25 Burst results for "Sarah Mccammon"

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:42 min | 3 weeks ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Out his agenda. Sarah McCammon. NPR NEWS Atlanta You're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. Some boats are still being counted. Yes, but already we're getting a picture of how different parts of the U. S. Electorate cast their ballots This year, NPR's Tom Dalton has been looking at The religious vote, the headline voters of Faith and voters with no faith affiliation largely voted this year the same way they voted. Last time. The religious landscape in terms of voting has been remarkably stable. Robert Jones directs the public religion Research Institute, this Reagan We've essentially seen this white Christian voters. Have tended to support Republican candidates and Christians of color and everyone else, including the religiously unaffiliated have tended to support Democratic candidates. A big headline in 2016 was how many white evangelical Christians about 80% supported Donald Trump in spite of his unfamiliarity with the Bible, his divorces and his association with porn stars. His reputation hasn't changed all that much since then. But Robert Jones sees no change in Trump's support among this faith group. We essentially have white evangelicals somewhere around eight and 10 supporting the president standing by their candidates standing by their man. Pundits and politicians are most interested in those voter groups who are up for grabs. Ryan Birds or religion and politics expert at Eastern Illinois University, says From that point of view, white evangelicals may no longer be very interesting. Politically. I think the Democrats should stop thinking about what evangelicals entirely when I think the Republicans should take them for granted, like what can you do to make them change anything on the Democratic side order public inside some of Joe Biden supporters did try to reach evangelical Christians this year, among them, Jerusha deferred who happens to be Billy Graham's granddaughter. She says she wanted to reach those Christians who are so turned off by evangelical support for Trump. That they no longer even want to be called evangelical. Not so much to get them to vote differently is just to connect with him. I think what these individuals needed with Cem, Faith leaders to come out and say, I know you're not hearing this everywhere, but this is not our faith. So she joined the not our faith group working for Biden. More of a Encouragement, Teo the droves of people who are leaving the church because of the hypocrisy. In my opinion, In fact, that is a phenomenon the share of the US population and the electorate who list their religious affiliation as none is growing steadily. Ryan Bird's says the trend is most notable among the youngest voters. Generation Z Born after 1996 Democrats, Bird says, now have an almost exclusive grip on those nuns. Thie N. O. N E S. The Republicans have to figure out a way to peel off some of those or libertarian. Let's say Jen Zy done. Or they're going to have a very bleak future politically and doing it, he says, while keeping their white Christian base happy. Tom Delton NPR news.

Donald Trump NPR Joe Biden Robert Jones Jen Zy Sarah McCammon Ryan Bird Tom Dalton Tom Delton Atlanta public religion Research Insti Ryan Birds US president Billy Graham Eastern Illinois University Teo Reagan Jerusha
Demonstrators gather for Women's March in Washington, D.C.

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | Last month

Demonstrators gather for Women's March in Washington, D.C.

"Women's rights advocates marched in Washington and around the country today in opposition to Trump Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Cockney Barrett As NPR's Sarah McCammon reports, The marches were as much a get out the vote rally as a protest. Barring some surprise, Senate Republicans have the votes to push through Judge Barrett Supreme Court confirmation before Election Day. Aggressive activists are using the moment to remind Democratic voters to turn out for the November election, hears Jenny Lawson of Planned Parenthood Votes speaking in Washington, D C. It is not hyperbole to say that everything is on the line this November. We cannot afford four more years of this administration, attacking our access to reproductive healthcare and writes wearing masks. Thousands of demonstrators marched to the National Mall outside the Supreme Court, anti abortion rights activists and other groups demonstrated in support of Judge Barrett. Sarah McCammon. NPR NEWS Washington

Supreme Court Barrett Supreme Court Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Sarah Mccammon Washington Judge Barrett NPR Jenny Lawson Senate Donald Trump National Mall
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:40 min | Last month

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KCRW

"Access to an abortion pill can continue through the Corona virus pandemic. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports that federal rules limiting access to the drugs have been temporarily relaxed. The drug myth of per stone is part of the standard protocol used to induce a medication abortion early in pregnancy Since it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration 20 years ago, it's been heavily regulated patients have had to pick up the prescription in person at a hospital or clinic in May, medical groups, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Successfully sued the FDA, arguing that rule is medically unnecessary and could put women at risk of exposure to the Corona virus. The Supreme Court says a lower court decision temporarily blocking that FDA rule can stand while the issue continues to be litigated at the district court level. Sarah McCammon. NPR NEWS You're listening to NPR news. National Weather Service has issued a requalify alerts for most of central California. That's due to the wildfires that have burned thousands of square miles in the state. A federal appeals court has ruled all absentee ballots filed by Wisconsin voters must be in the hands of election officials. By the time polls close on Election day in order to be counted, Ah lower court order had granted voters a six day extension to get their ballots in after election Day. Wisconsin Public Radio's Shawn Johnson reports. A federal judge granted the six day extension last month, mirroring an extension he granted for Wisconsin's April election. The ruling was aimed at accommodating a huge influx of mail in ballots brought on by the cove. It 19 pandemic. The seventh Circuit Court of Appeals initially ruled that Republican legislators lacked the legal standing to appeal the case. But on Thursday, the court changed this mind. Two of the judges ruled the extension was ordered to close to election day and because of that, it must be stopped. AH third judge dissented, accusing the Wisconsin legislature of ignoring the severity of the pandemic and denying the right to vote to thousands of people for NPR news. I'm Shawn Johnson in Madison. Unrest continues in the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan. Reuters news agency is reporting the country's president has offered to resign after national parliamentary election results were invalidated this week. He won't do it until there's a new Cabinet running Characters Dam and it's not clear who is serving in that Kyrgyzstan was part of the former Soviet Union. I'm Corbett Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations..

NPR NEWS NPR Wisconsin Supreme Court Shawn Johnson Sarah McCammon Circuit Court of Appeals Food and Drug Administration Kyrgyzstan American College of Obstetrici Corbett Coleman National Weather Service Soviet Union Madison California
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:40 min | 2 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In close contact. The Trump campaign and Republican Party raised $5 million at that fundraiser and an RNC official tells NPR A Siri's of precautions were taken. Everyone who attended was tested and screened. And maintained 6 FT of distance from President Trump. Tamara Keith. NPR NEWS. NPR's Sarah McCammon has reaction from members of the public at a coffee shop in Virginia Beach this morning, Monica Scott was having breakfast with a friend. She's a supporter of former vice president Joe Biden. And she hopes the news will cause some Americans to be more cautious. Hey, at the very least, this might make someone who hasn't taken this seriously take it seriously at a local diner, Garry Crawford said he supports Trump believes he could have responded more effectively. The pandemic definitely could have been better. If that's you know, the one downfall that I have with way reacted. Crawford says he hopes the president makes a full recovery as he looks toward the November election just a few weeks away. Sarah McCammon. NPR NEWS Virginia Beach at a House intelligence hearing today, lawmakers are examining allegations The protestors across the US have their cell phone seized to be analysed by intelligence officials. The ranking Republican on that committee Congressman Devin Nunes dismissed the proceedings as another attempt to impeach the president. No reason for this hearing to be held in public except to stir up media interest in the Democrats latest publicity stunt, their attack on the leadership of the Department of Homeland Security. At the same hearing a. D. H. His lawyer also concurred with a head of the FBI and other administration officials at white supremacists are an active threat to the country. This coming days after President Trump declined to outright condemn one racist group, instead saying You should stand back and stand by Trump later attempted to walk that back. The Dow is down nearly 41 points. You're listening to NPR news. This is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm David First. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he and other state leaders had a healthcare briefing with the White House earlier this afternoon, but the president was not on the call as he had expected. Cuomo called into 10 10 wins after the briefing. Put politics aside. This is on a very human level. I went through this with my family. It's it's frightening to get Cove it and it's frightening for the whole family and the kids so We wish him in the first lady, a speedy recovery. White House says that President Trump and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the virus and are experiencing mild symptoms. Baron the president's youngest son, tested negative. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy is urging everyone who attended that fundraiser held by President Trump and his golf course in Bedminster yesterday. To get tested for covert 19. The governor's has a contact tracing process is under way, and everyone at the event should take full precautions. Health insurance fund that covers stage actors is changing its policy in a way that could make it harder for members to qualify. The New York Times reports. Actors will now be required to have worked at least 16 weeks since January, 1st. That's an increase from the current 11 weeks it takes to qualify for six months of coverage. Employment has been difficult for many actors as a Corona virus restrictions have closed theatres. There was no current plan by officials to reopen them. The group actor's equity, which has the members on the board of the fund, says they are against Changes. It's 63 degrees. Now mostly sunny skies this afternoon, we'll have a low of 53 Tonight. Sunny skies expected tomorrow with a high of 66 degrees again mostly sunny on Sunday with a high near 65..

President Trump vice president NPR NEWS Governor Andrew Cuomo NPR President Garry Crawford Sarah McCammon White House Republican Party Tamara Keith Congressman Devin Nunes RNC New York Department of Homeland Securit Joe Biden Virginia Beach David First FBI US
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:35 min | 2 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KCRW

"Uh, the Marine one was taking off yesterday we actually pulled pulled some of the people that have been traveling in close contact. The Trump campaign and Republican Party raised $5 million at that fundraiser and an RNC official tells NPR A Siri's of precautions were taken. Everyone who attended was tested and screened. And maintained 6 FT of distance from President Trump. Tamara Keith. NPR NEWS. NPR's Sarah McCammon has reaction from members of the public at a coffee shop in Virginia Beach this morning, Monica Scott was having breakfast with a friend. She's a supporter of former vice president Joe Biden. And she hopes the news will cause some Americans to be more cautious. Hey, at the very least, this might make someone who hasn't taken this seriously take it seriously at a local diner, Garry Crawford said he supports Trump believes he could have responded more effectively, too. A pandemic definitely could have been better. If that's you know, the one downfall that I have with way reacted. Crawford says he hopes the president makes a full recovery as he looks toward the November election. Just a few weeks away. Sarah McCammon NPR NEWS Virginia Beach And a House intelligence hearing today, lawmakers are examining allegations the protestors across the U. S had their cellphone seized to be analysed by intelligence officials. The ranking Republican on that committee Congressman Devin Nunes dismissed the proceedings as another attempt to impeach the president. No reason for this hearing to be held in public except to stir up media interest in the Democrats latest publicity stunt, their attack on the leadership of the Department of Homeland Security. At the same hearing. A D H is lawyer also concurred with a head of the FBI and other administration officials at white supremacists are an active threat to the country. This coming days after President Trump declined to outright condemn one racist group, instead saying You should stand back and stand by Trump later attempted to walk that back. The Dow is down nearly 41 points. You're listening to NPR news. Texas is in the process of shutting down dozens of drop off locations for mail ballots under Republican Governor Greg Abbot's order that Took effect today. Abbott maintains he's protecting the integrity of the election process in his state. However, civil rights groups accused the governor and other Republicans of scrambling to suppress minority votes. With just weeks to go before the presidential election. Last night, they filed a lawsuit to have Abbot's order overturned. It has now been two years since journalist Jamal Cash. O. J was killed after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. NPR's Jackie Northam says the journalist was killed by a Saudi hit squad. JaMarcus Shoki was both a widely respected journalist and a vocal critic of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. U. S intelligence agencies have assessed the crown prince was involved in cassocks his death. Two years on. Human rights groups and Saudi watchers say the crown princess pursuit to quash any opposition continues. Activists. Opposition figures and critics are regularly rounded up and thrown in jail. Dissidents living overseas are tracked electronically and pressure to return to the kingdom, if not quite often, their families back in Saudi Arabia are detained. Jackie Northam. NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street. U. S stocks are trading lower. The NASDAQ is down now 1.8% or more than 200 points at 11,116..

NPR NEWS President Trump NPR Garry Crawford vice president Jackie Northam Sarah McCammon Saudi Arabia Republican Party Greg Abbot Congressman Devin Nunes Saudi consulate Tamara Keith RNC U. S President Crown Prince Mohammed Joe Biden Virginia Beach
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:19 min | 2 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nominees for judicial appointments tend to be a bit more reserved when speaking about their views on reproductive rights. NPR's Sarah McCammon has this look at Judge Amy Cockney barrettes record. During her Senate confirmation hearings for her seat on the seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in 2017, Amy Cockney, Barrett was asked about her views on Roe v. Wade, and she gave a version of what's become a pretty standard answer to that question for people in her position, Well centre. It's not that I wouldn't have personal beliefs. I'm sure that every nominee before you has beliefs About that president many other president in many other but all nominees are united in their belief that what they think about a precedent should not bear and how they would decide cases. Barrett has written and spoken about the issue before. As in this appearance at a university in Florida shortly before the 2016 election, while a law professor at Notre Dame she was asked about ways of future Supreme Court might allow states to pass more restrictions on abortion. I don't think that The core case rose core holding that women have a right to an abortion. I don't think that would change. But I think the question off whether people can get very late term abortions. You know how many restrictions can be put on clinics? I think that would change Barrett's record as a federal appeals court judge offer some potential clues to her views in two cases where a lower court ruled to block Indiana laws putting limitations on abortion. Barrett voted to hear arguments that could have potentially overruled the lower court. But in a third case involving buffer zones designed to protect abortion patients from protesters, Barrett voted to uphold precedent allowing for those owns. Barrettes colleague, Notre Dame law professor Carter Sneed says it's difficult to predict exactly how Barrett would rule on abortion related cases before the Supreme Court. I get from Judge Barry is someone who understands the complexity of the question that's going to come before the court and who understands the stakes, both in terms of stability, as well as faithfulness of the rule of law is going to be very thoughtful about about how she proceeds. Katie Watson, an attorney and bioethicist at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, says there's only so much you can read into barrettes past judicial record. But you don't really have to. I think the best evidence of her position on Roe vs Wade is that President Trump has said he will only appoint justices who are committed to reversing road and there's no reason not to believe him. On that question. Activists on both sides of the abortion debate also seemed to believe Trump Barrett is receiving widespread praise from anti abortion rights groups. And opposition from advocates for abortion rights. According to recent polling. Most Americans support Roe reversing it would set up intense fights and state legislatures and legal observers say, create an even more patchwork system where access to abortion hinges almost entirely on where you live. Sarah McCammon NPR NEWS Washington Disinformation threatens the security of the US election. And while Russia is a frequent source, domestic interference may be the biggest threat. Come back tomorrow afternoon for that story. Just ask you're smart speaker to play NPR or your local station by name. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. And you're listening here on W N Y C Good afternoon. I'm David First, a government backed commission in Maryland is sent to investigate a harrowing part of the state's history. It's important for people to understand that lynching took place throughout the United States in one of those states that is often overlooked is the state of Maryland. Lovemore on an effort to document the state's known racial lynchings that is still ahead. This is a test of the emergency alert system. On September 11th 2001 the world changed, but.

Trump Barrett United States Supreme Court Roe NPR Amy Cockney Sarah McCammon Judge Amy Cockney Circuit Court of Appeals president Wade professor Senate Judge Barry Well centre David First Maryland Florida Indiana
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:21 min | 2 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"These decisions so that their customers have confidence, I think is misplaced, well his announcements likely to renew protests for many residents concerned. They won't be able to safely distanced from others at a time when the outbreak is far from over today, Florida added more than 2800 confirmed cases to its statewide tally. Since March. Roughly 700,000 people in Florida have been infected, and thousands have died. Virginia's Ralph Northam is the second governor this week to announce a positive test result for Corona virus. The Democrat confirms that he and his wife, Pam, are infected. NPR's Sarah McCammon has more from Virginia Beach. Virginia governor Ralph Northam is a Democrat and a physician. He's regularly appeared at press conferences wearing a mask and has mandated wearing masks indoors in public. In a statement, Northern says he and his wife, Pam, received positive Corona virus tests after a staff member developed symptoms and tested positive. Statement says Northern is showing no signs of illness while his wife is said to be exhibiting mild symptoms. The northerners are isolating at home and working with health officials to trace their close contacts. On Wednesday, Missouri Governor Mike Parson, a Republican who's been inconsistent about wearing masks in public and has not issued a masked man date, announced that he and his wife also tested positive and we're doing well. Sarah McCammon. NPR NEWS Virginia Beach. A federal judge in California, is ordering the Trump administration to extend the 2020 US senses headcount nationwide through the end of October. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang says an appeal is expected. The Trump Administration has been preparing to appeal, his attorneys say. The first says census results have to be delivered to President Trump has federal requires by year's end, but no court order U. S District Judge Lucy Coe notes past census results have been delivered, sometimes after legal deadlines. Kristen Clarke of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under law represented some of the groups that suit at the end the data is the constitutional requirement. And that require men obligates us to do all that we can to achieve a full and fair account of every person in the country period. The census count of the country's residents determines how many seats in Congress each day gets for the next decade. Lindsay Lohan, NPR NEWS New York US stocks are trading higher this hour. The Dow Jones industrial average is up 111 points at 26,927. The NASDAQ is up 1.2% or 135 points and the S and P's also climbed more than half a percent since the Open. You're listening to NPR news. Live from Kiki Dee News on Brian What California's most iconic National park is reopening today after a closure forced by wildfire smoke is Dan Breck reports. Yosemite National Park shut down last week after air quality fell into the hazardous category. That was mostly because of smoke from the creek fire burning in the mountains to the south. But since then, Park spokeswoman Jamie Richards says there's been a dramatic change. You could not accuracy the valley Cliff Whoa, from Yosemite Valley. Today we've got blues skies and conditions have significantly improved over the past week. The park is also reopening three Yosemite Valley campgrounds with a total of about 300 sites that must be reserved online at recreation dot gov. That's also the site to reserve a special day use past that you'll need to get into the park if you don't have a campsite or hotel reservation. Those day use passes are already sold out for today and tomorrow. I'm Dan Breaking News P. Jeannie says it may turn off the power to thousands of customers in the Sierra foothills starting tomorrow evening to prevent its infrastructure from igniting wildfires. That's because hot, dry and windy conditions are forecast from late Saturday to Monday morning. The shut offs could affect around 21,000 customers in parts of Butte, Loomis and you've a counties. Hot and windy weather are forecast for the Bay Area, too. But PG and E says it does not expect planned power shut offs in our region in Oakland. I'm Brian. What news? Support comes from Oakland International Airport, the heart of the Bay Area and the soul of the East Bay..

NPR governor Ralph Northam Yosemite National Park Trump Administration Sarah McCammon Virginia Beach Yosemite Valley Pam US Virginia California Florida Governor Mike Parson Bay Area President Trump Oakland Oakland International Airport Lindsay Lohan
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 2 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Republican Governor Rhonda Santos is decision means establishments like restaurants can fill all their seats. Santa says businesses know what they're doing. The idea that government dictating this is better than them making these decisions so that their customers have confidence, I think is misplaced, well his announcements likely to renew protests for many residents concerned. They won't be able to safely distanced from others at a time when the outbreak is far from over today, Florida added more than 2800 confirmed cases to its statewide tally. Since March. Roughly 700,000 people in Florida have been infected, and thousands have died. Virginia's Ralph Northam is the second governor this week to announce a positive test result for Corona virus. The Democrat confirms that he and his wife, Pam, are infected. NPR's Sarah McCammon has more from Virginia Beach. Virginia governor Ralph Northam is a Democrat and a physician. He's regularly appeared at press conferences wearing a mask and has mandated wearing masks indoors in public. In a statement, Northern says he and his wife, Pam, received positive Corona virus tests after a staff member developed symptoms and tested positive. A statement says Northern is showing no signs of illness while his wife is said to be exhibiting mild symptoms the northern czar, isolating at home and working with health officials to trace their close contacts. On Wednesday, Missouri Governor Mike Parson, a Republican who's been inconsistent about wearing masks in public and has not issued a masked man date, announced that he and his wife also tested positive and we're doing well. Sarah McCammon. NPR NEWS Virginia Beach. A federal judge in California, is ordering the Trump administration to extend the 2020 US senses headcount nationwide through the end of October. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang says an appeal is expected. The Trump Administration has been preparing to appeal. It's attorney say the first set of census results have to be delivered to President Trump has federal law requires by year's end, but a court order U. S District Judge Lucy Coe notes past census results have been delivered, sometimes after legal deadlines. Kirsten Clark of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under law represented some of the groups that suit at the end of the day. There is the constitutional requirement. And that requirement obligates us to do all that we can to achieve a full and fair account of every person in the country period. The census count of the country's residents determines how many seats in Congress each state gets for the next decade. Lindsay Lohan, NPR NEWS New York US stocks are trading higher this hour. The Dow Jones industrial average is up 111 points at 26,927. The NASDAQ is up 1.2% or 135 points and the S and P's also climbed more than half a percent since the Open. You're listening to NPR news. This is w N Y. C. I'm Rebecca.

governor Ralph Northam NPR Trump Administration Sarah McCammon Virginia Beach Virginia Governor Mike Parson Pam Florida US Rhonda Santos Santa President Trump Kirsten Clark Hansi Lo Wang Lindsay Lohan Northern
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 2 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Who wants him to come down on the fight of letting the people decide and near. Al and other groups say they're reaching out to voters in key states trying to put pressure on vulnerable Republican senators. To hold off on this confirmation process, so we don't obviously know what's gonna happen with the vacant seat. But how likely Sarah is it that the Supreme Court could be faced with a decision to overturn Roe v. Wade like any time soon? Well, there are many ways that this issue could come before the court again. Reproductive rights groups tell me they're watching more than 15 cases related to abortion, which are at the appellate court level right now and could come before the Supreme Court in the coming months or years. Just one example of those Mississippi state law banning abortions after 15 weeks. So far that one has been blocked by lower courts. But the state of Mississippi has asked the Supreme Court to consider it. There are many other cases at stake and, of course, the outcome of the affordable care act as we were just hearing that has implications for reproductive health and reproductive rights. Longer term. Anti abortion rights groups tell me their goal is to erode road to such an extent that states can expect very restrictive abortion laws to be upheld laws that would not have passed muster before think of some of those early first trimester abortion bands that were past in the past couple of years. Those groups also would like to see federal legislation prohibiting abortion and remember Chief Justice. Roberts has been considered the swing vote on this issue recently. But if President Trump succeeds in getting another nominee on the court, abortion rights opponents might not even need Roberts to vote their way in order to dramatically restrict abortion rights. That's interesting. NPR's Sarah McCammon covers abortion, Right, Sara. Thanks so much. Thank you. This is certainly true at my house. Americans staying home during the pandemic or eating more at home, doing more at home, ordering more deliveries that arrive in boxes at home, and some cities were struggling to keep up with the trash. NPR's Scott Horsefly reports. It's not like garbage collector Yogi Miller is spying on the people whose trashy picks up, but he can't help notice some changes along his residential route in northeastern Ohio. I could tell you a lot about people. The biggest day is everybody being home from work at home from school. More people means more trash. Easy is that Dimitrius Tart has also felt the weight of extra trash along his route in Alfredo, Georgia, tart used to pick up 17 or 18 tons each day. Now It's more like 22 tonnes. The candle the we gotta get out. Playing it up sometime with a grand heart drives one of those semi automated trash trucks, but he can't always stay a robot arm's length away from the garbage. He worries some of the extra trash he's handling might carry traces of the Corona virus. Gary, I hate and I have to get out and stuff that I see after touch.

Supreme Court Wade Sarah McCammon Mississippi Yogi Miller Roberts NPR Alfredo Dimitrius Tart Al Roe Scott Horsefly Gary President Trump Sara Ohio Georgia
After Falwell's Departure, Liberty Students Worry About Their School And Their Faith

All Things Considered

01:17 min | 3 months ago

After Falwell's Departure, Liberty Students Worry About Their School And Their Faith

"University students are returning to a campus under new leadership. Liberty President Jerry Falwell Jr is on an indefinite leave of absence after a Siri's of scandals, culminating with follow, posting a controversial photo online. A school, a conservative Christian school in Virginia has been a center of white evangelical political activism for decades, and Falwell has been a leading supporter of President Trump As NPR's Sarah McCammon reports, Some students say they're feeling conflicted about both leaders. Jerry Falwell Jr is the son of Liberty University's late founder, The Reverend Jerry Falwell. Like his father, He's been a vocal supporter of Republican politics. But Falwell Jr has been known more for his business acumen, then for his religious devotion, his whole family has worked so hard to build. A good school and, like his father worked so hard to build a legacy. Caroline Reinhardt is a 21 year old rising senior from Ohio. She's a government major at Liberty and, like one person's actions are threatening that and I think that's very sad. Reinhardt says she was pleased to see Falwell agreed to an indefinite leave of absence after a Siri's of high profile scandals. Including questionable business deals and accusations of racial insensitivity.

Jerry Falwell Jr Caroline Reinhardt Siri Liberty President Trump Liberty University Sarah Mccammon Christian School Virginia Ohio Founder
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:45 min | 4 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Coming hours. Sarah McCammon. NPR NEWS Virginia Beach. A new poll from NPR and assist shows Americans want the federal government to take a more aggressive approach to slowing the spread of the Corona virus and helping those struggling financially. NPR's Brian Man reports. The survey also shows that 3/4 of Americans now support rules requiring facial coverings in public. The survey found deep dissatisfaction among Americans with the federal government's response to the cove in 19 crisis so far, with 2/3 of people pulled, saying the U. S is doing a worse job than other countries. Sophie McClelland took part in the survey from Florida, which has seen a surge of new Corona virus cases. I think we're doing worse for one. I don't think that we have adequate testing, the Ipsos poll found. Nearly 60% of Americans would support a mandatory nationwide shelter at home order lasting two weeks to slow the virus spread. 2/3 won a national plan for when schools and businesses should reopen. Brian Man. NPR NEWS The US Census Bureau says it's pushing up its deadline to complete the 2020 national headcount to September 30th. NPR's handsy Lawang reports, the Census Bureau is cutting short by a month, a collection of 2020 senses. Responses online over the phone and by mail announcement was posted in the bureau's website. Days after NPR first reported that door knocking and households that have not filled out a form on their own, will also end early on September 30th. Roughly four out of 10 households nationwide have not yet been counted and shortening the time for counting risks a severe under count of people of color, who are less likely than white people to do the census on their own. And statement appears director says The decision to speed up account was directed by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the bureau long NPR NEWS. New YORK stocks are trading higher on Wall Street. At this hour, The Dow was up 122 points. The S and P of seven. The NASDAQ composite up to your listening to NPR News in Washington Live from news on Brian Watt in Oakland for the first time since the coded 19 pandemic hit in California. A state board is posting information about infections in county jails in juvenile detention. Cuties Julie Small says It's not a complete picture. How many people in county lock ups have been tested? How many infected How many died? We still don't know. But most counties air, starting to report those numbers to the board of state and Community Corrections. Linda Penner chairs the oversight agency. This is our first week a bit of a test drive right, but we're pretty confident in what we're getting. But Brian Goldstein, with the center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, says critical information is still missing. The data we do have it shows limited testing in these facilities. And at the same time outbreaks which are occurring some major counties. Such a San Francisco haven't yet reported recent cases, and the state is only planning to collect data going forward. I'm Julie Small News. San Jose Police chief Eddie Garcia is stepping down. He announced yesterday he'll be retiring at the end of the year. Garcia's been with the department for nearly three decades. Chief for four years. Mayor Sam Ricardo credits Garcia was strengthening the department after the number of officers plummeted due to austerity measures and pension cuts. In recent months, the department has been criticized for its response to racial justice protests. In sports. The A's beat Seattle 11 toe one, They host Texas It's six the Giants lost to the rocky 7 to 6. They play again in Colorado at 5 40 hour time..

NPR NPR NEWS Census Bureau Brian Man Eddie Garcia Sarah McCammon Virginia Beach Giants Brian Watt Sophie McClelland Brian Goldstein Julie Small US Mayor Sam Ricardo Florida Wilbur Ross Seattle Linda Penner San Jose U. S
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 4 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Sarah McCammon. Good morning, with protections for struggling renters running out. We'll look at what options remain and what lawmakers might do next. And strong words on Capitol Hill after a congressman is her describing a female colleague with a sexist slur. What made this moment different is the fact that the congresswoman just said, I'm not going to let this pass. Also, new rules for postal workers mean some customers could get their mail later. But will it save the Postal Service enough money to stay afloat? And we'll meet the four year old poet about to be published, even though he can't really write yet it's Sunday, July 26. The news is coming up next. Live from NPR news on Giles Snyder another night of protests in the Pacific Northwest, Police in Seattle and Portland declared riots in their cities. Dozens of people were arrested in Seattle and Portland police and federal law enforcement again used tear gas to disperse protesters who had breached a fence surrounding the city's a federal courthouse. One person is dead after police say a motorist open fire amid protesters in downtown Austin last night, Texas Public Radio's Julin almond aras reports. A video of the shooting shows protesters marching down the street chancing and holding signs when a vehicle tries to drive through the demonstrators. Punking can be heard. Somebody shouts for people to back up and then five gunshots ring out in the crowd. Moments later, three more shots can be heard. This's Austen senior officer Cucina Radcliffe. Initial reports indicate the victim may have been carrying a rifle and approach. Suspect vehicle suspect could be a gunshot victim. Suspect was detained and his co operating the video does not clearly show whether the deceased person was armed. Nor does it show exactly what happened around the vehicle prior to the shooting. Police that no other people reported.

Seattle Portland Sarah McCammon Postal Service Cucina Radcliffe NPR Pacific Northwest congressman Giles Snyder Punking Austen Austin Texas officer
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:16 min | 5 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sarah McCammon and I'm Elsa Chang. Many of us past statues in public places every day on the way to work school grocery store. They become wallpaper part of the scenery. But there are people behind each of those statues, monuments and plaques. And as we examine our painful racist past in this country, it's worth examining those statues as well. That's what we're doing this week. In a series of conversations today, Benjamin Ryan Tillman a statue honoring Tillman went up at the South Carolina statehouse in 1940. His name is also in a building at Clemson University. He was a longtime senator from the state, serving from 18 95 to 1918. He was governor before that, and he was an ardent racist who terrorized African Americans seeking the right to vote. University of Wisconsin Madison history Professor Stephen Kantrowitz literally wrote the book until Ming it's called Ben Tillman and the Reconstruction of white supremacy. Welcome Thank you. I'm glad to be here. Okay. I just want to start at the beginning. Where did Ben Tillman grow up? What was his backstory? Gentleman was born into a very wealthy slaveholding family in Edgefield, South Carolina, Hey, was born in 18 47. And that means that he turns 18 in 18 65 so The world in which he's raised ends at the moment that he becomes a man and he spends the rest of his life trying to reconstruct the kind of dominance that his class had always assumed It would have economically politically in another ways over African Americans in a world that doesn't have slavery in it anymore. And I think that more than anything else really captures who Ben Tillman was and what he tried to do. And he goes on to act on these racist views. He developed early on in life through a militia called the Red Shirts in South Carolina. Tell us who the red shirts were. Richards were kind of Klansmen without the hoods who followed the clan, which was put down by the federal government in the early 18 seventies, a za kind of open Ah anti reconstruction militia in South Carolina, a paramilitary organization of young white men and some Confederate officers. Whose purpose was to overthrow the state's Republican government and replace it with Ah white supremacist Democratic government and to be clear the red shirts perpetrated several massacres of black people, right They did. Indeed, Tillman is most famous first participation and one called the Hamburg Massacre, which took place on July 4th in the river town of Hamburg, South Carolina, right across the river from Augusta. A African American unit of the state militia had refused to surrender their weapons to the paramilitary to the red shirts. And the red shirts came to town, besieged them in their militia room knocked down the wall with a cannon. They brought over from Augusta and when the man fled, fired on them caught a bunch of them and then decided which of them to execute and It's not clear what precisely Tillman's role was in that, But he bragged forever after about knowing that this moment had called for cold blooded murder, and that's that's what they perpetrated. And after his involvement in the red shirts. Tillman was later elected governor. Not in spite of those red shirt massacres, but potentially because of them, right. Yes, Tillman, Tillman rose to power on a slightly different agenda. He rose to power claimed to be the friend of what he called the farmers by which he meant ordinary white men. I would argue that he was not actually the friend of ordinary white men. But he did imagine that the state's future had to reside on Ly in the hands of white men and on Lee in the hands of those white men who would forswear any political coalition with black men. And that is much as his over white supremacy and his threats to murder black people and his actual perhaps murder of black people was key to Tillman's whole political program, not just White supremacy as anti blackness or murderous attacks on black people, but also attacks on white people who would make political coalition with black people. That's a really important part of what white supremacy was, and is and how it functioned and functions. Now he was governor for four years in South Carolina. He left a major mark on the state. Tell us how The biggest single thing that Tillman did was serve, mastermind the creation of a new constitution for the state constitution of 18 95. He had already moved to the Senate by that point, but he was clearly in charge of that process and lead the referendum that led to calling the constitutional convention in which they perpetrated massive fraud for the umpteenth time. The Constitutional 18 95 is best known to us is a dis Franchising Constitution effectively strip the vote from from the overwhelming majority of black South Carolinians. It also effectively strip the vote from a huge number of poor white South Carolinians and turnout plummeted after that. Constitution went into effect in 18 95. On this I think is part and parcel of Tillman's whole program is that most white men probably couldn't be trusted to do the right thing consistently and prevent black people from returning to positions of political power, and therefore they too needed to lose the vote for the greater good off white supremacy. And how would you characterize Tillman's record as a senator after he left the governor's nation, Tillman made great hey off of his commitment of white supremacy as a senator and kind of gloried in the reputation he had as the wild violence. Embodiment of white supremacist south. He started to tell sometimes whether he was putting this on or doing it deliberately or whether it was just coming right out of him. But he would refer constantly to his pledge to Lynch black men who were accused of raping or attempting to rape white women. Heywood elude constantly to his participation in the Hamburg massacre, he would essentially say Two audiences around the country. White Southern men will not allow African Americans into positions of political power, and to the extent that you encourage them to or allow them to, you're going to provoke us to murderous violence, so don't do it. So obviously you have spent a long time thinking about Benjamin Tillman. How do you feel about All these monuments to this man. It's always struck me as bizarre, honestly, in the same way that monuments to property Lee or to the Confederacy generally have have struck Mia's bizarre that people who So perfectly represent values and pathetic. A ll to the ones the United States claims to stand for can be celebrated in public in the way that monuments another civic representations. Do So honestly, it's just been kind of incredulity, but I think, as you said at the beginning we grew up with these things is wallpaper, and it takes us time and attention and energy to learn to see them as something other than wallpaper in tow to see past. The respectability and the bronze and the rest and actually understand that they're human stories being told Stephen Kantrowitz is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Thank you very much for helping us understand who this man was. It's my pleasure..

Benjamin Ryan Tillman South Carolina senator murder Lee Hamburg Clemson University Sarah McCammon Edgefield United States Professor Stephen Kantrowitz Augusta Democratic government University of Wisconsin Madiso Stephen Kantrowitz Elsa Chang Republican government Senate
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:19 min | 5 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Sarah McCammon and I'm Elsa Chang. With tens of millions of voters expected to mail in their ballots this November, more attention is being paid to potential hurdles. One is a requirement in most states that ballots be received by election day, even if they get delayed in the mail, and NPR's survey has found that at least 65,000 primary ballots have been rejected so far this year because they arrived too late. The issue could prove decisive on Election Day as NPR's Pam Fessler reports white absentee ballots strong like clothes drying on the line flapped in the breeze outside the Montclair, New Jersey town hold this month, while a group of protesters wearing masks shouted Count every vote! We stretched almost the entire block and It was really powerful. Susan Mack of the local League of Women Voters said the pieces of paper represented 1100 mail in ballots that were rejected in the city's marrow election in May. Mostly for arriving late, Max said. It was a big disappointment for voters who thought they had followed the rules. They got the vote by mail. They filled out the vote by now. They mailed the vote by mail ballot and then they didn't get counted and it just breaks my heart. You know this is what democracy is about. It also might have made a difference because the new mayor won by only 195 votes. What happened in Montclair could be a sign of what's to come this fall. Already this year, tens of thousands of ballots have been rejected due to errors such as mismatch, signatures and miss deadlines. Charles Stuart of Mighty says those who use mail in voting for the first time as well as younger voters and minorities are the most likely to have their ballots discarded. So that's the sort of thing that makes me wary about what's gonna happen in November. When we get an even larger influx of people who haven't voted or haven't voted by mail in the past, and the political parties know there's a lot at stake there in court right now, trying to shape the rules for the general election. It took 11 days for my Ballot to get a postmark. Then five more days, or at least get stamped has arrived. Kirk Nielsen doesn't know why that happened just that his Florida ballot was rejected in 2018 for being late. He's a plaintiff in one of the many lawsuits filed by Democrats and voting rights groups challenging state deadlines, theywant ballots to be counted as long as they're postmarked by Election Day. Wilson says he's worried about being disenfranchised again. I think there's an even greater risk this year voting by mail and that my mail in ballot might not be counted. In fact, NPR found that some states rejected between one and 5% of their mail in primary ballots this year for being late. Including more than 15,000 ballots in Pennsylvania and 8000 in Georgia. The numbers might be small, but they're big enough to make a difference in a close election, which is why the political parties are fighting so hard in court. We believe an election day this for a reason. Mandy Merit is national press secretary for the Republican National Committee, which wants to preserve the existing deadlines, allowing massive amounts of ballots to arrive or the counting to continue well after election day. Really allows room for fraud. It allows losing candidates or other partisan operatives to go find more late votes that could potentially change the legitimate outcome of an election. Most election officials would dispute her claim that candidates Khun just quote, find more late votes to change the results. That merits says even the possibility or appearance of fraud would undermine voters confidence. Katie Hobbs, Arizona's Democratic secretary of state, is more worried about voter confusion If the deadlines are extended so close to the election, she says, such changes can be complicated. Ballots in Arizona and elsewhere. Don't always get postmarked, making sure that that like it's a postmark on it would require the voter to get out of their cargo into the post office and ask for it to be postmarked, and that is just a whole other layer of information that we would have to provide people. So for now, the state is encouraging voters to use secure drop boxes. Where they can leave their ballots off without going into either a polling place or the post office. For its part, the Postal Service says voters should mailer ballots in at least a week in advance if they want to get them in on time, no matter what the deadline's end up being this fall. Pam Fessler. NPR news Tucker Carlson is enjoying the best ratings for any cable news host in U. S history. He's also faced a wave of advertiser boycotts over his remarks on people of color immigrants and women. On Friday, Carlson's longtime chief writer, resigned over revelations he had written bigoted posts for years. Carlson plans to address that controversy tonight. NPR's David Folkenflik has more This moment is how do we say this? Nothing new for Tucker Carlson. Carlson has in the past referred to Iraqis as quote, semi literate, primitive monkeys on a radio show he insulted Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan's looks immigrants. Carlson argued on his Fox show Back in 2018. They don't get the job done. Our leaders demand that you shut up and accept this. We have a moral obligation to admit the world's poor. They tell us even if it makes our own country poorer and dirtier and more divided. A slew of advertisers dropped after that, Listen, he's anti immigrant. He's frequently racist. This is former NBC News and CNN host Soledad O'Brien, who is black and Latina and a first generation American, He says despicable things about women, he says despicable things about Asians, he says despicable things. About Latinas, and there's an irony. For the past three months, Carlson has drawn an estimated 4.3 million American viewers each night, a record for cable news President Trump frequently watches Carlson and tweets praise of him. Get major advertisers are peeling away again In June, Disney Papa John's and T Mobile were among the companies that said they would avoid his show, though their commercial still appear on Fox. He cited his commentary about the black lives matter movement. This may be a lot of things this moment we're living through, but it is definitely not about black lives and remember that when they come for you and this rate they will, a Fox spokesperson told reporters. That ve Carlson was referring to was Democrats, not protesters, not black Americans. Carlson Most recently questioned the patriotism of two Democrats, both women of color who are born abroad. Senator Tammy Duckworth's and Congresswoman Ilhan Omar had both criticized President Trump's Mount Rushmore speech. The problem is there are many of us here. Who do you like this country? We live here. We don't want to destroy it. We have every right to fight to preserve our nation and our heritage and our culture that from last Monday Fuck Worth is a retired U. S. Army lieutenant colonel who lost her legs in 2004 after the helicopter she was piloting was shot down by Iraqi insurgents. Duckworth's tweeted that Carlson should walk a mile in her legs. Which happened to be made of steel and titanium. Then on Friday came the resignation of Carlsson's top writer Blake Neff. CNN's Oliver Darcy revealed that Neff had posted racist, homophobic and sexist commentaries online under a pseudonym for at least five years. Carlson didn't address it last Friday, but instead condemned cancel culture in which he said liberals silence people they oppose. Soledad O'Brien, never less notes that several white supremacists including David Duke and Richard Spencer, have embraced Carlson's show. That is an indication that he says the kinds of things that they like to hear he frames arguments. That are basically white supremacist argument. He not going to use the n word on TV, Certainly, but I think he goes right up to that line. Fox's CEO Suzanne Scott, top news executive, J. Wallace sent a memo to staff condemning that remarks by Neff as important and unacceptable in the network's workplace. Fox and Carlson declined several requests to comment for the story. A memo from the network executives did not praise or criticize Carlson, instead noting pointedly that he would address the matter tonight on this program at 8 p.m. David Folkenflik NPR news This.

Tucker Carlson NPR League of Women Voters Carlson Montclair Pam Fessler Fox Soledad O'Brien David Folkenflik fraud Senator Tammy Duckworth CNN Blake Neff Susan Mack Max Sarah McCammon Kirk Nielsen
Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

BBC World Service

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

"The U. S. Supreme Court has struck down a Louisiana law that requires doctors to have local hospital admitting privileges before performing an abortion. As NPR. Sarah McCammon reports, abortion rights groups are expressing relief as well, A surprise over the decision. The Louisiana law is very similar to a Texas law that was overturned in 2016 before the court included two of President Trump's conservative nominees. Chief Justice John Roberts surprise some observers by siding with the liberal justices this time in striking down the law. Elizabeth Nash is a state policy analyst at the Guttmacher Institute, which supports abortion rights. This case is a way to see where the court stands on abortion and what it means for the future. And I think The court has stood pat on abortion rights. For now. Abortion rights opponents are vowing to keep fighting for new restrictions on the

U. S. Supreme Court Louisiana Chief Justice John Roberts Sarah Mccammon NPR President Trump Elizabeth Nash Policy Analyst Guttmacher Institute Texas
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 6 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Sarah McCammon and analysts to change margins sign fists in the air these are the sights and sounds of the protests that have broken out across the country less visible are the people behind the scenes the logistical networks keeping protesters fed hydrated in safe and peers know Caldwell reports it's ninety three degrees out and muggy and some protesters here in DC have been going for a week already that's really odd there's a global pandemic the people don't care because this is a cause that we need to fight for because it's been going on for too long Ahmed Afifi lost his voice chanting and shouting down by the White House over the last few nights but he doesn't plan on stopping this hard but like we have to show up because the more we are stronger messages so how does a movement like this sustain itself day after day after day well just like a multinational corporation with with supply chains and one of those chains starts right here we've been taking donations for two hours and already were just completely full and you know angles is running the supply station for an activist group called freedom fighters DC normally this is the courtyard of a brewery now it's a buzzing depot filled with provisions we've got half a dozen or more pallets full of water and snacks you know construction protective gear hard hats the resistant gloves goggles angles is choreographing a fast paced dance here first strangers arrive with donations which volunteers unload and sort into piles some of it stored here at the brewery and the rest gets loaded into other cars and whisked away this is just a staging area the first node in the supply chain next it goes half way across town.

Sarah McCammon Caldwell DC Ahmed Afifi White House NPR
How The Approval Of The Birth Control Pill 60 Years Ago Helped Change Lives

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:00 min | 7 months ago

How The Approval Of The Birth Control Pill 60 Years Ago Helped Change Lives

"The birth control pill turns sixty years old today the food and drug administration approved the oral contraceptive on may ninth nineteen sixty Sarah McCammon reports of pill change the sex and family lives of many Americans when it hit the market sixty years ago the pill offered a more convenient discreet and effective way for women to plan their families or prevent pregnancy altogether Dr eve Espey chairs the OBGYN department at the university of New Mexico by decoupling procreation and sacks it allowed women to marry later and to make these long term investments in education and professional development in order to really enter the work force in a in a very different kind of way six decades after its approval the pill remains one of the most popular methods of birth control nearly thirteen percent of American women of reproductive age use the pill according to the centers for disease control and

New Mexico Sarah Mccammon Dr Eve Espey
Appeals court effectively reinstates ban on most abortions in Texas

Reveal

01:02 min | 8 months ago

Appeals court effectively reinstates ban on most abortions in Texas

"York a federal appeals court has effectively reinstated a ban on most abortions in Texas during the corona virus pandemic NPR's Sarah McCammon reports that reproductive rights groups have been battling with Republican officials from Texas over whether the state can ban the procedure as part of a larger effort to preserve medical supplies for health facilities treating cold at nineteen Texas is one of several states where Republican officials have tried to ban most abortions during the pandemic and patients seeking abortions are being turned away a lower federal court in Austin has now cited twice with reproductive rights groups seeking to block the order by Texas governor Greg Abbott medical groups say abortion is a time sensitive procedure that should not be delayed and now for a second time a three judge panel of the fifth circuit court of appeals in New Orleans has again sided with Texas saying the state can ban most abortions the two to one decision includes a narrow exception allowing abortions for pregnancies approaching the state's twenty two we

Texas Sarah Mccammon Austin New Orleans York Greg Abbott
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 9 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Accessible Sarah McCammon NPR news this is NPR news from Washington Virginia's governor is ordering the state's public schools to remain closed for the rest of the school year because of the virus governor Ralph Northam is also ordering nonessential businesses to close temporarily they include movie theaters and workout gyms Connecticut's governor says public schools in his state will remain closed until at least April twentieth up to one thousand people being held in county jails in New Jersey are being released beginning today and P. R. Cheryl Corley says the move is meant to help slow the spread of the corona virus this will be a temporary release were huge number but not all of the detainees in New Jersey county jails people convicted and serving time for mostly low level crimes or probation violations get to leave while many other individuals still awaiting trial will remain Alexander Shalom with the ACLU says it's a landmark agreement urgently needed to contain any outbreak of covert nineteen in the county jail if someone got it it was going to spread through the facility like wild fire and and really the only way to stop it was to reduce the population Shalom says it's not a get out of jail free card he says after the crisis people either finish serving their sentence or judge can commute it Cheryl Corley NPR news stock markets in Asia closed higher today following yesterday's losses on Wall Street the Dow lost five hundred eighty two points or about three percent the S. and P. five hundred and the nasdaq also finished lower analysts say investors are waiting for the Senate to pass that economic stimulus package this morning Dow futures are up more than eight hundred points I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington support for NPR comes from the Charles Stewart Mott foundation supporting efforts to promote a just.

Washington Cheryl Corley Charles Stewart Mott foundatio NPR Dave Mattingly Senate Washington Virginia Asia ACLU Alexander Shalom P. R. Cheryl Corley New Jersey Connecticut Ralph Northam
Ohio abortion clinics ordered to stop procedures

Reveal

00:54 sec | 9 months ago

Ohio abortion clinics ordered to stop procedures

"A reproductive rights group says abortion should be considered an essential service as many health procedures are postponed during the outbreak NPR's Sarah McCammon reports Ohio's Attorney General has ordered clinics in the state to stop many abortions to preserve limited surgical equipment Ohio's department of health has ordered all nonessential surgical procedures postponed so that protective equipment like massing downs can be reserved for doctors caring for corona virus patients Ohio Attorney General David Yost has ordered clinics there to stop performing abortions that quote can be delayed without undue risk to the current or future health of the patient in a statement the abortion rights group NARAL accuses Ohio Republican officials including Yost of using the corona virus crisis to restrict abortion access the American college of obstetricians and gynecologists says abortion is a time sensitive procedure that should not be

Sarah Mccammon Ohio David Yost American College Attorney Department Of Health Massing Downs
Social distancing prevents infections, but it can have unintended consequences

Morning Edition

03:30 min | 9 months ago

Social distancing prevents infections, but it can have unintended consequences

"Social distancing is an important way to slow down the spread of the corona virus we know that by now the keeping your distance from other people especially when things feel stressful and uncertain like they do that can be isolating and lonely NPR Sarah McCammon looks at how we are all trying to cope as a writer lily Burana already spends a lot of time working alone at home about an hour outside New York City and as an extrovert Brana says she relies on her social network to balance out those lonely hours it's really hard because at the end of the day I look forward to sending my laptop and taking my daughter to a playground or meeting a friend in a museum and all of those things have to be tabled for now I'm out of a sense of obligation to not turn myself into an accidental actor Rana said she's healthy as far as she knows but she's been voluntarily cutting out most social activities in an effort to do her part to slow the contagion she is relying on social media even more than usual to feel connected I don't know how people in TB cemetery instead right could you can just hop on Twitter and complain about out alone you were then given birth hour and chef from Noblesville Indiana isn't exactly worried about feeling alone it's limiting if you can imagine well being in the home with five boys birth our and his family are used to being at home together he and his wife home school their boys but the corona virus has them feeling more isolated than usual they're skipping things like church services and extracurricular activities and starting to feel a bit cooped up the six year old and a nine year old have some sort of mutual destruction pact they're going to kill each other I think so they're coping by organizing family game and movie nights at home we watch episodes of Star Trek together luckily we do enjoy being a family together so that's that's nice but it can be challenging Emily Newell says that she and her husband are adjusting to working at home in Portland Maine she's used to spending her days with students and colleagues at the university of southern Maine where she teaches sport management but now classes are being moved online bills kind of isolating and a little bit scary I don't think we were overly nervous about it additionally but our staff is kind of starting to shut down its cannot weird realization of like oh crap we might be you know just ask them to cast our apartment for awhile with her parents hundreds of miles away in Ohio Newell says the prospect of not being able to travel to be with them feels isolating to me and my mom will probably be annoyed I'll probably call my mom a lot you said she's also planning to cope by reading and staying in touch with her students online staying virtually connected is an important strategy for fighting social isolation says Austin bassin he's president and CEO of fountain house a New York City based charity that works to reduce the effects of isolation on people with mental illness call that friend you haven't talked to in years call your mother is as they would say and he says talk about how it feels to be going through this bass and also suggest re framing the way we think about this period of isolation by distancing yourself you're contributing to it a suicidal act of collective action that is not only protecting yourself but protecting others and so if we can see some community in that I hope that's a motivating an aspirational way of looking at something that is inherently difficult so in a way he says we can all be isolated together Sarah McCammon NPR

The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

Morning Edition

03:00 min | 9 months ago

The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

"This next story features some of the most powerful moments of the conversations that team had in those words Steve Inskeep and Sarah McCammon found a deep divide this division is not quite the same as the red and blue partisan divide it's different from the gaps between races our incomes our generations the truth is it's bigger than all those divisions and it embraces all of them it's the divide between the city and the surrounding countryside in metro Charlotte we met urban and rural voters on the same day now we've heard their differing views on this program in past days today we hear what some think of each other I visited a predominantly black church in Charlotte it was within sight of the big skyscrapers downtown and there I met with local activists and I told them that you Steve had been talking with mostly white suburban and rural voters many of whom support president trump what do you think of I guess our neighbours and away who voted so differently from I K. said in church that's willing Fleming he's sixty three African American a long time activist in Charlotte I think anybody to anybody it did both the trump has to have the same school of thought a trump passed and as racism that I just don't believe in it I don't Sadam Vangelis preacher can stand up and have to give trump player than he does what he's talking about there is the way many white evangelical leaders have supported the president even after he admitted to paying off a porn star even through his impeachment we had this long conversation about politics in the state of the country and Karan mac because the local NWC P. president told me she feels like many white people just don't see their own racism what I've learned is this that black people do not seem to have the same level of work in this country our lives don't have worked in this country and it's been that way since the beginning of time to sixteen nineteen let's put it that way she's referring there to the years slavery started in the United States other voters described rural trump supporters as low information voters who don't understand how they rely on government programs like social security or farm subsidies Collette all sin is president of the African American caucus for the county Democratic Party I am going to say that a lot of people are just aren't educated they don't understand the system and the process and at the end of the day once that's understood I don't think that would have been a lot of people that would have voted for him but a lot of people are voting on a motion and fear and whatever so these voters feel marginalized by some of their white suburban and rural neighbors in the Charlotte area and they also feel like some of those neighbors just aren't seeing the big picture Schering your voters were not wrong there to talk about people voting on fear because some people do fear cities at the same day that you were in central Charlotte I was the far edge of the metro and went to a cafe in the small town called kings mountain and had breakfast in the corner with Tracy Stewart his mom Linda Stewart

Steve Inskeep
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:24 min | 10 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Sarah McCammon in for Michelle Martin this was a historic week in the U. S. Senate as the trial of president Donald Trump continued and after a long days and nights of arguments from both sides and questions from the senators there came a crucial vote on whether new witnesses will be called to testify as demanded by Senate Democrats the yeas are forty nine the nays are fifty one the motion is not agreed to Chief Justice John Roberts they're announcing the vote tally it was a blow for the Democrats and a victory for the president who's acquittal is now all but certain in a moment we'll hear from one of the jurors in the trial senator Ben Cardin a Democrat from Maryland but we begin with a quick look at what's next for the impeachment trial and for Congress and for that I'm joined here in the studio by NPR political reporter Tim mak hi Tim Hey there okay so the trial is now officially in recess what's going to happen over the next few days and when does the Senate actually vote on whether to acquit or convict president trump so the Senate is in recess of the weekend as you mentioned allowing some of the members of the Senate who are in the twenty twenty presidential race to go to Iowa and and campaign if that's what they want to do on Monday we'll hear closing arguments from both the house impeachment managers and the president's defense team for the two or three following days after that up until Wednesday at four PM we'll hear senators talk about their positions on the impeachment trial and finally at four PM on Wednesday we'll we'll expect to have a vote on whether to acquit the president and up until this point the senators have mostly had to sit quietly and listen to arguments or they've been limited to asking questions indirectly via justice Roberts the president isn't likely to be convicted at this point by all accounts so functionally ten what is the purpose of the speeches will be hearing from the senators some members of the Senate maybe interested in explaining why they were interested in having additional witnesses there are a lot of senators who are in tight races yeah I could think of Cory Gardner and Republican senator from Colorado he might want explained why he wasn't for witnesses and why as we expect he won't be voting to convict the president of the impeachment articles or they're Democrats in tough situations to you take of Joe Manchin who's a Democrat from conservative West Virginia he may want to describe why he is going to vote the way he's going about there's been a lot of debate in recent days as we mentioned about the calling of witnesses the Senate voted that down of course but the house Judiciary Committee chairman Jerry Nadler said this week that it might be the idea for the house to subpoena former national security adviser John Bolton after all this is over Tim could that happen and what would it mean for this process of the trial is not the end of this process for the president there are a lot of unanswered questions in the minds of house Democrats ends in the minds of a lot of other critics of the president and John Bolton's book is coming out in March it's gonna be a lot of talk about what Bolton knows about the president and particularly with regard to this alleged scheme with Ukraine so it's very possible that has Democrats will move to subpoena John Bolton after the Senate trials over coming up this week president trump will deliver the state of the union address Tuesday night in the house chamber he's doing this of course as the subject of an active impeachment trial what's the significance of that well it's interesting because he I'm sure feel very confident he has the votes to be exonerated on Wednesday when the Senate does vote to acquit him as we expect and so well the cast a little bit of a shadow he can also stand there and say look that has Democrats came after me for these allegations and they weren't able to convince the Senate to convict me that's N. P. R.'s ten mac thanks for being here thank you we turn now to one of the jurors in the impeachment trial senator Ben Cardin Democrat from Maryland senator carton thanks for joining us it's good to be with you thank you and senator all week this question of whether or not to admit new evidence or call new witnesses was looming over the trial we got the answer yesterday with fifty one of your Republican colleagues voting no on the matter what do you think the house managers were not able to make the case to those senators who'd been on the fence well first of all I think yesterday will go down not as a day and judgment of the president and the impeachment trial but the day of judgment of the United States Senate because the Senate failed to carry out its constitutional responsibility to have a constitutionally fair trial the house managers I think made a very convincing case for the need for additional witnesses they should not have had to make that case every impeachment trial in the history of the United States Senate has been with witnesses called the documents produced I at one time was a house manager in an impeachment trial in the United States Senate and where the target of the impeachment as it was judge Nixon had been convicted in a criminal case but the Senate made it clear to me that I had to produce art our evidence before the Senate that they would not accept the the the the verdict of a criminal court so it the house managers made a very convincing case to me it is inexcusable but the Senate did not allow for witnesses consider at least in public this whole process seems to be playing out predictably largely along partisan lines I wonder is that a real picture of what's happening behind the scenes I mean how much are you hearing your colleagues on both sides of the aisle wrestling with the issues at stake here well I I want to applaud the two of my Republican colleagues who did vote for for it was a witness is the documents it clearly there was tremendous pressure put on by the president's counsel the president not to allow additional witnesses to come forward I think it was unfortunate that that type of pressure seem to win the day it's important for the United States that it's important for the American people I might add it's important for the president to allow additional testimony to be taken because his if there is an acquittal that occurs next week it's always gonna be questioned as to why we didn't hear from about Strobel why we didn't hear from acting chief of staff multi those questions will will still be there so yes we we have there there's there is differences of view as to whether the president's conduct is an impeachable fat I understand the differences between my colleagues and that they could see this in a different light but there should have been no difference in regards to hearing from the witnesses and assuming that's the case is expected that the president is acquitted on Wednesday should Congress pursue this in a different way should the house issue new subpoenas for the likes of former national security adviser John Bolton well I think the house of representatives has its oversight function I'm not going to try to judge what they should be doing next in regards to that oversight function but I will tell you this is going to be extremely challenging because I expect that the president as he did in this impeachment trial we'll try to use except the privileges and immunities to block any efforts for any investigation in the house and then briefly senator if the president's acquitted and and this gives them an opportunity to claim that he's been unfairly attacked by Democrats what is your party strategy for talking to the American people about what this all means I think the constitution gives us very little leeway when it comes to our responsibilities as checks and balances in our system no one should be above the law no one should be given immunity a day that Congress needs to continue to carry out its oversight responsibility and to act as a check and balance we don't have a king we have separation of branches we need to carry out the function that senator Ben Cardin of Maryland senator card and things so much for joining us good to be with you thank you schools and universities in China have indefinitely suspended the start of their spring semester is because of the corona virus outbreak which the World Health Organization has declared a global emergency several language and study abroad programs have been completely canceled that's left some American students are scrambling to leave China NPR's Emily Fang talks to one American student suddenly thrust into the unlikely position of helping to get fellow students home the Beijing university campus in trying to enter that's deserted and when I walked up to the gate and blocked by two guards yeah from what they tell me the entire campus has been sealed and no one can go in but I know that inside several American students from me and they're faced with the opposite of my problem they're trying to get out my name is Benji Renton I'm a junior east Asian Studies major I Middlebury College in Vermont this week Brandon's US run language program at Beijing capital normal university decided to cancel the spring portion of their program because of the rapidly growing outbreak because of the virus the program's American administrators aren't allowed on campus Brandon's been to China many times before service Chinese is pretty good that meant you're kind of in charge all of a sudden how did that happen happen I don't know I think this is kind of the person that I am still over the last few days prevention is become the students appointment working to get the students home his help some of the twenty three other students cancel Chinese.

Sarah McCammon Michelle Martin Senate president Donald Trump NPR
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Sarah McCammon infer Lucasian of RO in Iraq repercussions continue from the U. S. killing of Iran's top security commander and a senior Iraqi official in Baghdad on Friday the Iraqi parliament is meeting to discuss ordering the withdrawal of US troops from the country NPR's Jana Raffi joins us from Baghdad welcome Jane thanks Sir and tell us please what's happening in parliament is it possible US forces will be forced to leave it actually looks more possible than it's been in more than a decade members of parliament are gathering that there is a bill on the table to expel US forces and also to deny US and coalition forces one would presume the use of Iraqi airspace so as you know there's been a mixed reaction here to the killing of the senior Iranian leader class some sort of money he was their senior security leader a but there was also quite a lot of outrage that this took place on Iraqi soil and it also killed a senior Iraqi official a paramilitary leader so what we're seeing in parliament is a cut down sectarian lines and sectarianism has been waning but that it has definitely picked up since the drone strike Shia and Sunni parties are saying they won't vote on this and the question really is did the Shia parties have the numbers to carry this resolution and there were a funeral services and memorials yesterday in several Iraqi cities for so the money and the Iraqis killed along with him what were those like well extremely emotional or masses and masses of mourners in Baghdad in the holy cities of Karbala and Najaf a let's listen to a little bit of that.

Iran commander official Baghdad Iraqi parliament US NPR Jana Raffi Karbala Najaf Sarah McCammon Iraq Jane
"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"sarah mccammon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Sarah McCammon family planning clinics around the country that provide health services to low income Americans have been getting some mixed messages recently from the federal government this past week the trump administration said it would immediately begin enforcing new rules for the title ten family planning program which would eliminate funding to organizations that provide or counsel patients about abortion then this weekend we learned that trump administration officials are now saying they will not immediately take action against groups deemed to be working in good faith to comply clear Coleman is the CEO of the national family planning and reproductive health association which represents family planning clinics around the country she joins us now welcome thank you it's nice to be here so first let's talk about title ten what is its role in providing reproductive health services and how is the trump administration trying to change the program of the total time program is now in its forty nine year and it was established to equalize access to modern forms of contraception and to help people both achieve pregnancy and prevent pregnancy our last year the trump administration introduced a new set of rules which represent the most consequential changes to the title ten program since it was enacted in nineteen seventy it changes the rules around how we can speak to patients about their contraceptive care it allows providers to select the range of contraceptive methods that are offered and would allow providers to exclude methods that they object to even if patients are interested in those methods and it also limits the conversation that clinicians can house with patients once I have a positive pregnancy test now president trump and other Republicans have run on promises to Quinn would defund Planned could this policy change is an effort to move in that direction not just for Planned Parenthood but for other groups of course now the objection I cover this issue quite a bit in the the objection from anti abortion rights groups is that they state that funding for abortion should in no way be co mingled or overlapping with other services and and so I would ask why couldn't these groups just stop providing abortions were referring patients for abortions well the title ten program has prohibited use of title ten dollars for abortion care since its inception and current grantees and some recipients follow very detailed rules that help you demonstrate when you have five title ten funds that support family planning services STI treatment and screening cancer screening and then any abortion care that is provided in the same organization those rules go down to the very detail of financial reporting and our grantees report quarterly the administration has not been able to document either in the role in testimony before Congress or in any public documentation that there is any abuse what so ever of the prohibition on title ten funds and what does this mean for the patients it can be very confusing and candidly it may be invisible but I think for many low income people they know exactly how much cash they have in the bank but they're not necessarily tracking the rules and one of our great fears is that folks are going to begin to encounter this when a service that used to be available to them suddenly not available or they're presented suddenly with a bill so I'm concerned I think lots of us are concerned that all of the decisions and considerations and guidance and coming back and forth between the feds and additionally the litigation that continues that patients won't really begin to feel the impact until they ask for something that is no longer available to them where they live Cllr Coleman is the CEO of the national family plan ng and reproductive health association thank you so much you're welcome it's my pleasure one of the most influential voices on sex and relationships for a generation of evangelical Christians announced this week that he and his wife are separating after nineteen years of marriage Joshua Harris's book I kissed dating goodbye was published in nineteen ninety seven when he was in his early twenties it became a manual for young evangelicals looking for love in recent years Harris has apologized for some of the ideas he promoted and publicly wrestled with them in a documentary in an interview with me last year Harris talked about going through that process with his wife Shannon I think it's it's made us realize how there's heartache and there's pain no matter what path way you choose in life there's no path that you can choose that can protect you from that this week on Instagram Harrison his wife announced quote we're writing to share the news that we are separating and we'll continue our life.

Sarah McCammon forty nine year nineteen years ten dollars