there and and i would have food again enough to make a three meals lunch breakfast and dinner keeping up his diet isn't simply about staving off hunger diabetes is consuming his foot and unless he eats healthy and takes his.

sarah varney san juan maldonado bayamon puerto rico hurricane maria david green puerto rico reporter six months two hundred eighty dollars eighty nine dollars sixty five year three dollars
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The vital connection between brain and body without a confirmed diagnosis he can't get certain benefits and he's in taking medication for his condition or his pain little the outward perseverance of both men belies the truth terror of their confinement as martinez senior describes his sons decline he tears up his son who can understand everything rolls on his side we're i have to do all that needs to be done for him he says martinez senior is sixty seven and not in good health himself he has severe arthritis and a painful bulge in his abdomen during the months they went without power he says the hospital bed didn't go up and down he shows me a photo of his arm black and blue and swollen from pressing against the metal bars of the bed to tend to his son but it's his sons withering away the tears at him most we are going if something would happen to me he says clasping his hands together in prayer i don't know in puerto rico i'm sarah varney sarah varney is with our partner kaiser health news now to mexico candidates in that country's upcoming presidential race have voiced concerns about the activities of the data mining firm cambridge analytica politicians there are vehemently denying any contact with disgraced company as npr's carrie kahn reports from mexico city that is despite evidence cambridge analytic has set up shop in the country and partnered with a local data mining app it didn't take long after secret tape emerged of cambridge analytica executives bragging about influencing elections in mexico for all the major presidential candidates to declare their camps hadn't hired or received data from the company gondolo the presidential candidate and current front runner and the rest manuel lopez opened at told reporters yesterday that he had worn mexicans about cambridge analytica working here months ago now that it's a worldwide scandal he says people are finally paying attention last october an executive with cambridge analytica placed an ad on facebook recruiting workers to head up political campaigns around the country according to buzzfeed that same executive was also pictured at a cultural events sponsored by top senator of the opposition party almost the pants candidate ricardo anniah told reporters that his party or campaign has had no contracts with the big data firm knocked was union it he loses tinto's gobierno and i believe there needs to be an energetic action taken on.

buzzfeed tinto ricardo anniah carrie kahn cambridge kaiser health partner senator martinez cambridge analytica executive manuel lopez mexico mexico city npr sarah varney puerto rico
"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"System disrupting the vital connection between brain and body without a confirmed diagnosis he can't get certain benefits and easing taking medication for his condition or his pain little the outward perseverance of both men bligh's the truth terror of their confinement martinez senior describes his sons decline he tears up his son who can understand everything rolls on his side we're island i have to do all that needs to be done for him he says but martinez senior is sixty seven and not in good health himself he has severe arthritis and a painful bulge in his abdomen during the months they went without power he says the hospital bed didn't go up and down he shows me a photo of his arm black and blue and swollen from pressing against the metal bars of the bed to tend to his son but it's his sons withering away the tears at him most doc thank you officer if something would happen to me he says clasping his hands together in prayer i don't know entire puerto rico i'm sarah varney sarah varney is with our partner kaiser health news campaign targeting the unions that maintain and build the city subways has hit new york but wnyc's stephen nessin reports the man behind the ads has a history of unsavory lobbying tactics to new billboards in midtown manhattan denounced.

martinez officer puerto rico sarah varney new york wnyc stephen nessin manhattan bligh partner kaiser health
"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The vital connection between brain and body without a confirmed diagnosis he can't get certain benefits and isn't taking medication for his condition or his pain little the outward perseverance of both men bligh's the truth terror of their confinement as martinez senior describes his sons decline he tears up his son who can understand everything rolls on his side we're looking at i have to do all that needs to be done for him he says bummer tina's senior is sixty seven and not in good health himself he has severe arthritis and the painful bolger in his abdomen during the months they went without power he says the hospital bed didn't go up and down he shows me a photo of his arm black and blue and swollen from pressing against the metal bars of the bed to tend to his son but it's his sons withering away the tears at him most we are going if something would happen to me he says clasping his hands together in prayer i don't know entire puerto rico i'm sarah varney sarah varney is with our partner kaiser health news now to mexico candidates in that country's upcoming presidential race have voiced concerns about the activities of the data mining firm cambridge analytica politicians there are vehemently denying any contact with the disgraced company as npr's carrie kahn reports from mexico city that is despite evidence cambridge analytic set up shop in the country and partnered with a local data mining app it didn't take long after secret tape emerged of cambridge analytic executives bragging about influencing elections in mexico for all the major presidential candidates to declare their camps hadn't hired or received data from the company gundel the presidential candidate and current front runner and the rest men will open a door told reporters yesterday that he had worn mexicans about cambridge analytica working here months ago now that it's a worldwide scandal he says people are finally paying attention last october an executive with cambridge analytica placed in on facebook recruiting workers to head up political campaigns around the country according to buzzfeed that same executive was also pictured at a cultural events sponsored by top senator of the opposition party we're not going to assume gunnison the pan's candidate ricardo anniah told reporters that his party or campaign has had no contracts with the big data firm umit knocked was union if he loses tinto's gobierno sandhill moondog and i believe there needs to be an energetic action taken on.

senator tinto carrie kahn cambridge kaiser health partner bligh umit ricardo anniah martinez buzzfeed executive mexico mexico city npr sarah varney puerto rico bolger
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Republicans in washington and around the nation are poised to achieve a longsought goal reshaping medicaid that's medical assistance mainly for those with low incomes the trump administration has given the goahead to indiana and other states to require many adult medicaid recipients to do work or community service in order to qualify the idea is popular in indiana with some exemptions will be granted for groups like caregivers students those in addiction recovery programmes still as special correspondent sarah varney report advocates for the poor say they are worried that the requirements will jeopardize medical care for more than thirty thousand people there the story was produced in collaborate racean with our partner kaiser health news cagigas way is a songwriter in the front women for the indianapolis banned gypsy moonshine over the past few years she's been covered by medicaid the public insurance program is largely free to patients in other states but in indiana just way pays about twenty five dollars a month if she misses too many payments the state will drop her insurance i think that it's fair to expect people to contribute based on third level of income and their ability to do so so i i think that's kind of what we do in a society right but joss wake who also works as a massage therapist who worries about changes coming to medicaid in indiana and even though she earns about sixteen thousand dollars a year near the federal poverty level she'll have to prove that she's working at least twenty hours a week.

washington indiana indianapolis sarah varney partner kaiser health joss sixteen thousand dollars twenty five dollars twenty hours
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is we believe a minimum there's still hundreds of people who are still believed to be buried under the rubble of the old city that endured some of the greatest destruction and the fight to retake the city is on the george v associated press thanks so much thank you stay with us coming up on the news our miles o'brien walks us through this year in science and a broadway musical there is already being considered an award contender but first the links between housing and health a recent study found that african americans who moved to less segregated neighborhoods see significant improvements in their blood pressure previous research has also shown that children who moved to more fluid neighborhoods are much healthier across the country local leaders of responding to these findings by giving poor families more choices and where they live sarah varney begins our report in st louis and the story was produced in collaboration with our partner kaiser health news ars this is no longer it's been three years since civil unrest erupted in ferguson missouri award chivalry is that all your song after white police officer fatally shot michael brown an unarmed black teenager learn but for one family those turbulent days have led to much quieter nights hi jennifer cummings moved in june into this government subsidize apartment in the upscale st louis suburb of chesterfield with her daughters simone in samara so amazing new when did you move in.

african americans sarah varney st louis officer jennifer cummings chesterfield samara george blood pressure partner kaiser health ferguson missouri michael brown three years
"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"sarah varney" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It no excess she doesn't push patients to violate their beliefs but she will advocate for their health she also finds many for patients have questions about sex some of the young iraqi women will come to me they're planning to get married in two months and they wanna be prepared so the asked me questions about it what is sex feel like and how does it work and then i'll dull even have them come to to me afterwards saying it was terrible nowak also says the clinic has hired more women health providers since so many of their female patients do not want to be examined by mail dr not far from the clinic i visit with two women refugees from somalia they sit in a spartan apartment weather children play the women are pregnant and avoid now doc shares one of the women croatian nor says only her husband is allowed to look at her in my culture law allow a man to look at and lowest on what would be your fear into your feeling if another man it's like like undoing some bad to my husband like fading his rights i asked what would they do in an emergency if only a male doctor is available nor translates for her friend fatima abdeel nor if this law that female took it to help you on you in a situation where it's emergency and you need that care god gives us that support your initiative in is it a malfunction can help you give back yeah and she said it's not the seeing like just a way like god knows you didn't do that on purpose so adamant abdeel north was in a refugee camp and kenya with little medical care during her past pregnancies now in the us she welcomes prenatal checkups even if our culture and religion collide with some help care practices it gives me peace she says because i know the baby is healthy for the world sarah varney buffalo new york sarah story was made possible with support from kaiser health news the phrase was unforgettable totally destroy that's what president trump threatened to do to north korea yesterday in his address to the united nations so how does that threat go down across the border in south korea are bbc colleague gabriel gatehouse has just returned turned from a trip to.

nowak somalia fatima abdeel medical care trump united nations south korea gabriel gatehouse kenya kaiser health president north korea bbc two months