2 Episode results for "Sarah Rainsford"

Monday 6 September

Monocle 24: The Briefing

30:58 min | Last month

Monday 6 September

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the sixth of september. Two thousand and twenty one on monocle twenty four. The briefing is brought to you in association with novartis. Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you. Live from studio one here as midori house in london. I am marcus hip coming up on today's program. According to specific law. I've been designated a threat to national security such not allowed into the country. The bbc correspondent sara. Rains forced has been told that she's no longer welcome in russia. We'll speak to her about her expulsion. Also head will examine the scale of the task facing the un. Sue envoy in yemen unscrewed. Barry plus the a immobility fair kicks off today. We'll check in with our theron. Sports correspondent gabrielli and alita later in the program. I'm nick nathan. I'll be giving around up at idell mobile. I live from milan. All that's right here on the briefing with me markus hippie. The bbc's moscow correspondent sara. Raynsford was forced to leave russia at the end of august when her visa expired. Russian state media said ver- move was in retaliation for the refusal of the uk to grant visas to russian journalists. Bus raynsford antar. Employers believe she was targeted because of her reporting which even saw her heckled live on tv. By the belarusian president alexander lukashenko and his supporters. I'm pleased to say that. Sarah has made. It's back to london and joins me on the line. Now good afternoon to you and a warm. Welcome to the briefing. Sarah is a good i to tell us in your own words. What exactly happened. You say this is about my visa not being extended but actually before. I even found out about that. I was heading back to russia from belarus a story proposing there and i was stopped at the border and i wasn't allowed through by the russian border guards who said that i've been put on an fsp blacklists and being declared a threat to national security in russia and as such i wouldn't be allowed back into the country which is obviously a pretty shocking kind of ten of affairs. I've been living and working. Russia this time for some seven years and before that on an author the two decades basically the entire vladimir putin's presidency so we told that i was a national security threats inbound mentoring. The country was a pretty major step and something i hadn't really seen coming to you. Were allowed to enter the country but just to basically collect your belongings. Well yeah not took twelve hours of pretty intense and forensic negotiations from the bbc. And as i understand it from the british embassy as well Calls to the kremlin and to the foreign ministry to find out what was going on but we still don't know the obviously doesn't disclose details when it designated security threats We don't really know why this happened near the official line. That i'm getting from the foreign ministry. Is that this is retaliation for a russian journalist who was denied. Leave to remain in the uk but that case was a two years ago and at the time nobody made any fuss tool and in fact when the foreign ministry will questions Live on air by an independent tv channel. About who exactly. There's journalist was what their name was. Even what agency. They worked for performance. You spokeswoman was weaving ducking and diving and wouldn't even name the reporter so it's quite weird case to be considered retaliation for this is obviously the russian government going after the bbc but it also feels pretty personal to absolutely oviously. You had been working in russia for a very long time and obviously this came as an absolute surprise. But did you have a feeling that something like this may happen eventually. One day considering the change you've seen in russia over the years. Well in my case. I already knew that i've been singled out certainly within the bbc but also within the the foreign journalists pool in moscow because a year or so ago now i was onto short-term visas i always had an annual visa on your accreditation. I'm pretty much no problem working in russia but a year ago that change. They put me on three months visas and then eventually they put me on a two months visa. Give them only at the very last moment on the very last day at one point. It was new year's eve. When i got my my actual visa extensions. They were trying to keep me on a pretty short rope and sending signals that they were kind of single be ounces. I say so. I was a little bit apprehensive that eventually my time russia was going to come to a fairly some end but the fact that i've been declared a security threat. That is something i never saw coming. I mean we've been followed in the past by the ss. Be little bit hassled. In the provinces there have been problems of course and of course there is the the whole sort of backgrounds. All of this which is the massive deterioration in relations between the west and russia will broadly but certainly between the uk and russia and we always thought that if something bad happened in the uk To somebody from rt for example. The russian pro-kremlin tv channel. Then perhaps they would retaliate against the because the russian government's the us as an equivalent. But this was nothing to do with artie. In the end it was something to do with unnamed journalist from the tass news agency two years ago allegedly. Exactly do you think how exceptional do you think. Your cases saw something other western journalists to be facing as well but it's made the other western journalists nervously show. I can tell you that. I mean am i leaving party. It was. It was what everyone was asking. Who's going to be next who they get into to single out next so i think perhaps that was part of the the whole point sending a signal trying to make people nervous because the the sort of broader climate is one of a of an increasing increasingly repressive environment for journalism in russia not so much for foreign journalists we always thought we were protected somewhat until this happened about particularly for russian journalists. The independent russian press is facing unprecedented pressure. They are being labeled foreign agents. Those who are not showing the kremlin line. An independent voices. Independent chris and the media now people basically being being labeled enemies of the state and finding it definitely increasingly difficult to operate in russia today so it is a difficult environment and and the thing that they foreign press now to some extent being dragged into that. What is happening next. Sarah thank you may for example. Be able to go back to russia. Eventually i would like to think. I could go back one day but i've been told and handed a piece of paper that says that i'm banned entry indefinitely so whilst they the foreign ministry publicly is saying oh will they let in our journalists well. Let's airbag they know full. Well that's not going to happen with this particular person and so therefore my own fate in that sense. It's pretty much sealed. So that's for me. That's a very difficult moment. Because i've been going to russia for three decades now. I i went there in nineteen ninety-two as a student and sort of be torn away from a country that i consider my my second home is really a kind of difficult. Phoenix of personal ties. Deep personal ties. I have with russia. And you know. I think that's kind of hard to come to terms with not only the fact that i'm being taken away from a story that i've been setting for many years and i wanted to go on telling but also that pests napping one away from from a country that are going to love how hopeless do think the situation with freedom of speech and journalism when you look at the future of russia while i don't think it's hopeless because when you visit the independent journalists who is still battling on despite any think it's pretty inspiring at today because some of them had told me that being labeled foreign agents was actually for them a sort of badge of quality it showed that their voices mattered and that they were saying something that people needed to hear and yes. There's not many of them. Few of them a brave brave enough to continue doing that. Kind of many of them have very recently had to leave. The country headed into exile. A lot of them are losing their jobs because they simply can't get funding so independent that meteo anymore when they're being labeled as as hostile organizations says difficult to get. Advertisers for example is also difficult even to get contributors to speak to those kinds of meteorologist stations and yet still they're all russians who are continuing to do really deep important investigative work and to tell stories that the the pro kremlin media. Don't tell so that is inspiring it does give you hope because russia is not. It's government so much deeper more complex country and situation. What does it feel like being back in the uk to feel any any any relief. At least you have a dog friend over there with your i not my home for more than twenty years so coming back so the case a weird word. I haven't been here for a long time. So i wish i was in russia louis. Thank you sarah. That was the bbc journalist. Sarah raynsford and no here is monaco's immature with the day's other news headlines. Thanks marcus. The taliban claim they are in complete control of the afghan province of panja which is in the east of the country. The valley became the home of the national resistance front which had until now held out against taliban forces as they took control of the rest of afghanistan taiwan says lodge incursion of chinese military jets flew interests ed fence zone yesterday taipei believes nineteen aircraft including fighters and bombers entered. Its so called defense. Identification zone taiwanese military chiefs have complained about such missions over a year. And you opinion polls suggest. Japan's voters want the country's pandemic response chief taco to become their next prime minister. The poll indicates kono is the favourite to replace your shahida suge who announced that he is standing down at the end of last week. And the i. A immobility show opens in munich today. Not only as you organizers. Hope to prove that this kind of trade fair is still worthwhile for the likes of audi and the cds benz. They are also tasked with convincing the press and public. We'll have more on the ira mobility show a bit later on today's program those the day's headlines bacteria mockus. Thank you very much emma now. Saudi arabia says it has intercepted three missiles and three drones fired by who the rebels in neighboring yemen. The latest developments underscores the scale of the task facing the new u n envoy to yemen hans screened. Barry let's get the latest now with journalists. I a craig ionas irregular Here on monocle twenty four and tess recently returned from yemen. Welcome to the bro program. So i own a. How serious was this latest attack by. Who thrills on saudi arabia. Well the he. He's a client several cal e drones and ballistic missiles to reach the eastern region of saudi arabia. I'm with a client. That target was to hit their an facilities and the will also strikes. The societies have intercepted further south on the border with yemen. In san nat. I mean we've seen an escalation Again in these cross-border attacks in the last few weeks some of which have caused injuries and damage to buildings and homes which appears to have been the case this time but the saudis are insisting that they're able to intercept most of those missiles during coming obviously these these kind of homemade drones using a more difficult to intercept But certainly you know who have got arranged now with that ballistic missiles and these. Uav's drones the is far beyond what they had at the beginning of the conflict. And this is what we've seen. Since two thousand fifteen really is the capacity to carry out cross-border attacks and the range the distance that they can reach into the saudi kingdom extending as time has gone on with the increased support of iran has kind of extended that capabilities as well. Now the same weekend when this happened. Swedish hans croon about took on the role of you and a special envoy to yemen watts. Awaiting him Well it's a bit of a thankless task. Really he's the fourth u n special envoy to take on this role since the war started back in two thousand fourteen. I mean it's now September this month is is the anniversary since the who took the capital sunol back in september twenty fourteen and yet he's the full to take on the job. There isn't really a peace process to speak of There is attempts a political process to reach some sort of peace process. That would fast meena ceasefire hopefully but There's a we're a long long way off facts at the moment And it's a very narrow focus has been so far anyway political process at very much Is built around a deal between the hippies and the government. And i think what has been shown by his predecessor his that it's incredibly important. Really to broaden our process because it's not going to get any buying on the ground in their full any lossing kind of ceasefire never mind political deal without more groups being involved because there are a multitude groups. Now fighting on the ground in yemen senator to keep a price that is the narrow down to the hippies and the government on seems pointless in many respects. What do you think greenbury. We'll try to do in his new position. What does the job mean in practice on. Well what is meant at practices has been a loss of shuttle shuttle diplomacy really for for all of those that are gone before him Because the yemeni government remained in exile in saudi arabia. A lot of the talks of being actually or on indirect talks have been going on there have been hosted by mon- next stool sa- singleton bolt him flying around a lot from jordan to re adds to muscats To tucson to meet the who the's and back again and it's really you know it a lot of the have been you know. A lot of talks about talks about deals and a lot of it goes down to the sequencing of who's going to withdraw fasters game to lift the defacto blockade that it's an effect on the port of deidra at the moment. Sunol airport the reopening of some sonar apple has been a sort of bargaining chip amongst all of this as well But i again going back to what i just said It's almost it might be a slightly simpler toss to me. Negotiating ceasefire has a much more local level between smaller fighting groups than it is to deal directly with those With the who teas and the government where talked to just repeatedly reached stalemate and it also means that it slightly pulls the rug from underneath 'these and the government in times of being the only ones with the power to do a deal if deals almeida a local level And it and it and it can't be done. We've seen it having been done amongst local groups throughout the conflict. And i think that might be a good starting point Full the hands greenberg to to goto. But well he whether he will not remains to be seen unfortunately his predecessors didn't really seem to take those options into account as you pointed out already earlier. The conflict in yemen has indeed soon continued for seven years since two thousand fourteen. How has it changed over the years. And where are we now. do you feel that. There's any reason to hope that warfare may eventually end one day while it's now a much more complex conflict than it was at the beginning And as i as i mentioned there are a multitude grapes now. Fighting on the ground for many different reasons some of simplisafe has just basically defending their territory. Some tribal groups that are fighting for some mothers. It's more sectarian about religious aspects So it's it's a much more. It's too messy conflict of conflict. It's bosley complicated and therefore makes it much more difficult to untangle unfortunately as as we know the humanitarian situation has gotten increasingly worse for yemenis The economic situation has also got worse which impacts on the humanitarian crisis because the currency has collapsed And that's become an increasing problem. The iva a recent weeks and months the value of the currency when i was in yemen With depreciating most by by day on so on the recent much put the moment. I think this this recent escalation. We're seeing at the moment with cross-border attacks we've seen a optic pointing in maarib is consistent with the appointment of the new. Un special boy this kind of an attempt to be seemed to be more powerful automated being forced to to some fool into some form of negotiation from a position of strength. We saw it before just as biden came into office as well. So it is a pattern But it it still remains to be seen as if any real serious attempts to can be made on the political before we can even talk about peace. Six even existing. Thank you for your inside the journalist creek and you're listening to the briefing monocle. Tony farm navarre's is is proud to partner. The briefing on monocle. Twenty four is a company that is committed to reimagining medicine. Global health care leader intent on changing the practice of medicine. Navarre's just being exploring uncharted frontiers and science for more than a century. Today the company is working on breakthrough treatments that pushed the boundaries of human understanding and biology data science and engineering to develop and deliver therapies. That help people longer and healthier lives around the world. Novartis reimagining medicine. You back with the briefing on twenty four. I am marcus hip. We're heading to munich now. For the very latest from the v a mobility show which is getting underway today. Monaco sports correspondence. Gabriel lease there for us afternoon. Gabriel and welcome to the program. So we've done shows from aa before and that's when the show took place in frankfurt. So how much has this event changed. Now it's taking place in munich gape right well. This is meant to be the kind of new and improved a show as you mentioned. It's it's been moved to munich. Frankfurt is no longer and this year. What they've really done is tried to reoriented towards this concept of overall mobility. It's not just. It's not just the latest car releases anymore. It's it's everything to do with moving around in many respects. It looks like the same old kind of trade fair car. Show that you would expect that the but they've also opened up a number of places in the city center of munich and some driving lanes between for people to try out for the the more real world experience with it. So that's kind of your headline in terms of what's different. So what are you seeing over there then. Can you pay into a picture. We're talking about a show that has kind of redefined itself around a broad concept of mobility. What's them meaning practice right. So alongside a number of of standard motor vehicle releases. Most of which i would say. Our electric emissions free is a big topic. Of course but at the same time you see. There are companies making e bikes. There are delivered vehicles. That are sort of something in between a bike and an an electric van. You see people peddling their software sort of ways of managing autonomous cars or fleets within a city how to kind of optimize moving around using software artificial intelligence that kind of thing. There's much more of a focus on on that side of things. I would say in addition to the flashy car releases which are still happening. Let's talk about those first car releases and other innovation taking place over there. What squad your eyes i. So far and what do you think the biggest announcements are going to be this time round. I think you see a lot of electric vehicles. That are finally ready to replace the conventional gas burning. Engine car for real. So and that goes alongside with the big automaker's like mercedes for example. There are launching dozens of different models that are purely electric whereas in the past this is sort of one or two which which were sort of specialty cars now you see in every market segment that they're that they're catering to they haven't electric model and and it's really the focus so there are some petrol burning still left but not so many so you see some some real interesting kind of highlights from the likes of bmw mercedes audi. They're all kind of the big. The big german makers are going all in on this new sort of architecture for for a whole fleet of electric cars and eventually these will be the only cars. you'll buy them less than look at. What's what's the new when it comes to the three and more mobility so besides automakers what are the other companies doing over there and and what kind of innovation seeing. What's kind of an idea. Do you get of how we may be moving around in the future. I think you see a lot of sort of continued. Push that we've seen in recent years but but it's becoming more central to everything where you're talking about a different modes of public transport that maybe that maybe walk the line between private vehicle public vehicle train ban. Bus sort of on-demand shared electric bus rides around cities. Where you can you. You can call it as you might end uber. But it's also shared so it's better for traffic better for the environment and of course it's emissions free. You're looking at more of the sort of emerging and sort of creating more options in a way so everything from taking your city bike for the for the first kilometer to hailing your on demand electric bus that takes a few different people to the same place in an optimized way using software and so on. So you know. They're not forgetting about cars. The private car is still important and of course each manufacturers would still like to sell funny of those but but you're seeing a lot more of that other side of things and how it can all come together. I don't think they figured it out. Maybe yet but but they're working on it and in various just vajna gabriel. Obviously it's good to see this kind of an event comeback after after all the lockdowns sunday and after the pandemic do think there is more to come. What is the state is when it comes to car show at the moment. Do you think they are coming back again. I think that the show will be really open to it. Made that case that they ought to come back. It's been sort of well documented that that many many auto manufacturers were choosing to skip car shows even before the pandemic and and now this is kind of a return after the last couple of years where they couldn't hold these things and they're trying to not only show that that is safe to do and people will tom but also that it's still relevant that the car makers should show up to these things and pay the fees to be there and the public should come in the pressure. Calm it is. It is feeling a little quieter than normal. But i think that's probably expected at this stage of where we are in the in the pandemic and and i think it does seem like there is interesting that the manufacturers here in a big way and they're trying to innovate and people are coming. So that's a good sign for coaches. We'll see if there will be as many as there were in the past. We'll be still room for sort of you know a few that really do it right and we will definitely check in with your beat later this week. Gabriel thank you. That was monaco's transports correspondent. Gabriel gabrielli at the cia mobility. Show in munich. You're listening to the briefing on monocle. Tony form and finally on. Today's broke from milan design. Week is in full swing after a weekend of press and industry previews across the series furniture showroom and the heroux fair crowns. Monaco sneak meniscus there for us. I am delighted to say. He joins us now. Good afternoon to you nick. So dell's more about your plans and monaco plants. I what is monaco's presence in milan executive this week good question. I mean you won't be able to hear a little bit of atmosphere in the background here but we're running through the whole thing. But basically at the moment. I'm broke causing law from monaco's pop up space in the newly barshop on 'cause got about in brera which is one of the design districts here and essentially we partnered with the swiss brand usa rawson. Create this amazing space where we can bring designers for interviews. Have a chat showcase airways showcase the ways of usa and we've actually worked with 'em and rossignol to make a custom one off bike but this is air base of operations here from here. We've sort of been going out to the show to the row. Fairgrounds like you said and meeting people talking to people having a look at what people have been working on in the past year because obviously this event has gained eighteen months in the making in many ways. It's nice to have a base book for monocle here at milan design week absolutely. I wish i was there. Actually i've been hearing about some aspects of of celona this time round. And can you first about super celona space. That's the reimagined trade fair area. Yes so that's what. I was talking about out at the at the fairgrounds. So essentially all the participating brands have being given guess a space in this in this showroom and they're probably got about one by five minutes space each of them to i guess create displays and some are more straightforward with. They've just got their chairs or their tables or their sofer's sitting up and others of kind of got a little bit more creative more. My personal favorite is multi has designed. They're sort of space as if it was an an a lawyer or an airplane and set up their chairs which array release of of. Gop's chair that he designed for the first alitalia lange in the nineteen fifties. They've done a release of that. And i guess rather than showcasing their entire range. They've really just focused on this one chair and turned into this display by setting them up as as airplane chair. So i mean that's fabulous but yeah it's amazing to see. I guess everyone coming together and displaying. With what i just said to gabriel. Es well i will transport correspondent that it's such a delight seeing these events take place again. What is the mood like in milan. Now who are there. Yeah i mean it's it's really really really bubbly which is great. And then there's lots of lines of people because obviously this event is is really important to the millionnaires as well. So you've got people lining up to get in local designers journalists. Everyone sort of lining up to get into these different showrooms spread throughout the city. So there's obviously the roy fairgrounds but then there's the actual places where these brands have gotten presents. The pop temporary spaces some of them the other actual permanent spices. But we're seeing crowds of people everywhere and people milling out on the street. It's it's really really love lively here last year for. They design a design sitting milano rather which was sort of a placeholder event to make up for the fact that salon. I didn't take place in milan. Design week didn't take place and the comparisons of that event last summer versus this event this summer. The contrast is incredibly stock. It feels like people back at feels like milan's back and the cities alive again and nico. No you're going to be staying there for a few more days. What are you looking forward to most. Is it something that will happen during the day or or is it something that will happen at barbosa. When you having cronies evenings i might. I'll i'll be honest. Maybe got a little bit carried away above us last night. So i might take it a little bit easier tonight. Maybe only have one granny rather than five but Yeah i mean. Obviously that's an incredible. That's an incredible institution in milan. And certainly everyone sort of congress there. But i mean all the action is during the day. And it's you know. We're we're seeing and connecting with people and designers like i'm about to go to speak to luke luke and nikita to talk about his work with the italian brand loads shortly to drop into uniform light today. They've got their showroom opening for the first time. So look at what they've been working on over the course of the pasture you know and then obviously we've also got a monaco's got events with with visa as well. We'll talking with them. About the future of design so there on tuesday and wednesday no on actually particularly looking forward to hearing the architect. Joseph grandma speak their With with our editorial director tyler. Lie and i mean. Grime is just fascinating. Character is is a is the co founder of architecture and research to your space. Caviar and former editor-in-chief domus magazine and he's the current director of design academy enthoven. So he's got this incredible pedigree and we're very lucky to have him coming in and talking with us in conversation with taller mentioned so i mean that's that's just a few things that i've gone on for the next few days. I think every night will be capped off about basso but maybe not as enthusiastically as as we did yesterday. Excuse to be a busy week for your. Thank you very much nick. That was the monaco's make money is joining us from ceylon adele. Mobile ian milan. And that's all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by reese james and msel. Our research was sophie. Monaghan cume sand. Our student manager was some impey. The briefing is back tomorrow at the same time. That's at thirteen hundred in milan. Midday london at seven. Am in washington dc. I am marcus hip goodbye and thanks for listening.

russia foreign ministry yemen bbc russian government uk munich Saudi arabia midori house gabrielli nick nathan idell mobile markus hippie Raynsford raynsford antar russian border guards Sarah sara milan moscow
Original Pride Flag; Museums Release Juneteenth Movie

Here & Now

41:37 min | 4 months ago

Original Pride Flag; Museums Release Juneteenth Movie

"From npr and wbz. I'm robin young. And i'm tanya moseley. It's here now. President biden will likely give russian president vladimir putin a list of demands when the two leaders meet in geneva tomorrow but the president has also said he does not want conflict. There's a lot to talk about somewhere. Attacks election interference a demand to withdraw from ukraine. The bbc sarah rainsford is in geneva and joins us from outside of the meeting. Venue and sarah president biden is the one who called this meeting with putin. There's a lot of pressure on him for a positive outcome. But what does putin stand to gain from this meeting. Well it's interesting the fact that this was the summit's Suggested and requested by the american side is definitely something that the kremlin has been underlining. Russia likes to be seen as an equal on the world. Stage it likes to be taken seriously. And the fact that joe biden early in his presidency has has called this meeting with president. President putin has seen extremely positively by the kremlin. That's certainly painting as an expression under understanding of equality which i don't think the the. Us president would actually agree with of course but in terms of what it can deliver. Well i think. That's that's fairly limited list of things that vladimir putin himself when asked about it said that they'll be talking about regional. they'll be talking about cyber security. But i think as a safer the russians the fact that the stomach happening and happening so early in the in the joe biden. Presidency is extremely significant. Well some nato leaders have actually expressed concern that by meeting with putin will. We'll actually be rewarding him. How to the concerns from world leaders. Play into how biden. We'll navigate this meeting. Well i think he's got a job. Because of course vladimir putin is a very experienced operator and of course joe biden has said. He's coming here saying that he will tell putin what he wants putin to know and he's obviously presenting himself as coming to talk tough to russia. He's talking about going toe to toe with a man. He's described portrayed as an autocrat coming here of course. After meetings with a america's democratic allies russia though will not be rolling over and having its tummy tickled in any sense. Russia will certainly be looking. And that's the putin will be looking to express forcefully russia's point of view and that is that you need to reckon with russia and whilst joe biden is talking about stability and predictability and blaming russia for undermining that's in the world russia's sees everything quite the opposite one thing which is worth pointing out that this interesting though that neither side has agreed to a joint press conference after this meeting so they will be talking to the press separately which i think is critical because of course you'll remember. It was the the press conference between president president putin and president trump previously where donald trump was seen to by the american slides to behave disastrously when he appeared to To to take president putin's word that he hadn't meddled in politics over the evidence presented to president trump by his own in services with all that you say in mind what power does biden actually have coming into this meeting. I mean we know that The administration has already imposed several sanctions against russia for election. Meddling and cyber attacks but this puts biden in an interesting position as you say. Putin is also coming to the table with grievances. Well yeah. I think you know the way it's being presented in moscow which is of course where i'm based It's being presented as the men will not reach agreement but they are hoping to reach and understanding. And you know russia. We want to present that as as understanding america that russia needs to be listening to america. Wants want to present it. Russia having agreed to stop its molina and meddling activity you know. Russia calls doesn't admit any of things that is accused of from election. Meddling to any of the other. Long list of effectively leading cyber-attacks attempted assassinations russia. Simply it's simply denies the accusations. So what's congealed. Joe biden due to actually influence. How russia behavior well certainly sanctions do have an effect on russian policy. I think certainly what. What when i talked to experts in moscow about this. I think people understand that. They don't believe that president putin wants to Increase the antagonistic. Increase the problems. It is a tough time in russia as it is around the world. Covert has impacted russia. Quite badly economy has has been hit too. I think the last thing that russia needs especially in an election year which it says in in russia is more antagonism with the united states i think is about cooling it down Looking each other in the eye trying to figure each other out tiptoe around each other to some extent but russia will want to come out of. There certainly are still looking strong at least with domestic audience. Sarah i wanna ask you about another big topic during this summit and that's the growing power of china and there is nuance here. Because china's expanding military with russia nato has said it is very concerned about russia's growing aggression. Can you say more about this. Focal point when the pritam was asked about china. He was to distinguish between Russia's relations with china and its relations with the united states and say that china is a friendly state and certainly china will feature very much in terms of any any further talks on arms control nuclear arms control. The us and russia do need to consider what happens after the the latest Current treaties fire and there is discussion about whether china should be brought in to. An tweet is russia. Doesn't want that but it is. Certainly you know a a new factor in the equation so yeah. The relationship in that sense is increasingly complex to. That's the bbc. Sarah rainsford engine eva. Thank you so much thank you. I loved hearing those kids. Play well ahead of the putin meeting tomorrow. President biden met with european leaders today and announced that the eu and us have agreed to suspend billions of dollars in tariffs on aircraft and more and put a seventeen year. Trade feud behind them that feud involved countries subsidizing their own. Airline companies in the u. Boeing in the us then slapping tariff levies on each other on things like us whiskey and european wines and the de escalation comes as the us and eu seem to notice that while they squabbled china was working on passenger planes of its own. So let's bring in here now. Transportation analysts seth kaplan and set the wall street journal calls this the longest and costliest trade fight in the history of the wto dates back to two thousand and four briefly. Talk through how it started. Yet it's hard to overstate. How costly it is. Boeing jets are the thing that the us exports more in terms of value than anything else case just billions and billions and billions of dollars. Sometimes you look at one airplane. That plane can be worth hundreds of billions of dollars. Nothing else like that. That the us exports as you said back in two thousand and four one thing about the aerospace in airline industry. Robin is there would be things everybody else's subsidized and that's very much true here. This was the us originally saying that airbus was heavily subsidized. And there's there's no doubt that there's truth to the fact that european governments provided lots of seed money billions and billions of dollars to get airbus to where it was the. Us said airbus was suddenly on. a on. an even footing with boeing in a matter of Not too long. Boeing had been in business nearly a nearly a century already accusing europeans illegally. Subsidizing airbus europeans. Later said well. Boeing is subsidized to in the form of large orders from the us government for military aircraft. For example on a scale that would never happen in europe well within an escalated into two thousand nineteen. It went well beyond airplanes. Almost twelve billion dollars worth of tariffs and levies on everything from wind detractors. So why did the us and you decide to set aside these now. I mean yes. They're looking at china but man this was. This was such a battle. It really was a and this. This happened quickly. Caught a lot of people by surprise. And i think it comes down to what you said just deciding that there were bigger common enemies if you think of other things. We're hearing on the show today. Right about meeting with putin obviously concerns with china on trade and this is the us us saying we don't see eye to eye on everything yet but better to sort of recognize those common enemies. Also don't forget. Boeing airbus sort of have a powerful duopoly in the world so as much as they compete against each other accuse each other of certain things. It's kind of this comfortable duopoly. And what they don't wanna do is lose sight of the fact that they have far more to worry probably in terms of foreign competitors with far cheaper aircraft coming into the market and actually having some success than they do about each other. They've both been doing fine. The years being in that to -opoly will but if subsidies are dropped what would that mean for airbus and boeing especially after this disastrous pandemic year. Those those two manufacturers have been through one of the worst periods here in the past year of of their histories but demand is rebounding. Now you mentioned the wall street journal they reported for example of just days ago that boeing all those seven thirty seven max's that nobody seemed to want for the past year dating back of course to the issue with the plane itself. Suddenly leaders demand for them airlines snapping up those planes and so these companies seem to be able to sustain themselves in a commercial environment with airbus to get it goes back anything more to the seed money sort of got them to this position in the first place in allegations by the us that that continues but a commercially successful company in its own regard. Just basically we've got under a minute. What about china. Where are they on passenger planes so they have designed to built. What's called the c nine one nine so if you look at seven thirty seven which a lot of people know what that looks like are competing a three twenty airbus. Three twenty china has a plane. And it's flying already not carrying passengers yet but flying successfully in terms of test flights that they're selling they've taken orders for thousand of them so far mainly from chinese companies the concern is what if it gets some success some traction in the market and china's able to begin underpricing airbus and boeing and selling them to. Let's say us and european airlines. Okay that'd be a whole other story. Seth kaplan transportation analyst. Thank you. thank you robin. A slew of bipartisan antitrust bills introduced in washington could change the way some of the biggest tech companies operate for more. Let's bring in elizabeth watkin. She's the silicon valley correspondent for the washington post. Hey elizabeth hey karner so folks actually might remember that. There was this sixteen month. Bipartisan investigation of tech companies. And these bills come out of that. Their recommendations made by house antitrust panel. One of the biggest proposed changes is something that is pretty common in silicon valley. And that's the ability for big companies to acquire smaller rising competitors. One of the bills would bar that practice. This is significant isn't it. I think it's very significant. It's one of the aspects of these bills that i would call a major blow to. How big tech does business. Google amazon facebook and apple have all had one hundred acquisitions in recent years. It's a large number of companies because of the silicon valley culture of startups and in the case of facebook for example they've really used the acquisitions to position themselves. In the market in a dominant way. Facebook is not growing in the united states. The main facebook but owned whatsapp and instagram. Which at the time were not dominant services but are now almost as big or in some ways getting as big as facebook and so if the big blue app that mark zuckerberg built in college. If that dies off one day or becomes a nothingburger he still has these other services that allow him to own the biggest social network of the world and did o in some ways the other companies. There's another element in this series of proposed legislation. That would also make it easier for people to use different tech services together or move their data to a competitor implications. This also have. I consider that to be one of the other major blows to the big four You know it's known here in silicon valley as data interoperability and it. Just this idea every consumer knows this how hard it is to switch port your data over like you can't take your data from facebook and just drop it on a competitor service. We all know how hard it is to switch between apple and android and this is already by the way well underway in europe which is to say that regulators are looking around the world are looking and saying how can we promote competition and won. They could do. It is actually legally force and regulate the creation of code technology because it requires building all new platforms and services to basically build new protocols for the internet that would allow consumers to do something simple as port over your data because that makes it easier to leave a service when you're disappointed. One of the aspects of monopolies. It's hard to prove in. American law is what's the harm to consumers. If these products are so great everyone loves google maps g mail. What's the harm and one of the ways that people might be able to express their dissatisfaction by leaving the services but there's these big walled gardens. It's very hard to do that. So it's hard to express the satisfaction on monday republican senators chuck grassley and mike lee introduced a bill that would would shift all antitrust enforcement from the ftc and the federal communications commission to the justice department and allocate about six hundred million to the doj's antitrust division. What does this indicate about republican efforts with antitrust. The big question is there's the big of bills that are introduced by democrats on friday and we'll republicans support it. I mean we look at what's happening with the rest of biden's agenda right now in congress it's slowed down because there isn't always bipartisan support. And there's lots of debate so in this case what you see is grassley and mike lee. Basically saying we don't want a solution that's regulatory. We want a solution that is enforcement. It's around bringing cases in an emboldened justice department and we're going to embolden that justice department which is already by the way has major anti-trust cases against facebook and the other big four so they've been really emboldened into the trump administration and grassley and lee are saying let's let's emboldened the lawyers to actually use the existing antitrust laws but with more muscle behind it to fight these cases. And what's interesting about these bills. Is they have a lot more. Bipartisan support right. Now than other initiatives so it very well could pass but when you look at them you say with other lawmakers are saying is no. We can't wait for the lawyers and the justice department to come after these companies after. They've already done harm. We need to try to create new structures and our society and our business that stopped the companies from being so powerful and dominant and potentially harmful to consumers in the first place our tech companies reacting. Or how do you anticipate they will respond. Just armies of lobbyists is the biggest lobbyists in washington already and that is going to grow a now they actually have something concrete to fight against as opposed to the last few years when we've seen these hearings and hearing after hearing testifying in soccer berg testifying lawmakers talking saying they were going to do it but now they have something to fight against and to erode so. I'm interested in seeing whether they're going to try to lower try to poison the well in some ways by not making the bills seem politically unpalatable So that they don't get the bipartisan support. Or in some ways weakening them weakening those hurdles that will be created for example to buy new companies or to create products on their platforms. And so you can really see the company's Trying to lobby to water it down there already very publicly saying that this would really hurt competition. And they're bringing in china they're saying well look at the competition from china. Do we really want the next generation of internet companies to not be american nearly a lot of talk as well. Elizabeth dwoskin is a silicon valley correspondent for the washington. Post as always. Thank you so much for having me. Well as our country gets ahead of corona virus infections. It's now pledging to send hundreds of millions of vaccines to countries still struggling with high case rates and low vaccine supply selena lonnie of the gulf states newsroom talked with indian immigrants and mississippi who are concerned about their families and friends and their native country at her home in madison mississippi. I'm writ sued opens up facebook on her phone. She scrolls to a friend's post. One of many that have been flooding her social media. She lives in mississippi and her art is in daily and she needed a ventilator. Angie's asking do you know where to get it. When the pandemic. I broke out. India didn't experience a large wave of corona virus cases but now thousands of people are dying each day soothe has lost nearly a dozen family members in india. I can't keep up with the numbers. And it's hard to imagine if i go back. Sued is from delhi but has lived in mississippi for forty five years. She feels helpless being so far away. Meanwhile vaccines where she lives. Go to waste. Mississippi louisiana and alabama have the lowest vaccination rates in the country last month. Mississippi's help officer. Thomas dobbs said the department is advising doctors to open up a package of vaccines. Even if some of it may go to waste if you have somebody in front of you who needs a vaccine. Go ahead and use which got that. We're at a point where there will be some wastage. It is frustrating soothe vaccine in february but in mississippi health officials say about eight thousand doses had been wasted as of june ninth in louisiana. Roughly thirteen thousand alabama reported just over twelve. Thousand vaccines wasted. I feel sad that in the word they wanted and they cannot get it. There's a shortage of everything from beds to oxygen in india. It's old most of the vaccine. It produced to other countries and as of june tenth just three percent of its own. Population is fully vaccinated. President biden recently announced that the us would purchase. Five hundred million vaccine doses. Descend abroad between this year. And next in the meantime families here watch is friends and loved ones die from afar mississippi based immigration lawyer. Patricia is says this is something. Her clients deal with regularly. I've had so many clients is parents have died overseas and they couldn't leave because they didn't have papers that's been going on since i started doing this work in her. Two decades of practice. Isis seen clients from india yemen vietnam mexico and other latin nations census data show. There are over four hundred thirty thousand foreign born residents across the gulf south. Some immigrants have jumped getting the vaccine but others are hesitant especially in conservative places like mississippi. If the governor is telling you that it's really not that important to get the vaccine. Some immigrants are listening to the government. Her law firm has held events to ease concerns or help clients get shots. And then you hard on. Some indians and mississippi are taking matters into their own hands to get supplies to people abroad. Who need them through as she bondi is asleep. Medicine specialist in ridgeline mississippi. This is awesome. Concentrate when you get it in the us that aarc the makes the oxygen shabangu as involved in the american association of physicians of indian origin. The group has been sending pulse monitoring devices and producing machines to india. The have already sent concentrate is thousand units and we are sending next thousand units as soon as possible. Other individuals are trying to send this equipment to their families threatening through high international shipping costs and complicated procedures some leading to india. I or any other country who may need in future some parts of the world have still only been able to vaccinate one percent of their populations sifang like other immigrants say she's hopeful countries like the. Us can lend a helping hand to these places that are most in need of a shot for here. Now i'm shalini chet lonnie on. Npr's rough translation. There's just fewer people that know somebody that's in the military after twenty years of war are civilians and military farther apart than ever. They were asking me. Do you want to hear this. Do you want to know us listened to homefront the new season of rough translation. An electric car maker lordstown motors is on the brink. The company stock slipped nearly twenty percent after two top executives resigned on monday. The company said last week it would go out of business after ethics concerns and ongoing safety problems with its electric pickup. The endurance let's bring in robyn farzad. Host of public radio's full disclosure. Hey robyn how are you. I am well so lordstown mode motors is a startup trying to build electric pickup trucks at a former. Gm assembly plant in ohio. Can you tell us more about what led to to the ceo and cfo to resign. Well they can't do it. It's electric now. I just always wanted to say that. I think tanya the station here is the alarming part. This is what the press release says quote lordstown motors announces leadership transition. And there's quick mention of the ceo and cfo. Resigning a quick. Thank you from a board member and then talk of transition to the commercial stage of our business of course. This was simultaneous to an internal investigation that quote identified issues regarding the accuracy of certain statements regarding the company's preorders. And you put it all together. Tanya and the company and the stock are hemorrhaging red. Okay say more about this. 'cause lordstown was under investigation for misleading investors They're accused of using fake orders to prop up the endurance explain a little bit more what they're accused of leading the inquisition hindenburg research. Which in the spring and issued a report titled the lordstown motors mirage fake orders undisclosed production hurdles and a prototype inferno and. I'm quoting from the report. Lordstown with no revenue and no sellable product. They believe has misled investors on both its demand and production capabilities. It alleges further that the company's orders are largely fictitious and uses prop to raise capital and confer legitimacy and as lordstown has had to trim expectations and concede in this case reporting issues. These skeptical reports. They win more adherents and so the stock is now at a third of where it traded in february. Lordstown isn't the first electric car company to face these kinds of issues there to others as well our their. Ceo's have recently resigned. Can you tell us more about these smaller. Electric car companies. And what's getting them in trouble overall. I think it's important to look at the broader market where high has so been rewarded in this very rich environment for tech and startups capitalist cheap. It's omnipresent tiny. We've talked about individual investors with these memes stocks. Amc and game stop so the echo chamber for claims of say in this case a great truck combined with the ease of listing shares it. Gets you quite a platform. The problem is at some point. The story runs into tangibility. Show me. where's the vehicle where the reviews tests peer review and the company can only punt so many times deadlines and everything and especially with short seller's and skeptics putting out reports and stoking the fears right the electric car company. I mean electric car. Markets overall are getting more competitive. What does the landscape look like for this. Market tesla remains the dominator the bellwether the trendsetter. It's worth just under six hundred billion dollars. It has weightless for its vehicles. Fan boys left and right the lead battery and software range and so anyone lordstown included. Who wants to make a run at the king here needs to be willing to sustain losses a lot of trial and error tanya. Something that vex is very well. Capitalized automakers with decades and decades of experiences. So i think lordstown is just a cautionary footnote at this point. Robin farzad host. A public radio's full disclosure as always thank you as always taking we saying to being with johnny of a birdie. Alicia keys singing. What's become known as the black national anthem. Lift every voice and sing well today. A new documentary will be released exploring the meaning of that song and the meaning of juneteenth the black national independence day june nineteenth eighteen sixty five when word finally got to enslaved people in texas than the most remote region of the confederacy full two years earlier. The emancipation proclamation had freed them dune. Teens is next saturday. The film juneteenth is a collaboration of ten. Black cultural institutions including milwaukee's america's black holocaust museum seattle's northwest african american museum and cincinnati's national underground railroad freedom center where we're going to linger a little today. That cincinnati's guayata african drum and dance theater. Their feature in the film asia harris with the cincinnati center asia. We also here in the film historian. Carl westmoreland say your center is on sacred ground remind us yeah so the freedom center is built in downtown cincinnati in an area that we now call the banks There's restaurants are stadiums for national teams but in the past it was known as little africa. And that's where free black citizens formed their own community at the shores of the ohio river. So the ohio river was a literal physical divide between the slave state of kentucky in the free state of ohio. Ohio's economy was dependent upon the slave economy that supported the neighboring state of kentucky. So there was a really heavy amount of conflict. Between pro slavery improvisers in abolitionists in cincinnati citizens had survived that violence that was sometimes supported by local politics and the black population will constantly endanger despite ohio being free because state laws like fugitive act of eighteen. Fifty really threatened the life of anyone who's african american. Even though people settled here and live their lives and started traditions here they eventually had to flee because the amount of danger here in the state of ohio. Well this is in the mid eighteen hundreds you say the fugitive act. Even though the state was free they might have been considered fugitives. So if you do not have what was called free papers if you were stopped by someone who was in authority. You didn't have that. Then you could be jailed or you could be stolen and kidnapped and taken back into slavery because you had no way to prove that you were not enslaved person who was known as yes in a fugitive. Your name is the national underground railroad. Freedom center explained that part underground railroad. The underground railroad was a network of people in organizations that was formed to help people Free themselves from bondage. So the underground railroad rain. All the way from louisiana all the way up to canada and ohio specifically was very. You know we could say there were many pro-slavery sympathizers but it was also very busy place for the underground railroad. It was close to places like ripley. Ohio which was flooded with abolitionists. And you know. John parker john. Rankin some more famed abolitionist. They live there and they really grew strong. Networks that grew down to cincinnati through kentucky. All the way through the south in back up again to canada. Let's hear some of the spoken word portion of the cincinnati portion of the new film. June teeth a. I hear from black. Historian carl westmoreland and then poet gerard lindsey. It will not for. Cumin is like africa historic moment like june teens being never recurred while enduring oppressive laws and violence. The families of little africa remained steadfast of being observers to countless freedom seekers escaping slavery ten. It is more than just a simple representation of grape perfection and overcoming anxiety and temptation to arrive at your destination. Everyone cannot give him because they do not have to get cincinnati poets rod lindsey asia harris. We also heard from historian. Carl westmoreland tells more about him. Mr morland is our lead historian at the museum and he actually was responsible for doing a major run of the research that allowed us to have one of the most major artifacts of slavery in the country. Which is a slave pin so pin actually came from germantown kentucky and they actually took the slave pinned down and put it in its exact form back into the museum. People can see exactly what conditions these people were living in and also to be able to reserve those buildings of slave pan of. We'll have pictures from you at here. Now dot org. Can you describe it absolutely so. My grandmother was very heavily involved in the freedom center. When i was a child and when i was twelve years old she took me to the slave pen in kentucky on the land still. It was a two floor building and the reason that they were able to preserve it so well over time is because after the family who owned that slave pen sewed all of their remaining enslaved people they built a tobacco barn around it so that was able to keep the building in a much better state than it would have been. Men were living on top and young children and women were on the first floor It still has its original some of its original. Shackles the windows Spacing for where the fireplace was where women would have cooked. So it's a very emotional space to be in. But also a very honorable space to see the conditions at our ancestors had to survive but have been able to thrive to. Now i was gonna say must be so chilling. Yes yes yes in perspective that i have of having been able to stand in it in its original state is is a much more intensive Experience for me that. I'm really grateful for and i think it influences. You know what i can do in the museum today. Yeah honoring enough for just a couple minutes tiffany cooper. She's with cincinnati symphony orchestra. They collaborated with the center on the cincinnati. Portion of the film juneteenth tiffany. We also know that the film is an exploration of lift every voice and sing as we said written as a poem by nwa cpi leader. James weldon johnson in one thousand nine hundred then set to music sung by a choir of five hundred school children to celebrate. Abraham lincoln's birthday also performed by your orchestra so lift every voice and seeing the black national anthem as something that is really important to the african american music repertoire the cincinnati orchestra has an annual program every year recognizing the contributions of african americans to music and we start our program off or end our program every year with this very important piece of music this idea of black liberation in the contributions that the black community has made to this country. Let's listen Off tiffany we know. The song was adopted by the aa. Cpi uses a rallying cry during the civil rights movement in the fifties and sixties. What does it mean to you. It moves me personally to tears each time. I hear plead whether it song or whether it has the show backing it because it really does speak to our experience in our desire to be fully embraced as americans. It's a it's a prayer asia harris to me. Actually i didn't grow up in a community where we really celebrated juneteenth so to be a part of a community now in a nation that seems to really have an awakening to recognize how significant this is to us just feels really special for the museum. Our contribution was based off the word perseverance. And that's one of our main pillars in the museum that we celebrate along with courage and freedom and we just want to really highlight how he persevered through music through art through spoken word even through things like these artifacts that we have to understand the conditions in to really you know channel our ancestors and make them proud about the accomplishments. We've been able to make despite you know the circumstances that we've been through. That's asia harris from the national underground railroad freedom center in cincinnati. We also spoke to tiffany cooper from the cincinnati symphony orchestra. Both of them worked on the new film. Juneteenth thank you both so much thank you. I walked past a victoria secret. The other day and there they were celebrating pride month all sorts of little underwear jammies in rainbow colors and i thought gilbert baker would love that he's the activist drag queen and artists credited with designing the first rainbow flag. Back in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight stitching it together with volunteers for parade and san francisco then encouraging his community to adopted baker died twenty seventeen but not before he traveled. The world was invited to the obama. White house promoting lgbtq civil rights and the rainbow flag will now a piece of his huge original flag while pictures of here. Now dot org has just been found and returned to san francisco. Charles bill is the president of the gilbert baker foundation a friend of the late gilbert baker. He joins us now. Welcome thank you and remind us this parade. In nineteen seventy eight was one of pure choy and san francisco. Harvey milk had been elected San francisco supervisor. He was in this gay pride parade. The flags were there reminded us of the spirit behind the making of this flag at the time. The lgbtq community really didn't have any good hopeful strong symbols. There were the intertwined sex symbols. there was the pink triangle that had been put on us by the nazis. Some people tried to use the greek lambda but it was so obscure and so there was actually a lot of discussion. Not just in san francisco but across the country. Some of the people having a discussion were harvey mill. Our friend cleve jones was part of that discussion and they reached out to baker because he was an artist and a drag queen and he showed and they wanted to know you know what kind of symbol he could come up with. And gilbert actually was the one that said this new symbol should be a flag which i think is often under reported. He had been so impressed with the bicentennial in nineteen seventy six and saw the power of the american flag it was everywhere and so he thought this new symbol should be a flag and very soon afterwards he had been out dancing at the winterland ballroom and i. He was a little high at the time and he just was so impressed by the diversity of the crowd that this idea of this rainbow of humanity. Him like a brick and he said our flag should be a rainbow. It expressed such joy such hope but just a few months later that same year. Nineteen seventy eight san francisco mayor. George mosconi and the city supervisor harvey milk were assassinated. I remember that moment is just taking the air out of that joyous flag you know when harvey went down when harvey died a lot of people sort of curled up into a ball and went into a very dark place but there were people like gilbert baker and people like cleve jones that didn't stop they kept working and they kept fighting and the very next year. Gilbert went to the parade committee and said let's make four hundred rainbow flags and hang them on the the light post that run up and down market street. It's donning to see how far it's gone at hangs on. Us birth federal buildings around the world but the original flags they hung. We understood at city hall. They fell into some sort of disrepair he found them and took a huge piece. A huge swath of them but then it ended up for various reasons stuffed away at his sister's house. What's it like. Was it like to have this. This original piece you know It's an emotional thing. I tell you it's a very it's getting choked up now. Just thinking about you know seeing that original cloth and everything it stands for what you think about some of the variants There's a flag that includes a black and brown striped to represent communities of color. One includes pink and purple stripes to represent the trans community well romina. I'm glad you asked that because you know as president of the gilbert baker foundation. I'm asked that question. a lot. And our official response is fly. The flag speaks to your go. There's room in the sky for all of them and the original flag was was this symbol of hope. That's what harvey milk really had task. Gilbert with is that you know that that it need to give people hope because you know for every kid who's in the closet who wants to take that first up out of the closet. That flag is a beacon and it's shining they're saying take that first step from darkness out into the light and in kenya in the cocoon refugee camp. Two hundred activists held their first pride parade and they got about fifteen hundred feet. And then twenty. Two of them were arrested and beaten and they were carrying three rainbow flags that were confiscated and the young man in iran was beheaded by his own family in an honor killing because he had the courage to come out of the closet and his friends are racing down the streets of theron waving rainbow flags to protest his killing day race in and out of buildings so they don't get caught so that flag has power it has meaning and it gives people hope all around the globe. Something sometimes maybe in the united states we take for granted afford because we see everywhere. Like you said. Victoria's secret and but it's a really powerful symbol. And it means a lot. People charles president of the gilbert baker foundation. Thank you so much and happy. Pride month thank you hear. Now is a production of npr wbz and association with the bbc world service. I'm robin young. And i'm tanya moseley. This is here.

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