18 Burst results for "Sarah Page"

"sarah page" Discussed on The Mental Health and Wealth Show

The Mental Health and Wealth Show

05:22 min | Last week

"sarah page" Discussed on The Mental Health and Wealth Show

"And has been featured in numerous publications including the wall street journal. New york times forbes. Black enterprise and more. Kevin holds a bachelor's degree in from hampton university and certificate in financial planning from northwestern university. And we've been connected in a blog fear for quite a while now so. I'm super excited to have you on the show. Yes thank you for having me. I'm so excited because you have been an og in the personal finance phase. I think he's trying to blog in twenty ten correct. I did i feel so accomplished for every stuck with for so long seriously. That is longer than most people's relationships about it. That's like that's like a marriage that's commitment and you know they say most people quit blogging. After six months and i totally understand why. It's a lot of work to to manage a blog. So congratulations on that. And i'm super excited that it connected us several years ago all the way back i think in maybe twenty fifteen two thousand sixteen and glad that you're still on my radar and i know that you have done so much in the past few years and you've learned so much some super excited to share your knowledge with the mental health and well audience and with a one to kind of start on your history. You know you were born in tulsa. Which i know holds a very special significance when it comes to race and money in particular. Can you share a bit more about the tulsa race massacre on it for my listeners. Who may not know yeah definitely. I'll give a brief of it. I'm writing a book on it. So like i can go for days really nice. Yeah yeah so. There's a lot of interesting historical context and that happened but for brief overview. So this this year. This may and may june technically was the one hundredth commemoration of what happened in black wall street and in nineteen one was called the the greenwood district. It was one of the wealthiest communities with these black communities in all the country. And at the time i mean tulsa had five black owned hotels thirty one restaurants to movie theaters. Twenty four grocery stores and on may thirtieth nineteen twenty. One was actually memorial day. A man named dick rowland. Who was shoeshiner. Went into town and into alabama and tripped over the elevator operator. He's a white lady named sarah page. She screamed and word got out that he may have a sexually assaulted her are tacked on elevated which was not true so once they hit the newspapers he was arrested..

Kevin may thirtieth nineteen twenty Twenty four grocery stores alabama tulsa hampton university One thirty one restaurants black wall street New york several years ago one may june twenty ten After six months greenwood district this year five black dick rowland one hundredth
"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

Northstar Big Book

03:53 min | 6 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

"Else and it's so crazy because it's just it's not good or bad. It's just different. It's just different from what not right or wrong right right. You know what role you know. He said she doesn't like US awards right or wrong. She likes to use things like this is something I like it's I don't like right so like. Who I was in my first marriage that didn't work for me and my ex husband there is nothing wrong with the way he did things there was nothing wrong with the way. I. Did things it just didn't work together. What I wanted and what he wanted or not the same thing. So that means when I'm in a relationship today with someone. I have to be willing to see the facts and the truth in ass myself. Is this what I want in. This is what I want except in if it's not and the answer is super clear like you said before we always know like your quiet you always know the needed to decide what you want to do with that. And this works for every single relationship in my life not just relationship with my partner, right? At people as I can love them as is, or it can say, this is toxic I don't have to have a relationship with people because I'm an adult. And the new tool right meditation we ask God's that's what we do. We don't ask other people we ask God. It's so true. I used to have a sponsor who's to say Sarah Stop fucking potential. I love that. Because God alone can judge are sex situation where on the bottom of page sixty, nine council with persons is often desirable but we let God be the final judge I wrote on the top of this page. A is the worst place to get sex advice. Or financial advice or probably advice right next to that I wrote asked God. Or seek someone who's an expert, but we are not experts. A degree in poetry so We realized that some people are fanatical about sex as others are lose. We avoid hysterical thinking or advice. In fact, we avoid giving advice at all. Right that's what the whole last page that we just read says me stay out of it are only job. Once again, just as a reminder is to guide people back to their higher power through the steps you only advice I give is if someone harming another person, right? Suppose we fall short of the chosen ideal is what we wrote down and stumble does this mean we are going to get drunk some people tell so but this is only a half truth it depends on us and our motives if we are sorry for what we have done and have the honest desire to let God take us to better. We believe we will be forgiven and while learned our lesson. I underline this next person read if we're not sorry and our conduct continues to harm others, we're quite sure to drink and probably die rate. We are not theorizing these facts out of our experience. So this basically means if nothing changes nothing changes..

partner
"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

Northstar Big Book

05:07 min | 6 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

"Help you find resources. Yes, and that's their job right so when they should never tell you something, they don't know how to do absolutely when they come to me I have a list of people they can call and places they can go that can offer actual health and it's I mean it saved my life it truly did and brought me to the place where I was able to see. So clearly that I did not deserve any of. Those things that happens and it doesn't matter if I walked out of my car butt naked down the street I still didn't deserve any of those things that happened. But that today I can control my behavior and that's empowering rate. So the whole goal of this is not only do we not WANNA harm people right? That's the first goal is that we don't WanNa harm anybody and the second goal is we want to feel empowered to make good choices and to be good role models to feel good about ourselves and the only way they've ever been everyone was like I'll love you until you love yourself which was such a beautiful sentiment but like what the fuck does that even mean no idea. I found that the only way to get self esteem as to take a steam. -able actions. Yes. I had to do things that made me feel good in order to feel good right and when I went through that really hard time post divorce where I was with someone a WHO I thought was my friends and I changed the rules of how I spoke because i. no longer was speaking in very overly sexual way. It it almost went really really bad and I kept doing inventories and I said you. I don't know how to shake this. It's really really bothering me said, we'll get to use this feeling and empower yourself and I completely changed the way I behaves who -pletely alter my behavior how I dress how I talk, how things I share around specifically around men. And I. What happened is I ended up creating a sacred intimacy with my partner and the only person I'm willing to talk about that stuff with him or you and I'd say. That's so cool. But a different. Now. Yeah. I, love that. Okay. in this way in this way. Beautiful Okay. So we got it all down in paper. We looked at it in this way. Here's my favorite part. We tried to shape a sane and sound ideal for our future sex life. Okay. So we defined what Sane and sound means sane means showing good judgment sensible impractical. Okay. So is my idea of a relationship?.

partner
"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

Northstar Big Book

05:15 min | 6 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

"You find a girl who's okay and is known for not using a condom. That means that she's not using a condom with everybody which means your sleeping with everybody. which is terrifying. It's terrifying and also I mean this is funny because infertility is not funny. But as you know, I struggled for many years with the city and looking back at really made sense because I was rack list VR and it is a I thought it was miraculous that I wasn't a teenage mother right that I didn't get pregnant multiple times throughout my using because I. certainly could have and I mean I think a lot of us got away a ton and a lot of us didn't ray like I don't know about you. But when I got that HP result nobody was surprised. Like how could how this happen when I went to church every day I was like you got the Gardasil shots. I was like, yeah like five years too late girl. Okay. So where where we at fault which is really important right I. I think that it's super easy to look at the situation as a whole I don't know about you but I've been in abusive relationships and it was so easy to feel like. Well, I see very clearly what this other person did to me and it was really hard in the beginning to see what my part was. That doesn't mean that I'm responsible for any of the abuse that happened Nari it doesn't mean that I deserved any of the things that happened but it does mean that I've apart to see that you have no part. Impart of that for me was seen that my part was I didn't value myself. Right, my part was I was too scared to seek help. I mean there's a million things that I can see my part. And the really cool thing for me is that I love Aa because they don't pretend to be experts in places that they're not really. Yes. I. One hundred men women were not like please come to see us for your medical stuff and your psychiatric needs. There were no like we are here toward the steps and bring you closer to God so that you can go seek appropriate treatment and they tell us go seek outside help if you need it and we need it for me that included medical treatment included psychiatric. treatment. For me Emma Rape Survivor and so I did many many years of rape crisis counseling and because of that I became a rape crisis counselor in return did down. She's the person that I trust the most and the whole world when it comes to trying to decipher untangle the mess that comes with being an assault survivor like I am too and one of the things.

Rape Gardasil assault
"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

Northstar Big Book

05:46 min | 6 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

"You do that inventory about the situation or going through I'm like, yeah, and she'd be like, why didn't you share with me on like because it was awful. My answers were horrible like if I would've shared it with you, you would have had to see out loud what I can see that you can also see that I, don't WanNa see. I will also say that is why I believe that it's so important to write this down. Yes. Ewing verbal inventories are great on the fly for small things for big things like Saxon Mentor. Absolutely, obviously in your fourth and fifth step but when you're writing out at ten, so it's really important if you see some vital truth to have that written down, so you can go back to it and you. Can't justify or talk you out of it. You wrote it down you saw the truth. So yet yourself out of that truth. All right. It says. What can we do about them? We reviewed our own conduct over the years past. So our own conduct, not anybody else's. Word. Had we been selfish dishonest or inconsiderate? This is important because this is what carly was talking about when initially she thought she should just write a list of all the terrible things she had done right so here. You know I heard so many people with my sex conduct I was selfish dishonest and inconsiderate not just to the people who I was intimate with. But let's should their partners right sometimes. I. Was intimate with people who had partners so as inconsiderate to them. I was certainly inconsiderate to my parents because we walked around and whatever we walked around in and we lived out loud in a way that was like if you don't like it, you turn away and it was so scary can you imagine your child like like that your home and they had to come I was that I felt I space when I guess not my space or my sister who had to endure all the terrible rumors and things that were said about me because she's younger than me and right but such a good point..

Ewing carly
"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

Northstar Big Book

05:28 min | 6 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

"Use a as a dating pool and that. Know for me men in a we're going to be my brothers and fathers and you know they were not going to be anything other than than people I was going to be useful to and what's awesome about added I went from a girl in a that was not safe to a woman in a that's respected that sober recovered manet can send their boys to say go talk to carly. She used to be crazy when it came to her conduct I think we forget. How Essential Life and death vital. The work we do here s and I think that if that was in the forefront of our mind that this is life and death and that Aa sole purpose is the teaching and practicing of the twelve stops that no, one would. And we would realize who are dealing with with is people who just barely escaped death who have not connected with their higher power who's hallways are blocked off who have go stories in shame. Have not made an havoc and can't hold down a job and can't keep money can't. Keep promises in number like let's date. To say that this is not a haven for the well now. and. Also, you know I'll never forget I had been single for. A really long time a couple years and I moved back to Cleveland and you asked me what my like deepest heart's desire was. What did I want and I said you know I I I want a life partner and I wanNA family and you said WH-. What are you doing about it and I was like nothing and at the time I had I, was living with my parents for the year to help out and You really do you think that like an eligible bachelors to knock on your parents door and be like back neck is? Here I could date. Yeah rows. Generate I wasn't. Willing to take any action steps in my mind because of the movies we were talking about this before the podcast..

carly partner Cleveland
"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

Northstar Big Book

04:37 min | 6 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

"I don't know or I don't know. But I knew I was significantly sober right? They'd been sober for a long time at that point and you know I. I just remember thinking. I can't believe I'm at this place again right I worked so hard to become this person that I looked in the mirror and I loved right I I all those things that east dislike about myself that people like you're too loud. You're so sensitive I started really embracing those things. I didn't like the person I'd become and. Eventually I I saw that this train was gonNA crash and I thought I don't want to be on this train when it crashes because my sobriety is so precious it's almost like I could see into my future right eggs I could see the divorce could see the kids. The mass and crying nights in him, not coming home and the addiction and all. And I just thought to myself why why would why would I ever put myself in this position? So is terrible and hard as it was in our break up was I mean it was I was gutted and it was terrible and He obviously took it really poorly because he wasn't working to stop. So he didn't have any spiritual tool you call off a wedding call F wedding and. Him and his family did not react kindly to me and I because I'm a woman in Aa who works with other women. I got to show up to meetings where he was sleeping with all those girls. Didn't you get a sponsor a girl that he's yet. Yeah I worked with her and she didn't know listen listeners she worked with a woman who her ex fiance was sleeping west. Yeah and she didn't know who I was and it wasn't my business to tell her right and my only the only reason I come to a is to hear a message and to give a message and to help other alcoholics and to you know here, get the solution and that was my only job there and it was Rudolf because I'm not a robot of human being and. I cried my way through it and I showed up and I didn't say anything about him and I just tried did my best focus on the steps because that's what we're here. But the reason we don't date people in as it comes an unsafe space. All those meetings they're off the table right I. T's when there's not a pandemic and you actually go to meetings and those are the meetings you do. Now, you no longer feel safe to go to meetings, which is the place that you feel safe and it's not just a person think about the ripple effect rate it's all the people sponsors it's his sponsor rate. It's a whole group to Mesh those support systems. You know it's almost impossible not to it's yes sleet tricky and so I I do not recommend I mean the real tragedy of the story rate is that this person and I had no contact after that zero contact over the years and You know I would hear every once in a while somebody would say to me. So and so's doing really well unsolicited arrived. People felt like they needed to tell me how he was doing and I'd see that's great. I wish him the best he got married he had a kid but in the back of my head, I never received an amend from him. He never ever you knew he wasn't doing well because I was doing. Well, he would have made immense you destroying your relationship terrible terrible things happened and I had never heard from and I thought. You know how spiritually fit can you be but again, totally not business right. The real tragedy is He Oh, deed a couple years ago now and left behind a lovely wife and a little itty bitty baby and you know destroyed his family.

Aa
"sarah page" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

07:15 min | 6 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"He instinctively reached out and grabbed the first thing. He could which happened to be the arm of the seventeen year old elevator operator, Sarah Page, her arm, not abreast not our ass, not her pussy, her arm. Startled she screamed and then a white clerk in a first floor store who didn't see shit call the police to report seen role and flee from the elevator, and then the white alarmist and obviously super racist clerk on the first floor reported the incident as an attempted assault. Sarah Page never filed anything. She never claimed addicted Shitter Sarah filed no charges against it because nothing happened but the following. Day the Tulsa police arrested the completely innocent. Roland cannot stress enough. He didn't do anything and they began an investigation and then an inflammatory report in the May thirty first edition of the Tulsa Tribune spurred a confrontation between black and white arm mops around the courthouse where the sheriff and his men had barricaded the top floor to protect Roland. Nice be sure and protect him after unjustly arresting him. Interesting. Shots were fired and then outnumbered African Americans began retreating to the Greenwood district the most prosperous African neighborhood excuse me african-american neighborhood in all of America that time the Black Wall Street, it was known as Greenwood in eighteen ninety eight had the fifty five room Stratford luxury hotel built the largest black owned hotel in the country. It had the Tulsa Star a black newspaper a newspaper that regularly informed african-americans about their legal rights core rulings legislation that was banished beneficial or harmful to their community. Greenwood had luxury shops, restaurants, grocery stores, jewelry, and Clothing Stores Movie, theaters, Barber shops salons. Saloons Library, pool halls, nightclubs for Doctors Lawyers Dentists, Greenwood resident, and business developer W girly quite possibly the richest African American men in the nation at the time worth around twenty million in today's dollars. In the early morning of June first nineteen twenty, one, this gem of a neighborhood. This shining example of how black Americans could prosper in post world want America was looted and burned the fucking ground by white riders. Listen one hundred years ago. America's black community has fucking heart punched out of its collective chest and stopped on I cannot imagine how incredibly demoralizing this must have been to the hopes and dreams of every single black citizens, America. More injustice added to America's dark legacy of racial intolerance. The white mob deliberately burned or otherwise destroyed homes credibly estimated to have numbered over twelve hundred and fifty along with virtually every other structure including churches, schools, businesses, even a hospital, even the fucking library. Oklahoma Governor James B A Robertson declared martial law national guard. Troops arrived in Tulsa the guardsmen assisted firemen and putting out fires took African Americans out of the hands of vigilantes and that's awesome. But they also imprisoned virtually all black Tulsen's now already imprisoned over six thousand people held at the convention. Hall and the fairgrounds some for as long as eight days and that's not awesome. They said, they did this for their own safety you know would have been safer Jalen, their white attackers, but that didn't happen. Twenty four hours after the violence erupted, it ceased in the wake of the violence thirty, five city blocks lay in charred ruins over eight hundred people treated for injuries in contemporary reports of deaths begin at thirty six but historians now believe probably more likely around three hundred died. And not one of these criminal acts was prosecuted or punished by the government at any level municipal county state or. Not One motherfucker went to jail for destroying the finest black neighborhood in America. Can you imagine how much resentment and mistrust and lingering anger and rage and hurt this one right created for Black Americans? Imagine if someone destroy your neighborhood, burnt it to the ground less than sixty years after the end of slavery after decades of incredibly harsh discrimination and lynchings, your community finally builds up one neighborhood one in the something to be really proud of a that is flourishing a community that could have if not for the riots turned into something monumental in its destroyed. Seeing the pattern here, the legacy of destruction we didn't Cherry pick these rights and exclude others to force a false narrative that American rights have hurt black communities more than any other. That's just the Goddamn truth. Rides have consistently hurt the black community more than they've hurt anyone else in America time and time again. Now. Let's jump to the sixties the watts riots, watts like Inglewood and Compton another south central Los Angeles. Predominantly. Black community less than ten miles east Inglewood about three miles north of Compton. Couldn't find racial demographic information for Watson Nineteen, sixty, five But in nineteen sixty, five US Census Bureau report did describe the entire south central area of La to be predominantly African American. Today. The neighborhood is almost sixty two percents panic just over thirty seven percent black and half a percent white. According to another source of nineteen, sixty, five watts was predominantly low income community with a large African. American. Population many of whom who felt that in addition to high unemployment poverty and racial discrimination. They were also a regular recipients of brutal treatment at the hands and clubs sometimes guns of the. LAPD. This right this watts riot is a riot that would lead directly to the nineteen ninety two La Rights is the first massive American race riot truly focus specifically on a perception of police brutality. Important understand this right to understand the roots of many of twenty twenty s race rights focusing on acts of police brutality. On August Eleventh Nineteen Sixty Five Marquette Frye a twenty one year old black motorist was pulled over and arrested by officer Lee W. meniscus. Beliefs I say his name Mikus. Elsa NECAS MINAKA's this White California highway. Patrol went on suspicion of driving while intoxicated and interestingly what started this right seems to be an opposite type of story than the one that led to the Tulsa right. Marquette and his brother were driving along. Avalon Boulevard in south central La that August. Eleventh Day Marquette near one hundred sixteenth. Street officer Meniscus Meniscus. These names who is white said he saw the car, we even pull it over which fries seems to corroborate. Shout out to fry for having an easy last. Friday in a jovial mood in to having a few drinks. But told the officer that he was only swerving because he was trying to dodge potholes in the road and the officer laughed. Multiple witnesses later recounted officer and FRY were getting along. Great are actually joking and laughing with each other but then mom showed up. Officer Minaka's later acknowledged that everything was doing just fine until his mother got there. He said I told him he was under arrest. He was real nice about it. He was joking around putting on a show for the crowd that started together. I was even laughing. What followed is still subject to debate but most accounts reflected RENA FRY started screaming at her son angry with him for driving drunk and that fry then spurred on by his mom's anger began to resist arrest, and then in the melee that followed somebody shoved his mom officer Minaka's later recalled when he tried to arrest fry, he jumped back verbally snap at the officer for the first time. Then his brother Bob Lewis who had shown up at the crowd grew called for backup. sorry his partner brother not his brothers partner Monica said it might have been easier to have dropped it right there but it's hard to back away at that point. I'd already told the guy he was under arrest. Manica. said that when backup officers started arriving minutes later, one of them tried to stop from disappeared into the crowd a backup officer tried to hit Marquette on.

America Tulsa officer Los Angeles Elsa NECAS MINAKA Sarah Page Greenwood Inglewood Tulsa Tribune RENA FRY Compton assault Roland Saloons Library LAPD Barber Oklahoma
What Was the Tulsa Race Massacre?

BrainStuff

06:46 min | 9 months ago

What Was the Tulsa Race Massacre?

"In Tulsa Oklahoma, a group of scientists and historians is on the verge of unearthing chunk of the city's past that has long been buried and one. Some people may prefer to keep that way. It's a potential mass grave from worst single incident of interracial violence in American history. Beginning may thirty first in nineteen twenty one thousands of armed white. Tulsen's invaded black section of the booming oil town, terrorizing its residence looting, their homes and businesses and burning to the ground, some thirty five square blocks of the city. Before the rampage was over more than ten thousand black people were left homeless, and more than six thousand were turned in camps where they'd stay in some cases for months. We spoke with Scott, Ellsworth, a native Tulsa and a professor of African American history at the University of Michigan. Ellsworth is the author of the Nineteen Eighty two book death in a Promised Land, one of the first books to take a comprehensive historical look at the Tulsa race massacre previously mystically called the Tulsa race riot of nineteen twenty one. He said to this day. We don't know how many died. Reasonable estimates range from I would say forty to his high as three hundred. When the unmarked suspected mass grave and a Tulsa cemetery is excavated in July of two thousand twenty. It may provide a few answers to exactly what happened over those two days and nineteen twenty one. It will be for many a literal. Reopening of a wound festered within the city for nearly a century. The Tulsa massacre of nineteen twenty one did not a word often used to describe such events erupt. The city simply reached. What now seems an inevitable breaking point? In early nineteen, twenty one tulsa was awash cash from the oil boom. The good fortune reached into the north section of the city, mostly populated by black Americans. That later to be known as the Black Wall Street contained one hundred ninety one businesses, including hotels feed store, a roller rink cleaners, mom and pop stores and restaurants plus offices for doctors, dentists and lawyers. The area had at least five churches to a library movie theater and a hospital. Like the rest of the city at that time, the black area also known as Greenwood had its problems alcohol, even under prohibition was readily available. Illegal drugs were easy to find to. As we're gambling and prostitution the whole city, not just greenwood struggled with crime end with lawless punishment less than a year before a white teenager, accused of murder, was taken from jail cell and lynched by a white mob. The police did little to protect him. And Racial Violence against black people was commonplace, even though thousands of black Americans had just returned from fighting in World War. One Jim Crow Laws and pervasive racist attitudes meant that equality remained nothing more than a dream for black Americans and many white Americans. Wanted to keep it that way. Ellsworth route and in two thousand one report commissioned by the State of Oklahoma on then called riot that quote during the weeks and months leading up to the riot, there were more than a few white Tulsen's who only feared. The color line was in danger of being slowly erased a believed that this was already happening. So into that explosive milieu, a black teenaged boy, working as a shoeshiner, had a brief run in with a white teenage girl operating elevator. and. The fuse was lit. The boy was taken into custody. A group of more than two thousand angry white people, some intent on lynching him, possibly prompted by an inflammatory editorial in a white run newspaper gathered on the courthouse steps some armed black war, veterans and others squared off with them there and soon shots were fired. White people from all over the city began their march on the green. What area to tamp down? What many white people saw as an uprising? Their stories of black citizens being murdered in their homes interrupted in their evening prayers. The terror went on for eighteen hours into June first. Despite their sworn duty to serve and protect neither Tulsa police, nor any other government agency assisted the black population. Instead Tulsa police officers helped set some buyers, an all white unit of the National Guard joined the invaders. Other. Public officials provided guns and AMMO two white men. The KKK got involved a semi functioning machine gun was on black. Tulsen's and some reports indicate the airplanes dropped homemade fire starters. Despite being largely outnumbered black Tulsen's fought to protect their homes and businesses and most of all. Greenwood. But in the end, scores of black people and some white people were killed in. Greenwood was left in ruins. The exact numbers of injured and dead. Even after what's to be uncovered in three suspected mass graves may never be known. It's still unclear exactly what happened between the Black Shoeshine Boy Dick Rowland and the white. Elevator Goal Sarah page to spark the massacre. Though one thing is known. She refused to bring charges. Roland was vindicated. For years. Tulsa refused to acknowledge in any meaningful way. What had happened in nineteen twenty one. Nobody has ever been charged or prosecuted for the crimes that occurred during those eighteen or so hours, even those who grew up there ellsworth included were not taught that part of the city's history. The Tulsa race massacre became a terrible and closely held secret. That began to change with Ellsworth's defeated promised land, and some earlier work, then in nineteen ninety-five, when members of the national media descended on Oklahoma City after the bombing of the federal building, they were informed of this other more terrible episode of domestic terrorism in the state's history. More news accounts and more books of the massacre followed and twenty nineteen, the HBO Comic Book Superhero Series Watchmen inspired in part by Tulsa, enlightened many to the story. But pulses failed efforts to come to grips with its deadly past has left scars. Ellsworth said city was robbed of its honesty. You have entire generations growing up in Tulsa who've never heard of this your people growing up with a false reality, a false vision of the land they were on I mean imagine if today right now that you had young people growing up in Manhattan, who had never heard of nine eleven, but there were no books to talk about nine eleven that it's as if it didn't exist. The race massacre was a gigantic myth in the history of Tulsa it was deliberately buried for a long time. With the honor thing of one of at least three suspected mass graves and Tulsa next month will mark another step in the long road to understanding and perhaps one day recovery.

Tulsa Ellsworth Tulsa Cemetery Tulsen Greenwood Oklahoma Oklahoma City KKK Professor Dick Rowland HBO Scott University Of Michigan Jim Crow African American Prostitution Roland
"sarah page" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 9 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm professor and chair of the African African American studies department at the university of Oklahoma professor hill has researched what happened in Tulsa in nineteen twenty one he knows the time line well the origins of the race massacre began when Dick Rowland an African American youth we believe he was approximately eighteen years old he entered the Drexel building entered an elevator in which Sarah page on a seventeen year old white girl who was the elevator operator and he entered the elevator and we believe he may have stepped on her toe we may believe because of no elevators weren't has as nice as they are today there may have been a jostle when the elevator moved into whatever happened it startled her and she ran from the elevator to a nearby business and told the store owner what happened the store owner receiving this frantic white girl based on the story that she told him I believe that she had been assaulted Dick Roland fall to mislead the next day he was arrested by Tulsa police he was held at the courthouse and as rumors of alleged assault began to spread whites began to congregate around the jail that night there were perhaps hundreds of whites outside the courthouse clamoring to land state role in the African American community got wind of these threats against Dick Rolen's life many in the community knew Dick roll and knew that he was not capable of what he was being accused of and so a small contingent and potentially a small contingent of African American men went down to the courthouse to offer assistance to the place she wore one veterans aren't and this side of black men being armed and striding in to this CD of white people with dignity and with manhood so incited whites that many of them left the courthouse went to their home or went somewhere nearby got a weapon and came back the police chief told the small contingent that he would not need their supporters systems to keep the crowd on the control or to protect Dick Rowland and so they were turned back they came back because there was a fear that they grow as lynching was imminent a second group return a larger group returned and this time when they offered their assistance and they were told no but a white person in the crowd attempts to disarm one of the African American man who's who is armed a shot is fired and the worse race massacre one.

Tulsa Dick Rowland assault African American community Dick Rolen Dick roll professor and chair university of Oklahoma professor Sarah Dick Roland
"sarah page" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

11:04 min | 9 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on On The Media

"Neighborhoods. And they had airplanes dropping things down on people's houses, and they had made up their mind to clear the entire area of black. People Russell Cobb is a professor of the University of Alberta and the author of the Great. Swindle race religion and lies in America's weirdest state. He's dived deep into the history of Greenwood which began with a concession. Government to the quote, five civilized tribes, the Cherokee, the Muskogee Creek seminole. choctaw and chickasaw. And they just happened to cover what we would consider. The old south from Florida up to North Carolina, then westward into Mississippi and Arkansas. Now. They were labeled the five civilized tribes in part because they adopted slavery, I mean this is the historical irony, right? The White Southerners filtering into that territory in the seventeenth eighteenth century were saying well. If you want to really assimilate to civilization, you need to be farmers and established white supremacy and hold black people in slavery, and so they did. The white man random out of the southeast anyway, but they took their slaves with them, and when we get to the period right before the twentieth century. This federal commission known as the Dogs Commission trying to establish who exactly is a citizen of the Cherokee nation or the creek nation are faced with this problem. What about the Black Friedman the descendants of the slaves? Now, we talk about June eighteenth and June teens in Oklahoma was actually even later than Texas, last slaves and Indian territory wernfried until eighteen, sixty six, but when they were. They did become part of those indigenous nations. So here's the thing we have this federal government saying we're going to liquidate your government. And if you want to be a good citizen of the United States, you need to understand private property, so each tribal citizen is going to get more or less one hundred sixty acres. With one. The Friedman receive one hundred and sixty acres of land in what is slated to become the new state of Oklahoma. The land was poor. So where did the wealth come from? It's right on top of what became the biggest oilfield pre-world world one end, so greenwood became Black Wall Street. That's where the money was right. It was a beacon in the nineteen teens. You start to see descendants of slaves, especially Texas in Mississippi, Alabama come to Tulsa. Come to Black Wall Street to make it like the American dream and we're to black schools. Thirteen churches to black movie. Theaters of Black Public Library and don't forget a roller skating rink. black-owned shops black owned hotels, even a black owned newspaper the Tulsa Star the Tulsa was started by Aj Smitherman and Smitherman was one of a handful of black leaders who would not stand idly by as Oklahoma became more and more like the rest of the south, so as segregating was imposed as lynching story to take place as fake news spread about black men attacking white women. Smitherman denounce these things and even called for self-defence. Ren- was predominantly black. WAS IT entirely black? It was not like there was this entirely black greenwood, and this entirely White Tulsa remember, this was a place that was literally called Indian territory just twenty years before this. So. There's all kinds of mixing and it's also a boomtown. You have white people going into Greenwood Jewish merchants setting up shop in Greenwood Native Americans the Friedman and then you have what they call that the time state blacks because they were from states as opposed to territory. Tulsa was a wild west town, but it was also a Bible Belt town which it still is, and there were plenty of white. People were curious about black clubs music. Dance Greenwood attracted all the big names in Jazz. There's that famous song about Tulsa. Take me back to tell I'm too young to marry. Drop me off at Archer walk down to Greenwood. Wills is saying you can put me on the White Street and I'M GONNA. Walk down to Greenwood because that's where the good times are. Are and so the the powder keg, the thing that made it explosive was that you had these two towns. They were intermixing and a lot of ways both prosperous, but white Tulsa was increasingly adamant about enforcing white supremacy, and that's where the rule of the media really comes in, so there's one publication in particular that you flag in shaping white pulses sentiments. That was the Tulsa Tribune. It was owned by Richard Lloyd Jones. He was sort of a celebrity journalist. He was writing for Collier's weekly. And he landed in Oklahoma, and he said this is the place for me. It's got white supremacy. It's got an economic boom going on. He was essentially handed the editorship. The Tulsa Democrat which he turned into the Tulsa Tribune this paper of his repeatedly struck a couple of themes. Yes, Tulsa was indeed a wild west town. There was all kinds of police corruption. There was violence in the streets bootlegging etc, etc.. But what Jones did was say it's coming from Greenwood or is. He called it little Africa, and they went on a fact-finding mission and they found white women. Dancing while a black man played the piano. And they heard this infernal new music called Jazz. But most importantly for them was that the black Tulsen's were getting a sense of equality. Both the Tribune and the world, we can't give the Tulsa world. A free pass because of those papers said that the number one issue that is creating tension is this black man's notion of equality, which of course Aj Smitherman was very adamant in saying in the Tulsa. Czar. Yes, we are equal, were equal under the law. If you're not going to protect our rights, we will stand up and protect them ourselves. Jones publishes a note warning the mayor and the Tulsa police chief. If something isn't done, something's going to explode. Yes, he actually is chilling chilling to read that. The precipitating event. Involved a young man named Dick Rowland who's black and white woman named Sarah. Page, Dick role and worked in a building, called the direct so building shining shoes. This was Memorial Day, so there wasn't anyone else in the elevator and rolling was going up to the top floor to use the segregated bathroom Sarah Page operates the elevator, and so she takes him up there, and on the way back down there. Some sort of physical altercation between the two what got out was that he had attempted to rape her. Of all Sarah Page, never actually pressed the charges, and furthermore a lot of things suggest that many Whitehall sons were looking for an event. One example that showed the dangers of social and racial equality page was very poor, uneducated white girl who had recently relocated to Tulsa. It is possible that she was told to do this through. Certainly no evidence to even indict much less convict rolling. And that story went directly to the Tulsa Tribune as the following headline. NAB Negro for attacking girl in an elevator. At, the top of the interview, we heard the survivor Olivia Hooker talking about planes dropping things on people's houses I mean what would. Someone see if they were in a helicopter watching all of this. They would have seen a war. The white attackers were often deputised. The police chief Atkinson was handing out badges like candy. White mobs looted gun stores and sports equipment stores for any kind of weapons they could find. Police themselves participated and battle lines formed thousands of white attackers and black Tulsen's who are prepared to not take this lying down. Obviously, they are vastly outnumbered, but they were also well armed, and they took up defensive positions around the neighborhood. When the actual attack begins, survivors remember at five o'clock in the morning. This loud whistle going off, and then all of a sudden guns are blazing and here come the airplanes. What would they dropping? Incendiary devices, so molly Tov cocktails, and that's why the fires spread so widely of course people are filing out of their houses, and a lot of them are being rounded up and put in internment camps, but some of them are just being shot. Right on their front porch. We don't know how many people died that way. Hundreds. Now. Let's talk about. How we remember. How did the regional and national media react? The Tulsa. Media wants the world to know that there was a quote unquote Negro uprising. And they pointed to the armed black defenders who came to stop the Lynching of Dick, Rowland in the courthouse. They said the blacks went crazy. They invaded white downtown. That's how it was remembered was as a riot. What about Aj Smitherman? The editor of the Tulsa? Star the black owned newspaper. Were there any countervailing voices? They're worse. Smitherman was one of the main targets of the white mob. He got away.

Tulsa Tulsa Tribune Greenwood Aj Smitherman Oklahoma Black Friedman Dance Greenwood Richard Lloyd Jones Black Public Library Dick Rowland Tulsa Star Friedman Texas Mississippi Muskogee Creek seminole. United States Russell Cobb America Tribune
"sarah page" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:26 min | 9 months ago

"sarah page" Discussed on The Takeaway

"It's politics with Amy Walter on the takeaway. It's good to be with you. All this hour we'll be talking about the history of slavery and systemic racism in this country in recognition of the June eighteenth holiday, a holiday which celebrates emancipation. We'll talk more about June teeth than its significance this year, but we begin in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I'm RJ young. Tulsa Oklahoma. Sports, talk, show, host and sports writer. The year I turned twenty nine, then Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby. Killed Terrence Crutcher Ali stood on armed. In the middle of the street in my hometown. The summer I will turn thirty three and George Floyd which choked to death with a neo throat. By, yet another man who brought a violent end. To a black man under the guise of being a peace officer. Floyd couldn't breathe and. Right now, the only thing I can do is hold my breath. That audio is courtesy of Keio issue in home and part of the America amplified initiative, but Tulsa racists. History dates back much further than RJ, young can remember. Ninety nine years ago. Tulsa was the site of one of the deadliest and most destructive race massacres in US history. I'm Carlos K Hill. Professor and chair of the African African American Studies Department at the University of Oklahoma. Professor Hill has researched what happened in Tulsa in nineteen twenty one. He knows the timeline well. The origins of the race massacre began when Dick Rowland an African American youth. We believe he was approximately eighteen years old. He entered. The Drexel building entered an elevator in which Sarah page on a seventeen year old white girl. Who was the elevator operator? And he entered the elevator and we believe ep may have stepped on her toes made believe because of. Elevators weren't heads as Nice as they are. Today there may have been a jostle. When elevator moved, he bumped into Earth, whatever happened, it startled her, and she ran from the elevator to a nearby business, and told the store owner what had happened store owner, receiving this frantic white girl based on the story that she told him believed that she had been assaulted Dick Role, and ultimately the next day he was arrested by Tulsa police, held at the courthouse, and as rumors of alleged assault began to spread Weitz began to congregate around the jail that. That night there were perhaps hundreds of whites outside the courthouse, clamoring to Lynch, Rowland the African American community got wind. These threats against Dick Rollers Life in the community new DIG Roland knew that he was not capable of what he was being accused of, and so a small contingent, initially a small contingent of African American men went down to the courthouse to offer assistance to the police chief will were one veterans armed and the site of black men, being armed and striding in to this sea of white people with dignity and Whitman Hood. So. It why it's that many of them left the courthouse quint to their home, a went somewhere by got weapon, and came back. The police chief told the small contingent that he would not need their support or assistance to keep the crowd on the control or to protected rolling, and so they were turned back. They came back because. There was a fear that dig rowlands lynching was imminent. I second group return a larger group returned and this time. When they offer their assistance, they were told no, but a white person in the crowd attempts to disarm. One of the African American man who's who is armed a shot is fired in the worst race massacre. One of the.

Tulsa Dick Rowland Oklahoma African African American Studi George Floyd RJ young officer Dick Role African American community Terrence Crutcher Ali Amy Walter Roland Professor Hill Professor and chair Carlos K Hill RJ University of Oklahoma Dick Rollers Life rowlands
"sarah page" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"sarah page" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Wealthiest black men in town would later testify that the violence was the fault of man, and his followers girly would accuse them of being radicals hot up on drugs, and drink later, many Greenwood citizens would perceive early as a traitor to his race for these statements, but for both victims and perpetrators more was at stake in this blame game than the city's reputation critical legal and financial questions would turn on who was at fault. Whether Greenwood would have a chance of rising from the ashes. Would depend in part on where the blame land. Two words would become critical in understanding how the city fathers were trying to control the narrative, and why almost immediately the white community in Tulsa referred to the events of the previous forty eight hours as a negro uprising, but soon, the language changed, and the destruction of Greenwood was labelled, a race riot a word that conjured up images of lawless black people fighting a race war, what white Tulsen's did not call. It was a massacre a word reserved for innocent victims, murdered by violent mob. In this case, a white mob. There was a lot riding on what it would be called from the preservation of dignity to financial repercussions to the most crucial distinction of all, there was a two year statute of limitations on a riot was no statute of limitations for prosecuting murder amid the violence and chaos, the young man at the center of it was largely forgotten sometime between the standoff at the courthouse Tuesday night, and the devastation that followed sheriff. Mccullough snuck dick Rowland out of town, Roland was said to have moved Kansas City later. Rumor mongers would say that Sarah page had joined him there for the truth has never been determined. While white leaders were busy burnishing, Tulsa, darkened image, the homeless Greenwood residents were trying to figure out how to rebuild most probably assumed the hardest part would be finding the money and that wasn't going to be easy estimates of total property damage in the neighborhood range from one point five to two million dollars at a time when a good house cost two thousand but as the insurance companies had warned they never paid a dime to a single African American claimant. The only Tulsa to receive a payout was downtown shopowner who lost twenty thousand dollars worth of guns when the white mob, looted his business, but philanthropists around the country were eager to help and sent donations small and large to the Red Cross other cities and towns, grams, offering funds the Chicago Tribune, even attempted to donate one thousand dollars a huge sum at the time. The city of Tulsa, however, sent the Tribune's contribution back, Tulsa officials would allow the Red Cross to accept cash for. Humanitarian relief, but it turned away all offers of money for reconstruction. They wanted it known that this was a Tulsa problem, and Tulsa would solve it. But Tulsa did not on June second one day after the massacre, a different chamber of commerce group committee of real estate men came up with an alternative plan. Exile survivors, the committee suggested moving the negro north to what was then scrubland in Greenwood's place, developers could build an industrial district and a train station such a plan would kill two birds with one stone. It would give the cities real estate developers a chance to make a pile of money by buying land for pennies on the dollar and selling to the highest bidder..

Tulsa Greenwood Kansas City Chicago Tribune Red Cross Roland murder dick Rowland Sarah Mccullough shopowner twenty thousand dollars one thousand dollars two million dollars forty eight hours one stone two year
"sarah page" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"sarah page" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"In nineteen twenty one, a white mall attacked prosperous. Predominantly African American neighborhood, Intel's Oklahoma known as black Wall Street. It has been called the Tulsa race massacre and it has been described as one of the worst instances of racial violence in the history United States over the years, there have been suggestions that there could be mass graves Tulsa, and this week, the city's mayor said it would be investigating whether that was in fact the case Michelle Brown works at the Greenwood cultural center and gives historical tours about what happened in nineteen twenty one. We reach MS Brown, Intel, MS Brown lie. Has it taken until now for an investigation like this to happen? You know, that's a great question. And I think that we finally have a mayor who is courageous enough to approach the situation and incident to actually move forward and. And reinitiate the investigation. We're talking about an event from nineteen twenty one, the spring of nineteen twenty one that meant that mobs white mob, set fire to hundreds of businesses and homes, whole city blocks, hundreds of people dead ten thousand homeless, and we don't know the whole story. So maybe just to start off, tell us how this began began quite simply, didn't it? It did and it's a story that was all too common during that period. The inflammatory accusation that a young black man had a salted a white woman in an elevator in broad daylight in downtown Tulsa. When he got into the elevator as he did every day as to shine boy, he was given special permission to go into the Drexel building and get water and use the restroom. Everyday. He encountered Sarah page on the elevator. This particular day after the elevator doors close and dick role in our page or alone. There's a scream from the elevator. The elevator doors, open and dick Rowland takes off running. He's later arrested and taken to the jail house last courthouse. And the accusation is made that they're paying have been assaulted, and that's the story circulated throughout Tulsa. Throughout the day, it went from claims that she had been assaulted two. She was sexually assaulted by the end of the day. They were claiming that she had been right and this infuriated a mob of angry whites who were determined to take matters into their own hands. Lynchings were all too common in Tulsa. Dick Roldan was arrested and whites began together in front of the courthouse, angry and upset about what had happened about forty, black men approached the courthouse initially spoke with the sheriff at that time and offered to help protect Grohl, and he told them to go on back to Greenwood that he had everything on a control and dick Rowland would be fine. So they did return to Greenwood, but some estimates have it that there were as many as ten thousand whites that had gathered in front of. The courthouse last Joe house later that evening angering upset determined to take matters into their own hands and grew up about a one hundred black men returned this time. A white man approached the black man with a gun and said, what are you going to do with that gun? He said, I'm gonna use it if I have to and they begin to struggle over the gun and during the struggle the gun goes off. And at that point there forget all about dick role in page. There's an all out battling front of the courthouse blacks retreat to the Greenwood district and whites slowly advanced towards the Greenwood district. Eventually breaking through the barriers that African Americans had set up protecting their community, but because they were so outnumbered outgun eventually whites are able to overtake the blacks and invade their community and when they do so they invade killing looting stealing and within a short day, by the following day, more than thirty five square blocks of property has been completely destroyed. A thousand homes burned to the ground. Three hundred black on homes, three hundred black owned businesses completely destroyed and not only were they shooting, but they were also dropping nitroglycerin bombs from airplanes that had been borrowed from a local company. And this is described in two thousand and one report, but the Oklahoma commission to study till sa- race riots is that this is probably the only time that the United States is anybody committed bombed from the air. That's correct. What do we know? But what happened to those?.

Tulsa dick Rowland Michelle Brown United States Intel Greenwood Greenwood cultural center Oklahoma Dick Roldan Grohl Oklahoma commission Sarah Joe house
"sarah page" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"sarah page" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Six eleven to pay to thirties are investigating the death of a man whose body was found in the parking lot of the resort last night. WBZ game Stephen reports Saint Charles police say sixty one year old Earle Hagen of Plainfield was in the parking lot of the pheasant run resort. And was apparently hit by a car and killed WB. B M spoke with hagan's, brother. Marquette talked to one of his friends earlier. I believe you were standing there. I think he was there with his girlfriend. Marquette says the girlfriend was being questioned about the incident Hagan says he's been told his brother died of multiple blunt injuries after being hit by a car. Hagan says his brother Earl had been a cabdriver for many years and quit several years ago because he had problems with his ankles Earle Hagen was facing charges of domestic battery in winnebago county. Just a few months ago, Steve Miller, NewsRadio one one zero five point nine FM. One in Libertyville will be crowned the king or Queen of carp. The problem. There's an overabundance of common carp lurking at the bottom of the lake and the independence grove forest, preserve in Libertyville or overpopulated. So we decided to turn this into an event that event says visitor services manager Sarah pages carpet, Rama fishing tournament in the south bay of the forest. Preserve that starts at six thirty tomorrow morning. You can fish for fun and a cash. Cry for the largest total carp caught by weight and the largest single carp. Caught by wakes says competitors have caught navarine twelve to fifteen carpet previous years..

hagan Earle Hagen Marquette independence grove forest Libertyville Earl Stephen Plainfield Steve Miller winnebago county Saint Charles Rama Sarah sixty one year
"sarah page" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"sarah page" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Mm hi and welcome to episode eleven of this podcast will kill you how that's exciting i know i'm aaron allman update and i'm erin welsh in case you haven't figured it out this episode is all about him bola what you just heard were first hand accounts of the 2014 a bola epidemic told by three bad asked women lauren crowley knell bond and sarah page we're going to let them introduce themselves so my name is lowering howley on the the first research fellow at harvard he h chan food public health so i'm sarah page imam added circuitous pathway to my current field so work for um as a global health fellow in and based at us aid though i must senior infectious disease adviser sitting on the health came in the african bureau say work really close in with the global health team that's dealing with the emerging threats division and global how security uh yes so i'm now law enforcement to sierra leone part of like a law uber laboratory really interesting snowden now i'm working on aids pathogenesis uh in in in the knowledge lab so we'll get back to them and some of their stories a little bit leader in the episode so what are we drinking today we are drinking the spillover vis spillover what is in the spillover erin today it's tequila khumbu cia some lemon juice them from honey and don't forget the rim which is a salt in sugar rim but the most important part of the spillover you could really make any drink that you want anything beer yet wind water juice lacroix for example just make sure you fill it all the way to the brave of the glass um so that it's a bow to spill over.

erin welsh research fellow harvard public health african bureau law enforcement aaron allman lauren crowley howley
"sarah page" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"sarah page" Discussed on WEEI

"Thanks for your call is the they know you might not like their programme might not like the way they lean politically and they lean left left left politically trust me they know that you might i liked that stuff you'll still watch the games so they overpay for these games they overpaid for the leaks the ratings have not been is good the hemorrhage cash and the ratings are down and they start firing people like that that spin what's happened there at espn and when you talk about the the palk receipt of espn and the barstools relationship sarah spain is a great example sarah spain according to el press was on today with the guys is a female talking head on espn who was a behind the scenes upset that barstool eddie s p and had a partnership i don't know this fact but that would be what book but port weizmann told okay so sarah spain upset about barstool but when you look back at her track record i would say not great and in sarah spain and sam ponder would say to barstools treatment of women is at the core of the review well house this for a shower a treatment of women in the aftermath of the gen stirred your brett far of penis pick exchange which was pretty onesided according to all indications jen certain ask for bread far too send picks he did anyway sara spain said the following on espn w a site for sports lovers happy women that's also written by women back in the day this is a couple of years ago now obviously she writes only far and stirred your would know what really happened but i'd bet the situation was it nearly as onesided as she purports it to be i just don't see how far could ask her out get denied and decide the next logical step will be a text to the contents of his rank lewis so this a woman and i i i read from women in sports i've heard treny talk about this and i've heard others talk about how it's it's up to them to protect themselves and not make it into a woman on woman issue and you should be helping women in sports not hurting the because they're already it because it's not dominated by women the sport the sports media landscape is very maledominated got to support and prop up your teammates in this cause how bells sarah's page ruin that by saying i bet.

espn weizmann sarah spain brett el press sam ponder sara spain lewis
"sarah page" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"sarah page" Discussed on Minority Korner

"The area was home to several prominent black businessmen not only did black americans want to contribute to the sex sex success too many asas and cities why do we need those as we in taking their combat doubt arest lowered they did good there there they did a good job there are shops they were also there was also the racial segregation laws so they had no other option but to shot in greenwood which their own people but they were supporting each other railways oil boom wealthy wealthy area so detroit avenue among the edges sandpiper hill contain a number of expensive houses that belong to doctors lawyers and business owners who the buildings on greenwood avenue housed offices of almost all of tolls has black lawyers realtors doctors and other professionals is amazing the sounds like a black utopia right there are fifteen wellknown black american physicians one of whom was dr ac jackson okay now 'dynasty now dr jackson was considered the most able negro surgeon in america the air right all right okay so at the same time okay ku klux klan start fuck hair goes yelm area so in northeastern oklahoma they're clueless korean started to pop up and there is racial and political tension so in about nineteen 21 up there were about thirty two hundred members of the clan in tulsa okay ready i'm not give it to me because i need to know you need to know this so i have set the scene you've set the thing i know exactly where i am magically transported back to their yes i am just waiting to see what happens next so then madness all started in march 31st nineteen one when a 17yearold white girl named sarah page.

greenwood oklahoma tulsa sarah page racial segregation oil boom edges sandpiper hill dr ac jackson dr jackson ku klux klan