18 Burst results for "Sarah Sophie"

"sarah sophie" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

07:04 min | 2 months ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"You. With me all. What's happening Weirdos, fucking. Jane Lynch. Looking. fucking weird. Look your winged your Weirdo you're where I can't talk to I'd like to put a sticker margarine Dennard Johnson getting hot room if you know what I mean. So I, guess I'm the Weirdo. Welcome to WEAN IT WE NUMBER TWO A we just talked about it. We just record it and were recording the show or in the car cars running. It sounds really great. Yes. But you will click on like from this it will merge it will merge in you'll notice how bad the sound. You're hearing Valerie. If that bad. It's just the sounded to people getting away from their baby in a car. Can we're getting ways generous just being being away being? Too Hot to not have the AC running. So apologies, but you're fine. It's not like we're eating. Yeah that's right. You don't like a little who eight noise. Get Real get real talk about Neapolitan. Spoiler spoiler. Start over started again. Stirred it once more staring at once more. So we love doing these guys the response to the first one was so nice and we're just. About, that re- that I wanted to say that I do read a lot of the messages that you send me. So even if I don't get a chance to respond because if I have my phone out. Leila. goes on being fun maybe, Baby Papa Nanna which means she wants to watch videos of my parents and of herself So I might not have a chance to respond to all of them but I do read them and they really mean a lot. I was so overwhelmed by the the like. Love and. The, the fact the anybody took their time. Out of their day to write a nice little paragraphs and as alls I try to reply when I can. We talk about a lot. We're just going to get into it. I do want to say thank you to everybody that's getting Pete's picks. There's no sponsors these episodes just yet. But if you do need some new drawers, go to on dot com slash weird way to say thanks everybody needs underwear underwear that directly helps. US Yeah it does it does we need. Please please please us we need to Charlotte's web dot com slash. Weird. Keep it crispy nineteen get some calm dummies. And I have a couple of plugs living. Dot. com. Promo Code Weird. Okay. Okay So we we did get a question about talking about the black lives matter movement and anti-racist parenting, and we will definitely we don't go in depth in that and in this episode we meant to and then we were like, oh, we just had such a silly billy and then we felt kinda guilty. So we at least wanted to. Recognizing, that it is a privilege to be able to talk about all these different aspects of our lives because. Our race isn't constantly. Being. Oppressed against your so. Yes. Checking the. Checking that. So I had some plugs that I wanted to give you or not plugs resources because I think. You know. We are all trying to. Play with the balance of when to use our voice and when to amplify melania voices when to listen. To not make it about ourselves so I will just continue to. Collect resources and and share things that I'm listening to or reading that seem interesting and I will share that on the podcast with you guys not to say that we're not gonNA talk about it in more depth but at the very least I, think it is so important and invaluable to seek out. People who are actually experiencing this. Black people and people of color who are The experts in this and we can just listen so. for me. I. The most important thing about not the most important. Thing for me in the way that I have avoided. Just forgetting about this because I have definitely been guilty of like somebody gets shot, I get all up in arms and then I just go back into my life privileged life. The way that I've avoided that is just following a bunch of people on Instagram so that I'm constantly daily reminded about this and let this is the fight that we need to be focused on. So I have some instagram follows for you at Rennie Wyatt. R. I N N Y ARE OT. At W. Kamau Bell who you know I think. She she rose. At Rachel Dot car goal I think in singer name rate I've only ever seen it spelled. And then at Sarah Sophie F not a person of color but she is a great activist and wrote a wonderful documents. Co wrote a wonderful document on resources for white people. And then four anti-racist parenting which will. Also follow Hashtag ally ship. they're really great, and then you can just follow whoever they were, whoever shows up on that. and then for anti-racist parenting the conscious kid dot org. and embrace race dot Org. They are con- I mean like it is broken down for you how to talk to your kids. How to raise anti-racist kids and then there's countless books and resources So those are my plugs for now and we can go more in depth later when we really can give it our our full attention but check those things out if you are interested and you should be. Thank you. Get into is enjoying our second. We made a weird and thank you for that very much. Yeah. Okay guys enjoy get into it..

billy W. Kamau Bell Jane Lynch Instagram Rachel Dot Dennard Johnson Charlotte Valerie Pete Co Leila. Sarah Sophie F Dot. Rennie Wyatt
"sarah sophie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

12:07 min | 5 months ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"It or play it on herself but I think she didn't show us anything that leads us to believe that the first win we were wrong about like she still had great social bonds. She still seem strategically to know where everything was going. She wasn't voted out. She was able to stay below amber enticing as terms of people who voted out free swap. She looked to be totally safe. A swap and did a great job so well. Yeah I don't necessarily think I mean there's an argument to be made that maybe Sarah does more this season. She someone who highly factors into the endgame of two different seasons but also played one of the best games ever in her first time out and makes it very far in this one. So I think it's about fair like I said Kim doesn't play nearly as well. She did last time but she doesn't really show US anything to make us think we should reconsider her. I feel like the Sarah Versus Kim. Debate might be Something that POPs up a lot in the next few months so above Kim. We have Sandra who is going to lend here. This is about where she's been all season. She started ahead of Boston. Rob over. The course of the season did drop below him. I think that they actually both dropped a bit from where they started. The I think both if fell this season I think coming off of being the two idols from island of the idols. They both had high high expectations for both of them. They both Fell a bit here. I think Sandra not being present in the season you know. Say what you will about the in my opinion very dumb quit argument. That's happening but but I think just for lack of presence in the season has hurt her legacy a bit and then certainly also losing the fact that she is the only two time winner was always going to be impacted at least a little bit and I think what we saw was that it was impacted. A little bit and then certainly also can't be ignored. One of the most insane bad moves ever seen survivor with the denise. Move which I feel like it often gets talked about as denise is move and I think sometimes we forget how bad movie was how little it made sense that she wanted to get denise to vote Jeremy Out for her but left the option for her to vote Tony if she wanted and just gave her all the incentive in the world to vote her herself out. We talked about this a lot during the episode itself of the reasons why didn't make sense. But but that I think I'm sure was was another factor in just the little bit of a falling down here that that Sandra saw in in the the Legacy Watch rob. I mean Sandra. I mean she could play five more times than I. Yeah she's she's one game twice so she's legends statue of her head. She's a legend. You know to go back to that thing with the niece I mean look. Sandra was somebody who had a good read on Tony and before anybody else did and so the problem was she wanted Jeremy. She told Denise to vote Jeremy and she what she said after the episode was that she. She wanted Jeremy out so that she could be closer to Tony because she was worried that Tony was getting too close to Jeremy and so that's why she became the idol denise so that she would vote Jeremy for her but then also said You know you could do either one. I want you to vote Jeremy Though and And so I see. I see what you're saying there but even if she had wanted to Tony to voted. I'm still not convinced that that would have been the right move either. Yeah Yeah Look Sandra won twice. You know what are you? What are you going to do? She was a she was playing fine up until that point. She didn't come out and I don't think she's lost it so this is good. She's she has a floor. Sandra grounded Sandra still. Of course I think the only thing that this this or her going out in this way in the season and sort of self inflicted way and away where she made a mistake. You only way I think it really impacted is. I think it's an interesting thing to consider when comparing to coney you now you've got to people who've won twice and play multiple times and Tony you can say well. One time he played and he lost he played really poorly and he. He was the whole reason he went home. Second Game Changers. He played too fast and made this huge mistake. What's interesting now is was Sandra's you do have one game where you can say. Hey Sandra she made this mistake. So that's the only place where I could see it. You know. I think you could use that to make the case that Tony a better player like I'm not. I'm not even making that case but that's where I see it. I don't think today's are this season. really impacts her standing on something like this among all the other winners it would only be. When you're splitting hairs with the best of the best that you would bring up this this one but it could be impacted those ways and that she does have time where she made a mistake. A big one right so above. Sandra shouldn't be surprising to anyone. We Have Austin Rob in the number three spots on the list. He started at number three. And he's GonNa end it number three but there's going to be two different or at least one different person ahead of him now. I think me personally. I think I was a little more impressed by some of what rob did this season than than most other people were. I think that being able to command some of those early votes was kind of impressive in my eyes but but ultimately what we see is is is that you know. He a lot of people say that he was too inflexible. I also I'm not sure I completely on board with that. I think that the way that rob plays is the best way for him to play and I think that trying to do something else. I think that I guess you could call it inflexible. I think it's more that this is what he's really good at. And I think one of the main differences when we look at rob versus. Somebody like Tony is that Tony did have the the well roundedness to his game that Tony was able to come in with a massive target and play it down whereas rob came in with a massive target and said you know what I'm always going to have this massive target might as well just play hard and play fast and try to dominate this game. I think there's a chance that this could have worked here with rob but but it doesn't and I still think he's a great player but but I do think that ultimately he was outclassed by Tony in this season and I can't even say that well you know. Tony didn't have as big a target is rob. I think that rob had a bigger target than Tony. But but I think that Sony had one of the closest in terms of targets on his back to rob and he was able to do so well so as alternately that's where he's GonNa land here Brendan. What are your thoughts? Yeah I think that I think that rob does deserve some criticism for this game. I think that he has Sarah's talked about an exit interview. He didn't even try to work with Sarah Sophie on the swap tribe. And I I just think that rob is a great player. He's a great winner. He's played to really dominant impressive games. But Yeah I take some pause with rob. Now that we've seen a player like Tony come in and show that these players that play aggressive in one season can come back. I mean if had said before the season will tony. He's going to be able to act like he's not someone who everyone's GonNa target and he's I think he would have said well. Tony can never play that way. Honi has to go also the wall tone. Tony will never be able to disappear and I think what's fascinating is. We've seen now that player like that can disappear if they're committed to being patient to doing all these things and so even though rob is still deserves to be in the legend tear. You still got one of the best impressive single games. I think looking forward. I mean there's no I don't think we can use the excuse for these big players anymore. That on a never could have made it because we saw one do it which I would never have thought you could do. But he did rob for Boston rob that I think the season that he did come in with a big target on his back and was able to make it work for him was heroes vs villains where he came in as sort of like the biggest name that was out there and somehow improbably take villains drive on his back and if it wasn't for the well disgust Harvard devote where things end up out of his control like he had the right plan and then it doesn't work out for rob there he could. Well go on to that Being the season that he wins he ultimately gets his win in Redemption Island against inferior competition. But I feel like that that that could have been his tony game from this season in Heroes vs villains that being said that I do agree with people that have said that rob is unable to adapt his game that much he did a little bit came back on. Heroes vs villains. He said nobody's going to look for the idol. He tried he tried the buddy system there. Hey we're all going to. Nobody's GonNa go for the IDOL. Whoever who goes and looks for the idol. There's a mark on them. Vote in the Mouth Russell who already played on a season whereas I'm just GonNa go find out That he just went and found the idol and they couldn't wrote it out the an idol so rob was able to pick up on that and adapted strategy and Redemption Island and then ultimately say if I have the idol. The nobody called me up so he was able to make that adjustment but I think that the game has changed a lot. From the era of the you know the survivor in the twenties. And I don't think that the Boston Rob Strategy is effective anymore and I'm not sure that rob necessarily you know a change up his game to be more of an individual game. Rob's game is all about numbers fear controlling a group making sure you know inflicting his will on a group of four or five people and being able to really control. What's going to be going on? That's not how Tony Plays. Tony is able to keep he. He's able to keep shifting his rookie. He might go with these four people and then go back to the same people that he was voting with before and Tony just moves so fast and has so many different ways that he can change his game and so. I don't know if Tony is going to have the consistency. Like going back to Tony and Sandra like Tony has super high upside but also low floor and I think that Sandra probably has like more of like not as high of the upside but also not as low of the floor when she plays more classic Sandra game in doing crazy stuff with idols so rob. He's a legend. You can never take that away but I think that the the era in which the Boston Rob Strategy Works of you throw out the Boston Rob rulebook because I don't know necessarily effective and maybe it goes hand in hand with the only person that didn't get advice from him in Sandra. Last season.

Tony Plays Rob Sandra IDOL Jeremy Out Boston Sarah Sophie Kim Redemption Island denise Sony coney Brendan Honi Harvard
"sarah sophie" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

08:35 min | 6 months ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"That's the most dangerous thing you could do right. But I do see. I see that Sarah Sophie seemed to have a great bond And to be fair. I like watching this. Like a purist. I'm just watching on Wednesdays So that's the only information I'm getting. I'm not getting the secret scenes in that would probably change my perspective of it. Maybe there's been some weeks where we've watched everything and we are pretty clueless about what's going on to and that's the other part is. I recognize that. We're all still clueless. It gets a show and there's probably much on a lot of subtlety. We don't I I gotta say like. I am really impressed with Sarah's game I am I am. I think it's really easy to put Sarah to Pigeonhole Sarah but she has a lot of likeable qualities. That maybe don't come through as much onscreen but you can tell people really like being around Sarah and and and she's smart and she's strong and she's got really good boundaries And I wouldn't be surprised if if Sarah to this whole thing down okay. Well Sarah I think is really the person to watch this week because for me I really want to see. How does she respond to this betrayal from Tony where she is somebody who Tony turned on her in the first game that they played after they had had a bond and then the after all these years they end up rekindling that relationship to the point where they're feeling good they're working with each other cops are us and now we're at this point where this is a real crossroads where? I'm sure Tony is going to double back and say to Sarah. Look I had to do what I had to do. And look we're still good. Cops are us. You're my partner. And what is Sarah going to do? And how does she respond to this? How do you think she ends up handling this? It's so hard to predict how she handles it. I I think I. I'm not sure like how reactive she'll be initially but I I would venture to guess that her response will be that she ends up looking to cut tony whether it be this. Vote ahead. I think she's GonNa recognize. Tony is not only someone you can't trust in Italy but also someone who's now built built a resume rig moves and You know I also thought I also just want to comment. Sorry I know this was in your question. But I- Sophie said in that thing that she was a bottom Tier Win. I don't know at all First of all like I think tearing winners is really not understand the game at all because each game is so unique and And and and how a jury decides to reward is is it if they reward you you. You did a great job but I think he's a great player so I was really impressed. Sophie's going but that being said yeah. Yeah I I think that Sarah will eventually realized she needs to cut Tony. Not only because he's not trustworthy but because he's now building himself quite a resume for everyone to see it's one thing to build a resume and reveal that resume at the finish line of people like. Oh that was you. Oh that was you but at this point. Tony is really put himself out in front. And he's made himself a big target which listen. He won the first season by doing that. I just don't think it's GonNa work amongst these winners. Okay so I WANNA go back to what you're saying with Sophie. Because I wanted to ask you about that because you are somebody who has been at times self deprecating about your win in survivor Panama. And we've seen Selfie talk about this and Michelle and a couple of other people over the course of the season and talk about yes. I'm a winner. But the way that my win is viewed as oh like people. Don't view my win as the same as this person's win and this is something that I carry with myself. That is this a real phenomenon for the winners of survivor phenomenon. Self-deprecation you know in terms of like boy. You Know I. Yeah I one but my win. You know people don't consider my wind to be as good as this other person's win for sure that's for sure. I mean there's definitely in the eyes of the viewer right like there's all this emotional connection to watching it and and when the person you WANNA win wins. It's a different experience and when there's more twists and turns different experience of and certainly I would say like The way that survivor and CBS's chose to market certain players Kind of a in terms of like how the outside world use it Different guys win in in that value system I am certainly bottom. Tier winner That being said I think that that's a really myopic. Way of looking at the game And I think that each game is so unique We tend to WANNA reward the people that make the big moves but someone like in the case of Michelle You know it takes a skill to to win the game. That were the way she won the game And she would never win at the Boston. Rob Won the game but I just want to point out also like the kind of the things that we tend to really value in game. Play has never really worked twice. You know. Let's be honest. Sandra was not considered one of the great winners after her first win And it's only because she won again that people valued it And so I think. That's something for us to marinate on it like being inquiry on is like Boston rob is really unlikely to win. Twice right played. How many times is fifth time playing time playing so that I'll is like it's a really hard way to win the game now? It's really fun to watch but if you choose a style. That's really hard to win. Does that make you the Great? Like a great winner not to say Boston. I think he does have a lot of skills. I will say this Tyson I at our. How do you have a friendship? And he's come over and and vice versa. And we played this game with Brad culpepper. I forget the name of the game. Something about Hitler was in the name of it Secret SECRET HITLER REVERSE AGE and playing that game it was it was like a little bit like playing mafia and I realized during that game like Tyson for example he really does have incredible. Skill set that relates to survivor. More so than I do Really really loves deception. He really loves those things And he does great at it. So you know I I do think like Tyson for me is like someone who's very talented the game but it's hard to say like who's the best one every game so different different different points in each in each game. Yeah and I'm not even asking for you know your rankings of I was interested in you. Know the psychology of Sophie talked about how you know. I felt like not other people felt like I felt like that my win was considered to be a lower your win and I wanted to come back and prove that I could hang with the big dogs. Yeah Yeah I. I don't feel that way personally. I don't know I see myself you felt at Sylvia's a great player And like you know. I obviously had to imagine that they were going to have a winner season and so every time somebody wins you like you think about their game and what it would be like them and I always in my mind thought. Selfish very smart. She'll be a very Should be one to watch like I I you know. I think she's a very good survivor player. Yeah was this idea. Something that you brought with you when you ended up Going back of that. Like Hey I've got a really show people. This time around like my win is not any kind of a fluke. You'll see when I come back there and does that affect the way that a winner prepares for a second season. No but I will say this. Tyson brought up a really good point the second season that I played and He was like look you only one so there was no. There was no mistake that you could look back on same. Damn I would do that differently. There was no pain in your heart. No regret for you to like harp on say. Don't do that and so it was really easy to get more comparable than I should have been really really to to be less aware of kind of the happenings. It camp and for Tyson. Who had been voted out twice before that or that was his third time playing. I believe right third time playing a he had been voted out two times before that we had stings like he was he was vigilant. Tyson didn't sleep. You wouldn't leave camp like these are things I would never even contemplate. It ever.

Sarah Sophie Tony Tyson Michelle You Boston Brad culpepper partner CBS Panama Italy Rob Selfie Sandra Sylvia
"sarah sophie" Discussed on The Free Agents

The Free Agents

13:50 min | 6 months ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on The Free Agents

"Off. When is that a straight shot? Oh by God. This song every episode. Now you gotTa Poverty Buckshot. We're new lyrics. Were winners at Ward sock. I love that it's going to take us twenty episodes to hear the whole song. I think we're going to get it all to the chorus. Aw Damn we're probably not gonNA have a live finale anymore because of the corona virus but I was about to ask you trae. Will the band play the whole song at the finale? I think the answer would have been. Yeah but zoom in for sure come on Jeff so I'd like to hear the original recording of Jeff singing it into his phone. I mean that's that's where we found that the it came from is literally just jeff coming up with an idea kitchen showing off to his son. Oh Yeah Watch this. Watch this ridiculous thing. I'm going to get on this show that we don't get notes on. Oh there has to be there like John when he came up with the where he talks to his machine. There has to be a probe present. The final third round of this challenge. Adam Adam can't even stand up he can't even get on Tomlin so he's eliminated then. Nick goes down. Sophie goes down. Sarah goes down. There's only two left. It's Kung Fu ben as they were calling them fascinating moves like I don't know yeah feels like he's leaning one way too much throws up like a right arm and sort of balance and then. Kim is also challenging him and she keeps US talking to herself keep showing US little clips of like stay focused. Don't get distracted and it works because Ben y yeah. I can't believe Kim on that. Posture was awful on the hunched over. Like I can't believe that strategy at lasted Ben who looked like he's core and his focus was really in control for the first. Yeah you know what I mean and the thing was I think the win against him. If you get a bad wife that can really knock you off as well. Just get the at the wrong time. But the way she was hovering around like that came out was like that doesn't make sense at all that she can balanced like you could soon as as well and it looked awful. Yes congratulations Nora Nora. When this challenge you could see it. Yeah I know what you're talking about. Nora said when this challenge started. She's like a woman's GonNa win this. She's like like women's balances in their hips lower and men balance generally up in their shoulders. And I was like okay. We'll see but then it. It sorta obviously down to just one male and one female so in the end she was right and didn't look great posture but it ended up working. And now I think This on twitter Kim now holds the record for most immunity wins by female in survivor. History with five. I think that's true. Yeah pretty impressive. And she's only played twice. Yeah get rid of her. Can Challenge thought. The water looked amazing. God every episode of survivor. There's one scene where he just go. I have to go to Fiji this is. It's so gorgeous. Jackson pointed out when Jeff says okay guys swim back. It's like where you swim like your looks like a mile from shore. Yeah yeah there's so far out. There appears to be like all right. It's worse than the challenge like swim two miles back to those shore now and extra wavy. I thought I thought the waves were bigger than we usually see for that challenge which led to a couple of great dismounts. Jeremy's dismount which jeff called one of the craziest of all time just a primal howl as he basically did like a looney tunes flip off and then Tony. Basically landed on his Hibbert. And you've got the ooh from everybody spouse grade. I think if one of US ever gets on survivor we got like we gotta just do a bunch of like weird footwork like practice like we are just like dangling on things on the side of your toes and your feet and there seems to be a lot of it. So it's something you gotta toughened up. The bunions got a practice coin flips stuff to work out before we get out there. Yeah you're right. You're right so after that challenge. Of course we get back at back at camp this is where they're scrambling to figure out the vote. This was one of my favorite like five minutes six minutes however long. This segment was segments in survivor. Recent history at least I loved how it appeared at least in the editing and they did such a great job of just how insane it was because this is where you know Kim starts off by saying let's just do a vote between Nick and Adam and then Ben suggests we should make it nick a Michelle and then nick and Tyson. They sort of went full. Joker like agents of chaos especially. Tyson like introduced a little anarchy here and and even said like create enough confusion and people start forgetting about you. A little bit definitely worked for them because we had nicknamed turnaround. Adam's name Michelle Sophie Sarah and even Tyson's name was chucked out there at one point. What what did you task especially as a Newbie? Like think of this scene where it did. Pure pandemonium was going on at least in terms of the editing. It was awesome and it was I. I believe that I believe that you know it didn't it wasn't happening that quickly. Obviously but as Jeremy said a little bit later on you've played this game three or four times and he's never seen anything like it so it was. It was a blast to watch Lee. Yeah well it looked like they were all just gunning for Adam at the start and it was almost like it was. It was going to be too convincing. So somehow then they just thought of throwing up on the board just talking about Adam so they decided to create that chaos and and it really did over or spill over to the tribal council that not. I mean it was. It was just crazy seeing how so many names were thrown out there. Because you know you talked about it. There was giving up her spot for the Chinese food to Nick and I thought I thought yeah. That's fine but obviously was a very very bad movie. That really put a target on her back for some people. So that backfired. I thought well I mean backfired on if that's what she probably knew. That was going to happen anyway but. I didn't think that was going to create such a bad situation for For her as it did but you know ultimately it she she gets through that not but certainly I think people will now have earned her sites in their thoughts trade. Do you think this was a little just sort of created creating a creative. Excuse me editing by the producer. Because you started this episode. Feel like it was it. Sounds like you think it was a little more straightforward where Adam ultimately goes was like eight or eight votes is. Do you think that's fair here? Yeah I definitely think I mean. It's hard to tell exactly when Adam came up but I kinda think he was probably top chops for the entire time and the scene that really that really solidifies that for me is that seen almost the longest lasting scene of all this montages when Ben goes up to Avenue's like Hey. Did you say we NEED TO BE SPLIT UP? And he says no somebody else did. But Adam won't tell them who it is and Benjamin storms off and that's when I was like oh it's going to be Adam. These ben at each other's throats for the majority of the Game Adam got caught lying and then get super defensive about being caught lying. That's a bad position to be in so yeah I mean I do think that Adam I think maybe people were throwing out scenarios to find out somebody else besides Adam besides doing just the easy vote for the guy on the bottom but it just kept coming back to the atom who's basically been annoying everybody out there and getting super paranoid to point where he convinces them a decoration as an idol. Yeah and I would add to that if people are that concerned like or what we what we see as a viewer like this craziness going on so many names being thrown out. I don't know who are we voting for the last one we thought about or is this new one where we going if that was really really true and and maybe it was to some extent but like you're telling me some of these people like Sarah Sophie Kim even Michelle now with the fifty fifty point advantage. Even Jeremy with his still his peace out. I'm out of here. Tribal Council movie can play none of those five people with power like even what we saw even thought about playing it. My point is like that insane. And you're like I don't know what the Hell's going on. Well you might consider using like an immunity idol or steel. Vote or something and none of them did that because in the end it was pretty pretty straightforward though. We got all this Goddamn whispering going on at Camp or tribal council. Jd like the whispering. I generally I don't although I I did enjoy it last night just because it was pure pandemonium and and and just seeing Adam. Scramble was just delight really. It was fun. I mean Trey brought up the confrontation between him and Ben. I don't understand why Adam didn't lie. Just throw out at aim like Michelle. Michelle told me that you know. Michelle said certain you know. But the fact is he had way too many poker's in the fire and he didn't want he didn't want more blowback he's already facing a blowback right in front of him and then he's GonNa he's GonNa throw somebody else under the bus and they're gonNA come at them. I mean but yeah it was pretty clear that Adam is is is the scrambling the scrambling went and he seemed like such a the obvious goat as was mentioned. And you know you can't if you if you if you bring along a pit bull you know on a walk and it keeps attacking everybody around you. You know. Eventually it's going to attack you right so you you just have to put them down like the Adams gotta go I thought tribal council there. The Jeff was gonNA step in at some point but he he. He seemed to thrive in it as well. He was just like this is crazy. Isn't it and it just kept going and going and going and seeing atom scramble desperately tried to get support when he just found on was just incredible thought he was he was looking around and they oh by sleep ganged up and took a show on him to his face just like he was desperate but then if he had put off that move that immunity object was right on his hunch. That would have been the greatest move survive a history. I'm going in thirty nine cool. I wouldn't go that far but I honestly was absolutely hoping that that was because that would have just then caused even more chaos because who would have been voted out then it would have been because it was. Wasn't it for now about that to talk to Sarah Sarah? Yeah Yeah. It's the idea that that Florida Lee could even be an idol immediately. I was like Oh man I hope it is then. I was like well actually. I hope it isn't really want is for him to go for it. Like any either way him going up there to try and pull that off the podium. It was going to be a classic. And what's he's he even says like in the credits like sort of post credits or whatever as as the episode is wrapping up. He almost did him in because he says the thought that there was an idol at tribal allowed me to play more aggressively than I should have so I was like an excuse that sounds like maybe but I think he may be really convinced himself that that was an idol and he was like well. Watch this this is GONNA be epic and of course it was. Although I like till the things sort of like it moved a little bit I wonder superwealthy a little wiggle to prop makers were thinking someone would try to remove it in the middle of traveled cancel. So I guess Survivor Australia. I think it is at least in one of the international survivors. There has been an idol at tribal council like out in the open but I think it was the voting earn. Not Not Jeff probst podium. So you know this. I feel. I'll be shocked if we don't see this moving forward in the US version survivor right. There's going to be somewhere place now at one question though like Adam early in the episode talked how. We thought that it was it. Is he banned from going to the tribal council area and testing? Yeah you can't go to travel for a second. I forgot something. I don't know if you're allowed if that's just out of bounds. I guess you're not in trouble council but otherwise he could have gone and tested out but Dole also on their on islands right so he physically wouldn't be able to get there unless he was a really good Soi. Okay One thing just before the tribal council because we were talking about the pandemonium and we got that Ben Versus Adam scene and all this and again I loved I loved Tyson. Be In slick right with the just this ideas like all right. I'm just going to throw everybody's name out here a little bit and just get everybody confused because that's good because they'll just stop forgetting about. I think it is a strategy that can work in your favor at times and it appeared to at least in this but Adam brought up an interesting point during a confessional and he was like 'cause brings up the idea of like I'm talking to us..

Adam Adam Michelle Sophie Sarah Jeff probst Sarah Sophie Kim Ben Nick Jeremy US Tyson Ward sock Nora Nora twitter Adams John Camp or tribal council Tribal Council Sophie Sarah Sarah Hibbert
"sarah sophie" Discussed on The Free Agents

The Free Agents

12:12 min | 7 months ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on The Free Agents

"SOME SLACK. Jawed Yokel from John. Who knows wearing probably wouldn't know all the great nutritional stuff that peanut butter Nasima idea. Good Morning Sweet. World and welcome to New Buffs. The only survivor. Podcast worth a fire token or to Thursday march nineteenth. Were recapping the sixth episode of survivor winners at war. So Yeah UH spoilers go Laura this when I'm Jay skeets here on the island with task trae in the man making the magic happen. Gd and joining us the coconut phone. It's the international man of mystery. Lee Lee what's up? Hey guys has gone fantastic man. Wow did we pick an episode to start are no buffs survivor? Podcast with waiting seven years for the perfect. It really was the first to get in guys. This is like on the shortlist. Maybe of one of the greatest episodes we've ever seen Maybe not a good one to start with premier all downhill from here but yeah. We got a double elimination. We got two legends sent packing before we break all that down. If your new to know dunks for whatever reason you found us here today we are generally an NBA podcast but there's no MBA discuss right. Now there's very few sports so we had get creative. Some of US love survivor. Some new to the game. There's I in fact I broke it down. I tweeted it today. There's only three. Sports left to watch survivor. Marbella one and then a new one cats. Domino's cats domino's yeah. Yeah we were talking survivor here myself. Trey JD diehard survivor but newbies and tasks and lease. So I wanted to start with you. Guys tasked safe to say the first episode of survivor. You've ever want front to back. I definitely with commercials but I would say it felt so fast. Okay I found really really quick. Yeah I thought about the segments afterward and maybe when a little bit quicker because I was holding a two month baby throughout the entire time that was distracting me but basically there was just a little bit of drama at the beginning with peanut butter man. There who who found his idol and he's while he said he was tinkling in his words pretending and then we went to the challenge and then we went to the Council of those. It really fast. I actually watched it a second time. You're right they're like they're like seven or really maybe eight scenes and we will break down. Here we'll go through it all but Lee. What did you think the first episode of survivor? You've ever watched that correct. Yes that is correct. I enjoyed it. I thought the did more challenges though. I thought it was kind of like you did three or four challenges and then the last bit was the voting off the the sort of building up to the voting off of the contestants seem to go for like half the show. Yeah you know that's changed. In recent years there used to be more challenges within a survey is so especially this season I think they are skewing hard towards. Let's let these all winter strategize on eleven especially because there's multiple teams sometimes. There's one team right. There's there's a lot to deal with her. Yeah there's a lot to deal with. Okay so let's not bury the lead though we had two legends. I know you'll leisure Andrews alleged I know party has been set in this room shallow. I know I even over last name. That's how much he's been said. I didn't believe her last name when Jd said at one time so I had to go look poverty. Shallow I think you can put in the leading category. I have no idea really but Sandra's alleged never heard her. She won twice. Wow alleged yup the only person to ever went to the Queen is dead. She lived the Queen. I mean she's she's lethal as from my perspective She she is she has been. She made some mistakes obviously last night on this episode. This was straight. So Yeah Denise blindsides the Queen Sandra and then you know we also had the boys sort of getting together to poverty. So let's let's start with the truly like the blindside. Or what the whole Denise Sandra Dynamic Eighty Well Sandra do rock well the only thing she did wrong in my mind is trusting that denise would would vote for him on his name journey. Jeremy Okay Yeah was that the two of them they were on the bottom. They will go after each other. Sandra is basically like here. I'm giving you a lifeline. It's GONNA cost you to fire tokens. Well I'm I'm giving you a lifeline and you. I'm GonNa have your back so you have my back so you just vote for Jeremy. And then we'll be fine but don't tell anybody yeah. I mean I think she played it pretty well except that she didn't bank on the fact that denise already had an immunity that was quite gave up her idol and got voted out by her own idol. How did I play that? Actually she got to confidence. She should've known when they walked in and Boston. Robin Ben Voted Out. She should have been like. Oh the game has changed. They voted out some minor players. I and now they're going after the big names 'cause it's been Tyson and then it was Boston Rob. And now we got Sandra in poverty. You might put them on the Mount Rushmore. I don't know about Tyson. Probably Not Tyson. Honestly he's just he's been around a long time he's a great character but if you're talking legends anyways nonetheless she should've known right. Then I gotta be on my toes here. Why why would you give that away the last time you can use it and if you are going to still give it away because you know. Obviously they're trying to figure out what the hell fire tokens are and how important they are. Because there was a lot of fire tokens. Talk in this episode. I mean everybody's trying to get them and bartering now and it's a fun new wrinkle to the game fire brand new. Why didn't she at the very least throw a vote to someone else? Why did Sandra also vote for Denise? I think because she did not want to seem like well like she was going against her. That was that was that was the whole point of that and I think that's they framed. That framed her like that. That's why she's really good at the game because she's literally telling Denise you know that there's that whole scene where she's like. Oh you're a very wonderful person GABBA. You're GonNa vote me out and she she's like so So diplomatic about it but yeah I am going to vote you out. And then later on they make the deal and it's just. She needs her hands to be cleaned moving forward. It's too early in the game. Go against your your alliance. So why did denise give her idol to Jeremy? That's yeah that's the one part. She did not really need to do of cracks in hindsight and heights because in theory they could have split the votes. Yeah and it's a shocking that they didn't have because that's their alliance. That's that's the only reason why she would give it to Jeremy. Well yeah her. And Jeremy Words they were on the bottom and he if she gives it to him if he got any votes than hurt then then she would know that. Everybody's canceled add except for her. Vote Against Sandra and which is exactly what happened so technically she didn't even have to play that that idol I gotcha. Yeah because of the way the votes shook down but she also played it smart in that she only had to give up one fire token right for that. It's a nice counter. Yeah to that that wicked where. They are. Bartering of like okay. I'll give you gonNA take it to fire tokens okay. I'll give you one. You WanNa give the idol all that I love that. Now give me another one later and yeah you're right to ask. She's she go and doesn't need to pay that off. I don't believe gets back into the game. Because that's the other part here. These these people who voted out poverty and Sandra. But they're still technically in the survivor game because they're on edge of extinction right. Yeah so that's kind of how can you come back from the edge of extinction? Well IN YEARS PRIOR. You know there's challenges to like sort of win your way back into the game. Is this the only the second third we is this a surprise to you? Yes I mean look. I'll be honest. I had a little bit of trouble. Following it all adds Because the different teams and then you know Wendell was talking to that lady shower poverty. I think it was poverty. And you can sort of see like it's really well produced. I'll say that really well at all that because I could feel that attention in the drama so I like that sort of thing but you know sort of trying to figure it because I didn't know it was a double elimination either. So when the first elimination happened and then they then they said. Oh we've got another one going okay realized that He did say a few times. I mean I look on this my first. You don't pick up every little intricate deal but then and then and then at the end after the flame was put out and then they were. She put that little ring or whatever else token looks. Look you're not ugly. Like there for newbies jumping in here sort of during the season even like. There's a lot of things going on. You Guys. Have a general idea of how survival works. But then you're right. There's these fire tokens and edge of extinction. And who knows what I did. Yeah and when episode started for the first time ever maybe there was no previously on. There was no well. They haven't been doing that for I haven't they. They've got I was like oh I was worried for task leave. Because they're not even doing a previously. They need every second transplant extinction who You had to know is a double elimination because Jeff probst kept on calling it a legendary double elimination over and over and it was it. Was it legendary okay? We don't have to go in the sense of. Who got voted out. I mean these are two icons in the guy they can't yeah. I'm obviously pulling window having been on the show because he's the only one that obviously no and I thought he was dead. I thought he was going to be tough. Not to jump around here just sort of go through the show here. Okay so I seen is seen as one of your sort of your sort of your quick. Look back at last week because it's the tribe. Which is the green tribe for everybody out there. Yes they have tribe names but it's really just just worry about the color. Yaris the Green tribe and this we get them celebrating right. The Freedom of Boston rob just having been voted out ask. Are you wearing a hat today? In honor of Okay. So so yeah. That's obviously them excited that they voted Boston. Rob We're all still here. Benz feeling very confident because he likes his connection with with Sarah and Sophie. Animal a little bit more freaked out. Yeah but that's really the first scene we can. We can breathe. We can leave the damn shelter. We can go take our panties off the ocean and wave them around and have a few laughs. Tinkle peanut butter called his underwear man. That's very funny okay. So that is anything really to add from that I. I mean yeah I mean. Adam's always freaked out sats his character. That's that's what he is. He's wrong in this case. So I think Ben. It appears through the television show that he does have a bit more of a connection as building. Maybe a bit of a better bond with Sophie right right and Ben it seems to be I guess. Is he changing his game? I can't really remember his season. He on him. Ah the emphasis seems to be on. You know what I'm going to have fun and I'm GonNa make guesses time so we will. That hurt him in the end. Maybe I don't know I think Sarah Sophie they would be a good alliance to be in their both beasts and Yeah they can you know Adams easy. Vote for them right right where I do agree with that and while we go through here too just so everybody knows. Sarah has a steel vote. She still has that In her bag drinks and Sophie does have an immunity. That's right so that's what's going on the green so moving on edge of extinction here edge of extinction this where we get the the scavenger hunt that Tyson..

Sandra denise Jeremy Words Boston Sarah Sophie Tyson Lee Lee Trey JD Robin Ben Denise Sandra Dynamic Eighty NBA New Buffs Jawed Yokel Rob US Gd Denise blindsides Laura Domino
"sarah sophie" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

11:16 min | 9 months ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"And recognize that chant. It's the English version of the anti-rape anthem. By Chilean activists that went viral. This version is by a flash mob of more more than one hundred women performing outside of the New York City. Courthouse were Harvey. Weinstein will be tried for rape at the front of the pack of women was Delaney Stamp. She's she's the CO founder of the Resistance Revival Chorus and dream defenders and one of the leaders of the Working Families Party Malini. Is that women who inspired us to ask how. How does she do it all? She's here so let's find out. Molina Nice to meet you off the twitter. Thank you thank you for having me. I confusing What did it feel like to stand outside of that courthouse and then outside of a trump a building and say those words? It felt Cathartic. I mean I didn't really. I've done a lot of actions for the last decade and sometimes you feel you're excited about making the impact here excited about engaging in it but sometimes you're like well I've done this a lot and there is something different That happened to me being survivor and my own rate being being able to point and say you know a lot of through like the violators you like. You are the rapists abyss. I was so powerful and the fact that especially when we were doing it in front of the Weinstein trial. You had the judge as you had the courts had you know the story is and the and the song goes you know. It's it's the courts the judges it's the cops like it's the system it and to say that and to to be there with all of those things was just so so our fall and then to ride the train we actually had a one. We did it on the train as well and there was an the elderly woman who is sitting down and started to cry. And I choose right in front of me and I just swelled up with all of these emotions because I can only think of what she was thinking as a woman watching all of these women on the subway just go packing the subway and and enchanting this and saying it's not my fault. Aw The fault wasn't mine. Not where I was not how I dressed you are the rapist. Where in your own life to these words words resonate? I was assaulted and it was one of those things when I was younger I was about nineteen years old club. One of those teen clubs in New York the end my for for days later people are like Oh you were drunk or oh you were this like it was in. I was trying to figure out what happened bent and because I did have a fuzzy memory I was making all of these excuses. I was going back and saying well. What did I wear or was as I inviting or was I put at the end of the day like I said No? I remember that clearly and it doesn't matter how where I was where I was dressed like the fact is is that people should not be committing rape or assault on women and it also happens to men as well but this is the violator in your Arabia's in your path is it just it just it just resonates so well because it's not in the path it's not the anybody does anything to deserve this. Also at the front of that group of women were to other Latinos Latina guests. Natalie Molina Nino Bauman Dasa. How did this action come together? Yeah so some of us. Paolo Mendoza is one of the other. Co Founders Resistance Survival course we we were the one who put you on my radar. I Love I love her so much. A bunch of us we're talking about. We were when we saw I left eye sees the Chilean Elaine Feminist Group and we saw going happening everywhere like I saw from my European comrades to organize it just blew up all over the place and I just remember crying crying watching the videos of how powerful it was to see people all over Latin America people in all of the worlds to say like this is a problem album. It's not just the flash PAN OF ME TOO. It's not just the you know these big moments that have a lot of shine on it and it's happening every a day and people are really suffering and Bala was like we should do this and I've got some people who who to talk to about an I who is also one of the other who helped with the choreography help translate it with Fowler. Who's like oh I would love to do this? And I've got some more women woman and then Sarah Sophie flicker another one of our co founders of the chorus. It's like we should do this out of the Weinstein child but we wanted to be respectful to the silence breakers to to actually the the people who are most impacted make anything that we did to interfere with getting justice. You call yourself a rebel bull rouser. Where does that show up in your life? Outside of protests mid shows up a lot of I grew I grew up in New York City in Brooklyn Gordon. Staten Island New York. Which explains a lot to be both big in the tank in me GotTa represent there were just certain things All of my life and especially especially with my family to I'd be like why. Why do we do do these normal or not normal things but what is traditional thing that we're doing and I think it was just like the way I was raised like I have two MOMS That was really hard hard for a very Catholic. Puerto Rican family to go through. My mother came out when I was a kid. And just like I think the notion of not living that traditional lifestyle when it was starting to break in the United States like it just made me a natural rabble rouser like I would go in school. It'd be like my mom's lesbian lesbian. People don't talk about or I would say. ESPN because that's what I thought could sorry. That's why he's it's not like she's so I feel like it was always. I was always that kind of like in a sense. A fire starter whether it be bucking in traditional norms or kind of standing up for staff. But that isn't super political. What do you pinpoint? As the beginning of your political consciousness press' I'll say to moments and they're very intertwined was one time. My cousin jumped the subway. Actually right around here at the forty second street station and the cops and I saw the cops just like tackle him and beat him up and didn't realize he had hodler. BB's cousin with him. That was I was sick so I saw it and I just freaking out for a really long time. I just a moment. There was just like. Don't trust these people. I just don't trust the cops right and then the other moment was September eleventh was my fourth day of high school and just remember eleventh in the aftermath of it because I just remember seeing being out of my Muslim Arab Sikh you name it friends that would just get stereotyped as one entity scared for their lives and my family being very much like this is terrible what happens I mean in Staten Island. We lost the most people and so people. I remember going home after a few days. Because we couldn't bridge and the ferry was closed and the people being like. Where's my dad? Where's my mom? You know firefighters and cops and also just how easily we went to war after we all of these things and I remember the first my first actual action was leaving leaving school and protesting the Iraq war and so that was a huge just just growing up and being there not moment and just kind of post September eleventh was like a super political transformative thing for me two thousand four. You wouldn't have even been Tina right. You're registering people to vote. Yes why did that feel important. In that moment I mean there was a moment of vote. Really hope like hopeless. I couldn't I wasn't eighteen so I couldn't vote myself. It was I have my cousin. Dan was signing up for the National Guard and I was nervous that I mean. He ended up being deployed at this point. My cousin was deployed. A few times puts at that point not yet and I was just scared of Mike. Somebody who's just like a little bit older than me who I look up to going. Deming murdered getting killed killing others. The war was it was really ugly and for me registering people was a way to get civically involved but also said to save it like this is for my future feature to write like this is where I'm just seventeen years old like I wanna see change and a different so please register and vote for me. It was also ah cry for help. Others felt really empowering to do that you drop out of high school Why a a lot of things so I dropped out of high school and to officially legally by record? I think it's like two thousand six or think But I stopped going to school. My senior year and part of it was after we got the financial aid right like after. We got fast for that. Said you are not going to get financially as part of your application as far as application to college right so Vinay College you you go through the financial aid process you look at you look at things and I really wanted to go to a school. That had musical theater. I auditioned went onto Roger Schenn's but when we got our financial aid butter back I just there's something clicked like something shut off. I believe that was like a moment that I lost a lot of hope. In my future I was a young teenager. That didn't have the help that I needed the way way. Your story is often written contextualising. What you've experienced personally? Things like the fiction in the context of of a larger global moment. That was happening that it happens in tandem with the financial crisis. When did you realize that what you were experiencing was not an anomaly? One was like the message of hope and change from Obama. I remember being being very inspired by it. This this is two years drought but I got my ged. Finally in two thousand and eight. which was really excited? I was like I'm going to go to school and I remember my grand..

Weinstein New York City rape CO founder twitter Working Families Party Natalie Molina Nino Bauman Harvey Paolo Mendoza Staten Island New York Delaney Stamp Obama Chilean Elaine Feminist Group New York Staten Island United States Iraq ESPN
How Nelini Stamp Sets Injustice Aflame

Latina to Latina

06:30 min | 9 months ago

How Nelini Stamp Sets Injustice Aflame

"And recognize that chant. It's the English version of the anti-rape anthem. By Chilean activists that went viral. This version is by a flash mob of more more than one hundred women performing outside of the New York City. Courthouse were Harvey. Weinstein will be tried for rape at the front of the pack of women was Delaney Stamp. She's she's the CO founder of the Resistance Revival Chorus and dream defenders and one of the leaders of the Working Families Party Malini. Is that women who inspired us to ask how. How does she do it all? She's here so let's find out. Molina Nice to meet you off the twitter. Thank you thank you for having me. I confusing What did it feel like to stand outside of that courthouse and then outside of a trump a building and say those words? It felt Cathartic. I mean I didn't really. I've done a lot of actions for the last decade and sometimes you feel you're excited about making the impact here excited about engaging in it but sometimes you're like well I've done this a lot and there is something different That happened to me being survivor and my own rate being being able to point and say you know a lot of through like the violators you like. You are the rapists abyss. I was so powerful and the fact that especially when we were doing it in front of the Weinstein trial. You had the judge as you had the courts had you know the story is and the and the song goes you know. It's it's the courts the judges it's the cops like it's the system it and to say that and to to be there with all of those things was just so so our fall and then to ride the train we actually had a one. We did it on the train as well and there was an the elderly woman who is sitting down and started to cry. And I choose right in front of me and I just swelled up with all of these emotions because I can only think of what she was thinking as a woman watching all of these women on the subway just go packing the subway and and enchanting this and saying it's not my fault. Aw The fault wasn't mine. Not where I was not how I dressed you are the rapist. Where in your own life to these words words resonate? I was assaulted and it was one of those things when I was younger I was about nineteen years old club. One of those teen clubs in New York the end my for for days later people are like Oh you were drunk or oh you were this like it was in. I was trying to figure out what happened bent and because I did have a fuzzy memory I was making all of these excuses. I was going back and saying well. What did I wear or was as I inviting or was I put at the end of the day like I said No? I remember that clearly and it doesn't matter how where I was where I was dressed like the fact is is that people should not be committing rape or assault on women and it also happens to men as well but this is the violator in your Arabia's in your path is it just it just it just resonates so well because it's not in the path it's not the anybody does anything to deserve this. Also at the front of that group of women were to other Latinos Latina guests. Natalie Molina Nino Bauman Dasa. How did this action come together? Yeah so some of us. Paolo Mendoza is one of the other. Co Founders Resistance Survival course we we were the one who put you on my radar. I Love I love her so much. A bunch of us we're talking about. We were when we saw I left eye sees the Chilean Elaine Feminist Group and we saw going happening everywhere like I saw from my European comrades to organize it just blew up all over the place and I just remember crying crying watching the videos of how powerful it was to see people all over Latin America people in all of the worlds to say like this is a problem album. It's not just the flash PAN OF ME TOO. It's not just the you know these big moments that have a lot of shine on it and it's happening every a day and people are really suffering and Bala was like we should do this and I've got some people who who to talk to about an I who is also one of the other who helped with the choreography help translate it with Fowler. Who's like oh I would love to do this? And I've got some more women woman and then Sarah Sophie flicker another one of our co founders of the chorus. It's like we should do this out of the Weinstein child but we wanted to be respectful to the silence breakers to to actually the the people who are most impacted make anything that we did to interfere with getting justice. You call yourself a rebel bull rouser. Where does that show up in your life? Outside of protests mid shows up a lot of I grew I grew up in New York City in Brooklyn Gordon. Staten Island New York. Which explains a lot to be both big in the tank in me GotTa represent there were just certain things All of my life and especially especially with my family to I'd be like why. Why do we do do these normal or not normal things but what is traditional thing that we're doing and I think it was just like the way I was raised like I have two MOMS That was really hard hard for a very Catholic. Puerto Rican family to go through. My mother came out when I was a kid. And just like I think the notion of not living that traditional lifestyle when it was starting to break in the United States like it just made me a natural rabble rouser like I would go in school. It'd be like my mom's lesbian lesbian. People don't talk about or I would say. ESPN because that's what I thought could sorry. That's why he's it's not like she's so I feel like it was always. I was always that kind of like in a sense. A fire starter whether it be bucking in traditional norms or kind of standing up for staff. But that isn't super political.

Weinstein New York City Rape Co Founder Natalie Molina Nino Bauman Twitter Harvey Paolo Mendoza Delaney Stamp Staten Island New York Chilean Elaine Feminist Group Working Families Party New York Espn United States Sarah Sophie Puerto Rican Bala Latin America Arabia
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

15:21 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Lawrence Schiller. And this is inflection point with stories of how women rise up. I'm talking with artists and activists parliament does and Sarah Sophie flicker to organizers of the March on Washington and co creators of the book together, we rise which documents behind the scenes of the March. So okay, the that we were addressing the intersection -ality issue. So what about those women who voted for travel how they feel like they're outside? There have been you know, we hear that the either think that feminist is a dirty word, and they don't they don't buy into it. Because of the values don't align with their values, or they just don't understand what all the fuss about like, what are we all up in arms about everything's great for women. So how'd you like what do you see as the potential for common? Ground to talk with those women who are not in the choir. It's a few things I think the first thing has to be understanding like the nature of how we uphold, you know, a white supremacist patriarchy and the only way that that's. Because women are over fifty percent of the population. Like if we wanted to go down this would go down. So I think so much of it has to do with a lot of those women's proximity to privilege into power and so much of what they have or what they perceived to have has has everything to do with the proximity. They have two quite powerful men. So there's that. And I think we have to understand that. I think you know, there's also those women tend to vote that way like it's not they weren't voting differently necessarily than how they always vote. And I just remember I have a group that I've worked with now for twelve years, we go to swing states we knock on doors, and we do it, you know, the week before every election, and I was with my daughter in Philly the week before this election and together she and I knocked on over six hundred doors. I think and you know, these white women with kids in the background, you know, I'm generalizing right now. But like, and and you on your walking papers, you see that. There's one person who's voting democrat in the house. And you know, that there's probably another person who's not in it tends to be the woman are they claim to be voting democrat. And you know, you're opening the door. And you're like, what am I even selling this woman? You know, I just think like there's a grappling. We have to do with the fact that. These men are bringing home the paycheck. These you know, what we know now about. You know, sexual harassment abuse and domestic violence. You know, it's like how do I don't know that I can convince this woman to like step outside of what the man in her house, maybe saying she should do that sad. I think the burden is on white women to talk to members of our family who may think this way mean I personally don't have those people in my family gratefully, but. But you know, I certainly like make it a point to now, you know, have those discussions, and and one of the things we've done Pailin I've worked at the women's March with his daring discussions toolkit and campaign, which basically like in a really simple way breaks down. How you have those conversations? And you know, what we know is, you know, your personal stories tau connecting on. What we have in common. I know for me. I can always talk about being a mother to another mother. And there's a lot of points of connection there. It's coming into a conversation grounded in love lacking. Judgment. You know, I think in general within the feminist movement, you know, white women and by extension men need to learn how to actively listen better. And not just because you've been privileged to say, whatever's on your minds, just say, whatever's on your mind, like be thoughtful be intentional. You know? I think it's a big. It's a bigger issue. I would just add to that that, you know, and sir certainly touched on it that white women needs to go and talk to white women. Right. So to go talk to the fifty three percent and have that conversation because it's a different conversation. When white women are talking directly to white women. If I go as an immigrant woman of color with a lot of history good and bad with white people. It's a much more painful conversation for me because also my communities are under attack. Right. I'm exposing a lot of pain that I can choose to. And I've had many of those conversations with white women not those that voted for Trump, but progressive liberals that don't understand. Race. And there's a lot of those two like, let's be real. There's a lot of those right? And I can have those conversations and carry that burden for that moment. But because while you all are organizing and talking and trying to open up the heart of those white women. I'm on the flip side talking to my people and trying to get them to be involved in the movement and trying to get them to go out and vote and trying to get them to be politically engaged and explain to them why this is happening. And so I think it's it's a it's a let's be strategic conversation around. What is best where where can I best put my energy also, and this is just being real? There might be some white women that aren't going to get on the bus with us. And that's okay. We just going to have to leave you behind and we're gonna keep on moving. We got we got we on freedom might not come to feed them with us. And that's your choice. If you want to join the if you want to join us, and we can all agree. We can all agree that at the end of the day. All of us are equal. We all want every. To do better. And having everyone do better sometimes mean, those that are better off have to sacrifice, then we're good. If if that's not how you see the world. That's okay is well, I don't need to have everybody. See the see the world in those general terms with me. And I think that that's an important conversation to be able to have as well. It seems like the major division is reproductive rights that the right to do with our bodies as we wish. So last year when the women's March happened either on that same day or on that same weekend in San Francisco. There was an anti-choice March. There is an antiabortion March. And it feels to me like that's the one thing that is going to get in the way of bringing these women who are not on board with the movement into the movement. And I I mean, I certainly don't have the answer because I'm not giving up my right? I I don't know that there is a, you know, this this issue has been so framed in abortion, which is fine. I'm the first person to say I had an abortion when I was seventeen a mom with three kids best decision. I ever made that said you have to frame it. As like, this is if we all agree that a personal decision is a personal decision. And we say that may not be my decision. But you know, you're free to do what you want with your decision making abilities. There's that. But then there's also, you know, if we start broadening the way that we talk about this stuff, if we're talking about reproductive Justice, that means everything from paid family leave to sex education, which I know is another sticking point. Also, you know, luckily important critically important. It's equal pay. It's the ability to raise our kids. You know, the right to abortion means nothing if we don't have the ability to to raise our kids outside the scope of like a violent or impoverished or hungry. You know, whatever it is environment. You know, we productive Justice is black lives matter. It's also the choice to not have kids. You know? It's it's talking about menopause. It's all of it. You know? And so I think abortion becomes such a sticking point for people. And I get it. I get why. But you know, there is like a reframing and broadening of the conversation that I think is much more inclusive of all women in at all the different places. We are in our lives that I think is always like an important topic to bring up. You know, I'm I'm thinking here, and I'm thinking out loud like might get into trouble. But I don't know if reproductive Justice is the litmus test of the women's movement because there are other issues that are just as important, right? And I think that was the what we try to frame at the women's March, which meant that immigrant rights are women's rights. Right. So now, we can have nuances around. What are the policies around? How'd you get into the United States, obviously? But when we're talking about undocumented immigrants, and there's eleven million undocumented immigrants in this country. The majority of them are women and children that to me is also just as critical as reproductive Justice and just as critical to be board to protect and take care of those millions of women, and that's why it is a women's issue in the same with the criminal Justice system. So while obviously, I am pro choice, and while while obviously I fight for those policies, and I stand with my mother also had an abortion when we first came to this country because when she was abandoned by my father, she was also unbeknownst to her pregnant, and she was Catholic raised in Columbia and would never have considered or thought of having an abortion. But when she was faced with the reality of having two children, no money. No family. Really no house homeless on the street and pregnant she was like what do I do? And my mom tells the story often. So I have no problem sharing the story, and it took her a couple of months to make the decision to have an abortion. And that is something that saved literally my brother's life in my life because her being pregnant would have just put us over the edge who knows where we would have ended up. So I'm I'm I'm a staunch believer in in the right to choose. But I think framing it in that that is the issue is looking backwards and not necessarily looking forwards where we're trying to go with an intersectional moving, and and you know, to that point, you know, what we were attempting with unity principles is all these things intersect. So when you frame something not just as abortion, but as a reproductive Justice issue, then inevitably immigration is a reproductive Justice issue because families as we know are torn apart and criminal Justice is a reporter. Active just Justice issue. When so many of, you know, women sons are ending up in prison and. All these things are all connected. There's no way you can't. Once you start looking at it under the lens of intersection -ality. There is no one issue. Women are over fifty percent of the population. All of these issues affect all of us. And if they don't affect a woman specifically, they affect her partner or her child or someone in her family, and and and you know, until we start connecting all these issues of lost. So I think there's there's a reason why the the book together we rise starts and ends essentially the same way. And it's a it's a refund a quote two different quote that says. My liberation is bound in your liberation, and we truly believe that. Right. So we at the women's March put the most vulnerable at the center of the work that we're doing because as we uplift the most vulnerable than we are inevitably uplifting all of us when the most vulnerable rises up we all rise together. That's the title of the book. So it's it's it's utopia. And it's what we strive for. And it's war. We're striving to. But I do believe there is a road to getting there. It's a long long road. And we are not the first ones to walk on that road. There are many that walk before us, and there are many many many that will walk after us, but we all have to agree to that principle, so Palo. What's the best advice that you've ever been given about finding your voice? The best advice, and it really as everything kind in my life goes back to art. And being an artist the best art is the art that comes closest to the truth. And so I think with regards to finding my own voice. It's what is my truth, and that is a life long journey and and truth. My truth will also change throughout that journey. And I think it's it's both of those things constantly searching for the truth and being willing to pivot when the truth turns to another direction saffy. I mean, I don't know that anyone's ever given me any great advice. I mean, I think about. I mean, not specifically to that question. You know, I'm like a white lady who has a pretty big platform. I don't know that I've ever had a problem with my voice per se. Other than like the inherent, you know, men speaking over your and man's planning. And all that great stuff. You know? So for me, it's a question of like, you know, I think listening is a big part of my voice. I think like I finally come to a place with myself where you know, we talk so much about raising our girls to be courageous to be brave to be fierce. And I know that I am brave. But like do I think I embody the things that like the, quote unquote, feminist movement has been pushing out not necessarily what I'm really interested in is uplifting. Like the part of myself, which I know is the strongest which is like, my boner ability and my ability to listen, and my ability to think outside of experiences that directly affect me my. Compassion, my empathy. I like the fact that I'm not like a yeller, and I don't engage in fighting. I want to uplift lake qualities of nurturing and caregiving, and I want to extend those qualities to my sons, and in general, I want to broaden this conversation for boys. I think we spend so much time talking about our girls, and we spend no time talking about our boys in if we're flummoxed over how this whole metoo movement came about let's look at our boys. Let's start talking about that. My daughter's tan were reading books, we have copious books about puberty and feminism and all and websites, and I just took her to the teen vogue summit. And you know, it's a privilege that I get to take her to these things that I'm invited to these things. There's nothing I don't even know if my boys would be, well, you know, they're young. But I don't know if the where they would be welcome. Or where this conversation is happening for them. And you know, part of like where this moment needs to get to. Two is you know, like I said earlier, I think, you know, this moment was uplifted because white women who are privileged are speaking out. And that's amazing. I think you know, something that's been troubling..

Lawrence Schiller Washington Sarah Sophie Philly teen vogue menopause United States San Francisco harassment Pailin Trump Columbia reporter partner Palo fifty percent fifty three percent twelve years
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:59 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was then changed to the women's March on Washington DC and the team set up their headquarters in the offices of legendary newsman Harry Belafonte to as an organizer for the March on Washington in nineteen sixty three for the civil rights movement. But first how did the women's March get off the ground? Here's powell. You know? There was Teresa shook she put her her idea on Facebook because she had and she was angry. She was an organized she'd never organized before in our lives. She lives in Hawaii. She puts it on Facebook. It's like I'm going to watch on March on Washington on January twenty first touts with me. She goes asleep. She wakes up. It's ten thousand people are saying she's coming in. She's like, oh, I don't know what I'm doing. So she connects with Bob bland, Bob LAN, then connects with a whole bunch of other women, I'm white women. All of them are white. They're not working Nuys and some of them one of them. I don't know who actually says let's let's call it the million woman March. So that explodes on Facebook. Really because of the historical problems that feminism has had with white women and women of color in particular, black women, so that wound, and it's a generational wound. Reopens and those women I have to say those five women are six white women that were organized enough that time realize, oh, well, we don't have any women of color leading this with us. We need to reach out, and we need to find women of color, so Vanessa Rodwell was one of those women. She reaches out to Michael Skolnik. Michael Skolnik causal into beacon Carmen who are the national co chairs along with Bob blend and they come on board. The damage was done. Right. And what we did what I spent a lot of my time and a lot of other women of color organizers from the women's March spend our time on was reaching out to our community is to say, hey, yeah, they step in the beginning. But now, this is a different this is a different organization. It's it's it's all of us, and we are leading this. And so what I said during that time is look we don't have one woman of color at the or at the table. We don't have to we actually have like eight women of color leading this thing. Like, we are at the table, creating the vision the policy the unity principles, what this is going to be if we don't show up now than when are we going to show up and the reality is is that most women that showed up at the women's March at the March on Washington were white like that's the reality. But we had a lot of women of color, and we presented an intersectional movement. And we did it in a way in which for the first time on a main stage was happening in the United States. We did not come up with that concept. Kimberly Crenshaw did in the eighties. But nonetheless, we said okay here. Here's a side idea America run with it. And and they have and they didn't and people are fumbling through it and learning and and trying to figure it out. But I don't think that you can say that this movement is a white woman movement because the most marginalized voices have been at the leadership from the beginning. So thinking about the role of art again in bringing more people in to the movement and more women of color into the movement that did art player role in doing that as well as making sure that the women who are actually organizing it were diverse. Yeah. Art played a huge role in organization of the women's March. And we ended up with, you know, over one hundred fifty you know, really well respected while known artists who we leaned on very heavily to lead the charge on this stuff. You know because. We were getting so much pushback. But you know, when America Ferrera or Yara Shahidi or Tracy Ellis Ross posts about their support of the women's March. Suddenly, you know, a whole new audiences opened up to us we can speak more to this. But we partnered with an organization called amplifier and all the most iconic art work that you know, is now so, you know, visually like you're like, oh, it's women's March. You know, oh, that's the resistance that all came out of our partnership with amplifier who we continue to work with, you know, our consideration for who was going to be on the stage, which Powell was incredibly intentional and. You know, the collaboration that we had with artists and the work we did on social media and the work that we did in our messaging. I would say were a big part of the success. And I would just say so we had incredible honorary co chairs that were part of the women's March Gloria Steinem was one dollars worth that was another Angela Davis ladonna Harris. And then we had Mr. Harry Belafonte was also one of our honorary co chairs, and we organized out of his offices that was women's March headquarters. He left us his offices, which was incredible in one night. It was in December knows very cold. Because I remember very clearly I was late night mister be as we like to call him Mr. be shut up at the office as a surprise. And Mr. be at that time us eighty nine ninety years old. He had recently had a stroke. So he came in with his Walker was a big deal for him to be there in my son happened to be there that night too because I hadn't seen him for a while. So we're. Sitting at the table at his table in his office. My son's on his lap, Mr. be sitting there, and he. Is just like the most brilliant minds still. And he's telling a story about his time at 'em while he organized, a civil rights March the March on Washington, and you know, he had Bob Dylan mare, and and Joan Baez there, and and Lena Horne, they're like he got all of the artists there that was his role his job, and he said to us, and this is something that really has stuck with me. And he said it before obviously. But it has been kind of the our north star. Mine northstar during this time, and he said when the movement is strong the music is strong. And we see that now where we are our movement is very strong, and we see how art and specifically music is being influenced by the movement, you know, again, going back to black lives matter. There is no lemonade by beyond say without black lives matter. Right. Black lives matter moved inspired and forced. Beyond say tell that record to tell those stories and same thing with Kendrick Lamar like there is no Kendrick Lamar. He's an amazing lyricist. He's an amazing rapper, but what made him great in. That moment was the movement that was happening around him. So where we are today with women. We are starting to see the influence of this new women's movement in the art that is is is happening and is and his stemming from today. This is inflection point. I'm Lawrence Schiller. My guests are artists and activists parliament does and Sarah Sophie flicker to organizers of the women's March on Washington. We'll be back right after a break..

Washington Facebook Harry Belafonte Art Michael Skolnik Kendrick Lamar Teresa Hawaii Bob Lawrence Schiller United States Bob bland Gloria Steinem Vanessa Rodwell Nuys Kimberly Crenshaw America America Ferrera
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is inflection point. I'm Lawrence Schiller. My guests are and does and Sarah Steffi flicker to organizers of the women's March on Washington. Subscribe to the inflection point podcast, apple podcasts radio public and NPR. One. Okay. Sarah sophie's. I'd love to hear a bit more about your background. And what led you to being interested in women's issues and women's rights, and how art has played a role in that more you over the last few years? I mean, a a critical part of my background Paolo. Now loves the story makes me tell it didn't. I only started telling you this year. But I think like something foundational for me is so I'm Danish I was born in Denmark, my mom's Danish, my dad's American and the story goes, and it's a bit of a math in and possibly disputed at times. But I choose to believe it is. So my my mother's grandfather was in fact, the prime minister of Denmark, and he brought democratic socialism to Denmark, and when the Nazis invaded Denmark. The story goes that it was my grandfather's idea for the king to wear a star. And to tell the police force where a Jewish star. And then what ended up happening is most of the population put on a Jewish star. And it was impossible for the Nazis to tell who was who. And in my mind that city great act of two creative. It's creative resistance. It is an act of solidarity. And that's always a story. That's stuck with me. And my father initially was at the Justice department during the voting. Attacked and spent a lotta time in the south making sure people could vote so it's just sort of where I come from runs through your blood. Yes. The the women's rights injustice stuff. You know, I've always been more interested in intersectional feminism, and I went to mills college, I came up in San Francisco during the tail end of the aids crisis and had a lot of friends die and was a big act up was a big part of you know, my late teens and early twenties. So. You know, I guess coming from that background. I naively assumed we were further along as far as like the intersectional component of feminism. And it really wasn't until organizing the women's March that I truly felt like, oh, this is what intersection has been pushing and pushing and trying, but I don't think we're as far along as as we think we are in certainly, you know, the way that white women continue to vote proves that and. Just a whole confluence of things that led me to this. So what I'd love to talk about just in terms of being women artists. What some of the opportunities and challenges are in in that field. So like most industries the arts is tends to be male dominated in terms of who you see in the galleries and in the theaters and in the bylines, so sorry to Paula and hers of filmmaking. Have you come up against anything that has made it easier or harder for you to be a filmmaker because of your gender? Yes. I think the systematic sexism that exists within the within the film industry has been seen specifically with the whole Weinstein scandal. Right. You know, there's a big studying. I don't remember the numbers off the top of my head. But the there are more female directing students in MFA programs across the country than males. And yet the number of mails that get direct their first films after grad school is much higher than women and those women that make their first films drop by fifty seventy percent to who gets to make their second film. So as an example, for me, I made my first feature film narrative feature film documentaries as a different subject, but my I made my first narrative feature film eight years ago. I have yet to make my second narrative film, and that is for variety of reasons I wrote a book I had a baby the women's March happened. So my my attention has been skewed, but nonetheless, all of the filmmakers that I came of age with with our first features. Barry Jenkins is now made his second feature film onto his third Cary Fukunaga made his he's on his fourth fifth film. Those are just like two of my closest friends that have done it. So so that in of itself is a systematic and all the women that came of age with me when we were making those same films. I think there's one Rivasseau who's made more than has made her second film, everyone else's not so again, so that that is just examples of where we are have I personally encountered a specific act of overt sexism. Yeah. One. Have I encountered subversive sexism all the time. You know to be the only female that is honest that that is telling men what to do carries its own difficult ways to navigate through that. So if whether it's someone a man stepping in to direct, and how do I how do I navigate that in front of a set of fifty men is difficult. I should say fifty 'cause they hire a lot of women. But nonetheless, I how do I negate that to put that person in their place? Be let everybody else know. Yo you're not gonna do this on my stead and see do it in a way, that's truthful authentic to me, which is kind generous and loving, right? So it's definitely a lot of navigating. And I don't have the answers. But I definitely have been on the other side of it. What about in the performing arts, Sarah? So how how has that played out for you? So I've done everything from film. I've directed I've acted a theater stage. You know, I think. Part of this conversation that we're still getting to is the pervasive nature of all this stuff and one of the. You know, this staggering statistic is I think it's something like ninety six percent of the DJ, which is the directors guild is our men ninety six percent, and I don't know this districts on writer guild direct. You know, a pretty, sir. All that at any rate. I think it's this is an issue that is pervasive across all fields. I think the reason that it's this specific. This metoo moment really got picked up was because it was white privileged women who are telling their stories and white privileged men who were being accused of these things. I don't even really wanna talk about the ways in which as an artist it's been. This near thing. You know, I can't even count the amount of times that shady terrible things have happened to me. But it does that make the entertainment industry unique now, and you know, I have the platform and the privilege to Tom I story, but. You know, so many women don't and I imagine the abuses are as bad if not worse. This is inflection point. I'm Lauren Schiller talking with two of the historic.

Denmark Lawrence Schiller Sarah Steffi Sarah sophie Washington apple San Francisco NPR Paula Lauren Schiller Barry Jenkins Cary Fukunaga Justice department Paolo prime minister Weinstein Sarah Tom DJ writer
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Band, political cabaret and an area less. I know these women do a lot. What pal and I really try to focus on is. How do we change hearts and minds because we know that this administration for us. Sara Sophie's background is dramatically different from palace. Have. You heard the story of Torvald stoning. And when the Nazis invaded Denmark. The story goes it was my great grandfather's idea for the king to wear a star. And to tell the police force where a Jewish star. And then what ended up happening is most of the population put on a Jewish star. And it was impossible for the Nazis to tell who was who. Okay. So together Paulo and Sarah. Sophie, brought in all these artists to create artwork for the women's March created the why March videos and in celebration of the one year anniversary of the women's March. They've published a book called together we rise. And it documents the scenes behind the women's March from before during and after to the question of now, and it's out right now. We got together while I was in New York recently to talk about the power of art and culture in activism. Paula and Sarah. Sophie, like, many of us think of their lives as before. And after the election of Donald Trump. Here's what pallet told me. Before Donald Trump was elected. I was writer director a.

Sara Sophie Donald Trump Sarah Denmark Paula Paulo New York writer director one year
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Who was an organizer for the March on Washington in nineteen sixty three for the civil rights movement. But first how do the women's March get off the ground? Here's paula. You know, there was traces shook she put her her idea on Facebook because she had this idea and she was angry. She was an organized she'd never organized before in our lives. She lived in. Why she puts it on Facebook. Like, I'm going to watch on March on Washington on January twenty first who's with me, she goes asleep. She wakes up. It's ten thousand people are saying she's coming in. She's like, I don't know what I'm doing. So she connects with Bob bland, Bob bland and connects with a whole bunch of other women white women all of them are white. They're not working and some of them one of them. I don't know who actually says let's let's call it the million woman March. So that explodes on Facebook. Really because of the historical problems that feminism has had with white women and women of color in particular, black women, so that wound, and it's a generational wound. Reopens and those women I have to say those five women were six white women that were organized enough that time realize, oh, well, we don't have any women of color leading this with us. We need to reach out and we need to find women of color. So Vanessa rubble was one of those women she reaches out to Michael Skolnik, Michael Skolnik caused one to beacon Carmen who are the national co chairs along with Bob plan, and they come on board. The damage was done. Right. And what we did what I spent a lot of my time and a lot of the other women of color organizers from the women's March better spend, our time on was reaching out to our community is to say, hey, yeah, they step in the beginning. But now, this is a different this is a different organization. It's it's it's all of us, and we are leading this. And so what I said during that time is look we don't have one woman of color at the at the table. We don't have to we actually have like eight women of color leading this thing. Like, we are at the table, creating the vision the policy the unity principles, what this is going to be if we don't show up now than when are we going to show up and the reality is is that most women that showed up at the women's March at the March on Washington, we're white like that's the reality. But we had a lot of women of color, and we presented an intersectional movement. And we did it in a way in which for the first time on a main stage was happening the United States. We did not come up with that concept. Kimberly Crenshaw did in the eighties. But nonetheless, we said okay here. Here's this idea America run with it, and they have and they didn't and people are fumbling through it and learning and and trying to figure it out. But I don't think that you can say that this movement is a white woman movement because the most marginalized voices have been at the leadership from the beginning. So thinking about the role of art again in bringing more people in to the movement and more women of color into the movement that did art play a role in doing that as well. As making sure that the women who are actually organizing it were diverse. Yeah. Art played a huge role in the organization of the women's March. And we ended up with over one hundred and fifty you know, really well respected while known artists who we leaned on very heavily to lead the charge on this stuff. You know because. We were getting so much pushback. But you know, when America Ferrera or Yara Shahidi or Tracy Ellis Ross posts about their support of the women's March. Suddenly, you know, a whole new audiences opened up to us. We. Pelican speak marvelous. But we partnered with an organization called amplifier and all the most iconic art work that you know, is now so, you know, visually like you're like, oh, it's women's March. You know, oh, that's the resistance that all came out of our partnership with amplifier who we continue to work with our consideration for who was going to be on the stage, which Paolo was incredibly intentional, and, you know, the collaboration that we had with artists, and you know, the work we did on social media and the work that we did in our messaging. I would say were a big part of the success. And I would just say so we had incredible honorary co chairs that were part of the women's March Gloria Steinem was one dollars worth that was another Angela Davis ladonna Harris. And then we had Mr. Harry Belafonte was also one of our honorary co chairs, and we organized out of his offices that was. Women's March headquarters he left us his offices, which was incredible in one night. It was in December knows very cold. Because I remember very clearly I was late night. Mr. be as we like to call him, Mr. be shut up at the office as a surprise. And Mr. be at that time us eighty nine ninety years old. He had recently had a stroke. So he came in with his Walker was a big deal for him to be there in my son happened to be there that night too because I hadn't seen him for a while. So we're sitting at the table at his table in his office. My son's on his lap, Mr. be sitting there, and he. Is just like the most brilliant minds still. And he's telling a story is about time. Am while he organized, a civil rights March the March on Washington, you know, he had Bob Dylan Maher in jumbo says there, and and Lena Horne they're like he got all of the artists there that was his role his job, and he said to us, and this is something that really has stuck with me. And he said it before obviously. But it has been kind of the our northstar my north northstar during this time, and he said when the movement is strong the music is strong. And we see that now where we are movement is very strong, and we see how art and specifically music is being influenced by the movement, you know, again, going back to black lives matter. There is no lemonade by beyond say without black lives matter. Right. Black lives matter. Moved inspired an forced. On Seda tell that record to tell those stories, and we can same thing with Kendrick Lamar like there is no Kendrick Lamar. He's an amazing lyricist. He's an amazing rapper, but what made him great in. That moment was the movement that was happening around him. So where we are today with women. We are starting to see the influence of this new women's movement in the art that is is is happening and is and as stemming from today. This is inflection point. I'm Lawrence Schiller. My guests are artists and activists Palam does a and Sarah Sophie flicker to organizers of the women's March on Washington. We'll be back right after a break..

Washington Facebook Art Bob bland Kendrick Lamar Michael Skolnik Lawrence Schiller United States Gloria Steinem Mr. Harry Belafonte Kimberly Crenshaw America Vanessa rubble America Ferrera Bob plan Angela Davis ladonna Harris Pelican Bob Dylan Maher
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:13 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is inflection point. I am Lawrence Schiller. My guests are palim and desert and Sarah, Sophie flicker to organizers of the women's March on Washington. Subscribe to the inflection point podcast on apple podcasts radio public and NPR. One. Okay. Sarah sophie's. I'd love to hear a bit more about your background. And what led you to being interested in women's issues and women's rights, and how art has played a role in not more you over the last few years. I mean, a critical part of my background Paolo. Now loves story makes me tell it. He didn't. I only started telling you this year. But I think like something foundational for me is so I'm Danish I was born in Denmark moms, Danish, my dad's American and the story goes, and it's a bit of a math in and possibly disputed at times. But I choose to believe it is. So my my mother's grandfather was in fact, the prime minister of Denmark, and he brought democratic socialism to Denmark, and when the Nazis invaded Denmark. The story goes that was my great grandfather's idea for the king to wear a star. And to tell the police force where a Jewish star. And then what ended up happening is most of the population put on a Jewish star. And it was impossible for the Nazis to tell who was who. And in my mind, that's great act of it's a creative. It's creative resistance. It is an act of solidarity. And that's always the story. That's stuck with me. And my father initially was at the Justice department during the voting. Attacked and spent a lotta time in the south making sure people could vote so let's just sort of where I come from. Yes. The the women's rights and Justice stuff. I've always been more interested in intersectional feminism, and you know, I went to mills college, I came up in San Francisco during the tail end of the aids crisis and had a lot of friends die. In was a big act up was a big part of my late teens and early twenties. So. You know, I guess coming from that background. I naively assumed we were further along as far as like the intersectional component of feminism. And it really wasn't until organizing the women's March that I truly felt like, oh, this is what intersection Audi as you know, I've been pushing and pushing and trying, but I don't think we're as far along as as we think we are in certainly, you know, the way that white women continue to vote proves that and. Just a whole confluence of things that led me to this. So I'd love to talk about just in terms of being women artists. What some of the opportunities and challenges are in in that field. So like most industries the arts is tends to be male dominated in terms of who you see in the galleries in the theaters, and you know, in the bylines so sorry to you Paula in terms of filmmaking. Have you come up against anything that has made it easier or harder for you to be a filmmaker because of your gender? Yes. I think the systematic sexism that exists within the within the film industry has been seen specifically with the whole Weinstein scandal. Right. You know, there's a big studying. I don't remember the numbers off the top of my head. But the there are more female directing students in MFA programs across the country than males. And yet the number of mails that get direct their first films after grad school is much higher than women and those women that make their first films drop by fifty seventy percent to who gets to make their second film. So as an example, for me, I made my first feature film narrative feature film. Documentaries ends a different subject. But my I made my first narrative feature film eight years ago. I have yet to make my second narrative film, and that is for a variety of reasons, I wrote a book had a baby the women's March happened. So my attention has been skewed, but nonetheless, all of the filmmakers, I came of age with with our first features. Barry Jenkins is now made his second feature film onto his third Cary Fukunaga made his he's on his fourth fifth film. Those are just two of my closest friends that have done it. So so that in of itself is a systematic and all the women that came of age with me when we were making those same films. I think there's one Rivasseau who's made more than has made a second film, everyone else's not so again, so that that is just examples of where we are have I personally encountered a specific act of overt sexism. Yeah. One. Have I encountered subversive sexism all the time. You know to be the only female that is on upset that is telling men what to do carries its own difficult ways to navigate through that. So if whether it's someone a man stepping in and trying to direct, and how do I how do I navigate that in front of a set of fifty men is difficult. I should say fifty 'cause hire a lot of women. But nonetheless, like, how do I navigate that to April that person in their place be let everybody else know? Yo you're not gonna do this my set and see do it in a way that's truthful nothing to me, which is kind and generous and loving, right? So it's definitely a lot of navigating. And I don't have the answers. But I definitely have been on the other side of it. What about on the performing arts? So how how has that played out for you? So I've done everything from film. I've directed I've acted a then theater stage. You know, I think. Part of this conversation that we're still getting to is the pervasive nature of all this stuff and one of the. This staggering statistic is I think it's something like ninety six percent of the DJ, which is the directors guild is our men ninety six percent, and I don't know this statistic on writer guild direct. You know, pretty, sir. All that at any rate. I think it's this is an issue that is pervasive across all fields. I think the reason that it's this specific. This metoo moment really got picked up was because it was white privileged women who are telling their stories and white privileged men who were being accused of these things. I don't even really wanna talk about the ways in which as an artist it's been. You know, this, you know, I can't even count the amount of times that shady terrible things have happened to me. But does that make the entertainment industry unique? No. And you know, I have the platform and the privilege to tell my story, but. You know, so many women don't and I imagine the abuses are as bad if not worse..

Denmark Sarah sophie Lawrence Schiller Washington apple Audi Justice department San Francisco NPR Paula Barry Jenkins Paolo Cary Fukunaga Justice prime minister Weinstein DJ writer ninety six percent fifty seventy percent
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:08 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Working in narrative films as well as documentary and most of my films dealt with immigration undocumented, specifically immigration post, Donald Trump installed exploded after Donald Trump personally. Anyways. I started working in volunteering at the women's March. So I was a national organizer for the women's March and the artistic director of the women's March and in the year since the women's marches happened, I've continued to work there continue to do our cultural activism stuff as well as some films, but not so much anymore and Sarah Sophy before the election for a while. Now, I've been working in the cultural political space and sort of merging the two so that's everything from political theater group called the citizens, man. I'm the creative director, and I do trap ease with and I worked previously with art not war making cultural campaigns for organizations like Emily's list. We worked tangentially with the Clinton campaign and things of that nature, and since I'd say five days after the election. I have been a national organizer. The women's March and the great love story of the women's marches that Powell and I found each other. And now we get to make all this incredible work together. So. I need to hear about how you became entropy is artist. I heard this story are affair has not included this story. Interesting. I don't know why you keep doing it. Because I I don't know the idea of being a good story about that. So I just was pretty serious dancer until I was around fifteen and then I just wanted to find a way to segue, the dance that my body knows into something that I could perform and a medicine credible woman. Chelsea bacon. Who is a historically? Amazing trapeze aerialist, and she just started teaching me. And then we started the citizens band together. Like six months later, I've been performing not that well since the beginning of my career, so I guess maybe like three or four months after the election of like a month or so after the women's March, my husband is down the street with our seven year old, and they saw some circus thing and my seven year old said, oh, mommy would. I loved that. If Hillary Clinton had won the election, and my husband told me that and I was like damn I'm not gonna let these must steal my joy. And I was so grateful that he you know, he had that my seven year old had that insight because then I ended up performing and there's the part of this week. We can't normalized and like I want to talk about exit so important, but also like you have to keep your life normal. And I think it's extremely important. Yes. It's extremely important to in the keeping of your life normal also realize that because we are resisting. And this it's every day, something new and something crazy and things we never imagined were possible are now happening in a bad way. That we do get tired, and it's okay to get tired because to stay Tanaka tired as just impossible. But in that top when you're tired you need to be able to arrest. And what is that thing that allows you to rest isn't meditation? Is it dancing is it being a trapeze artists is it singing, and then in that resting you get more strength. And ultimately, you you you focus on what is the thing. That is pushing you to organize to resist in at the end, I think this is what I say all the time. No matter what it is. What is the centers love, it might be an issue? But it's love for that issue. So for me, it's the immigrant community. Right. So I am an immigrant though. I'm not an undocumented immigrant. I've been in the space for eight years. And when I am at my darkest place when I want to give up when the dream act that was supposed to be passed is not being passed. What is the thing that gets me out of bed? It's my love for the immigrant community. It is my love for those. That are undocumented because of their getting up and fighting everyday, then how can I not when I have the ability to be safe in this country to a certain extent. And so all those things resting focusing on what you love. And then that thing that gives you strength is what will get us through the next four years. We'll power I'd love to hear what your immigration story is. I mean, I know that that it's been part of what drives you. Yeah. That zone to tell us tell us. I'm from Columbia. I was born in Columbia. My mom was very young. She had me she had me at twenty two. And she had my brother when she was eighteen and so she immigrated to the United States with my father who had come a few months earlier. And so we immigrated to Los Angeles. So we were the only Colombians and ally. Yeah. The only ones they were like, oh, what are you? And so we came to the United States to Los Angeles. We had no family here. My mom, didn't speak English. She barely had a high school education. And then after a few months of being in the United States, my father abandoned us, so he left my mom at the age of twenty four with a three year old and the six year old, no English. No family, no education with like two hundred dollars in her pocket. And so my mom. Made miracles happen. Every day she made the impossible happen every day. And we went through being homeless. We went through living pain on welfare we went through living in the projects. But through that all of that, she was able to get an education or solve shouldn't community college. She worked at a fast food restaurant. And she says that she learned English from Italian woman that didn't speak English. So to this day. My mom's English is cute, but not the best. Exactly. And so she put to kids through college. We both have our masters degrees. She you know, we have our own families. She I we each on houses. Like, we in many ways are the epitome of the American dream. And that is the thing that we all need to fight for no matter what I'll or how what is your belief system. That is the thing that we need to fight for. Why did she leave Columbia? You know, she left because like how so many immigrants. Do she wanted a better future for her children? She was not going to find the feature that she wanted and Columbia in Columbia. She knew that her future for her children was in the United States. So she left everything that she knew she left her family. She left her her friends. She left her security in her safety to go. Follow a dream for her children. And that's what immigrants do across across the world or they're fleeing war or they're fleeing hunger. But ultimately, it's to better the other. It's rarely to better yourself. You want provide for your family, whether it's back home, or whether it's for your children that are with you. So what made you want to become a filmmaker? You know, my road to being an artist is a very different road as immigrant children. There is a lot of responsibility to. To make sure that your parents sacrifices. Live up to the life that you're living. So that translates to beat a doctor being a lawyer being teacher being something it's like very stable. So when I decided that I wanted to artists my mom hit the fan. She was like what the Italian about. She didn't talk to me for like three weeks. He was like you can't do that you're gonna start and come to this country for you the star of. No, no, no, no, no. And I finally sat down I told my mom. I was like mom. This is what I wanted to do. And the reason why I want to do it is because I've found my voice I found a way in which I can express myself. This is who I am. And you can either support me or you cannot. But this is what I'm gonna deal since. Then my mom has become my biggest fans, she loves everything that I do. But that responsibility from feeling responsibility of needed to be a lawyer or a doctor or some sort of professional has shifted to what are the types of stories that I'm telling right, that's my responsibility. And so my responsibility as an artist as a filmmaker and even as an activist now is to shine a light on. On. Women in particular who stories we don't often hear who we walk by on the street, and we ignore them. And to me, those women are the women that I grew up with and they're the unsung heroes of America. They're the unstable. They are the fabric of America, the dishwashers the janitors the caregivers the caretakers. And so that now and has been my my goal is a filmmaker is to tell those stories with love tell those stores with dignity because so often those stories are told installations and untruthful ways and tell those stories honestly, so that those stories can be the bridge to other Americans and other people around the world. I'm Laurin Schiller. This is inflection point. I'm talking with Parlamento and Sarah, Sophie flicker to organizers of the women's March on Washington and co creators of the book together we rise which came out for the one year anniversary of the March..

United States Columbia Hillary Clinton Donald Trump director Sarah Sophy Los Angeles America Powell Emily Chelsea bacon Tanaka Laurin Schiller Washington Parlamento Sophie
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We felt was a shocking turn of events. And we were not alone. We have seen a narrative shift. We have seen a culture shift. We are in the middle of a cultural revolution. And how did that happen? I firmly believe that that happened with a lot of things coming together. But art was at the center of that storytelling was at the center of that sharing our stories whether it was online, whether it was on videos with was writing stories, whether it was writing poetry, whether it was making art visual art has been incredible this past year. Whether it was an incredible music artists were at the forefront of that cultural movement. And so now we're seeing that cultural shift. That's parliament dozer the artistic director of the women's March. She curated the speakers and the musical performances with Jenny says she led on partnerships organized all of the artists of visual direction of the March and all the artwork in storytelling as a first generation immigrant, a Colombian American and a woman of color representation is near and dear to her heart. So you better believe she was intentional about including underrepresented voices and women of color. What is important about that story is that what makes the United States beautiful empowering and NY it holds so much. Hope is that. An immigrant that was fatherless homeless and abandoned is still able to stand up against the president of the United States in the most historic powerful way possible. Besides arranging the diverse and powerful lineup of speakers and performers ranging from America Ferrera to Gloria Steinem to Elliot's Shabazz, Malcolm X's daughter Palo also co-founded the resistance revival. Chorus with Sarah, Sophie flicker to bring more joy into the movement by bringing back old songs and creating new ones..

United States Jenny Gloria Steinem America Ferrera Malcolm X president NY director Sarah Sophie Shabazz Palo Elliot
"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:21 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chorus artists activists parliament dosa and Sarah. Sophie, flicker connect to the moments of joy that come with being a part of history in the making here. How women use the power of art and culture and activism in what they learned documenting the women's March for the newly released book together we rise. That's inflection point coming up at eight here on kqed public radio. This is a special report from NPR news. What's next for Brett Kavanagh's domination? I'm Jeremy Hobson, well, Christine Blasi. Ford seemed fragile and overwhelmed by the process of testifying. Judge Cavanaugh was pugnacious and defiant as he categorically denied her allegations as to sex. This is not a topic that I ever imagined would come up at a judicial confirmation hearing. But I want to give you a full picture of who I was. Never had sexual intercourse or anything close to it. During high school for many years after that. In some crowds is probably a little outwardly shy about my inexperience. Tried to hide that the same time. I was also inwardly proud of it. For me and the girls who I was friends with. That lack of major rampant sexual activity in high school was a matter of faith and respect and caution. Kevin also denounced the Democrats for raising Blasi Ford story late in the confirmation process. This whole two week effort has been a calculated an orchestrated political hit fueled with apparent pent up anger about President Trump and the two thousand sixteen election. Fear that has been unfairly stoked about my judicial record revenge on behalf of the Clintons and millions of dollars in money from outside left wing opposition groups. This is a circus. The consequences will extend long pass my nomination. The consequences will be with us for decades. This grotesque and coordinated character assassination will dissuade competent and good people of all political persuasions from serving our country. Let's take a closer look now at judge Kavanagh's testimony with NPR's, Nina, totenberg, NPR's, Ron Elving, Mara Liasson, Scott detro-, and Amy how of Scotus blog. Scott. You're on Capitol Hill. How did Cavanaugh do today? What what what is the takeaway from his testimony? Boy, the hearing room could not have been any different from the morning to the afternoon. I think Cavanaugh surprised everybody the the part of his testimony that was released yesterday beforehand pretty much mirrored almost word for word at times what he said on Fox News. He didn't know he wasn't at this party. He's never done anything like this. He's not questioning that Ford may have been assaulted once. But it wasn't him. He said all that it is testimony. But he went on the attack. He went after Democrats he said that they have turned advise and consent into seek and destroy. They he called the confirmation process. A disgrace a circus. He was a political animal in a way that I've not really seen anyone up for the supreme court ever act that way before and it seemed to be a clear calculated attempt of go on the attack and say, this is not fair you've destroyed my life. You've destroyed. My reputation you're trying to tear me down at all costs. Mara a calculated attempt. You think of what President Trump was thinking as he watched that? And he has tweeted about this. He says judge cavenaugh showed America exactly why I nominated him. His testimony was powerful honest, and riveting I would say Trump watch that said I couldn't have said it better myself. I mean, it sounded very Trumpy. Trumpian very full of grievance. The left is out to get me. I'm gonna fight back. I'm gonna counterpunch ten times harder. This is all a plot. It's a big conspiracy to undermine me direct my reputation. This was the White House was not happy with the way. Brad Kavanagh came off in the Fox News interview. Trump felt he needed to be more aggressive, and he certainly was Jeremy that reference that he made to revenge of the Clintons. That's not just about the two thousand sixteen election. Brett Cavanaugh was an integral part of Kevin stars Kansas dictation, Kevin Ken Starr's investigation in nineteen ninety eight that led to the impeachment of Bill Clinton, and he was pressing for can start to take the approach when he testified of going at the lurid. Details of exactly what Bill Clinton was alleged to have done with with Monica Lewinsky. And there was a debate within the people who are preparing that testimony as to how lurid to get and Brad Kavanagh we're saying we need to go after this. And we need to go after it painful piece by piece, and we really need to bring all this to people's attention. So there is reason for him to think that the Clintons might have some sort of an animus, but the thing that was so amazing as he said. Something to the effect. What goes around comes around? And you could say that about him the memo he wrote to Ken Starr was he listed a set of questions. He said should be asked to President Clinton which were incredibly detailed anatomical sexual questions about what he did with Monica Lewinsky, he argued hard for that line of questioning, I don't think it ever happened. But the kind of politics of personal destruction that he certainly was engaged in. Now, he feels angry Amy how this is a person who may well be on the supreme court soon. After going on a tirade like that in his testimony. Does it? How can he be an impartial judge on the court after that? I think he would point to where he has been in the past. He and he referenced this several times you talked about the American Bar association's evaluation of him and how his judicial temperament once on the bench. And so I think that would be what what we would expect him to try to do would be if he is confirmed to really carry on business as usual as if this had never happened and hope that nobody moved to recuse him from various cases. And what happens if the Democrats do take the Senate, they decide to hold to hold hearings and get all the witnesses that they couldn't get before the committee or they couldn't get the BI to investigate. I'm glad you brought up. Live forever because that was a big part of the Democrats questioning I want to listen here to part of Senator dick Durbin democrat of Illinois asking Brett cavenaugh about an FBI investigation. You started off with an impassioned statement at the beginning. And I can imagine try to imagine what you've been through your family's been through. And I'm sure I wouldn't get close to it. But it was I'm I'm sure I would impassioned statement. And then the course of it. You said I welcome any kind of investigation. I quote you. I welcome any kind of investigation. I've got a suggestion for you. Right now. Turn to your left in the front row. Don Mcgann counsel to President Donald Trump. Ask him to suspend this hearing and nomination process until the FBI completes us investigation of the charges made by Dr Ford and others. And goes to bring the witnesses forward and provides information to this hearing and the conversation continued, I welcome whatever the committee wants to do because I'm telling the truth. I want to know what you want to die. I'm telling you want to know what you wanna do. China's sent innocent of this charge. You're prepared for an FBI investigators reach conclusions. You reached the conclusion owner they do investigate questions on. Flames judge you can't say you're at the beginning. I wanted to. Any kind of investigation is thing was in Ron this. This thing was sprung at the last minute after being held by staff. You know, judge and I called. Immediately. If there is no truth to her charges. The FBI investigation will show that or are you afraid that they might not? FBI does not reach. You know, you know, this is, you know, that's a funny question because the FBI doesn't reach conclusions provide the three oh three. Oh, two. So I can explain to people who don't know what that is. They just go and do what you're doing ask questions and then type up a report Mara. Why wasn't there an FBI investigation? Why doesn't he want to say I'll have that is a big mystery to me. I mean, Nina can explain this better. But the FBI did investigate the Anita hill allegations because the White House asked them to if the White House ask the FBI to investigate these allegations. They would why he was so intent on not saying he wanted one. I don't even see what it would cost him to say sure, I'll take any kind of investigation I'll testify anywhere anytime under oath, not under oath. Part of the reason he may not want them to. And I don't think it would take that long. Is that repeatedly in the hearing today he said look every witness who was there says it didn't happen now. That's not whatever. Every every written this who is there said, they didn't remember it. But they were interviewed provided one page letters through their attorney saying, we don't remember. And that is not the kind of thing that the FBI does it goes out. It looks people in the eye. It asks them questions follow up questions asked him if anybody can corroborate that. That sort of thing. I think the FBI I'm not one hundred percent sure of this actually turned up an additional corroborative witness for a Nieta hill. And then more came out as it became took the FBI three days. Right. It didn't take very long. No. Well, the FBI started ahead of ahead of that to be fair Joe Biden when he learned about these charges finally after being pressed by some of his fellow senators said who said we have to do something said, all right? I'm going to ask the Bush Whitehouse, George W Bush White House to reopen the investigation and send people sending agents to interview her to interview him and has turned out. Some corroborating witnesses as well. Scott detro- at the capitol. What what are you hearing this evening as as we take all of this in the testimony from Christine Blasi for the testimony from judge Cavanaugh? Well, what's going to happen next is that we we have nailed down a report that the judiciary committee is going to move forward as planned meet tomorrow morning at nine thirty to hold a vote on judge Kavanagh's nomination shortly after the hearing ended a John Cornyn who's the number two Republican in the Senate. And sits on the committee came out and told reporters, I think we're ready to vote looks like they're gonna vote tomorrow. It looks like the Republican party is moving forward with this nomination. Of course, Jeff flake is one of the few on decided Republican vote. He does sit on the committee if he chooses to vote against judge cavenaugh, we would know that tomorrow in committee, and my understanding is the the nomination could still move to the floor. I think it's the floor and not the. Committee. That would really be the end of judge Cavanaugh if enough Republicans have turned against him after today. Now, I saw a report that there was going to be a vote on the Senate floor on Saturday. But my understanding of the Senate rules, the the when it sent to the floor and has to sit there for a certain amount of time. And then before it's taken up, and then there's thirty hours of debate. Thirty hours of debate. It would be an initial procedural vote. Not not the final vote that what could happen over the weekend setting starting the clock running for for a vote early next week, Ron if that happens, and it gets to the Senate floor, then the question is going to be what a couple of moderate Republican senators, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, do that appears to be the pivotal question. Although if they decide to vote for him, there's every possibility that several Democrats in red states that went very heavily for Donald Trump won. I think by forty point are going to be pretty strongly tempted to vote. Yes as well. Because they don't really want to have to go back and explain why they voted for Neal Gorsuch, but not in this case for Brad Kavanagh. Maybe they'll have enough on the basis of today to make that boat. But it would be a lot easier for them. If they can't stop him. If they can't make the difference. If they don't have the two Republicans, then why should they make the sacrifice in terms of their re election in just forty days over something that's already. A train this left the station. Right. And I don't think you're going to see any of those Democrats being the deciding vote I would say until the Blasi Ford allegations, you probably would have seen the three Gorsuch votes, be the three cavenaugh votes..

FBI Judge Cavanaugh President Donald Trump Brad Kavanagh judge cavenaugh Senate Kevin Ken Starr Clintons Ron Elving President Clinton Brett Kavanagh Christine Blasi Monica Lewinsky Dr Ford NPR judge Kavanagh President Jeremy Hobson Mara Liasson Scott detro
"sarah sophie" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The EMMY for last night and hear about that. Oh, no. I missed that the the the big television awards show going on in case you're wondering yes, indeed. They got political. There were moments last night. It started off course on the red carpet where people were trying to make these fashion statements in the political ones that they'd like to make. It's not just about looking good. It's about sending the right message blackish star Jennifer Lewis for a Nike sweatshirt to the award show. Normally that would be seen as a tragedy that someone more sweatshirt to award show, but she wore a Nike sweatshirt because she was very proud of Colin Kaepernick, she said that she was wearing Nike to applaud that company for supporting column capper, Nick and his protest quote against racial injustice and police brutality. So that's why she's wearing Nike said it was custom Nike because she had some drag queens, add beads to the sweatshirt. Okay. Yeah. I used to watch blackish, and it got to political and I stopped watching. I cannot tell you the number of shows I've stopped watching just because I got tired of being lectured. It was kind of a good show. It took a horrible turn into politics. And I was like, well, I didn't I didn't hang around that long. But I definitely I just saw a couple episodes. I liked it. And that's too bad. Let's see who else here. Glow director. Jesse Peretz his wife. Sarah. Sophie flicker was walking down the red the red carpet with her arm exposed and written in sharpie was stopped Cavanaugh and a phone number to call. So they're trying to stop right Cavanaugh. Also, the the the time's up organization, which deals with the these all these metoo allegations route Hollywood where there really are tremendous amount of sexual harassment and assault problems. They were handing out pins to the people who were going to the red carpet yesterday that said, quote, I believe Christine blazey Ford as well as I still believe Anita hill. How many of those people who were handed the pin? It had to be explained to head explained to them who she was before they put the pin on this as they support her. I don't know. Good question. Maybe all of them. Maybe. There are also political moments onstage as well. Emmys host Michael shea one of the one of the cast members of SNL had this to say my mother's.

Nike Jennifer Lewis EMMY Anita hill Cavanaugh Jesse Peretz Christine blazey Ford Sophie flicker Colin Kaepernick SNL director Michael shea Sarah Hollywood Nick harassment assault
"sarah sophie" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"sarah sophie" Discussed on WREK

"For me hey the two me while the women's marches from january have come and gone activism in the fight for justice continue women's march artistic director paolo mendoza and strategic adviser a national organizers sarah sophie flicker use the power of art and culture and activism and for the one year anniversary of the women's march this past january they released a book called together we rise which documents the scenes behind the march before joining and after k l w's inflection point host lawrence schiller spoke with these women who were both national organizers for the women's march and leaders of the resistance revival chorus these activist artist see their purpose as connecting fellow members of the resistance to the moments of joy and transcendence that come with being part of history in the making mendoza begins before donald trump was elected eliza writer director filmmaker working in narrative films as well as documentary and most my films dealt with immigration um undocumented specifically immigration post donald trump since the world exploded after donald trump personally anyways um i started working in volunteering at the woman's march so i was a national organiser for the women's march and the artistic director of the woman's march and in the year since the woman's march has happened i've continued to work there um continued to do art cultural activism stuff as well as some films but not so much anymore ends sarah sophie before the election for a while now i've been working in the cultural political space in sort of merging the two so that's everything from a political theatre group called the citizens man than the creative director him and i do trap he's with and a i worked previously with are not war making you know cultural campaigns for organizations like emily's list we worked certeain generally with the clinton campaign and things of that nature and um since a i'd say you know five days after the election i have been a national organiser at the women's march and the great loves story of the women's marches that powell learn i've found each other and and now we get to make all this incredible work together so um serves of the i guess may be like three or four months after the election of like a month or so after the women's march my husband's walking as truth are seven year old and they saw some circus thing.

paolo mendoza strategic adviser lawrence schiller donald trump director sarah sophie powell emily clinton four months seven year five days one year