17 Burst results for "Sarah Parsons"

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:46 min | 5 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There are plenty of well educated women in Japan. More than half of them joined the workforce with a university degree. That's almost the same number of men and yet less than 15% of senior positions are held by women. And the average Japanese woman's income is only half of what their male counterparts, saying the government spends a lot of money. Re Skilling Japanese males in their fifties or sixties who are leaving companies Now I would say to the government, you should be spending the same amount of money. On the women who have been housewives and trying to go back to work. That's Cynthia is Suey, author of a book in Japanese called Eight Things Full Time Housewives should do before entering the workforce. Speaking to Murray Conroy, Sarah Parsons, how many women are in leadership roles, and is that number changing in the business world? So it is a real issue, but the Japanese employment system the Japanese workplace is very gendered. I mean, I know the lady that was speaking on the clip was saying, You know, the men trained. I mean, in the 19 eighties, we've talked about the economic miracle. I'm not Harkey. I'm not looking back on it nostalgically. But the women you know, had a very strong role in that period as well. The salary man's wife was the one who held him up and was at home and that the role of the House wife and the mother in Japan is a very, very strong one and ideologically as well. It has a lot of sway so women at that time would have to employment paths within a traditional Japanese company. And one of those was a clerical path that the women were expected to go on. And the other ones that the men who would accept long hours transfers, etcetera, etcetera, So this became quite a normal thing and the promotional route the expectations of the manager of all kind of gotten along this gender employment system. So it's really hard for that to change. I do see a lot of kind of female lead. Entrepreneurial companies cropping up now trying to challenge these norms, trying to get more women into them and better childcare facilities changing the women women who were breaking out of the corporate structure to strike out on their own. Yes, because of this real kind of shining a light on this situation. A lot of women are doing that and there's some fantastic initiatives out there. But it's the kind of traditional corporate Conservative Japan Inc I suppose, where it's very difficult for those women to have any kind of sway, and it's getting them into these decision making roles within society at large that that's proving a massive challenge. Can I come in? I think the government was intending to achieve 30% of women in leadership position by tooth and 20. Initially they give up on that. And now they're saying that maybe Before sometime in 2030. They would like to achieve 30%, but they're not really putting much of political energy right now. So I don't think you know he really mean that much. It was very ambitious at the time. But it wasn't backed up by anything other than you know, this would be a nice to have, and they didn't really so in their own government team, So it's very difficult. Roland Kilts in the world of culture and media, are you seeing the same kinds of challenges faced by women? Or is it slightly different there? There are similar challenges, particularly in the animation industry. Japan's globally famous anime industry has been dominated by men. I will say it, it's a bit different in manga or Japanese graphic storytelling comics. That's a field where, because manga creators can be independent and work from home. There are a lot of great female artists and more and more coming up. I should also mention in the fields of contemporary literature. There was some wonderful female writers now producing some of the best novels and stories in Japan and around the world. So there's a female voice emerging very, very strongly in the creative arts. In Japan, But you know to go back to something Koichi mentioned because you have a one party system. And these prime ministers just kind of are in the same mold. Of course, you know that that old saying Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. I think that applies in Japan better than just about anywhere else. The new prime minister is the same as the old guys. It's you know, got different hair or left hair. So that there's not a lot of changes the top to stimulate anything at the bottom. Yes. Zero Takeshita. You know all these things, in my opinion, and the problem that we're talking about is very much related to the structure of how these large Japanese companies are formed. And that is basically the fact that still lifelong employment and CNN priority system still lives very strongly. Now, if you put yourself into the decision, maker of these, you know senior Japanese men in bigger companies. The fact is that they've been underpaid all their life and they're reaping the benefits of this lifelong and also seniority system. And they also do not have the capability of transferring their talent because their capability, their talent, their know how is all valid within the company, but not outside So obviously you can't change the company. You can't change the status quo and what kind of plus is there for you to make any kind of changes? What is it for you if you want to introduce meritocracy at this point, But is that the economic logic? If you have labor shortage within Japan that you would tap into a group of people, women who are on the by and large, very, very well educated, have a lot of job experience, maybe have been out of the workforce for a few years. But doesn't make economic sense to turn to that group and to bring them back into the fold. Of course, I've been saying that you know, we're basically dumping half the human resource down the drain. I think what we have to realize Is that the structure of these Japanese companies are disabling these senior managers to make those changes because there's nothing in it for them. Sarah, you wanted to come in. There's a big mindset change needed and that's very hard to do When you just implement some quotas at the top, and we saw it with the women Onyx initiatives that everybody was talking about. Everyone was saying, you know, women need to shine. And these quotas come in, and they couldn't reach her off them because they needed to be a mindset, change and understanding of the economic benefit of this well speaking of change and changing mindsets. When speaking about the labor shortage, it must be said that Japan's Not generally applying the same solution as some other countries in its position. It's not opening the doors wide to new immigrants. It's not welcoming immigration. Seijiro Takeshita. Why do you think this is the case? Well, there's a multiple factors this associated with this greatly due to the fact that what Roland has stopped basically mentioned earlier, which is stability. The Japanese public hates to have any kind of big alterations or change in their very safe and sacred community. So obviously there's a lot of Resistance against having the changes in that arena. That sort. Of course, as many of you have been saying, this is 2021 considering the demographics of Japan. It's very, very clear that we have to really open up. In fact, I think we're far too late radio as we speak. But it's very difficult to gain that consensus. There's still is I wouldn't say prejudice. Um, but there still is a very severe lack of understanding and living with foreigners to have the diversity, cultural diversity, which is very unfortunate because again rugby World Cup was a very good taster for Japanese to open up and you know this Olympic should have accelerated this opening up trend. But unfortunately because of Covid 19, the whole agenda has really died down. I think Roland cults. I wonder what issues this brings to mind for you. What does it mean to be Japanese? Well, I'm going to take a sort of devil's advocate point of view for the sake of conversation. One of the things that I think people admire about Japan and people respect about Japan is the fact that in the 21st century it remains very strong culture. Identity language. It remains distinctive, You know, In a world where every city has becoming homogenized, you have Starbucks on every street corner, whether you're in Europe or Asia. Japan still clings to this notion of being Japanese, right or wrong, and it's a country where the attraction of the popular.

Murray Conroy Sarah Parsons Sarah Roland Kilts Europe Asia Seijiro Takeshita Japan 21st century 30% 2030 CNN fifties 2021 Cynthia Starbucks Conservative Japan Inc 20 19 eighties sixties
"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:09 min | 5 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

"News with more Alderson President Biden is to visit the three sites where Islamist militants attacked the U. S. On September the 11th 20 years ago, nearly 3000 people who died at New York's twin Towers, the Pentagon in Washington and Shanksville in Pennsylvania. In his anniversary message, Mr Biden said, America's greatest strength was unity. The U. N Secretary General Antonio Guterres has urged donors to find a way to continue supporting Afghanistan. Despite the Taliban takeover. Many are now withholding funds, but Mr Qatada's warned of the country's possible decline into economic meltdown. Pakistan's national carrier. PIA will resume flights from Islamabad to Kabul from Monday is the first foreign airline to restart a full scheduled commercial service since the Taliban seized power. The head of Afghanistan's cricket board says the national women's team may still be allowed to play cricket and plans are being worked on. His comments came after the Taliban restated its stance against women taking part in sports. Australia's threatened to cancel amends test match between the two countries if Afghan women are excluded. Israel says it's captured four of the six Palestinian militants who escaped from prison earlier this week. Violent protests erupted in the occupied West Bank on Friday night after Israeli police arrested the first two. Indonesia says it's sending a deal with Norway in which it pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in exchange for money. Jakarta says it hasn't had the agreed payments from Oslo. Norway's climate initiative insists discussions are ongoing. Search and rescue work is continuing on Pantelleria, the southern Italian island where a tornado killed two people and injured at least nine on Friday, buildings were destroyed, and cars lifted into the air transfers to mainland hospitals have now begun. BBC news. You're listening to the real story from the BBC World Service with me, Celia Hatton this week. We're looking at the challenges and opportunities facing Japan. I'm joined on the line by Seijiro Takeshita. He's a professor in the School of Management and information at the University of Shizuoka in Japan. Sarah Parsons, who runs the business consultancy East West Interface. And is a senior teaching fellow at so as the University of London police Cano, a professor of political science and the faculty of liberal arts at Sophia University in Tokyo. And by Roland Kelt. He's a Tokyo based writer, journalist and scholar and author of the Book Japan America, which explores Japan's pop culture clout. Well. Earlier, we discussed the political and social changes underway in the country. I want to take a closer look at Japan's economy. It's the third largest in the world after the US and China. Japan has a lot going for it a well educated workforce, superior infrastructure and dominant positions in several key global sectors, from cars to electronic. All this And yet economists still refer to Japan's lost decades, the period of economic gloom that's largely stretched from its real estate and stock market collapse in 1991. Through to now. Seijiro Takeshita. So the question is What's keeping the Japanese economy in the doldrums? If not exactly in the doldrums. Why isn't it doing better? Actually, I don't think it is indulge. Um, I think people are expecting the same type of growth that we had in the eighties, which is not the case because Japan is a mature economy are protected GPS well over $40,000 meeting that we have joined the team of mature economy. And if you look at, for example, the progress and things like, you know, process innovation, not necessary product side, but process innovation, which is basically innovating the product to a better uses for, you know, general public. Japan still has a very, very strong edge. Look around you, for example, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that you pass competitiveness have not weighing down. It's a different type of growth. It's a different type of strength that Japan is starting to reveal. And as we've been discussing, for example, you look at the demographics to Japan, which suggests certainly that we're not going to be growth prone, but much more looking at the quality side, the type of growth That we should be looking at me. Would you agree with that sentiment? How much has Japan's economy diversified since the eighties if at all? Right, Right. I agree in the sense that you know, I mean, the idea that we can relive the shore error in the 19 eighties on the bubble economy or the fast growth period before that, for much of the 19 sixties and beyond, is unrealistic. But at the same time, I also Get a sense that there are a lot of people who feel that Japan is underperforming, in part because of the contrast with the fastest growing economies among got neighbors. Asian neighbours China, obviously, but also South Korea or Singapore and Japan seems to be sort of fading in the background, In contrast in terms of perception The other thing is, I think it's also to do with the growing gap or, you know more than the growing gap. But I guess the fact of the matter is that Japan is no longer the military in society. The younger generation of people are feeling that kind of growth of their parents experienced and all forthcoming. Sarah also mentioned earlier the poverty that is getting worse among the women child poverty. E. Japan is among the worst in the country's single parent household, obviously and so I guess there is this sense that Japan used to be a more one nation, but it no longer is and the government is not coming up with the policies that sufficiently go against that sense of unfairness that is perhaps increasingly pervading the society. So what modernizations are needed in Japan's economy, Roland cults. I wonder if we can focus On the facts machine for a moment and Japan's love affair with the fax machine When a Cabinet task force asked Japan's government bureaucracy to explain that continued dependence on the fax machine, 400 departments submitted spirited arguments in favor of its continued use. Why does Japan love the fax machine? Is this a good example to illustrate this lack of innovation in the economy? Well again. That's a complicated question, because on the one hand yes, obviously, a fax machine is very low tech. It's dated, Um it's dealing with paper and print and things that we've all moved on from. On the other hand. There is an argument in Japan and then one. I respect very much about concern for privacy. And if you have something on paper and you fax it, you have more security. And that is, I think a key point because it's also one of the reasons people ask me this a lot. Why E money. Electronic money has not so far taken off in Japan, and why so many people in my neighborhood in Tokyo pay for everything in cash myself included. And part of that is because Japanese people just don't want to be traced. They don't want to have their every expenditure recorded in a database. And I do respect that. So I think it's not exclusively low tech failings in Japan, but I would say to the one of those points that the domestically the Japanese Economy in many respects has shown great sustainability. I mean, just before the pandemic, the unemployment rate was, I think the lowest expense since 1974 the crime rate is extremely low. You don't have the kind of gun violence street crime that you have in the United States, for example. Incredibly efficient public services, Whether it's.

Celia Hatton Sarah Sarah Parsons Seijiro Takeshita Kabul United States 400 departments 1991 Pantelleria Biden Islamabad Friday night Roland Kelt New York East West Interface BBC World Service Tokyo Monday two people 19 eighties
"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:38 min | 5 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

"Is a very youthful Colorful, creative, innovative country, indeed, so why don't young people hold more sway within Japan itself? Well, there aren't that many of them on the one hand. But I do feel and I feel this in my students at the university that there is a kind of new self awareness among Japanese youth and one aspect. I think that is quite powerful in the younger generation is the fact that they Relatively speaking, They've been coddled. They've been really well cared for. You know, they don't have brothers or sisters, most of them they grew up as only Children and they've been really well cared for, and they feel in some ways entitled To a better world. And I think some of them are pushing for that inside Japan, and some of them are perhaps because they feel entitled are somewhat selfishly trying to get Japan to change. Sarah Parsons, Japan's home to the world's oldest population, as we've said, and on the flip side of very low birth rate in Roland just mentioned all these single Children growing up. Why are couples so reluctant to have bigger families to have more babies? Well, there's lots of reasons behind this. I think you know most developed economies now, especially And with high levels of female education will naturally have that to drop in birth rate. And that's certainly been the case in Japan, where it's incredibly expensive to bring a child into the world. Educate the child. We have got later marriages as well, which does have an impact. Japan has quite low rates of babies born out of wedlock. We've got higher divorce rates. I mean, these are all common to the developed world. At the start of the program. We heard one woman discuss this challenge that faces her this horrible dilemma that if she has Children, she essentially has to give up the career that she's built up because it's almost impossible to get back into the workforce is Is that really the crux of the problem that you know, women have to make this life decision as to whether they're going to have a family or remain without Children and have a job. It's not so much that they make that choice, but they self select. Sometimes the route to promotion can still have long hours attached to it. You have to act in a certain way. There's a lot of research as well showing that the human resource practices are still very much along the male breadwinner ideology. So for women, you know it is a challenge, and some of them were up for it. And as we've seen into those women are coming into leadership roles. It's inspirational, because I know That the environment that they're eaten is very challenging, and I'm a single mother. I have two Children, not Children anymore. But it's a very tough thing to do to rise to that level within a Japanese corporation. If you don't have the support if you don't have an understanding husband and he may well be working long hours as well. Koichi. You know, you also see among the young people are sort of different choices because I agree with Roland that only one hand you do see youth who are now being more active politically and otherwise. They were of what's going on in society, and they're not afraid to speak up. On the other hand, there are also people who decide that the best strategy is to continue to keep the mouth shut. That you know you've become the nail that sticks out and then you get hammered down or you also decided to take an exit right? And many women as Sara was saying, voluntarily or not, the defacto just exit from child rearing or from career greater percentage of women. Also the fact to leave Japan altogether or actually not get married to a Japanese husband because they're not going to be at home. You know, doing the household chores that they should be doing, Whereas you know, maybe foreign husbands would have different kind of common sense. So in some ways, we are almost losing the battle. But I think all is not lost quite as yet. I think we can turn things around. If there is a change of political leadership, there's a drastic change in the corporate boardrooms. If more women are present in the decision making arenas than You know, there could be two big changes because these, um growing, you know, a number of years. I think that, uh, finding it off very frustrating. So I'm not entirely hopeful. But I think Daddy without hope, either. Okay, a little bit of optimism. That's as good a point as any to pause this conversation for a moment. We have to take a short break now. Stay right where you are. We'll pick this up in just a few minutes when the real story continues. Distribution of the BBC World Service in.

Sara Sarah Parsons BBC World Service Japan Koichi two one aspect two big changes one hand one woman Roland single mother couples Japanese single one
"sarah parsons" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

08:51 min | 5 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Your full time job, it's impossible to return to your original career path, regardless of your sex. If you want to go back to work, you have to look for a job at the supermarket, for example, somewhere a student would get a part time job. That plenty of well educated women in Japan, more than half of them joined the workforce with a university degree. That's almost the same number of men and yet less than 15% of senior positions are held by women and the average Japanese woman's income is only half of what their male counterparts The government spends a lot of money. Re Skilling Japanese males in their fifties or sixties who are leaving companies Now I would say to the government, you should be spending the same amount of money. On the women who have been housewives and trying to go back to work that Cynthia Suey, author of a book in Japanese called eight Things full Time Housewife should do before entering the workforce. Speaking to Marie Conroy, Sarah Parsons. How many women are in leadership roles, and is that number changing in the business world? Okay, So it is a real issue, but the Japanese employment system. The Japanese workplace is very gendered. I mean, I know the lady that was speaking on the clip was saying, you know, the men trained. I mean, in the 19 eighties, we've talked about the economic miracle. I'm not happy. I'm not looking back on it nostalgically. But the women you know, had a very strong role in that period as well. The salary man's wife was the one who held him up and was at home and that the role of the House wife and the mother in Japan is a very, very strong one and ideologically as well. It has a lot of sway so women at that time would have to employment paths within a traditional Japanese company, and one of those was a clerical path that the women were expected to go on. And the other ones to the men who would accept long hours. Transfers, etcetera, etcetera. So this became quite normal thing and the promotional roots expectations of a manager of all kinds gone along this gender employment system. So it's really hard for that to change. I do see a lot of kind of female lead. Entrepreneurial companies cropping up now trying to challenge these norms, trying to get more women into them and better childcare facilities changing women women who are breaking out of the corporate structure to strike out on their own. Yes, because of this real kind of shining a light on this situation. A lot of women are doing that and there's some fantastic initiatives out there. But it's the kind of traditional corporate Conservative Japan Inc I suppose, where it's very difficult for those women to have any kind of sway, and it's getting them into these decision making roles within society at large that that's proving a massive challenge. Can I come in? I think the government was intending to achieve 30% of women in leadership position by 2020. Initially they give up on that. And now they're saying that maybe Before sometime in 2030. They would like to achieve 30%, but they're not really putting much of political energy right now. So I don't think you know you really mean that much was very ambitious at the time. But it wasn't backed up by anything other than you know, this would be a nice to have and they didn't really so in their own government team, So it's very difficult Roland Cults in the world of culture and media. Are you seeing the same kinds of challenges faced by women, or is it slightly different there? There are similar challenges, particularly in the animation industry. Japan's globally famous anime industry has been dominated by men. I will say it, it's a bit different in manga or Japanese graphic storytelling comics. That's a field where, because manga creators can be independent and work from home. There are a lot of great female artists and more and more coming up. I should also mention in the fields of contemporary literature. There was some wonderful female writers now producing some of the best novels and stories in Japan and around the world. So there is a female voice emerging very, very strongly in the creative arts. In Japan, But you know to go back to something Koichi mentioned because you have a one party system. And these prime ministers just kind of are in the same mold. Of course. You know that that old saying Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. I think that applies in Japan better than just about anywhere else. The new prime minister is the same as the old guys. It's you know, got different hair or left hair so that there's not a lot of changes its top to stimulate anything at the bottom. Yeah, yes, Seijiro Takeshita. You know all these things, in my opinion, and the problem that we're talking about is very much related to the structure of how these large Japanese companies are formed. And that is basically the fact that still lifelong employment and CNN or itty system still lives very strongly. Now, if you put yourself into the decision maker of these senior Japanese men in bigger companies The fact is that they've been underpaid all their life and they're reaping the benefit of this lifelong and also seniority system. And they also do not have the capability of transferring their talent because their capability, their talent, their know how is all valid within the company, but not outside So obviously you can't change the company. You can't change the status quo. And what kind of plus is there for you to make any kind of changes? What is it for you if you want to introduce meritocracy at this point, But is it the economic logic if you have a labor shortage within Japan? That you would tap into a group of people. Women who are on the by and large, very, very well educated, have a lot of job experience. Maybe have been out of the workforce for a few years but doesn't make economic sense to turn to that group and to bring them back into the fold. Of course, I've been saying that you know, we're basically dumping half the human resource down the drain. I think What we have to realize is that the structure of these Japanese companies are disabling the senior managers to make those changes because there's nothing in it for them. Sarah, you wanted to come in. There's a big mindset change needed. And that's very hard to do When you just implement some quotas at the top, and we saw it with the women nomics initiatives that everybody was talking about. Everyone was saying women need to shine and these quotas come in, and they couldn't reach her off them because they needed to be a mindset, change and understanding of the economic benefit of this well speaking of change and changing mindsets. When speaking about the labor shortage, it must be said that Japan's Not generally applying the same solution as some other countries in its position. It's not opening the doors wide to new immigrants. It's not welcoming immigration. Seijiro Takeshita. Why do you think this is the case? Well, there's a multiple factors That's associated with this greatly due to the fact that what Roland has stopped basically mentioned early, which is stability. The Japanese public hates to have any kind of big alterations or change in their very safe and sacred community. So obviously there's a lot of resistance against having the changes in that arena. That sort. Of course, as many of you have been saying This is 2021. Considering the demographics of Japan. It's very, very clear that we have to really open up. In fact, I think we're far too late radio as we speak, but it's very difficult to gain that consensus. There's still is I wouldn't say prejudice. Um, but there's still is a very severe lack of understanding and living with foreigners to have the diversity, cultural diversity, which is very unfortunate because again rugby World Cup was a very good taster for Japanese to open up and you know this Olympic should have accelerated this opening up trend. But unfortunately because of Covid 19, the whole agenda has really died down. I think Roland cults. I wonder what issues this brings to mind for you. What does it mean to be Japanese? Well, I'm going to take a sort of devil's advocate point of view for the sake of conversation. One of the things that I think people admire about Japan and people respect about Japan is the fact that in the 21st century it remains very strong culture. Identity language. It remains distinctive, You know, In a world where every city has becoming homogenized, you have Starbucks on every street corner, whether you're in Europe or Asia..

Marie Conroy Seijiro Takeshita Sarah Cynthia Suey Sarah Parsons Europe Japan Asia 30% 2020 2021 CNN 2030 21st century fifties sixties Starbucks Olympic Roland Cults Covid 19
"sarah parsons" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

10:13 min | 5 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Is struggling to institute changes It's been promising for years. Moves to encourage more women into the workforce, For example, and regionally. How is Japan, stacking up against other major powers China, Russia and India were asking what's stopping change in Japan? That's after a summary of the news. BBC News with David Harper on the 20th anniversary of the 9 11 attacks on the United States. President Biden has said the central lesson of September the of September the 11th 2000, and one was that unity was America's greatest strength. He paid tribute to the nearly 3000 people killed when Al Qaeda terrorists crashed airliners into the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon in Washington. The former French health minister. And, yes, Boza has faced questions at a court hearing in Paris for allegedly having downplayed the risks of coronavirus and endangering the lives of others. She is under formal criminal investigation. Israeli police have captured two of the six Palestinian militants who escaped from a high security prison. Earlier this week. They were found in the Arab city of Nazareth, where a large manhunt is underway for the other four fugitives. A U. S federal judge has quashed some of Apple's APP store rules, forcing the company to allow application developers to use other payment systems. However, the judge did not tell Apple to let creators use their own in our payment systems, one of epics main requests Lawyers for the American woman suing the Duke of York. Prince Andrew over sexual assault allegations say they have successfully served him with legal papers condition for the lawsuit to proceed. Prince Andrew has always strongly denied the sexual assault allegations. Haiti's chief prosecutor has asked the Prime Minister Ariel on read to come in for questioning about the assassination of President Juvenal Muise. The prosecutor said the prime minister needed to explain why he spoke by phone to one of the main suspect in the killing. Hours after it happened. President Muise was shot dead by gunmen who stormed his residence. The Brazilian football legend. Pele is recovering in intensive care after surgery. His doctors said The eight year old was making satisfactory progress after he had a tumor removed from his lower digestive tract. BBC news. You are listening to the real story from the BBC World Service with me, Celia Hatton this week. We're looking at the challenges and opportunities facing Japan. I'm joined on the line by Seijiro Takeshita. He's a professor in the School of Management and information at the University of Shizuoka in Japan. Sarah Parsons, who runs the business consultancy East West Interface. And as a senior teaching fellow at so as the University of London. McConnell, a professor of political science and the faculty of liberal arts at Sophia University in Tokyo. And by Roland Kelty is a Tokyo based writer, journalist and scholar and author of the book Japan America, which explores Japan's pop culture clout well earlier, we discussed the political and social changes underway in the country. I want to take a closer look at Japan's economy. It's the third largest in the world After the US and China. Japan has a lot going forward, a well educated workforce, superior infrastructure and dominant positions in several key global sectors, from cars to electronic. All this, And yet economists still refer to Japan's lost decades. The period of Economic gloom that's largely stretched from its real estate and stock market collapse in 1991 through two now. Seijiro Takeshita. So the question is What's keeping the Japanese economy in the doldrums? If not exactly in the doldrums. Why isn't it doing better? Actually, I don't think it is indulge. Um, I think people are expecting the same type of growth that we had in the eighties, which is not the case because Japan is a mature economy are protected. GDP s well over $40,000, meaning that we have joined A team of mature economy. And if you look at, for example, the progress and things like, you know, process innovation, not necessarily product side, but process innovation, which is basically innovating the product to a better uses for you know, a general public. Japan still has a very, very strong edge. Book around you, For example. I mean, the fact of the matter is is that Japan's competitiveness have not weighing down. It's a different type of growth. It's a different type of strength of Japan is starting to reveal and as we've been discussing, for example, you look at the demographics to Japan, which suggests certainly that we're not going to be growth prone. But much more looking at the quality side, the type of growth that we should be looking at Koichi Would you agree with that sentiment? How much has Japan's economy diversified since The eighties if at all. Right, Right. I agree in the sense that you know, I mean, the idea that we can relive the shore error in the 19 eighties on the bubble economy or the fast growth period before that, for much of the 19 sixties and beyond, is unrealistic. But at the same time, I also Get a sense that there are a lot of people who feel that Japan is underperforming, in part because of the contrast with the faster growing economies among got neighbors. Asian neighbours China, obviously, but also South Korea or Singapore and Japan seems to be sort of fading in the background, In contrast in terms of perception The other thing is, I think it's also to do with the growing gap or, you know more than the growing gap. But I guess the fact of the matter is that Japan is no longer the military in society. The younger generation of people are feeling that kind of growth of their parents experienced and of forthcoming. Sarah also mentioned earlier the poverty that is getting worse among the women. Childhood at the Japan is among the worst in the country's, uh, single parent household, obviously, and so I guess there is this sense that Japan used to be a more one nation, but it no longer is and the government is not coming up with the policies that sufficiently go against that sense of unfairness that is perhaps increasingly pervading the society so What modernizations are needed in Japan's economy, Roland counts I wonder if we can focus on the facts machine for a moment in Japan's love affair with the fax machine when a Cabinet task force asked Japan's government bureaucracy To explain that continued dependence on the fax machine. 400 departments submitted spirited arguments in favor of its continued use. Why does Japan love the fax machine? Is this a good example to illustrate this lack of innovation in the economy? Well again. That's a complicated question, because on the one hand yes, obviously, a fax machine is very low tech. It's dated, Um it's dealing with paper and print and things that we've all moved on from. On the other hand. There is an argument in Japan and then one I respect very much about Concern for privacy. And if you have something on paper and you fax it, you have more security. And that is, I think a key point because it's also one of the reasons people ask me this a lot. Why E money. Electronic money has not so far taken off in Japan, and why so many people In my neighborhood in Tokyo pay for everything in cash myself included, and part of that is because Japanese people just don't want to be traced. They don't want to have their every expenditure recorded in a database. And I do respect that. So I think it's not exclusively low tech failings in Japan, but I would say to the one of those points that the domestically the Japanese Economy in many respects has shown great sustainability. I mean, just before the pandemic, the unemployment rate was, I think the lowest expense since 1974 the crime rate is extremely low. You don't have the kind of gun violence street crime that you have. In the United States, for example, incredibly efficient public services, whether it's transport or package delivery, etcetera. I mean, you actually get used to these things in Japan, and then when you leave Japan, you're astonished at how inefficient much of the world can be. So there is a great deal of sustainable strength. I think in Japan's economy what I find frustrating having lived there now for 20/20 years as a journalist I've met so many mostly young people who are innovative, great ideas, particularly in the I. T industry who have tried to start independent companies tried to go the startup route. And have just been squashed by Japan's corporate machine. And that to me is a great shame because Japan is very underrepresented in it, And that's not the fault of young, talented, visionary Japanese. Mm In the first half of the program. We spoke about the lack of participation of women in political life. What explains the absence of women at a senior level in business and what can be done to fix this? Let's consider now the role played in the economy by more than 50% of the country's population. 51.7% By last official count in Japan. Here's the BBC's Mariko Oy. 1 15 years ago, um, equal, Suzuki faced the choice that many women do continue pursuing her career or start a family. She chose the latter and spent seven years as a stay at home Mother. But as her two Children got older, she tried to rejoin the workforce and realized her time at home was seen as a blank on her resume. What do you think it's impossible? In Japan. Once you leave.

David Harper Celia Hatton Roland Kelty Sarah Parsons Seijiro Takeshita BBC Sarah BBC World Service seven years 1991 East West Interface University of London President Tokyo Al Qaeda Takeshita Paris Boza Apple World Trade Center
"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:14 min | 6 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

"Japan still clings to this notion of being Japanese, right or wrong, and it's a country where the attraction of the popular culture is partly because people are drawn to the Japanese nous of it, and not because it's watered down or diluted or made to fit some kind of global sensibility. So I think if you're a non Japanese worker, and you come to live and work in Japan, it is a big challenge because you really do have to adapt to Japanese nous. And what about you, Roland? You have a Japanese mother. What was it like for you? When you returned to live in Japan? What was that experience like incredibly difficult? No, I'm exaggerating a bit. You know, One of the things I had to tell my American friends is that when I arrived in Japan as an adult and decided to live in Japan, I was not perceived as Japanese at all. But in Japan, it's called half of your mixed race. So my father's American, my mother's Japanese, But I can say since I went to kindergarten in Japan as a child, and I used to visit Japan as a teenager with my mother that I had a great deal of respect for Japanese culture and society, and so adapting to that culture, and that society was something that I took to quite Enthusiastically at the same time, I wasn't working retail and I wasn't working manual labor and I wasn't enduring those struggles in Japan. You know, I know it's quite different. When people go to the United States, and they can, they can develop their own enclaves, their own communities within the U. S. And feel like they're a part of American life. I would say that's difficult in Japan, you really do have to adapt to some extent to Japanese life, and that makes immigration a bigger challenge. Roland, a fascinating insight into life in Japan and speaking of identity. What if the identity of the country on the world stage regionally, Japan is seeing competition from China, of course, but also from South Korea, which is becoming a dominant cultural player and a technological innovator. Russia and India are also key players. Koichi Nakano. How does Japan compete and find a voice within this group? Right? I think the key here is really sort of updating that. I just think Japan's identity in Asia. In the postal period, Japan emerged from the rulings of the Second World War. He was also eventually admitted to the international community as a leading member. But now, of course we live in an age when Japan is a mature economy, and it has pretty good things going, but also it's not what it used to be. And at the same time you have China on the rise yourself. South Korea GDP per capita growing up very fast and maybe vented, overtaking Japan. Cool things. Cosmetics pop culture from come from Korea, Japan, the young people loved them. But the older people have difficulty adjusting, and I think it's related to the immigration issue. We talked about earlier to certain generation of the Japanese people, uh, more likely than the youth tend to have Rather outdated views that often bigoted about Asian people. And I think the failure to adjust to the reality of Japan today is really putting Japan back. Since you're a Takeshita, Would you agree with this? What would you make of Japan's ability to adjust its perspective within the region? How, for example, is it managing its relations with the United States and also with China are are its alliances clear? So Japan has to basically clarify and basically Stress it stands and the stance that Japan has to take is very clear, which is going under the umbrella of security of the United States and its allies. Of course, globalization isn't going to stop along with innovation is not going to stop, but it will be halted to a certain degree because of the current situation of this excessive aggression that we're seeing from countries like China. So unfortunately, there will be a pause. There will be a lot of a transitional changes in Japan would have to experience and basically I would say that really need to make a much better top down decision making process, And this is, unfortunately our weakness if you look at the Japanese corporate world Were wonderful in mid management and the workers, But top management always is a problem because we're always too late, too little in making our decisions. Roland kills. I wonder if you can reflect a little bit on some of Japan's strengths. When it comes to soft power. What are some of its areas of soft power that we should keep in mind that we need to remember? I do think when you read Japanese novels, contemporary novels or you watch animation from Japan or read manga, the energy and the creativity and the inventiveness and the disruptive nature of those narratives is really thrilling, and that's what's drawing these audiences from around the world. And tourism to Japan was just exploding, leading up to the pandemic. Many of those tourists were young and coming to Japan because they wanted to try the food. They wanted to see where anime is made and manga are created and they wanted to travel around the country to go on pilgrimages. To find the sites where these stories take place. So that kind of creative energy I I sometimes wish Japan could balance it more going to back to what Sajida was saying about the corporate world. You know, to bring that kind of creative disruption into the corporate boardroom that is thriving. Really in the pop culture industry. Okay, Well, we're almost out of time on this edition of the real story, but I want to get one very brief Thought from each of you before we close. If you were a doctor, and you were going to administer medicine to an ailing Japan what one thing would you prescribe to turn the country around? Seijiro? Takeshita? Let's start with you or a doctor. Doctor Takeshita. Let's say for now. Okay? Let's say that I'll try the electric shock because I think we need a shock jump in the arm. Um and we will be, you know, making that transition change now. According to India's Swiss business School. Our top management ranking is 58 out of 61 countries, and many people think this is bad, but I think this is a very good figure. Our top management is 58 out of 61, in spite of the fact that we're third largest economy in the world, which shows that the new generation if they make a little bit of improvement in this arena. Things will change. A lot of things that we've been talking about two decade will be altered thanks to the new management, and that is at least my hope. Sarah Parsons. What would you prescribe for Japan? Oh, my goodness. That's a question, isn't it? Probably a sedative whilst they get through this change the sedative really, is this kind of calming things. And I think people brought this out that Japan relies on its culture on its uniqueness, You know, and Sometimes really hard to change, and things can be slow. But there's a lot of things that do need to change. So I think the sedative comes in there to just help them through that change. Koichi Nakano, what would you prescribe for Japan? What one change? Would you like to see? Well, I am a doctor, but in the wrong field in political science, so I'll probably say that maybe the change in the government bringing in people who are going to celebrate and emphasize individualism and human rights for a change would be a good place to start. I think The women's rights, the migrant workers' rights and the rights of the workforce. In general, I think is going to change the culture and he's also going to change the way we do business. We run the government and that I think is very much needed for a mature economy, Electrical Roland Cults. What would you prescribe to turn the country around? Yeah, I think I'm going to take the slightly contrarian point of view, and I think I would prescribe an ice bath. I think going back to what stage it has been.

Sarah Parsons Koichi Nakano United States 58 Asia Roland Korea Second World War Sajida 61 countries 61 U. S. Swiss business School South Korea today Seijiro each One one States
"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:33 min | 6 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

"Half of them joined the workforce with a university degree. That's almost the same number of men and yet less than 15% of senior positions are held by women. And the average Japanese women's income is only half of what their male counterparts, saying the government spends a lot of money. Re Skilling Japanese males in their fifties or sixties who are leaving companies Now I would say to the government, you should be spending the same amount of money. On the women who have been housewives and trying to go back to work. That's Cynthia Suey, author of a book and Japanese called Eight Things full Time Housewife should do before entering the workforce. Speaking to Murray Coy Sarah Parsons, how many women are in leadership roles, and is that number changing in the business world? So it is a real issue, but the Japanese employment system the Japanese workplace is very gendered. I mean, I know the lady that was speaking on the clip was saying, You know, the men trained. I mean, in the 19 eighties, we've talked about the economic miracle. I'm not Harkin. I'm not looking back on it nostalgically. But the women you know, had a very strong role in that period as well. The salary man's wife was the one who held him up and was at home and the role of the house by the mother in Japan is a very, very strong one and ideologically as well. It has a lot of sway so women at that time would have to employment paths within a traditional Japanese company, and one of those was a clerical path that the women were expected to go on. And the other ones to the men who would accept long hours transfers, etcetera, etcetera. So this became quite a normal thing and the promotional route the expectations of the manager of all kind of got the longest gender employment system. So it's really hard for that to change. I do see a lot of kind of female lead. Entrepreneurial companies cropping up now trying to challenge these norms, trying to get more women into them and better childcare facilities. That's changing the women women who were breaking out of the corporate structure to strike out on their own. Yes, because of this real kind of shining a light on this situation. A lot of women are doing that and then some fantastic initiatives out there, But it's the kind of traditional corporate Conservative Japan Inc I suppose, where it's very difficult for those women to have any kind of sway, and it's getting them into these decision making roles within society at large that that's proving a massive challenge. Can I Yeah, come in. I think the government was intending to achieve 30% of women in leadership position by 2020. Initially they gave up on that. And now they're failing that maybe Before sometime in 2030. They would like to achieve 30%, but they're not really pretty much of political energy right now. So I don't think you know if they really mean that much. It was very ambitious at the time. But it wasn't backed up by anything other than you know, this would be a nice to have and they didn't really show it in their own government team, So it's very difficult. Roland counts in the world of culture and media. Are you seeing the same kinds of challenges faced by women? Or is it slightly different there? There are similar challenges, particularly in the animation industry. Japan's globally famous anime industry has been dominated by men. I will say it, it's a bit different in manga or Japanese graphic storytelling comics. That's a field where, because manga creators can be independent and work from home. There are a lot of great female artists and more and more coming up. I should also mention in the fields of contemporary literature. There was some wonderful female writers now producing some of the best novels and stories in Japan and around the world. So there's a female voice emerging very, very strongly in the creative arts in Japan. But you know, to go back to something Koichi mentioned because you have a one party system. And these prime ministers just kind of are in the same mold. Of course. You know that that old saying Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. I think that applies in Japan better than just about anywhere else. The new prime minister is the same as the old guys, you know, got different hair or less hair. So that yes, there's not a lot of change at the top to stimulate anything at the bottom. Yes, Seijiro Takeshita. You know all these things, in my opinion, and the problem that we're talking about is very much related to the structure of how these large Japanese companies are formed. And that is basically the fact that still lifelong employment and CNN priority system still lives very strongly. Now, if you put yourself into the decision maker of these in a senior Japanese men in bigger companies The fact is that they've been underpaid all their life and they're reaping the benefit of this lifelong and also seniority system, and they also do not have the capability of Transferring their talent because their capability, their talent, their know how is all valid within the company, but not outside so obviously you can't change the company. You can't change the status quo. And what kind of plus is there for you to make any kind of changes? What is it for you if you want to introduce meritocracy at this point, But is that the economic logic? If you have a labor shortage within Japan that you would tap into a group of people women Who are on the by and large, very, very well educated, have a lot of job experience. Maybe have been out of the workforce for a few years but doesn't make economic sense to turn to that group and to bring them back into the fold. Of course, I've been saying that you know, we're basically dumping have the human resource down the drain. I think What we have to realize is that the structure of these Japanese companies are disabling these senior managers to make those changes because there's nothing in it for them. Sarah, you wanted to come in. There's a big mindset change needed and that's very hard to do When you just implement some quotas at the top, and we saw it with the women nomics initiatives that everybody was talking about. Everyone was saying, you know, women need to shine. And these quotas come in, and they couldn't reach her of them because they needed to be a mindset, change and understanding of the economic benefit of this well speaking of change and changing mindsets. When speaking about the labor shortage, it must be said that Japan's Not generally applying the same solution as some other countries in its position. It's not opening the doors wide to new immigrants. It's not welcoming immigration. Seijiro Takeshita. Why do you think this is the case? Well, there's multiple factors is associated with this greatly due to the fact that what Roland had stopped basically mentioned early, which is stability. The Japanese public hates to have any kind of big alterations or change and they're very safe and Sacred community, So obviously there's a lot of resistance against having the changes in that arena. That said, of course, as many of you have been saying. This is 2021. Considering the demographics of Japan. It's very, very clear that we have to really open up. In fact, I think we're far too late radio as we speak, but it's very difficult to gain that consensus. There still is. I wouldn't say prejudice. Um, but there still is a very severe lack of understanding and living with foreigners to have the diversity, cultural diversity, which is very unfortunate because again rugby World Cup was a very good taster for Japanese to open up and you know this Olympic should have accelerated this opening up trend. But unfortunately because of Covid 19, the whole agenda has really died down. I think Roland cults. I wonder what issues this brings to mind for you. What does it mean to be Japanese? Well, I'm gonna take a sort of devil's advocate point of view for the sake of conversation. One of the things that I think people admire about Japan and people respect about Japan is the fact that in the 21st century it remains very strong culture. Identity language. It remains distinctive, You know, In a world where every city is becoming homogenized, you have Starbucks on every street corner, whether you're in Europe or Asia..

Sarah Seijiro Takeshita Cynthia Suey Europe Asia 2020 Japan fifties 30% 2030 21st century CNN Murray Coy 2021 Starbucks Conservative Japan Inc Sarah Parsons Covid 19 sixties Olympic
"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:33 min | 6 d ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBUR

"Mr Pitt. Somebody needs to be found and Mr Sugar as he has been the chief Cabinet secretary, which is really the number two position in the cabinet he was ready to carry on immediately. But also because he was supposed to be the continuity candidate. He was largely seen as a stopgap prime minister, and there was also immediately a past struggle within the party between the elderly man. And so Mr Suda was rendered very vulnerable because of the past struggle within the party as he support levels dropped very sharply as the Covid situation got worse and worse while his government was seen as focusing over the on the Olympics at the expense of public health Seijiro. Let's turn to you and just to focus a little bit more on the party itself. First, Japan has a parliamentary system and one that has throughout Japan's Postwar history. Rarely resulted in any party winning power other than the one that's in charge Now, why is that? Well, it's very unfortunate, but one of the negative things about Japan is that we don't have any competition in politics and you look at the real world. The fact of the matter is that you need competition in order to basically innovate and, you know, go forward. But this is one of the problems about Japan. One time we did have the opposition ruling Japan, but that was a total shamble to say the least. And the Japanese public have learned that they really do not have any implementation power, and I would say this is one of the Japan's weakest link. The fact that we don't have a strong opposition. We don't have competition in the political scene, and therefore people play with politics, not policies. As I think Koichi has just been eloquently express. Right now. We were talking about the political issues agendas inside, while what we should be doing is talking about policies, especially under this very difficult times of covid 19. Sarah Parsons. Let's think about the people who are participating in politics and and in the party itself. The LDP party There aren't a lot of women and Mr Su Gazette cabinet. Is this a familiar trend in Japan? We saw quite a lot of the Tokyo mayor during the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Eureka quickly She's a woman. Yes, well, I'll just put this in context because every year the world economic health foreign publishes a global gender Gap report and Japan ranked 147 out of 156 in the field of political empowerment. So it's always rent very low on this dimension. It's no surprise that there's a low level of women within the party is very conservative party very conservative views you've probably seen in the news. Some of the comments from leading Japanese politicians and women should have babies. Women. The role is to be the mother is it follows the very Typical Japanese gendered roles. I've seen Sonja Takayuki going for leadership, which is obviously a positive thing I met a young lady go to politics a couple of years ago, she said, You know, It's very difficult to balance any kind of child care, family care with it and very, very conservative views. If you want to change anything. And there's been some news about the LDP after the head of the Olympics committee was criticized for saying women talk too much. They allowed women into the board meeting, but they weren't allowed to speak lots of survey showing that you know the attitude towards women as well is that they're probably not going to be very good leaders. And in this sense, I hope that these women can Lead the way and show everyone that women can be very good leaders. But you know, it's still very much based on masculine leadership traits. So we're hearing a few themes that are coming to the fore already this perceived resistance to change the idea that Japan has a very conservative society. Roland counts is that the way that society is at large, or is this just how it's reflected from within the government? How engaged to people feel with politics in Japan? That's a good question. Well as many people are pointing out, it's a one party system and it was really designed that way if you go back to the post War era. The CIA was very much involved in the development of the LDP Liberal Democratic Party, which is neither liberal nor democratic, and it was installed in a way to keep Japan under America's thumb. Crucial moment, so it was designed as a one party system. It was designed not to change or disrupt the status quo. And in that sense, it's pretty efficient or it's been pretty efficient. So does the party serve the interests of the people at large? Well again, that's that's a complicated question. I would say to the extent that There's a kind of tacit bargain between some of the Japanese population and the Japanese political system, which is that as long as things run smoothly as long as there are no big disruptions As long as people feel comfortable and life is convenient, then we just keep the status quo and that's fine. I say some of the Japanese population, however, as many people have been saying there's a dynamism in Japan. I think Japanese youth and Japanese women Present the future for Japan and that dynamism is not being addressed by the political system, and I think it's also fair to say that Japanese youth Partly because of the technology is available to them. They are much more self aware about the state of Japan. I think you saw that during the Olympics when a lot of young people got involved with the protests against the Olympics. And I think young Japanese are aware of Japan's place in the world and are frustrated by the sclerotic nature of Japanese government and also the nostalgia. Of those old man running the country. All right. Well, let's focus more of our attention on the almost intertwined issues of Covid and the government's torture decision to go ahead with the Olympics. Seijiro back in 2013. The Tokyo bid committee won the games with the slogan The Games will be safe in our hands, the organizers and the government spent a huge amount of time and billions Of dollars, trying to keep the games covid safe and to convince the public that the games were safe. How do they do in the end? Well, I think there were no direct consequences from you know the Olympics, but the fact that they conducted in spite of 70% questioning the Olympic yourself, I think will be a tarnished image. That is very, very negative. But I think it's also a psychological negative impact because this was supposed to be as you pointed out earlier, a booster for the popularity of The LDP and Mr Suder, but also to basically rejuvenate the Japanese concept. As you know, we've been going through a decade or two decades of what we call the lost decade where we've been stagnating or relatively stagnating in comparison to the you know, vast girls that we had in the eighties and early nineties Tokyo Olympics back in 1964 was exactly that basically telling the world that we're out of World War two were to start a new Japan and basically, many people are hoping that this would be a kind of Ignition point for Japan. To start a new but unfortunately that's really died down very quickly considering the very considered nature of Japanese, which tend to have the highest level of risk avoidance amongst old people in the world. But what about the wider changes that are afoot in Japanese society? Japan? As we've said, has the world's oldest population around 30% of the population is over the age of 65. That percentage is increasing every year. Roland, you've lived in Japan and the United States. I wonder if you can contrast the two when it comes to demographics. What's the effect of this large cohort of older people across? Japanese politics and society. Well, For one thing. I would say that what I referred to earlier as a kind of damaging nostalgia that pervades a lot of the older generation in Japan, and especially those politicians we've been referring to in the LDP..

Sonja Takayuki Sarah Parsons 2013 Olympic 70% Suda Olympics United States World War two CIA Sugar Pitt 147 1964 156 billions eighties LDP First Paralympic Games
"sarah parsons" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:52 min | 4 months ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Blackadder is a drama ballerinas. No come aspects there The end where they say single as they single meal. But I'm in the Singapore sent over this window and I magic Formal approval by the Agua Philip with his lava in La Labrador. Nothing that's good broke apart. The president of the mascot as fungal Manchester, all Communists Celotex dad via They never say single else's enticing Camille, then theorem, according to the squint of personal union last arugula tiaras, But I started an affair to in my magic carpets. Text at the new ever say single as enticing. Camille in nougat and Rescue broke apart at Cornell from remand to Boys are basically lost me Horace especially is Bravo Supermarkets. Esta semana filet mignon seared telephone data available asset that wasan varied up invested in Dylan Simcoe. Brandon Webb, Visitor to locally that mustard Kanaya around Montagne job here to Longwood. Florida Central is territorio Bravo to caress Style assault team as RC held Mitsubishi EST aqui para que estas el momento. They come here to carry the whole city character. They happy A no, I said good or general estimates are so help me to be cheated. You guarantee level don't get to cattle. They were master Loki Valley. RC helmets. Appreciate that back, Adama still below Della Casa soon, Okay. They buy those mill cuatro mil wants to see it. The mill bastard. Okay, Valley, you know important wanted the empath Inga Helmi Yahya. Like on this young Ademas de Credito. An RC here with Toby. She s facet E. Caraway will console Oh, actually pronto that we were outlanders dentist will be Tito's all like leaps across the UV Delta's well. Bandidos, considerable financier. Pinto put a D. J. R. C. Who? Mitsubishi to concessionary, Augustino RC. He'll pull to come as C S R c. He'll pull to come correct Human Correa whether if it is scary, but I'm setting a table over to me and said Quatro, the Julio Sarah Parsons inquisitive..

Brandon Webb Dylan Simcoe Camille Longwood Inga Helmi Yahya Adama Singapore Mitsubishi Bravo Supermarkets cuatro mil Julio Sarah Parsons Toby Manchester Quatro Pinto single D. J. R. C. Tito single meal Caraway
"sarah parsons" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:32 min | 4 months ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Rick till was selected at random from the phone book to host the show. All right thank you for that. And welcome back to the program rick to the with you. Coast to coast and around the world on the american forces radio network. It's our pleasure to welcome to the show author steven g mantis co written a book along with sarah. Parsons walter called happened to the us mnt. Let's united states men's national team the truth about the beautiful game. It is available today from triumph. Books and stephen. I don't know where to start with the disgust. I had after missing out on entire world cup cycle in concacaf there's no reason There's no excuse. Why the united states at this point doesn't qualify them in mexico and everybody else but they managed to do it. So i guess that was the impetus behind this book Well yes i. I because everyone kept saying like what happened to this team. The quarter finals in two thousand and two world cup and now we're not qualifying. Meanwhile we thought the us had been making progress so we went back and looked at the data. And actually you're right. I mean if you look at the the heck's the teams that the united states finished fifth mexico finished first. The united states has twice as many players and mls playing two or three times. The number of minutes and mls and the us has four players in the top. Five leagues In during that heck's playing nine thousand minutes in mexico has five players playing six thousand minutes and costa rica two players playing six thousand minutes. Oh the us had the talent. There's no question about it. So that's when we started a dive into what other things happened. Besides that and also keeping in mind that there had been progress made going into the nineteen ninety four world cup. The united states had three wins five draws and twenty three losses against mexico and since nineteen ninety. Four we've had sixteen wins ten losses ten draws and thirteen losses so obviously some progress had been made. Well yeah the united states soccer federation started taking things seriously. I worked at the world cup in ninety four. And i think about the days before they would have those qualifiers at the coliseum just to sell tickets A mexican home game colorado. Junior said that he was told you you get a cap but you're gonna have to fly yourself if you wanna play for the team I think about you know as we built for ninety four and started taking those guys who qualified like the roy wiggly's and the tomas dooley's and you know opening up our minds a little bit but you know because at a talian ninety bob gansler just took really a college all star team down there for me. One of the biggest problems with the team now is the the hubris of that we can coach ourselves and And it's kind of started with bruce arena. Who did have success of course in south korea. But his second incarnation was awful. The I was not a fan of bradley. I don't know why are they would name a guy like berhalter as the head coach it to me. It would be like getting a guy from france and making him an nfl head coach. What do you think about that. It's interesting because That's was the conventional wisdom. Everything you just said is what people told us. And what we've discovered is i actually in europe. It's the opposite. I'll give you an example of this. In the united states dominates in basketball right in the nba is the best league in the world. We have the greatest players playing the united states in europe when they wanted to catch up to the united states. They did not hire. Us coaches they actually develop their own european style of basketball which obviously now many of those players are coming in the nba. very successfully. They had bigger players. Start to shoot from the outside which was unconventional monier. they had players Do you develop something. Called the euro strapping of how they went to the to the to the basket entire new style developed with european coaches not american coaches. And so we actually challenge this idea of. Should we actually have an american way of playing. And that's what we actually Discovered was that even if you take the women's team in nineteen ninety-one when the women won the world cup The women's team was not favored at all to in that world cup. And what they did was they recognize it and have this skill level to compete against the european Which had been playing the european championship since nineteen eighty-four which is around the time. Nc double a women's soccer really got going on their first championship in nineteen eighty two. And what they did. An endurance did was. He instilled a high press three four three system because he was like. If we let these other ladies can possess the ball they will beat us because they have a higher skill level so let us our athleticism and willingness to work defensively together in groups in the other side of the pitch in order to create turnovers and then shooting score and so i think that that sort of was. Hey let's use the strength of the united states and the way we learn the game and use that to our advantage. I'll give you another example in seventeen seventy six. The united states patriots didn't go hire a bunch of british forces or european forces Generals to come teach us how to do it we develop their own guerrilla style tactics to go defeat a superior military power to try to go compete against soccer power. The same way they play against us doesn't make sense to us like you should be using guerrilla tactics as well and the guerrilla tactics are basically a counterattack style of play. So everything you said. Send until we really got into it. Well i mean listen there and you could say revolutionary war was a french general. Lafayette paulus general. Today's cashew that was showing us what to do. But the the basketball thing i mean. Yeah they put out a good player here and there but their national teams. Don't stand up to us outside of you know. Spain may be coming in for a silver medal. But the you can't compare the women to the men in the united states there are completely different thing. The women here They grew up in a sport where it was viewed. It was like you know that's a great sport for girls You know and and you know tough guys will play football but in europe a and and all over the world really until the last twenty years. If you're a girl playing soccer you your feminine. Your femininity was stripped from you. they don't have the college system that we have so the the united states women. It's very easy to see why they dominate. But when i look at at mls. And i look at college soccer for the men. I just think that those two things heard our national team so badly we need to somehow find a way. It's easy for christian pulisic. Who has a you know a croatian or serbian passport. I say but to get like the iovine karofsky like it man. United or the john o'brien at the accident. I realized that now with the the deaths and some of the we have many players in the champions league Claudia arenas son we. We need to get those kids. The good ones early because if they go to college and play. Mls and mls keeps expanding so fast there. Just watering down the talent in this country more and more and more of that well. His is something people told us is that the united states wasn't doing very good job of developing identifying talent across the united states. That we we hadn't done that. We looked at other countries so take germany. For example. Seven of the eleven starters. The german team that won the world cup came from to develop ademi's By munich and shock up and we found that thirty that The majority of the team came from two states. Germany and that and that those two states only represent thirty five percent of the country of germany. So they only have like tony cruz. And from eastern europe who was found by byron munich. And it was brought to by of unique..

south korea thirty two players nine thousand minutes six thousand minutes two two states europe fifth five players Seven christian pulisic thirty five percent france Four steven g mantis john o'brien tony cruz Rick till sixteen wins
"sarah parsons" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:15 min | 7 months ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"State shall appropriate song letters claim, Let off claim lost, considers and want to associate saves the S Vented restaurant address Quatre associate that says there is vented Restaurant address inspects young grad peace took away stuff whether they move a big fat zero and Southern English 100 left door. Don't they? They with that. Let's go Bradley Cameron, where walks in America that pronto Sarah Parsons to happen that evidence of in tow, he said, Oh, pagosa stand those building to those on the ground is our closing to this and we're both our It'll be solo. Significant. Magoza discovery to diagnose not appear doesn't have a big fat zero on the bullets back and said, Oh, and to go Solo and Southern Ng these and Orlando went Portland Police protocol. They give us you already dressed for Mars. Romero come grand is this went to send Congress Exclusivas Segundo Wanda rooms to go Tina in excess of the inventor, your home with Lexy articulos. Let's continue levels. Seven. Direct, honest Aromasin compress you, Lucy Does there's Cerro hoping, other squint of saying yes has continuously heroes. Other mass company. Jefferson's marvelous Sacasa rapidamente in the grand Tour event ability to assume the rooms to go. And then whoever outlet and Colonial company toyed with this and with my young adios Just think when they settle Settle East Colonial drive who part of the media Louis that they like what the untrained eye stays and 9600 East Colonial The old Cheney highway complete tempera. No Perella, my horse, Alex soon but a muscle for to stay out that we see the rooms to go, Fiona, that protocol that touches anything that Some people skipping this wannabe local brother always going. BJ's wholesale club getting was a septal sparing said Accomplice Supercommittee Intend to implement ordaining was trapped when B. J Spoon to come easy, but it includes those frescoes is in contact O P. J. Steven Haley Rosamund a little speckles Must. Cormorant isn't standing sport. Miss Ricci Thomas Cornell does. My boss says You're in danger of intolerance and Ms program asking who said at Cooper's request. Do Donna Kelley began? Baracus? I guess manhandle allowed. Okay, This is instrumental your sport, Mr Beat people to come. Yes..

Sarah Parsons B. J Spoon Donna Kelley Lucy Bradley Cameron America Cooper Ricci Fiona Alex Tina 9600 East Colonial Jefferson Thomas Cornell S Vented BJ Romero O P. J. Steven Haley Rosamund Congress both
"sarah parsons" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

08:45 min | 9 months ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Com slash klavan spelled clay to the va and there are no es in clave. Today is the anniversary of the boston tea party which is interesting because i've been thinking all week about the founders. I do this periods of transition personal transition but also you know The country's transit transition. I tried to get a bearing on. What exactly it is. We're we're fighting for because you can get messed up in the fight of the moment and forget the the big picture during the revolutionary war George washington one of the most virtuous men who ever lived virtue is the time being defined as the The sacrifice of your own interests to the public good One was virtuous men who ever lived but as he was started to see how the war was going and how congress wasn't funding armies and armies were drifting away. He wrote this letter to congress when he said with far. The greatest part of mankind interest is the governing principle and that almost every man is more or less under its influence motives of public. Virtue may for a time or in particular instances actuate men to the observance of conduct purely disinterested but they are not of themselves sufficient to produce perseverance conformity to the refined dictates and obligations of social. Duty is to remind you that everybody is out for his own. Interest is very rare that a person comes along who sacrifices his own interest to the common. Good it happens as he says as well as washing says at times but we have to depend on people to act on their interest. Most of the time and james madison the architect of the constitution understood this and he studied all the republican republics in history especially the greeks went back and looked at the greek city states looked at rome looked at why these countries failed and he came to the conclusion that they depended too much on public virtue. They depended on too much on people doing the right thing. And so he wanted to create a system of conflicts of interest and that's why he invented the federal system right. He what he said was in the old days they used to say. The republic has to be small. I'm going to use the fact that america is so big of course was smaller than still and he knew it was going to get bigger by taking all these states and putting them up against each other. That's why montana where there are. Three people living have two senators new york where there are a million people. living also have two senators. He wasn't an equally strong so they would have equal power when they were fighting out their interest and he felt the more people The more interest groups there were fighting the less likely we would be to Fall into tyranny and collapse and that's why conservatives are always trying to preserve the system and why leftists are always trying to destroy it because the what they hate is freedom and what we love is freedom. it's not one particular issue it's about freedom and it's the system that preserves the freedom and that's what we're always should be. We all should be trying to preserve. So i read to let me let me read to op. Eds were just little bit. Snippets of op-eds made that joke about joe biden. But this is a real thing that they're making a big fuss of this there. Some of them are just trying to intimidate the press shane. Don't you dare pick on. We're gonna come back with our identity politics and silence you again as we used to do and is trump stopped doing And you're gonna take it because you love us and you hate trump and you know you don't care about our freedoms at all so we're going to just letting you know that we're gonna make a big fuss about. You're not calling. Jill biden dr so they published in the wall street journal. Which was the center of this attack. A twitter thread by sarah. Parsons a professor sleep at to. This is a professor of archaeology at the university of alabama birmingham and a fellow at the john simon guggenheim foundation one of the most prestigious foundations in the country. And this is re twitter fee. I know everyone is angry. About what joseph epstein wrote about it yesterday in the wall street journal however the real aim for irish should be james. Toronto he is the editor of their op. Ed page is so far completely escaped accountability. That ends now james. Explain yourself when three thousand plus americans daily from kovic million suffer with food insecurity and addiction. Major sedition happening racism climate change. You give space to an angry old white misogynist to yell at our future first lady ray. Her education doctorate while i started a national conversation. You might argue yes. The conversation goes like this. F the wall street journal f joseph and f- their trash op. Ed pages. I hope you consider pulling the peace apologizing and committing to making the wall street journal op-ed page something people wanna read and also go f yourself professor of archaeology with the guggenheim foundation. She tweets living human garbage monster. Paul zhigo wall street journal head opinion. Editor doubled down on the dr. Jill biden opinion pace saying she is open to criticism a wall street journal writers. Are you cool with blatant sexism and misogyny and slander against women. That discussion should not take place. Now i want you to read you about something else. About a scholar named james flint. Who died jason. Riley wrote about him in the journal today. I recently read charles. Murray's book human diversity which is about the genetic differences between men and women the genetic differences between races and the genetic differences between people in different classes. And i didn't like the book very much. I usually find these about pop studies of genetics. They always confirm that genetics. Make us the way we are right this minute. I mean even not really a great science writer does this to it just generic. I mean what would happen if they came back to. Genetics shown that men and women are exactly alike. Then you'd know genetics garbage right. You just say that's not true. Men and women are not exactly alike. They're very different. So your your science is wrong. You know the science is wrong. I can see with my own eyes. So when they tell you. Like i basically felt where he goes out of his way to be to dodge political attacks to not say that he thinks that black people are dumb. That's that he goes out of his way to avoid saying that. But that's basically the undercurrent of the book and look. I'm not attacking the guys who are racist. I think he's he's falling what he thinks of the size. I think science has garbage and so there was this guy. James flynn who is skeptical of these kinds of findings and you know riley points out that the changes in iq over time and the changes of cuban people in different circumstances really just obliterate this idea that there one racist smarter than another permanently because of genetic things but listen to what this guy james flynn who recently died. Listen to how. He addressed the debate. He said i am happy to discuss. And this is a guy who believed that charles. Murray school was wrong. That black people are not Races or not stupider or smarter that these things are fluid. And it's obviously true. i. I think it's ridiculous and he said i am happy to discuss the in. Iq debate with colleagues hold contrary views telling someone that what they believe is morally remiss or telling them that if they persistent disagreeing i will expose them is not my style. That's the fight. Warren say this is the fight run. Were were not in a fight. You know there really are three sides. There's the left is the right. And then they're the people who want the system to continue because the system keeps us free want everybody to be able to argue and speak and not be silenced. I don't. I don't even want these guys who i think are kind of nazis. I don't want them silence. I want everybody to be able to speak. I've i've spoken up for alex jones when they knocked them off the air. You know. I think it's just wrong. I think we can. We can defeat these guys an open argument and comparing their ideas to ours. Freedom will win through freedom. I really truly believe that it has always been. The case is always the case that censorship just leads to more censorship. So this is why. This is why i actually sometimes defend that s right to speak. Not the what. They're saying. But i don't want them to silence us which is what they do. You know there's an interview in in glamour magazine with joe biden's twenty twenty campaign manager. Jen o'malley dillon. Who is now his perspective. Deputy chief of staff and she says she says. I think that compromise is a good thing as with love. The atmosphere in the world now is like. Oh if you compromise. You don't believe in something. No is i believe in it so much that i'm going to work to find a path. We can both go down together and then she says the president-elect able to connect with people over the sense of unity And she says in the primary people would mock him like you think you can work with republicans and then she says. I'm not saying they're not a bunch of efforts. Mitch mcconnell is terrible but this sense that you couldn't wish for that you couldn't wish for this. Bipartisan ideal rejected that so they're going to have unity with us mo- foes and they're you know they just hate us that much and this is why you know you get exchange. Will you get exchanges like this mitch. Mcconnell said this when the electoral college confirmed joe biden. Was the president-elect this mitch..

the wall street journal klavan Jill biden congress university of alabama birmingh john simon guggenheim foundati james flynn boston tea party joseph epstein Ed page ed page Paul zhigo james madison james flint George washington joe biden twitter james guggenheim foundation rome
"sarah parsons" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

06:35 min | 11 months ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"V. e. l. o. Sand velo a place to feel better. How i'm dustin ross. This is the fringe zone. And this is truly the news that you can use because this is long. Long-awaited trump roast tiberan. No you fourteen. He just started getting musty. But joe family been stinking. And you're guilty by kanzi. Get show nail biting buller wiping pd brady. Peter brady voice asked the hello goodbye to tiffany you are generic relative and you look like a family guy person in real life and plus you look. They're girlfriend looks you know what. Why am i even talking to you too eric. I would go easy on you. Because i know you ain't a fully done human yet since your top lip and gums never separated. But i'm not sparing you shit. You look like mechanic and is sincerely hope that the brakes malfunction hard as you guiding the next car into your bay. Also that's why you and your wife annual bologna kids all look like the white people on lovecraft country and we all know how that story turned out donald junior. That's why you got a bad batch and can't stop sweating or be steal. You're going to be shaken for the rest of your life and that's also why aubrey o'day telling all your business you look like a a and you can interpret that as you wish. Ps we all know. Your thinning hair has h five. And that's why his name is your name forever. You sweaty pits having bitch vodka and jared. Y'all are definitely gonna rot in jail and you will never have the white prestige and reverence that you so badly. Seek all your look like your private parts are cold and damp decreases and your marriage. Bed is dead. That's why you always look like them. White people on the farm holding shoveling fourth unemp- people talking while that's looks like okay back to the rose malania you've got a baby by donald trump in the whole world knows it. You made a choice to get naked and have sex with her mother. Fuck it looks and smells. Like donald trump. And that's what you get. You ain't never been shit. No you ever be mentioned with the real first ladies of the nation. Michelle obama is the best been. The best will always be better at everything in life than you and are hoping makes you. Squint so hard and anger that you walk into a branch shredder and donald. You lost your fat siree loser with kitten heels. Lift in those which don't even make no sense. Which means is definitely something you would do no matter what you are going down as a one term president who got impeached and then got they asked with and couldn't even get reelected. You can't even get it up. Okay that's what you get your loser. Your whole damn family is loses. And that's why y'all are are leaving and with that. I want to welcome everyone to a new day at the fringe zone. Your weekly look into all mental health and mental hygiene things. You know because who wants to musty brain. The tagline is changing as we evolve. Your hey fran are you doing. You mentioned sarah parsons girlfriend. Not of that clip. That people use on twitter. Where dini's like well. How did i get thrown back trump. Oh flip stewart. How you guys doing today. We doing wonderful today. You know very tattoo. Say this feeling rejuvenated have never felt this joy. Why shouldn't say never. But i haven't felt like this in four years and i had another conversation about this on holding court this week but i just have. I did not realize how much of a dark funky s cloud that trump administration had over me until saturday when those election results got called in favor of joe biden and madam vice president-elect kamala harris and and i just i hadn't felt that way in a long time it was good to see that some people made the right decision to vote on the right side of things as opposed to voting for continued hatred continued. Mistreatment end just a lack of humanity. If felt good to see that it was still some good left in the world so doing doing real good how you doing. I'm wondering what's going to happen though. Because i saw that Trump is still pushing through his february budget so it looks like he's staging a coup because for him things are moving as usual he is not conceding. This is going to play out. He's being cairn terrier karen. Oh they said he'd be. He just looked like a carey. He's actually built like a career but he's being a care in asking to speak to the manager at the polling locations. You know doing all the things that are typical care would do get your ass out. You lost biden. Harris thank you. Oh no. i'm so low number right now. I don't know what was going to happen. He plays be crazy yourself. You you know. I just like dustin made a lot of very good point and i should be feeling real good because of the election. I'm just trying to feel good about today. Where as far as the election is concerned. The government just bevery shaky catches. Don't just never know when it's going to be that time. Why people are going back. You know what rise up. Fuck this we're gonna keep you know what the fuck we doing. Because there's so many people that acting like didn't realize how racism was so bad all this time me while i'm watching out where you being like. I don't know if i said this last week. But i'm rewatch old ciphers and we talked about names from that know shots. I'm just like oh. I want to celebrate this but i think i'm still feeling affect some. Ptsd so ali others feeling good about this. Please uplift us please. We'll come here. So i can live you up because i'm telling you right here. I am happy buck. Trump's fuck donald trump. donald trump is thinking of. That song was gonna go to number one. Could you imagine. I would have hit the billboard. Hot one hundred phone only repeat and lettuce stream on. I have been legendary..

donald trump dustin ross joe biden kamala harris donald junior joe family donald aubrey o'day Michelle obama twitter Peter brady sarah parsons jared president dini fran donald trump.
"sarah parsons" Discussed on Around the NFL

Around the NFL

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on Around the NFL

"It'd be great if Hollywood Brown steps right and he's he's never practiced as an N._F._l.. Player yet I mean that's kind of a lot to expect the Jordan Lasley. It's a lot of Seth Roberts taking first team snaps. That's my miles boykin. Who's you know there's so much faster? Mr had a big long touchdown. They've been talking about Jalil Scott behind the scenes. It's kind of like one of those guys that they think is going to make an impact. We'll see but they have so many different guys wide receiver and yet. No you have really no one you can trust other than sneed Lamar. Yeah I mean it was one. It's one practice he was pretty erratic. I mean that's the thing watching him. He can make every throw but but he doesn't but he misses some of the easier ones. I think he's really good in terms of policy move. I think they're going to have them. Re throwing on the run a lot but R._G.. Three was more consistent. You know it was one day but it was it was interesting to see in two thousand nineteen players walking off the field. The first day of trading game was a great scene. The crowd was it was awesome there. I mean they were chanting during training camp at random moments except for one guy who is like heckling Lamar Jackson. Why would you show up to training camp? He was really heck lead. I heard one guy goes like who you're thrown to Lamar and and he liked that I was like what is wrong with alcohol now that is like in. I'm not surprised there's a guy like that. It was guy it was like nine. Throw wasn't a great I mean I went. I went to a couple couple of training camps at Hofstra University and Long Island and and we've been to rams camp it is typically a love fest people it was and they were the watch in terms of like this laughing and making little chance and stuff they were the most active training camp crowd I've ever seen but Lamar was pretty. He was frustrated because he was having an up and down day <hes> a hole there for a word from our sponsor coming up on the broadcast the next episode with Ricky Hollywood and M._v._p.. The V._p.. Shadowy League figure in my boss Sarah Parsons Wowing Erica Little Teaser Erica for the show yeah..

Lamar Jackson sneed Lamar Seth Roberts Hollywood Brown Jordan Lasley boykin Ricky Hollywood Long Island Sarah Parsons Hofstra University Jalil Scott Shadowy League Mr rams one day
"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Put a sign slap. It sounds like a good idea. The overall winner was Sarah Parsons from the prevailed elementary school in Broomfield. School. It inspires me to loan. Very good at what did you draw your picture to remember? The house. Swimming. So if your school had a roller coaster, a tree house in a swimming pool. It would be pretty good wouldn't it? Does your school have those things yet? Sarah's winning picture will be featured on the school building a his annual report. For more information on parenting, go to CBS Boston dot com with this parent report, I'm Doug cope. WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty. It is a twenty-seven. A frantic woman reports are baby kidnapped hours later the baby is found in now as ABC's Pete combs reports the mother is behind bars distraught mother calls police in Asheville North Carolina to report her baby. Kidnap two hours later. Police. Get another nine one one call from a man in Henderson county. Cheerful Griffin says the seven week old baby had been thrown down a seventy foot ravine and somehow survived. The baby's mother thirty five Madden is now behind bars accused of trying to kill her own baby asked for the child. Little shayla is in very good condition. Pete combs ABC news.

Sarah Parsons Pete combs ABC news Broomfield shayla Henderson county Doug cope ABC Madden Griffin Asheville Boston CBS North Carolina seventy foot seven week two hours
"sarah parsons" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"We've the dash one create the procreate and for those looking for the holy grail of gear. Subscriptions are premium crate, these are all valuable at crate club dot US. And right now, we're running an extremely limited promotion of. Percent off for all software radio listeners. That's the biggest discount we've ever made available. And we don't know how long we can keep that live. So get on it right now. That's crate club dot US coupon code soft rep for twenty percent off any year box. Sign up today. Also is a reminder for those lessening now is the time sign up for the spec ops channel our channel that offers. The most exclusive shows documentaries and interviews covering the most exciting military content today, the spec ops channel premiere show training sell follows former special operations forces as they participate in the most advanced training in the country, everything from shooting schools defensive driving jungle in winter warfare, climbing and much more. Again, you can watch this content by subscribing to the spec up Shanteau at spec ops channel dot com and take advantage of membership for only four ninety nine a month. That's spec ops channel dot com. Sign up today. West if you're not already signed up at the. News rep dot com. You've gotta get on board expert reporting an actionable intelligence from your favorite writers you've heard on here. White Jack Murphy who is in Italy this week with his wife Benny. And of course, Alex Hollings, and the many guest writers who pop up as well on limited access to news rap on any device on limited access to the app. Joined the war room community invitations to our exclusive events, and it's all ad free. For members we have a trial offer up right now, you can get four weeks for only one ninety nine sign up for that right now at the news rep dot com. That's the news rep dot com. And by the way, for those not in the know, we have our own Soffer radio app. You can download for free on iphone or Android and are home pages. Soffer radio dot com where you can listen to our full archive of shows, including CJ show, these lights keep fading on me. I don't know why CJ show and the show that we did with Doug, Jack, where we kinda got more into your air force PJ background your combat background and. You know, what the last thing I want to cover it year because someone sent it to me. And I thought this was worth mentioning for westerner. Actually message me on the Safra radio page and sent me this article. So this woman's army air corps officer and World War Two veteran cheese. Turning one hundred years old, Sarah Parsons is turning one hundred.

Alex Hollings Jack Murphy Soffer Sarah Parsons officer Benny Italy Doug one hundred years twenty percent four weeks
"sarah parsons" Discussed on Around the NFL

Around the NFL

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"sarah parsons" Discussed on Around the NFL

"All shut up. We don't need your. Thanks. This stop talk. That's crawl, Neil Reynolds, who he's, he's, he's a match the NFL UK office Jamie king, all star, Kirkwood, Nick pike. Henry Hodgson back home NFL you hang a major supporter of our show and you know, good friend personally, but he has been a great ambassador for this podcast. We love you, handsome. Hank Mark Brady here has been a major supporter of the show, Eric tamposi and Todd Metcalf. You guys busted ass this week with us, and we do a really fun. We all need. We all were never going to London without you. It's part of our new con- we also need jetlag Jackson to come back. She was awesome. Also, Sarah Parsons, John marvel. Thank you back, covert, and especially thank you to the UK fans. This was could not have been any better for us. You guys. We expected this to be a fun trip and it was even better than we could've. I'll be ninety five years old. If I live that long and. L. remember this week for the rest of my life. And I'm legitimately moving here very soon if I can have anything to do with it. And I will say the seven of us on this journey from our little NFL group, we've had an incredible time and we promised with Lakisha with eight to have a reunion. I've said three times a week, all season long. We're going to be we're going to you had sort of a Michael Jordan at Barcelona week where you know he's famous for playing eighteen holes of golf everyday, going out and beaten a bunch of chumps on the basketball court. Stay up till five in the morning, playing cards and doing it every day over again that was sort of what you did in London. I I for a little bit while at the end of the week, I thought we were going to lose. Oh, I did too. Yeah, there you have lost me. I am moving dark. Sessile came out a couple of nights, but he came all the way back around and he's with us. Also Ryan Bartlett, Kim Molina back in culverts have given us a lot of support. I just mind. One takeaway like from this whole week is I wasn't part of last year's season opening podcast. It was a long year for me and this this trip sort of feels. Like validation for what we started five or six years ago in that we trusted our instincts, that in that building, people want your show to be interviewing players, interviewing coaches, talk into beat writers. And instead our vision was four idiots taking the piss out of each other as they say here, and it's just a really good sensibility match for the British listeners. And I think that's why why we're here. I mean, we were literally sneaky in around our bosses try to to tape this podcast, and this was a week where we love our jobs. We love football and we love all the listeners not just the u k listeners, EV, all listeners are the ones that helped get us here. And Mark Mark Brady the shadowy league figure who has along with the said, he was getting chills when they put our warm up songs on on Tuesday night, art introductory songs in it felt like you know, five years kind of coming to that moment. And just I just just thinking about it and we, we appreciate everyone that help us get us. Here. It was fine. All right. Let's go. That has signing off for the quiet storm mail, man, the old boss, the loose cannon. Oh, well..

NFL Neil Reynolds Kim Molina Michael Jordan UK London Hank Mark Brady Mark Mark Brady Henry Hodgson Sarah Parsons Jamie king Kirkwood Jackson Nick pike Barcelona Ryan Bartlett Eric tamposi basketball Lakisha Todd Metcalf