6 Burst results for "Sarah Matuzek"

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

03:55 min | 3 weeks ago

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Joy <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> doesn't take a <Speech_Male> time out with <Speech_Male> age. <Speech_Male> Older <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> women in Colorado <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> find it <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the <SpeakerChange> field. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> In late <Speech_Female> October <Speech_Female> during the final softball <Speech_Female> scrimmage of <Speech_Female> the season, <Speech_Female> the Colorado <Speech_Female> peaches are <Speech_Female> playing each other on <Speech_Female> Halloween themed <Speech_Female> teams, <Speech_Male> tricks versus <Speech_Male> treats. the final softball <Speech_Female> scrimmage of <Speech_Female> the season, <Speech_Female> the Colorado <Speech_Female> peaches are <Speech_Female> playing each other on <Speech_Female> Halloween themed <Speech_Female> teams, <Speech_Male> tricks versus <Speech_Male> treats. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Before <Speech_Female> warm up, magdalena <Speech_Female> mccloskey <Speech_Female> helps <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> decorate a dugout <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> with fake cobwebs. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But this isn't the <Speech_Female> kids team. <Speech_Female> The softball <Speech_Female> club welcomes <Speech_Female> women players <Speech_Female> from their 50s <Speech_Female> through 90s. <Speech_Female> 70 <Speech_Female> something midge crawl <Speech_Female> says, <Speech_Female> we all think we're <Speech_Female> in middle school. <Speech_Female> We don't think about <Speech_Female> age. We don't. <Speech_Female> You just think <Speech_Female> about how wonderful <Speech_Female> you are. <Speech_Female> Initiated <Speech_Female> by former <Speech_Female> physical education <Speech_Female> teacher, Chloe <Speech_Female> Childers, <Speech_Female> the peaches formed <Speech_Female> and began competing <Speech_Female> nationally <Speech_Female> in the 90s <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> one medals. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Yet for all <Speech_Female> their <SpeakerChange> success, <Speech_Female> joy is <Speech_Female> the point. <Speech_Female> The peaches <Speech_Female> cheer as the neon <Speech_Female> yellow ball <Speech_Female> arcs toward the <Speech_Female> clouds and teammates <Speech_Female> round the bases. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> They also call out <Speech_Female> encouragement when <Speech_Female> a swing is botched. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In the end, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the tricks <SpeakerChange> beat <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the treats <Speech_Female> two to zero. <Speech_Female> All players <Speech_Female> high 5 <Speech_Female> in a show of <Speech_Male> good sportswoman <Speech_Female> ship. <Speech_Female> Then they <Speech_Female> pass around buckets <Speech_Female> of Halloween candy. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Miss crawl trades <Speech_Female> her baseball cap <Speech_Female> for a headband <Speech_Female> of cat ears. <Silence> <Speech_Female> How will she spend <Speech_Female> the off season? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Winter conditioning <Speech_Female> says miss crawl. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> she can come back and <Speech_Female> hit it out of the <Silence> park. <Speech_Female> This story <Speech_Female> was reported by <Speech_Female> Sarah matuszek <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in Lakewood Colorado <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for the monitor. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Now, <Speech_Telephony_Female> commentary <Speech_Female> from the <Speech_Female> monitors editorial <Speech_Female> board <Speech_Music_Female> on integrity <Speech_Female> and Brazil's <Speech_Male> vote. <Silence> <Speech_Female> At a time of concern <Speech_Male> about erosion <Speech_Male> of the rule <Speech_Male> of law, <Speech_Male> some of the world's <Speech_Male> youngest democracies <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> are offering evidence <Speech_Female> that the <Speech_Music_Female> ideal of government <Speech_Music_Male> by the people <Speech_Male> is both <Speech_Male> resilient <Speech_Male> and enduring. <Silence> <Speech_Male> The latest <Speech_Male> example is <Speech_Male> Brazil, <Speech_Male> where a tense <Speech_Female> presidential <Speech_Male> election concluded <Speech_Male> October 30th <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in a peaceful <Speech_Male> vote for change. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> It showed <Speech_Female> that even <Speech_Male> in the most deeply <Speech_Male> divided <Speech_Male> societies, <Speech_Male> credible <Speech_Female> democratic institutions <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> provide a bulwark <Speech_Male> against <Speech_Female> the destabilizing <Speech_Male> effects <Speech_Male> of disinformation. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> If there is anything <Speech_Female> Brazilians <Speech_Male> should appreciate <Speech_Female> tonight, it <Speech_Female> is the efficiency <Speech_Female> and reliability <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> their voting system. <Silence> Valentina <Speech_Female> sadder <Speech_Male> associate <Speech_Male> director at <Speech_Male> the Adrian <Speech_Female> arched Latin <Speech_Female> America center <Speech_Female> told the Atlantic <Speech_Male> council <Speech_Male> after the vote. <Silence> It allowed <Speech_Male> for confidence <Speech_Female> in the results being <Speech_Female> released within <Speech_Male> hours of voting <Speech_Male> sites closing. <Speech_Male> Effectively <Speech_Female> constraining <Speech_Female> any credible <Speech_Male> questioning <Speech_Male> of the result. <Speech_Male> Ahead of <Speech_Male> the first round of balloting <Speech_Male> four weeks <Speech_Male> ago, <Speech_Male> justice Edson <Speech_Male> facin, <Speech_Female> a member of <Speech_Female> the electoral court, <Speech_Female> said <Speech_Male> I have <Speech_Male> the unshakable <Speech_Female> certainty <Speech_Female> that democracy <Speech_Female> bends. <Speech_Male> But does not <Speech_Male> bend or <Speech_Male> break with <Speech_Male> fake news. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> In <Speech_Female> Brazil's elections, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> much of the world <Speech_Female> saw the future <Speech_Female> of the Amazon <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> stake. But <Speech_Female> the peaceful <Speech_Female> transparent vote <Speech_Female> provides a lesson <Speech_Male> for countries <Speech_Male> striving <Speech_Male> to preserve <Speech_Male> the integrity <Speech_Male> of their own <Speech_Music_Female> balance. <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> That's <Music> <Advertisement> a wrap for the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> news.

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

02:36 min | Last month

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"His work, 1 October morning the favorite moments a lot of times are the simplest ones, he says. It's when you get that aha moment from a visitor about showing respect for bears or bison, for example. Speaking of which, a black bear knocked on his front door once, and later showed up on his back porch. We kept the trap out there for at least a week, and the bear never got in the trap. It was very smart, mister gately says. Asked how his work has transformed his life, mister Yale says he feels lucky to have spent his career in such a spectacular spot. But this place doesn't belong to me, he adds. It belongs to the future to my kids and their kids and the rest of the American public and the rest of the world. This story was reported by Sarah matuszek in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming for the monitor. Now, commentary from the monitor's editorial board on protecting the innocent. In a New York courtroom on Tuesday, the United States presented a cautionary tale for companies tempted to do business with mass abusers of civilians. It was able to force a French company, lafarge, to plead guilty to paying two terrorist groups to keep its cement operations running nearly a decade ago, when those groups occupied parts of Syria, the criminal plea agreement, which came with a $778 million fine. Was the first time a corporation faced a charge of aiding a U.S. designated foreign terrorist organization. The case sets an important precedent for the use of law to reinforce global norms aimed at protecting the innocence of people living in conflict zones, or under the harsh rule of a dictatorship. Such laws are increasing as a tool to address humanitarian concerns about people being abused in other countries. A decade has passed since the United Nations adopted a set of guiding principles on business compliance with human rights laws. The legal victory against lefarge is complicity with terrorist groups, sends and needed message about the universal nature of humanitarian laws, especially those aimed at

mister gately mister Yale Sarah matuszek Yellowstone National Park lafarge Wyoming U.S. Syria New York United Nations
"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:53 min | 7 months ago

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Her voice drips with drama. The monitor is avoiding spoilers. This story was reported by Sarah matuszek in Boise, Idaho, for the monitor. Now, commentary from the monitors editorial board on why Ukraine serves as an inspiration to Taiwan. The biggest surprise of the war in Ukraine has been the fierce resolve of Ukrainians to defend their national identity. Their civic solidarity rooted in democratic ideals, not only helped them win the battle for the capital of Kyiv, but also odd the west into sending major weapons for the battles to come. Their unity around shared values has been the unseen armor against aggression by Russia. This lesson in resilience may mean the most to another small country, Taiwan. It faces the threat of invasion from a much larger neighbor, China that asserts a dubious claim to rule the independent island. Many Taiwanese now ask if they would put up a heroic resistance during the early days of a Chinese assault to buy time and wind military support from the United States and others. One sign of Taiwan's new unity is a plan to lengthen the time for active military service from four months to one year. A move widely supported in a poll. Other possible moves include expanding conscription to women. And boosting training for the country's 1.5 million military reservists. Ukraine's lessons and civic cohesion are finding followers in Taiwan..

Sarah matuszek Taiwan Ukraine Boise Idaho Kyiv Russia United States
"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

03:42 min | 7 months ago

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"London for the monitor. Taiwan's indigenous populations may have more historical and linguistic ties with Pacific islanders than mainland Chinese. And therein lies a unique diplomatic bridge for the rest of modern Taiwan. Remembers his 2018 trip to Tahiti fondly. He spent 20 days hopping between islands and meeting other indigenous families like his own back in Taiwan. But it wasn't just personal interest that brought the graduate student overseas. The Taiwanese government helped pay for mister lupin to visit French Polynesia as part of a broader strategy to maintain the country's presence on the international stage. As China's economic and political clout grows, Taiwan's dwindles, and all but 15 countries of cut ties with the island in recent decades. Indigenous communities act as an international relations lifeline, they are Taiwan's sole representatives to the United Nations, and last month, Taiwan made headlines as a founding member of the indigenous peoples economic and trade cooperation agreement. Government sponsored cultural exchanges have also helped expand and cement Taiwan's influence in the Pacific. Critics worry Taiwan is exploiting indigenous communities, but others say this diplomatic strategy is an opportunity for all Taiwanese to reconnect with the island's history. Taiwanese society has a unique phenomena. It isn't sure exactly where its roots lie, says yap the poi Cano from Taiwan's council of indigenous people. Indigenous diplomacy is a form of soft diplomacy that's built on a personal foundation with other people. A way of fostering mutual understanding. This story was reported by itamar Walkman, in Taipei, Taiwan, for the monitor. Inspired by one Idaho second graders fame as an author, other elementary school students are demonstrating that courage and creativity common pint sizes do. Last weekend, two authors, second grader Dylan helbig, and former elementary school teacher Cristian lane, co led a writing workshop in Boise Idaho. The workshop was miss lane's idea, but the spark for it was Dylan's surreptitious placement of his handwritten book on a branch library shelf for others to read. It was titled the adventures of Dylan helbig's Christmas. Librarians slapped the barcode on the spine, readers raced to check it out, and Dylan's achievement went viral. Since his escapade, more kids are crafting original storybooks to share with the public and school libraries. And Dylan's proud parents say fans of all ages across the country and the world have thanked him for inspiring them to quit procrastinating on creative projects. Each one of you is a special and creative kid. Alex Hartman, the branch manager, tells the children at the workshop. You are capable of making incredible things and people are interested in what you can do. Pencil grip, 5th grader Rachel McHugh is writing a desert with waves. A silly cactus wanders the desert looking for water and stumbles upon a tornado that is made of water. And then they were friends until one day, her voice drips with drama. The monitor is avoiding spoilers. This story was reported by Sarah matuszek in Boise,.

Taiwan Taiwanese government mister lupin Dylan helbig Taiwanese society council of indigenous people itamar Walkman French Polynesia Tahiti Cristian lane Dylan Idaho yap London United Nations Taipei Pacific Boise elementary school Alex Hartman
"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

05:41 min | 9 months ago

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Colette Davidson for the monitor. At the top of this issue, we looked at how Russians in Russia feel. With our next two stories, we turn that lens to the United States, starting with the story of Russian speakers being accused of supporting a war, they actually oppose. Since Russia invaded Ukraine, russophobia has seeped into everyday interactions. Some Russian speakers in the United States, including those with few or no ties to Russia, say they are blamed for backing a war, they don't support. For Soviet born, Maria petrenko, the hostility husband subtle. The owner of had root advertising and technology, a web design and digital media agency in Detroit says she employs some designers and developers in Russia. Lately, she says she must constantly clarify her anti war position at the start of business meetings. And on a recent morning that she dropped off her child at day care, she says a man asked her something about what you guys were doing in Ukraine. I said, who are you guys? I'm dropping off my kid in Farmington Hills, Michigan. She recalls, like, what guys are you talking about? For Yuri groza, a Russian American IT specialist in North Carolina, the suspicion isn't so subtle. He says he's received threats via calls and text. Mister groza describes his Belarusian Kyrgyz and Ukrainian ancestry, but then adds, I don't even think that my identity or heritage have anything to do with me saying that war is bad. Any sane person would say war is bad. This story was reported by Sarah matuszek in aurora and Denver, Colorado, for the monitor. Sports organizations have rallied to boycott Russia and bandits athletes. But the National Hockey League with its strong Russian contingent is trying to walk a more nuanced, ethical line, particularly with one of its megastars. Russian athletes have been barred this year from the paralympics and the World Cup. The Russian owner of an English Premier League team has seen its sale frozen in the UK and no new tickets can be sold for games. An international cat association even banned Russian cats. And then there's the case of hockey player Alex Ovechkin. The Washington capital hockey player call for peace. One of just a few of his 40 countrymen in the NHL to speak out at all. But he also counts Russian president Vladimir Putin as a friend. And his Instagram page still features a picture of the two of them. In some ways, Ovechkin precisely because of his being such a Putin buddy has a greater form of freedom here. A greater space of activity of action says Andre markowitz co author of gaming the world. Growing sports sanctioned underscore the tension between fairness to an individual and a need for collective action in the face of atrocities. Here we have athletes, including Russian paralympians, paying the consequences, and that feels atrocious, even immoral, says author Sergey rodchenko, but on the other hand, Russia has pursued a brutal immoral war, and so then do you host Russian athletes like nothing's happening? It's a clash of moralities that's very hard to reconcile. The story was reported by Patrick Johnson in Savannah, Georgia, for the monitor. The new Netflix film, the atom project, isn't going to win any prizes for originality. But it's self awareness and charm means it takes viewers on a mostly entertaining ride. You can read the entire film review by Gregory wakeman at CS monitor dot com slash daily. Now commentary from the monitors editorial board on Chile's president elect doing things differently. In manner and style, Gabrielle borich has not changed since becoming president elect of Chile three months ago. He still walks through his scruffy Santiago neighborhood in shorts and hiking boots. When he takes the oath of office on March 11th, he won't be wearing a tie. We represent fresh air, youth, novelty, he told the BBC. At a time when faltering governance in Latin America is tilting public support toward authoritarian rule, mister Boris represents something else too. The possibility that societies like individuals are more open to reinvention through a commitment to widely shared values. Mister Boris has become the new face of a country striving for change, not by abandoning democracy because of its shortcomings, but through a determination to realize its potential. Just ten years ago, he was a prominent student protester. His presidential campaign arose in part from demands for a new constitution drafted and approved by the people. In Chile, a.

Russia Colette Davidson Maria petrenko Yuri groza Mister groza Ukraine Sarah matuszek English Premier League international cat association Alex Ovechkin United States NHL Farmington Hills Andre markowitz hockey Sergey rodchenko paralympics Detroit aurora North Carolina
"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

03:31 min | 9 months ago

"sarah matuszek" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"By Ned temco in London for the monitor. With Ukraine and Russia exchanging fire. It becomes more important than ever that NATO both signals the Kremlin that it is not an aggressor. And deters further westward advance by Russian forces. With Russian troops invading Ukraine, NATO leaders are redoubling their efforts to avert any inadvertent confrontations that could spiral out of control and draw the alliance into the conflict. Accomplishing this goal involves a tricky balancing act of showing the resolve to counter Russian president Vladimir Putin's aggression, while also trying to tamp down tensions in the face of his veiled threats against nations that interfere with his offensive. Avoiding accidental NATO Russia run ins. Starts with underscoring allied red lines. So that mister Putin doesn't get any ideas about venturing farther west than Ukraine. The United States is deploying some 14,000 troops in Eastern Europe in that regard. But the telegraphing of allied intent is critical to avoid any misinterpretation of its troop movements by mister Putin. And by the troops themselves. An illustration of just how The Pentagon is doing this came at a press briefing, hours after the invasion began. When a dog had reporter asked repeatedly if troops in Poland could potentially be drawn into fighting in Ukraine. They're not going to be accidentally drawn into Ukraine, Pentagon press secretary, John Kirby said, with emphasis as much for international as for domestic consumption. This story was reported by Anna Muller and groby in Brussels for the monitor. President Putin's battle to control the Russian world includes a religious front, a centuries old spiritual and national struggle within the orthodox church. A part of the consciousness of average churchgoers worldwide after centuries in the sway of Moscow, from national stars to atheist polyp bureaus, Orthodox Christians of Ukrainian descent, are fighting not just a political battle. But for spiritual sovereignty from Russia's arm of the orthodox church. This struggle of identity dates to the 17th century and threatens Vladimir Putin's sense of Russia's place in the world. Claiming historical justifications for war in a speech on February 21st, mister Putin alleged Kyiv was preparing the destruction of the Russian backed orthodox church in Ukraine. A western attempt to betray Ukraine's true Russian identity. The orthodox church of Ukraine supported by the Diaspora in North America broke free from Moscow in 2019. Winning official recognition from the seat of church hierarchy in Istanbul. Ukrainian Diaspora communities here in the west say they refuse to let that victory be undone by the invasion of their homeland. Putin's battle for dominance in Ukraine is also what he would view as a spiritual struggle, says Frank sisin, a Toronto based religious historian at the Canadian institute of Ukrainian studies at the university of Alberta. Putin has had to search for an ideology to replace communism for Moscow to be the center of what he calls the Russian world, he says. This story was reported by Sarah Miller Jana in Toronto. Sarah matuszek in New York and Alexander.

Ukraine mister Putin NATO Ned temco Vladimir Putin Russia John Kirby orthodox church Pentagon Anna Muller groby Eastern Europe London Moscow Poland orthodox church of Ukraine Brussels United States Kyiv Frank sisin