17 Burst results for "Sarah Josefa Hale"

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"With a firm belief in the importance of education regardless of gender in her early twenties. Sarah taught at a private school for time at school came to a close eighteen thirteen when she met and married. David hale an attorney. The often studied and read together and david encouraged sarah's pastime writing. The couple had five children unfortunately when sarah was pregnant with their fifth child and eighteen twenty two. David died suddenly of pneumonia. Sarah was left widowed in her mid thirties with five children to raise. It said that after david's death she wore black in mourning for the rest of her life in order to support her family. Sarah opened a military shop but it soon failed and sarah decided she would make a living off of her love of writing instead. She began publishing and local magazines and newspapers often under the pseudonym cordelia her husband's freemason lodge took up the cost of publishing her first of poems called the genius of oblivion just a year after david's death. It was well received but it was sarah's next work that really launched her career in eighteen. Twenty seven sarah published northwood an anti slavery novel it received positive reviews and established sarah as one of the first women in the united states to be a published author. Northwood caught the attention of reverend john. Laura blake on episcopal minister. Who was starting a new women's magazine at the time. Women's magazines subset of american publications geared towards women readers and they were quickly gaining steam. They hadn't yet reached widespread circulation but blake had vision for his magazine which he called ladies magazine it would be marketed as the first magazine edited by a woman. Four women and he wanted sarah to become the publication's editor. Sarah accepted and moved to boston to start the job. The first issue was published in january eighteen twenty eight it included essays poetry and fiction as well as an original column from sarah called the ladies mentor in. She shared her views on femininity and promoted. The idea of separate spheres. Sarah believed men and women had different domains. Men in the public and political sphere and women in the home as a result. Sarah opposed feminist causes like suffrage and instead focused on empowering women within the domestic sphere. She supported the idea that women were inherently good and that they should be educated in order to spread that goodness to men through careers. Like teaching and medicine. Sarah was invested in ensuring her magazine was firmly american. After discovering british publication also called ladies magazine. Sarah renamed the stateside version american ladies magazine. She solely printed american fashion styles which were muted compared to british illustrations and even went so far as to stop printing fashion altogether rather than allow british styles on the pages. Sarah revolutionized the occupation of writers in the us instead of following the playbook of other magazines at the time and reprinting british authors. Sarah solicited news. American only writers she published then emerging writers. Harriet beecher stowe. Susan b. anthony edgar allan poe ralph waldo emerson and daniel hawthorne to name a few since she paid authors for new works rather than reprints. Sarah was vital to the establishment of writing as a profitable occupation. Sarah herself continued to write to during her time. As editor she published a variety of poems plays novels and stories in eighteen thirty. She published a book called politics for our children which included a now timeless hit. Mary had a little lamb after her death. Historians debated whether or not she plagiarized the work but it still widely attributed to sarah. She also edited a children's magazine for two years under a pseudonym in eighteen. Thirty seven ten years. After sarah became editor of ladies magazine. A man named luis. A cody bought the publication and changed. Its name to goldies ladies book. Sarah remained editor for another thirty years and the publication grew to be the most widely circulated magazine in the country. Sarah grew her audience by keeping them up to date on current trends in eighteen. Forty her reports on queen. Victoria's wedding helped make the white wedding dress a standard. She was involved in the widespread proliferation of the christmas tree which she often included an art prints around the holidays. She may have been one of the first people to use the word lingerie as a euphemism for undergarments. Sarah even helped to create thanksgiving as we now know it. She petitioned president lincoln for a holiday of unity as the civil war approached in her column. She asked her readers to do the same. She also published recipes for now staple foods like cranberry sauce turkey and potatoes in eighteen fifty three sarah published her own encyclopedia of women called the women's record. It was over nine hundred pages long featuring the biographies of more than fifteen hundred women. Sarah retired from cody's in eighteen. Seventy seven at eighty nine years old two years later she died in her home all month for talking about journalists. For more on. Why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our newsletter. We're manteca weekly. Follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia annika special. Thanks to lose kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow..

daniel hawthorne David sarah Sarah two years five children Harriet beecher stowe Mary thirty years tomorrow fifth child luis first issue Four women Susan b. anthony first david Thirty seven ten years first magazine boston
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In this month encyclopedia will manica is brought to you. By macy's black history month is a special time to celebrate. The legacy of african americans rich contributions and their everlasting impact to our nation. Macy's is proud to spotlight black creators. change makers who continue to make their mark throughout the month of february and all year long you can shop. Black owned businesses available at macy's at macys dot com slash honors and head to that link to donate to a range of charities that empower black youth. It's just one way macy's demonstrating an ongoing commitment inclusivity and everything may do a hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia manica. Today's journalist was a defining feature in the development of the women's magazine. She was the editor of the most widely circulated publication in the pre civil war united states her coverage of trends helped establish many of.

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:34 min | 5 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"We've said a couple of times at this point, Sarah Josepha Hale and Goatees Lady's book were enormously influential. Under her leadership, the magazine reinforced several traditions that are a big part of life. For many Americans today, things like Christmas trees and white wedding dresses. What for being popularized in Britain, thanks to Queen Victoria. Popularized in the United States. Thanks in part to goatees Lady's book, The first picture of a Christmas tree and the magazines, Pages actually was copied from an engraving that had run in the illustrated London News had in grieving depicted Queen Victoria and her family around the Christmas tree. The goatees version take out the Queen's Crown and Albert Sash and mustache and some German biscuits from under the tree. Otherwise, though, it was the same picture supposed to be in American family. The biggest and most obvious example of Hale's influence in this regard is the American Thanksgiving holiday in the United States, Thanksgiving was already celebrated in various parts of the country, especially in the Northeast. Before she became an editor. Hail started publicly advocating for Thanksgiving holiday to be celebrated nationwide, and she began that question. 18 37 It was something that went on within and outside the pages of Goodies Lady's book, But her interest in Thanksgiving is a holiday went back before that she had written a lot about Thanksgiving before goatees Lady's book was even founded. There's a whole stretch in her first novel, Northwood. That's focused on Thanksgiving, including a New England family, explaining to a visitor from elsewhere that it's not celebrated in the whole country. But hopefully one day will be With one character, saying quote Thanksgiving like the Fourth of July should be considered a national festival and observed by all our people. The Thanksgiving meal is described in her writing this way. Quote the roasted Turkey took precedence on this occasion being placed at the head of the table. And well did it become its lordly station, sending forth the rich odor of its savory stuffing and finally covered with the froth of the basting? At the foot of the board. A sirloin of beef, flanked on either side by a leg of pork and loin of mutton seemed placed as a bastion to defend innumerable bowls of gravy and plates of vegetables disposed in that quarter. Goose and pair of ducklings occupied side stations on the table. The middle being graced as it always is, on such occasions by that rich burgomaster of the provision called a chicken pie. This pie, which is wholly formed of the choices. Parts of fouls, enriched and seasoned with a profusion of butter and pepper and covered with an excellent puff paste is like the celebrated pumpkin pie and indispensable part of a good and true Yankee Thanksgiving the size of the pie, usually denoting the gratitude of the party who prepares the feasts. And then he goes on to describe sideboards laden with a whole other course, plus a collection of desserts, including pumpkin pie. I have made some Thanksgiving meals and Thank goodness I did not have to make all of those different fouls, thistles simultaneously familiar sounding to a lot of people in terms of the turkey and the pie and the vast quantity of food. But it also seems even bigger than like the over the top Thanksgivings that a lot of people have. Yeah, By the time we got to mutton, I was like, Are you kidding me? This was also depicting a meal that was going to be for a whole lot of people, but still it's it's a lot There are other references to Thanksgiving inhales work after that, and then in 18 37. She wrote an editorial and goatees lady's book that advocated a Thanksgiving holiday to be celebrated in every state on the last Thursday of November. She started contacting state governments with this proposal, along with contacting a syriza of U. S presidents continuing on and so President Abraham Lincoln gave his Thanksgiving proclamation in 18 63. That proclamation said in part quote, it has seems to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly reverently and gratefully acknowledged. As with one heart and one voice by the whole American people. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States and also those who are at sea and those who are so journey and foreign lands to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November, next as a day of Thanksgiving and prayer to our beneficent father, who dwell within the heavens. At this point, the Thanksgiving holiday wasn't really associated with a romanticized First dinner involving the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag. That association didn't really evolve until the late 19th and early 20th Century's. So a few decades after Lincoln issued his proclamation, and it was decades after that, before Thanksgiving officially became a national holiday. That romanticized first Thanksgiving story was reinforced in the early 20th century through school lessons connecting it to ideas like freedom and good citizenship. And construction paper, pilgrim hats in my case. Yeah, and problematic. Yeah. Headdresses. Yes, quotation marks. So today, the first Thanksgiving story and consequently, the holiday as a whole has been really criticized for erasing centuries of exploitation and genocide of North America's native peoples of the hands of colonists in the government. But even without that connection to that romanticized story, Hale's Thanksgiving campaign has its own problems. One of the reasons she was so dedicated to a national Thanksgiving holiday goes back to her that slavery might Here the nation apart. So she thought a national Thanksgiving holiday might help unify the nation in the face of its division over the issue of slavery. So in other words, she thought this holiday might help keep the country together without actually addressing the underlying issue of slavery. I have so many thoughts that I'm just going to keep in my head. Hey, Oh, thought Slavery was wrong, but She also didn't agree with radical opposition to it. She advocated the resettlement of enslaved Africans in Liberia, where they would be free rather than the abolition of slavery within the United States. This resettlement plan we have talked about it on some episodes before had a lot of advocates arguing from all kinds of perspectives, including people of African descent who thought that this was the only way That they might truly be free and people who were simply racist and wanted the enslaved population removed for more detail..

United States Sarah Josepha Hale Goatees Lady President Abraham Lincoln Queen Victoria Britain New England Liberia London News editor Northeast Turkey Hail Albert Sash North America
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:44 min | 5 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Now in 18 63 during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving to be a national holiday on the fourth Thursday of November. Influenced by Sarah Josepha Hale, who spent 40 years advocating that By the way, Her claim to fame is in Turkey. She wrote The nursery rhyme Mary had a little lamb. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt changed the day to the third Thursday in November. But after much criticism, he relented and two years later signed a joint resolution from Congress. Making the Thanksgiving holiday the fourth Thursday in November. Yeah, he did when he was trying to change everything else from our economy to putting us on a war footing. That was one of the things he tried to change, but it didn't stick. Now people use it and they think of it. Maybe not this year, but other years in which is that's the black Friday Eve that so much people have lost sense of our traditions. But it was Lincoln that, finally Go ahead and fulfill the request to do the Thanksgiving in 18 63. That's the height of the civil war with things began to change in the North's direction, But he also came over the proclamation not only to, uh, free the slaves, but at the same time to have a day of remembrance. And thanks in an effort to keep the country together and in a thought that you know we're going to come through the other side on this It was. FDR removed the holiday up a week in attempt to he say spur sales to get us out of the depression. His plan was ripped, but he signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November. But he was thinking the economy as well. Speaking of proclamations, This has become a white house tradition. I.

President Abraham Lincoln Franklin Roosevelt Sarah Josepha Hale President Turkey FDR Congress Mary
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

08:58 min | 5 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"A little history specifically the history of Thanksgiving. Joining me is New York Times Best selling author Denise Kiernan, who wrote, We Gather together a nation divided a president in turmoil and a historic campaign to embrace gratitude and grace. Denise. Thank you so much for taking a few minutes. Talk to us. Let's start with an overview of what this book is all about. Hi, Ryan. Good morning. Thanks for having me. The book we gather together looks at. I've been describing it as the biography of an idea which found a little odd, but it really sort of looked at the American experience in American history through the lens of our relationship to giving. Thanks. So the books sort of looked at the history of the concept of Thanksgiving, which is very, very old one long predating, Um, you know, people coming to these shores and then looked at the meat of the book is looking at the establishment of our singular national day of thanks What we recognize today. As Thanksgiving. And at the heart of that particular story is Abraham Lincoln and a woman named Sarah Josepha Hale, who campaigned for a singular day, a national day of thanks And, uh, Lincoln was the one who answered Sarah, just EPA Hills police so to speak. She campaigned for years to make Thanksgiving a holiday in the United States of America. And so we look at that experience and just Sarah Josepha Hale's efforts and her life in general. But then really bring the Thanksgiving story forward into the 21st century and sort of look, it How it changed over the years. I even look at Thanksgiving during the Spanish flu of 1918 on looking at it, finally, as it was made and established holiday by congressional e established as a federal holiday, which actually did not happen. Until World War two. So you know is a writer to me. It was so interesting that the Thanksgiving we'll recognize today, you know, got it started its run in 18 63 in the middle of the Civil war. And then you know became a congressional Lee established holiday during World War two. And you know, the link throughout all of this book is kind of looking at gratitude and how that experience has evolved for Americans over the years. It's almost difficult to wrap your head around the fact there was a time when Thanksgiving wasn't really a thing. You know, we're also were also used to it. The story that we were told that we grew up learning about Thanksgiving. How much of that is accurate? And how much when you were going back researching this did you find didn't quite match up with with what we know. Oh, yeah, There's very little. There's not much that there's not that much that matches up, actually, but I'm not. I mean to be clear. I am not the first person to point that out. But, um Basically, you know the idea of Thanksgiving, even the word of Thanksgiving, the prop the proclaiming of days of Thanksgiving proceeds. All of that precedes 16 21 and actually happened outside of this country. So it's not an American invention by any stretch of the imagination and, um what is so so? Were there pilgrims in inclement and 16 21? Yes. Did they share a meal with the swamp in on tribe? Yes, was that and that's it? I mean, that that meal was not proclaimed at the time to be a Thanksgiving, which you know would have been the custom. Things did not go terribly well, you know? Oh, I thought I thought you were saying At Thanksgiving dinner. Things didn't go well, because that's a tradition we carried to this day, so yeah, no, I mean, there's there's no I mean, there is no there there is no evidence that the one China were invited. To join the pilgrim. There's no evidence that that meal was proclaimed the Thanksgiving and, more importantly, Thanksgiving existed long before that event. And when Sarah Josepha Hale, you know was approaching all of these different you know, presidents and eventually got her wish granted by Lincoln to have a national day of thanks. She made no mention of Commemorating any specific events or any specific meal that had ever happened. Um, so you know, I actually think that this story aside from just being true, um, is actually quite interesting on do you know, it's it's really It's a good one to kind of It's kind of look at because this was somebody who was very dedicated to an idea and didn't give up until she until she thought it made real. I'm joined by New York Times bestselling author Denise Karenin, who wrote, We Gather together a nation divided a president in turmoil and historic campaign to embrace grace and gratitude. I find it fascinating. The woman who was behind all of this. She's working with President Lincoln on trying to get this done. You've got the whole country in turmoil yet he did what she wanted. He Time aside and did this While he's dealing with all those other things. It really wasn't that that part of the story was really astounding to me, because I'm a lot of times when I write. I'm almost less interested in individual characters and individual events than I am and sort of the intersection of those characters and events. And so you know the fact I mean, Hale had been writing about Thanksgiving in a book that she, you know books that she published in her role as a magazine editor. She would write for the editor's column about Thanksgiving, she wrote ambassadors and governors and the heads of territories that weren't yet states saying. Come on, You know, we have to have this one day of thanks. And she wrote, you know she started with Zachary Taylor. She wrote Fillmore Pierce Buchanan, No dice. And then Lincoln in the middle of the Civil war. On she was wise. She wrote William Henry Seward as well. His secretary of state, which I think was smart, and you know it just It just struck in the right way. And it was a really difficult time and Thanksgiving that year. 18 63 like this year. So on November 26, that was, you know, just a week after he had to go, Um, t get it first. You know, such a solemn event. So all of these events coming together in that in that same year, I think we're just Were so interesting. And then finally I have to ask you about this now. I don't want to give the whole book away here. But But Thanksgiving in a pandemic during the 1918 Spanish flu what stood out to you about that? Well what you know, as a writer, you never know when you can see that the book and outline it right. It revised it and all that, you know, by the time it hits the bookshelves It's going to be a big It's going to be a very different world, right because it's so much time goes into these things. I know I just out weird how topsy turvy and difficult the world is going to turn out to be when this when this book Came along and here I wasn't you know, doing a book called. We gather together when the phrase you know, hits the shelves in the phrase social distancing. You know, when we went back and looked at, you know we were going through final proofing and a copy of it. The Spanish flu section really landed very differently, and you know it. So it was so eerily similar, you know, telling people not Telling people not to gather in large groups telling people to try and stay home, canceling large public events. And you know, there were a couple newspaper articles and you know when I came across where one smallish family dinner resulted in 27 severe cases. The Spanish flu and, um, you know, but it was hard people were people were, you know, sort of hungry to be with the ones they care about, and it makes it makes it trying. But you know, it's incredible pulls, people pull through. Yeah, you go all the way back to 1918. And so much of what happened during that pandemic is exactly what's happening today really, really is incredible. What an interesting book New York Times bestselling author Denise Karenin We gather together, a nation divided a president in turmoil. Oil and historic campaign to embrace gratitude and grace. Denise Thank you so much for the time..

Sarah Josepha Hale President Lincoln president New York Times Denise Denise Karenin Denise Kiernan Um writer Ryan Sarah William Henry Seward United States Lee EPA Hills America China
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:32 min | 5 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"History of Thanksgiving. Joining me is New York Times Best selling author Denise Kiernan, who wrote, We Gather together a Nation divided a president in turmoil and a historic campaign to embrace gratitude and Grace. Denise Thank you so much for taking a few minutes. Talk to us. Let's start with an overview of what this book is all about. Hi, Ryan. Good morning. Thanks for having me the book we gather together. Looks at I I've been describing it as the biography of an idea which sounds a little odd, but it really sort of looked at the American experience in American history through the lens of our relationship to giving. Thanks. So the books sort of looks at the history of the concept of Thanksgiving, which is very, very old one long predating, Um, you know, people coming to these shores and then looks at the meat of the book is looking at the establishment of our singular national day of thanks What we recognize today. As Thanksgiving. And at the heart of that particular story is Abraham Lincoln and a woman named Sarah Josepha Hale, who campaigned for a singular day. A national Day of thanks and Lincoln was the one who answered Sarah, just EPA. Hales, please. So to speak. She campaigned for years to make Thanksgiving a holiday in the United States of America. And so we look at that experience and just they're just EPA, Hale's efforts and her life in general. But then really bring the Thanksgiving story forward into the 21st century and sort of look it how it changed over the years. I even look at Thanksgiving during the Spanish flu of 1918 on looking at it. Finally, as it was made an established holiday by congressional e established as a federal holiday, which actually did not happen. Until World War two. So you know is a writer too Knew that so interesting that The Thanksgiving. We all recognize today, you know, got it started its run in 18 63 in the middle of the civil war. And then you know became a congressional Lee established holiday during World War two. And you know, the link throughout all of this book is kind of looking at gratitude and how that experience has evolved for Americans over the years. It's almost difficult to wrap your head around the fact there was a time when Thanksgiving wasn't really a thing. You know, we're also were also used to it the story that we were told that we grew up learning about Thanksgiving. How much of that is accurate and how much when you were going back researching this, did you find didn't quite match up with with what we know. Oh, yeah, There's very look, There's not much that there's not that much passes up, actually, but I'm not. I mean to be clear. I am not the first person to point that out. But, um Basically, you know the idea of Thanksgiving, even the word of Thanksgiving, the prop the proclaiming of days of Thanksgiving proceeds. All of that precedes 16 21 and and actually happened outside of this country. So it's not an American invention by any stretch of the imagination and, um what is so So? Were there pilgrims and Clement and 16 21? Yes. Did they share a meal with the swamp in on tried? Yes, Was that and that's it? I mean that that meal was not proclaimed at the time. To be a Thanksgiving which you know would have been the custom. Things did not go terribly. Well, You know, I thought you were saying at Thanksgiving dinner. Things didn't go well, because that's a tradition we carried to this day, so Yeah, no, I mean, there's there's no I mean, there is no there there is no evidence that the woman of were invited. To join the pilgrim. There's no evidence that that meal was proclaimed the Thanksgiving and, more importantly, Thanksgiving existed long before that event. And when Sarah Josepha Hale, you know was approaching all of these different you know, presidents and eventually got her wish granted by by Lincoln to have a national day of banks. She made no mention of Commemorating any specific events. Or any specific meal that had ever happened. Um, so you know, I actually think that this story aside from just being true, um, is actually quite interesting, and you know, it's it's really It's a good one to kind of It's kind of look at because this was somebody who was very dedicated to an idea and didn't give up until she until she thought made real. I'm joined by New York Times Best selling author Denise Karenin, who wrote, We Gather together a nation divided a president in turmoil and historic campaign to embrace grace and gratitude. I find it fascinating. The woman who was behind all of this. She's working with President Lincoln on trying to get this done. You've got the whole country in turmoil yet he did what she wanted. He Time aside and did this While he's dealing with all those other things. It really was instead that that part of the story was really astounding to me, because I'm a lot of times when I write. I'm almost less interested in individual characters and individual events than I am and sort of the intersection of those characters and events. And so you know the fact I mean, Hale had been writing about Thanksgiving in a book that she, you know books that she published in her role as a magazine editor. She would write for the editor's column about Thanksgiving, she wrote ambassadors and governors and the heads of territories that weren't yet steak saying. Come on, You know, we have to have this one day of thanks. And she wrote, you know she started with Zachary Taylor. She wrote Fillmore Pierce Buchanan, No dice. And then Lincoln in the middle of the Civil war. On she was wise. She wrote William Henry Seward as well. His secretary of state, which I think was smart, and you know it just It just struck in the right way..

President Lincoln Sarah Josepha Hale president New York Times Denise Denise Kiernan EPA Um Ryan William Henry Seward Sarah Grace United States Hales Pierce Buchanan Zachary Taylor Denise Karenin
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:41 min | 6 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WGN Radio

"W g n clean dot com For executive green carpet cleaning. And speaking of Andy Griffith. I'm once again for America's favorite feature, The award Wedding, Far flung forecast a fascinating compendium of interesting fax each week presented to us by your charming host, Dave took But see Juan. There was also another song she enjoyed singing on their Chinatown, China Town, My Chinatown when the lights are low. You were saying nothing? Nothing. I'm just enjoying the entertainment. Well, thank you Feel like a quarter in but I didn't. Thank you. Thank you very much for that about a nowhere. You're very kind today. Thank you for your introduction. And today, Our far flung forecast takes us to Newport, New Hampshire, New Hampshire about 40 miles outside of conquered the capital of New Hampshire population. 6507 goes back to 17 53. And incorporated as Newport, named for Henry Newport and distinguished scholar, soldier and statesman from England. But we bring up Newport, New Hampshire, because it is also the home and birthplace. Of a really remarkable woman from the 19th century. Sarah Josepha Hale. Does anybody know who Sarah Josepha Hale marriage if anybody, bueller Anybody. Nobody. Sarah Josepha Hale, What have you been drinking? The saying goes snitches coffee? It's just that coffee that you were talking about The sound of that was peppermint Schnapps. That, John Yeah. It was that elixir that hand be was drinking. But Sarah Josepha Hale was a writer and an activist and and one of the first Editors of magazines and publications in the United States. She also authored the nursery rhyme. Mary had a little lamb. But she also wrote a letter to President Abraham Lincoln in 18 63. Asking the president if he would consider a national holiday of Thanksgiving. This was on the president's mind and had been for some time and a push for a national Thanksgiving holiday had gone back a number of years, But she wrote a letter encouraging. Abraham Lincoln to make an immediate proclamation recognizing Thanksgiving as a national holiday, and he did on October 3rd 18 63 proclaimed in the midst of a civil war. We need to pause and take some time for gratitude. And by the way in 18 63 Thanksgiving fell on November 26 just like it does this year. So new partner Hampshire the home to Sarah Josepha Hale, and they're having cloudy skies and 28 degrees today, it's a little chilly in we could have a similar message of call for unity. During the strike that America's in right now. Oh, absolutely. Well, yeah. Yep. Today is I wanted to also mention is a anniversary. Something that happened 57 years ago. Today in Dallas, Texas. Here is a bulletin from CBS News. In Dallas, Texas, Three shots were fired at President Kennedy's motorcade in downtown Dallas. The first reports say that President Kennedy has been seriously wounded by this shooting. Then it was back to the so far for but not for long, Walter Cronkite with the bullets and of what's going on, They interrupted days of our lives and then went back to bald sheen. This picture has just been transmitted by wire. It is a picture taken just a moment or two before the incident. If you can zoom in with that camera and get a closer look At this picture on almost exactly one hour after his initial bulletin this now famous announcement. From Dallas, Texas. The flash. Apparently official President Kennedy died at 1 P.m. central standard time. Two o'clock eastern standard time some 38 minutes ago. Walter Cronkite, clearly shaken. In delivering the bulletin for which many of.

Sarah Josepha Hale President Abraham Lincoln President Kennedy New Hampshire Newport Dallas president Walter Cronkite Texas America Andy Griffith China Town Henry Newport executive John Yeah Dave bueller CBS News United States
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

02:10 min | 6 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"And again when I'm with Denise Karenin, she's the author of We Gather Together, a Nation divided the president in turmoil and a historic campaign to embrace gratitude and grace. You know when you read that final line in the subtitle, and When You Talk about Miss Hale and her writing letters to say, you know there should be A day of thanks. I would imagine the much maligned in 2020 Christopher Columbus had to come up with some point in the does he come up in the book, and, uh, if she played such a key role, perhaps there's some statues that could be erected. He did not. He did not come up in the book. On by, I think what was so interesting about her campaign? Woz? You know it took hold with Lincoln in the middle of the Civil war and then was not made congressional would not congressional E established. Has a holiday until World War two. So to me, it was interesting. This idea of you know, gratitude and thanks and finding something to come together and say thank you for in the midst of these times that were so incredibly Vices, and I think there's a real There's a real power to that to being able to say You know what? I got A roof over my head have food on my table, and I can say thank you for those things. Oh, yeah. To keep the bar and check. It's about keeping the bar in check. I think it sounds like Such an injury. I I apologize for assuming this was, you know, just to feel good, like, you know, Hit your reset button re prioritized. There's so much more to this book. I congratulate you on it again. It's we gather together the authors to these Karenin enjoy your Thanksgiving and thanks for coming on to tell me about Sarah Josepha Hale it It's I'm dumbfounded. I wanna look into this. Thanks so much. Thank you so much Happy holidays. You're on the brakes on the expressway South bound from the O'Neill Tunnel down to South Band and against slow from Furnace Brook to Braintree, the North bound side delayed between Braintree and Aponte it slow on the inbound side of star Drive just at.

Sarah Josepha Hale Denise Karenin Christopher Columbus Lincoln Karenin O'Neill Tunnel president Braintree Furnace Brook South Band
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:02 min | 6 months ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"In 1918. Spanish flu devastated the planet. With October being the deadliest month in the U. S. The end of World War one meant that people were ready to gather gratitude, but there were no public functions. And though Thanksgiving was impressively observed Quarantine interfered those of the word straight out of a Utah newspaper. Not everyone observed quarantine guidelines. However, the Ohio State Journal reported that 27 new cases of the flu could be traced back to just one lone Thanksgiving dinner. It's Vinnie Penn. Coming at you right here and W. R K o. We're moving on from churches and how empty they'll be come Christmas time from the holidays. On Mentioned Pilgrim's in his Thanksgiving Day proclamation. Just another little tidbit that I thought was interesting. He changed the date to appease commercial interests because the date felt fell too close to Christmas and experiment. They say that didn't go all that well and in 41 Roosevelt signed a House resolution designating Thanksgiving Day federal holiday in the United States. 78 years after Lincoln's initial proclamation and nearly a century after Sarah Josepha Hale first mentioned the idea herself. Now who is Sarah? Josepha Hale? I had no idea. I doubt many of you do, too. We're about to find out though. With this very special guest, Let's head back to the phones. At first glance, we have Denise Karenin on with us. She's written the book. We gather together, and that's what I saw for. We gather together and I thought this is exactly what we need. You know, we need to focus on Thanksgiving and then the holidays and And especially after a year like this one. I love these types of I kind of ran with it. And now I see there's so much more to we gather together. Then the beautiful notion of Hey, who cares that they're saying? It can only be us. We don't need 30 people over here. You know, we just need us and embracing that because the subtitles a nation divided a president and turmoil and a historic campaign to embrace gratitude and grace. So this is an ambitious title. Well, what's funny is Or maybe not funny is that you know these titles and these subtitles. You know, books take a long time. The world was very different when I brought in conceive that this book and it has turned out to be in 2020 while I'm While I'm promoting it, But I love what you were saying about this is the time to to really focus on. Yeah, Okay, Maybe we can't have 20 people over but I always think about we can choose to shift from obligation to intention. You know, I I intend to give thanks. The people I intend to be in touch with and the sentiments that you know that I intend to kind of hold dear, no matter what the circumstances are But even more than that, and what I assumed we gather together would be. It's actually the story of a woman named Sarah Josepha Hale. I have to be honest, you know, I don't say I know Nathan Hale. It's It's a new name for me. Tell me her story. It seems extraordinary. On is it? Is it a name in in history books? Well, it is. I mean, here here and there. I wouldn't call her unknown. I would call her under under discovered or underrepresented. She was a widowed mother of five in the 19th century with no formal schooling..

Sarah Josepha Hale flu Nathan Hale Denise Karenin Utah Vinnie Penn Pilgrim Ohio State Journal president Roosevelt United States. Lincoln
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hello I have a question sure did these women know each other or interact with each other that's one question and the second question is we're there man who especially help them accomplish what they did husbands you know I don't know other people that that were in a sense complementary and helps them instead of were roadblocks to help them do what they did the great things they did okay again your first question was this one do they think they know it okay interact yeah they they did not the only interaction I'm aware of is between Sarah Josepha Hale who ran this incredibly successful magazine she ran some of her teachers those are pieces from her fictional pieces but other than corresponding probably by pen and ink they never met that I'm aware of Clara Barton and teri Tobin both served in the Union Army in fort Wagner in South Carolina they both treated wounded soldiers there no where can I find that they ever crossed paths or had a conversation about that I know one of the publishers was considered the books and I would love it if they all you know sat room somewhere head teacher well that just didn't happen it's it's it's it's fantastic workmen have been helpful yes I would say to the women Harriet Tubman went back to get her husband after she freed herself he would come north so she married much later in life so there was no help there at all for her tummy Hey Beecher Stowe had a very understanding husband he was a theology instructor and he helped her a number of times he he in fact said to her you know you're not Mrs Harriet whatever is for Calvin he show thank you not to count how can he still you are hurried Beecher Stowe Keith he encouraged her to use that as her signature which she did so he's very supportive all along the way Judy ward house husband was a tyrant can explain any other way he was no help at all he was a hindrance he was very resentful over and tried to block her at every chance he had so she got no help there from an email October never married but she was very good at making contacts and use those contacts I mention one Henry Wilson senator she also work with local congressman who's from Massachusetts so she tapped into they were very helpful she had a good rapport with them so they helped her a lot but on the whole she was on her own she she had if she won people over like rock who was a you know a cantankerous old army guy and she wanted to see him and he just basically wanted to lower off but she was so persistent and she had these three warehouses full of things it was hard for to argue itself he came around eventually Sir Joseph here was widowed at age thirty nine never married again are the only person I could say that healthcare was the man who eventually bought her book her magazine Lewis go T. G. O. D. Y. and he was supportive and help you along the way but she could have gone to another book and probably you know had another publisher who would have been just as supportive so helpful not detracting that was basically what was sure Robert plumb in Q. NA at politics and prose I thank you if you really already answered my question but I'm not I'm going to pursue it here by just changing a little bit thank you you explain why you have a northerner union sort of focus on this perfectly good reason but I'm wondering are you aware of any women in the south who might have made the made the grade here if I left if for example it occurs to me that any woman in the south who is an outspoken abolitionist either in print or wherever might or would be up against tremendous odds in that pursuit and might make a candidate for your for your list there are so the question is are you aware of any women in the south who might have made the book and in particular were abolitionists who spoke out I I'm not I did attend a workshop in here with a woman who wrote a book called the abolitionists daughter about a southern who I believe he's a he's a minister but it's it's a work of fiction I should probably ask or was it based on any factual errors nothing to it and I I don't wanna say a cursory but fairly extensive look at what was happening in the south and who the people were they were right right did not turn up any the.

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"You to write the book number two what were your sources and number three what was the most interesting and unexpected thing that you discover I want you to okay what was your first okay well I think what writers will tell you it's not just the writing the book it's the researching the book that goes into a lot of queues up a lot of time and I think the dilemma that that nonfiction writers always have how much research do I do before it's not necessary it's overwhelming and I just need to get on with the job I would say considering both research and writing and they tend to mix probably three three and a half to four years well my sources I read every book I could forget my hands on about those five women some of them have great biographies written about them others don't have much particularly Sarah Josepha Hale and absorb that I went to all the locations where these women conducted their efforts I've been to this the car barn house I've been to Tubman's location down in the eastern shore in Dorchester county and I've been to her children's home in Auburn New York where she died in in the early nineteen hundreds so absorbed all of that though those all became very influential in and how I prepared this book what was the thing that struck me what was the thing that was most amazing well you know all these women are sort of mythological in some senses but they all had real flaws and I don't want to pick them apart is its ability the real human beings Clara Barton had what I call these days the entrepreneurial problem she started the red cross but didn't want to let go of it didn't want to take our hands off and she was kind of like the entrepreneur who started a company and his reach great success but never wants to let somebody else take over that would that was a flaw she also could be a bit we would pull her rank she was great friends with Harry Wilson who is a senator and she was not afraid to tell anybody like rocker who's a quartermaster you know I don't think what you're telling me that senator Wilson but approval so there was that aspect too high and I could go on but I think that and I've said that they were human beings real human beings hi Bob I have a question I know you've been fascinated by these are five by women and they're all notable but at any point have you considered others to include here and essentially runners up who might be worthy of us being aware of well that's a because of their own there are many other women that I could take off now who had lesser accomplishments in a in a sense but these were women who for me did extraordinary things over a long period of time and I couldn't find anybody else that quite that longevity that I was looking for and how many people the news my wife is always told me that dot three is not necessarily a good number to view for you can't have an even number gonna do five so I think I really focused on doing five and not not to be silly about it but it it it turned out those five were the most notable people that I came across with all my research I know are any of you who have thoughts about the south why did not include them I think what I wanted to do was draw attention to the union cause which is in real trouble and and five women who believe passionately passionately about it and did things they were not just the one on officially to lecture and and write books except in the case I heard Thomas but they they were doers they they did these things they went out there and they accomplish things not just talking or writing their diaries not that that's not an important thing to do but I was struck by what accomplishment and I use that word deliberately accomplished women they want.

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Abraham Lincoln's first inaugural speech which he delivered coincidentally in early March of eighteen sixty one Lincoln was present in terms of knowing what was going to happen when he took over as president the war was going to tear the country apart and he acknowledged that in his inaugural address but he also said we're going to have to rely on those better angels of our nature in order to bring that country bring this country back together after the war was over and certainly the five women I'm gonna talk about played major roles to bring the union together and to ensure that the unions succeeded the five women just very briefly Harriet Tubman who took her role primarily in the antebellum period before the war started actually in eighteen forty nine she freed herself people call it self liberation she freed herself but then even more astounding she came back again and again to Dorchester county Maryland to free enslaved people and to guide them north most people agree that they're probably seventy to eighty people watching free during the course of fourteen years an extraordinary thing by by anyone's imagination if you're still was a writer but it wasn't until she wrote uncle Tom's cabin which became her magnum opus that she blew open the whole story of slavery not only with facts and figures and information but with a compelling narrative she brought alive the characters in the book some very favorable and some not so favorable it hit the bookshelves of America just like no other thing I'd ever done in the past it sold over a hundred thousand copies the first week it was out it started out as a the serial in a magazine and got such such popularity during the course of this year running as a serial that was turned into a book in eighteen fifty two the next person I want to talk about is Julia ward Howe she was a poet in the early eighteen sixties award just begun she came to Washington with her husband Dr Samuel Gridley Howe there's a piece of work himself and not shy about talking about his ability to do great things she came and sort of was in the backseat while he was off doing things unofficial Washington with the sanitary commission which is sort of a early version of the red cross she went in a wagon with some friends across the Potomac and watch to the union soldiers parading and do their their room military kinds of things on the way back they were surrounded by union soldiers and she was struck by two things one was the fact that they were very young some not much older than her own children and secondly that they started singing and when they started singing was John brown's body and everybody agreed was a rousing marching tune but one of the persons who accompanied across the Potomac was her minister from Massachusetts he said you know it you could do a better job writing something than that that's really kind of denigrating to John Brown well she process that obviously and that night when she went back to the Willard hotel where she had a husband or staying she woke up in the middle of the night grab some paper and started writing writing writing a poem on scraps of paper the next morning when she got up she made a few tweaks to it but basically it was what was going to be the battle hymn of the Republic she had it published a little bit later the first of the next year in Harper's weekly it took off shoulders were singing it as they March civilians were moved by its lyrics and it's finally bringing to the forefront what if the union cause was really about the beginning of the war the cause was to some extent bring the union back together well that may be a fine unifying argument but hardly reasons people spirit when she talked about dying to set men free suddenly the whole purpose of the war took on a new tone that coupled with the Emancipation Proclamation set the union off on a new track Robert plumb the better angels the next person I want to talk to you about very briefly is Clara Barton I we tend to think of Clara Barton as a nurse and indeed she did do nursing duties but I think her real strength was her ability to get medical supplies which were sorely needed at the beginning of the war out into the field where they were needed most yes she did nursing duties but I think she was a medical logistics genius now that doesn't have quite the ring to it that may be nursing does but it's true when she took a wagon train of of medical supplies out to Antietam battlefield in eighteen sixty two the doctors on the field the surgeons were binding wounds with corn husks that they got from the nearby cornfield could run out of bandages they run out of sheets from a nearby farm farmhouse and tearing them up so she was in the right place at the right time she once said my place is just behind the cabinet meeting right where the action was and she lived up to them the next person I I want to talk about the fifth is probably the least well known among the ones I've already mentioned and that is Sarah Josepha Hale surges of hill back in the eighteen mid eighteen hundreds was famous because she was the editor of successful editor of a women's magazine first the women's journal and then Jody's women women's book that she was the editor of she also was great it attracting American writers and giving them I didn't send her publication and also may be as important she paid them which back in those days a lot of people who are running magazines picked up stuff and just ran at the copyright laws were pretty pretty loose she had for a long time favorite causes using our magazine is kind of a launching platform she raised money believing that women needed to be educated in colleges to raise money for Vassar College in Poughkeepsie New York and wound up raising enough money to establish the college she also raised money for the Mount Vernon ladies association so that Washington's home could be renovated and fall into this great this repair shop a women's advocate but also very much a part of American history she was born the only one of the five I'm talking about who is born in the seventeen hundreds she was born right after washing and took office so she had perhaps a little bit of a an older version of what was appropriate in the in the way of women's rights.

Abraham Lincoln
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"J. and we're kicking off thanksgiving right now this is the first I've talked about thanksgiving at all because I was saving it for our friend Anthony Mitchell some Marco how do you do Sir I'm well how are you I am well and we're celebrating not only the holiday but your book thanksgiving traditions in Boston isn't it is of equal to Christmas traditions of Boston which was a wild success I was quite surprised I was told by the publisher that they actually had the only reprinted it but it was the fourth reprint so here it is folks which the the the great and powerful okay so Marco all you've been waiting for him so feel free to call in right away don't wait six one seven two five or ten thirty and Anthony suggested and I agree with you actually all of us Anthony it you I and everyone share their their own thanksgiving traditions that will also talk about some of the thanksgiving traditions in Boston and we can talk about the chapters that you will you will you do have in your book what are you you can decide whether you want to talk about your personal thanksgiving traditions or starting to the book well that's the thing is this is what's so nice about Jay talking it's shared memories and I think sometimes when people begin to think of thanksgiving one of the first things that comes to mind of course is Turkey but I think it's also on Thursday morning with watch the Macy's day parade and you know the Macy's thanksgiving day is something that's become a tradition not only in our home but I'm sure many people's homes we wash the floats we begin to realize in some ways with music and marching bands and things of that sort it's a fantastic morning but I think one of the concepts is thanksgiving is something with the ball not just since the seventeenth century but it's also something with the ball to the twenty first century that includes not just the foods that are typical of our ethnic origin but it's also something a lot of ways that takes on a new meaning of what thanksgiving is all about I think a lot of us you know perceive the thanksgiving as the pilgrims having their first thanksgiving in November of sixteen twenty one after a bountiful harvest but thanksgiving can also be something of giving thanks for not just in a wonderful family wonderful friends but in some ways of also sharing the things that actually matter in life so thanksgiving give me something that's really truly personal but it's also something that involves all of us it does seem as though this is the one day that people really really really try to travel do whatever it takes to get home planes trains automobiles whatever's trains travel it's incredible I only go to also develop and in the Wednesday of course I'll probably travel down after lunch but the concept there is that the traffic could actually be two to three hours for less than seventy five miles but when people tell me they're traveling by airplane or by train it is just incredible but it's also the fact of spent spending it with family and friends that can actually make it all worthwhile because sometimes it takes a week to shop prepare and then finally cook the meal and serve it it only takes fifteen minutes to read that's true try to remember something that I never remember that is eat slowly here it slowly with a tiny for course chopsticks or something shoveling it in no I agree but I think sometimes it's also the fact that this is not just a thanksgiving time that we serve roast Turkey but it's something that in November is special insider and cranberries all sorts of different things but with a roaring fire and you know do you have a fireplace and everything down to it we well you probably have the optimum thanksgiving environment it's a fun thanksgiving and we have to admit it's also with freshly baked goods we do make everything from scratch in a because all of the eggs that are used in the preparation of you know stuffing and you know hard boiled eggs and the desserts that's all from a little trick and can you make it out wow so I guess since we started down this road you might as go up might as well go all the way why don't you go into some detail about your thanksgiving because it's pretty special I'm guessing well it's really a compilation of things that my mother had done my grandmother had done and you know family and friends but we we have orders and cocktails at one o'clock sharp no matter what they always have it at one o'clock shop that was my mother's rule and then we said to dinner at two o'clock and at that point it's also a roast Turkey and it'll probably include a small sirloin of beef or maybe even a ham I'm not quite sure what about that the orders well for orders I I do a lot of variety of things I mean I serve you know cook shrimp with a sauce but I also do shrimp wrapped in bacon I do things such as figs or date sort of stuffed with a goat cheese them small knots I also do things in over a simple little baked breeze individual bytes things of that sort I prepare everything the evening before so of course the only thing I really am doing in the morning is roasting a Turkey is a it works do you feel like his work the night before or is it also find it do you do it with a martini maybe I do I do it with a martini and I do have fun with it it's a lot of work because I only use the vegetables that one has to peel and just in case you ever go to someone else's house for thanksgiving what does it tell them how you like your martini now so they'll now and not be embarrassed it straight up three all of queen if they could be and I just on the side if they could be they better be all right but the other thing is you say is that work well yeah it's you know peeling vegetables and things of that sort but you have to realize we have chickens and these chickens have their face giving the next day which is thanksgiving day when they have butternut squash feelings potato peel wings and usually the next day after that usually leftover vegetables so our chickens are well fed but it's a type of a thing in some ways that I look at them just like I do my dog and cat who might have a little bit of fresh Turkey and realize that it truly is a holiday it's a holiday that has become ingrained in our senses and Sarah Josepha Hale actually advocated it to become a national holiday and it was actually Abraham Lincoln in eighteen sixty three that signed a proclamation that it would be the last Thursday of November when we would celebrate a national thanksgiving I need to finish up your house I want to picture the whole thing what do you have for side dishes you may well mashed potatoes and we also have butternut squash the onions green onions we're not creamed onions but I serve boiled onions and I also probably will have you know what I call a turn a potato and onion side dish it some very simple it's mashed together and it's something that my great aunt would actually serve in the U. nod to these people and remember them on that Chris of that thanksgiving day and Christmas day because already serving on both that it's actually something that's part of my shared thanksgiving traditions boat beside vegetables of important and of course they make the really fresh water but they also take cranberry sauce because we have great cranberries and a Yarmouth port and we by the by the gallon so it's something a lot of ways that people think of cranberries something tart but I actually enjoy it it's a nice for a to gladly get them but then bring them back and make them into something including cranberry loaf bread pains any not to Tallien heritage well in the past yes my mother who was not Italian but always serve a lasagna or something of that sort which was you know enjoyed by the Italian side of the family when we do it there are times when will serve stuff shells in a red sauce which I call grave a many people cultural sauce but it's also a fact will do something which by Italian grandmother had made which was a chicken soup with beat egg and it's a very rich soup with a little bit of lemon it's almost like a of a golem low soup what's that well it's I have a Colombo yes chicken broth yes chicken pieces and egg and a little bit of lemon and what you do is you beat the eggs into the hot chicken broth so it's kinda egg drop soup somewhat similar yes and has a much fresher tastes with the actual element she's any other what what else you season it with just a little bit of salt and pepper it's very very mild so they make a court broth I've been it's a very thick broth broth checking pieces and lemon and pepper fresher eggs and fresh eggs and how about I tell me about your breath well I made at the other evening and as well down off the Cape it was just simply chicken pies and I boiled it in water I didn't use any type of broth must've boiled it very gently for close to ten hours and of that point the chicken and falling from the bone the onions carrots and I think I had squash and celery in there and what I had done was to strain it and then re boiled it again and then when I finally strained at it was almost a billion so I called the court Williams it's a very rich very dark William and it's something the phone I put into sounds peculiar of plastic jug and they can actually make individual soup for people so it's quite good that I have to do that because I have I have the Prof previously may like you can actually want yes this breaking we do have to hear about the desserts that will be it and for his house this is a big fantasy for me and then we'll talk we'll start with George in Melrose after this break on WBZ what.

Anthony Mitchell Boston Marco fifteen minutes three hours ten hours one day
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The creation to eighteen fifty four arranged in four eras with selections from female writers of every age <hes> that was all the title but in her day she was so associated with cody's ladies book that people called it. Mrs hails magazine felix pretty complicated. Yeah you know i wanna like her in some ways but that whole like narrows down at fashion thing is a problem and it's the funny thing we're just as as the magazine was <hes> claiming claiming that it did not take a political stance but obviously did <hes> because of its refusal to acknowledge certain things i feel like similarly and obviously on a much. It's more important level. That's also how she dealt with fashion rate. She's like i don't want fashion which is in itself a commentary on fashion right <hes> and she would consult on women's apparel at vassar but didn't want fashion involved. It's a fascinating thing to me. He's got a lot of contradictions. You can their scans of a lot of these <hes> lot of issues of this book that you can see online fine <hes> you can read through. I mean they're just the goes. It goes on for years. There's pages and pages step you can dive into if you were interested in little glimpses. His of life for nineteenth century white women slashed the kinds of standards. The magazine was really heavily reinforcing yeah <hes> do you have some listener mail. I surely this is from. Helen and helen has so helpfully updated us on the amendment regarding the port chicago fifty that we talked about in a previous listener mail. Helen says hi holly and tracy. I just heard your listener mail about the port chicago amendment and as someone who works a lot with congressional websites. I went ahead and pulled up the link for you. That's not actually an amendment. I believe which is probably you had trouble finding it. It's section ten ninety nine of h._r. Twenty five hundred national defense authorization act for fiscal year twenty twenty. Hopefully this link. We'll take you directly to that. Section of the resolution loved the show and always look forward to do new episodes. Helen helen got a reply for me that started with the words thank you and all capital letters because i had really kind of torn my hair out trying to find in this text having looked at the link that i think the core issue was the engrossed in house version. It was not posted yet when i was doing all this looking and that's where it is. I don't recall seeing that option the drop down when i was doing my search for it but anyway this here is the actual text of it. It is sense of congress regarding the port chicago fifty. It is the sense of congress that one the american people should recognize the role of racial bias in the prosecution and convictions of the port chicago fifty following the deadliest homefront disaster in world war two to the military records of each of the port chicago fifty should reflect such exoneration of any and all charges brought against them in the aftermath of the explosion and three are- the secretary of the navy should upgrade the general summary discharges of each of the port chicago fifty sailors too honorable discharges so as of right this minute. This is not something that has passed both houses of congress and been signed into law yet. It is something that that that made its way through the house back in july so thank you again helen for sending that to me because i probably would not have gone back to look for it again. <hes> and thanks to everybody who sends us helpful awesome emails or just says hi or since pictures of cats if you would like to write to us about this or any other podcast britt.

Helen helen chicago cody congress Mrs vassar felix secretary tracy holly
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

13:18 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Like we said a couple of times at this point sarah just a hail and goodies ladies. Ladies book were enormously influential under her leadership. The magazine reinforced several traditions that are a big part of life for many americans. Today things like christmas trees and white wedding dresses which were being popularized in britain. Thanks to queen. Victoria were popularized in the united states. Thanks in part to goaty ladies ladies book. The first picture of a christmas tree in the magazines pages actually was copied from an engraving that had run the illustrated london news pattern in grieving depicted queen victoria and her family around a christmas tree. The goethe's version took out the queen's crown albert sash and moustache and some german biscuits from. I'm under the tree otherwise though it was the same picture supposed to be an american family. The biggest most obvious example of hails influence in this regard is the american thanksgiving holiday in the united states thanksgiving was already celebrated in various parts of the country especially in the northeast before she became an editor hale started publicly advocating for thanksgiving holiday to be celebrated nationwide and she began that quest in eighteen thirty seven it was something that went on <hes> within within and outside the pages of these ladies book but her interest in thanksgiving holiday went back before that she had written a lot about thanksgiving before cody's as ladies book was even founded. There's a whole stretch in her first novel northwood. That's focused on thanksgiving including a new england family explaining to a visitor senator from elsewhere that it's not celebrated in the whole country but hopefully one day will be with one character saying quote thanksgiving like the fourth of july should be considered the national festival and observed by all our people. The thanksgiving meal is described in her writing this way quote the roasted turkey took precedence on this occasion occasion being placed at the head of the table and well did it become it's lordly station sending for the rich odor of it's savory stuffing and finally covered with the froth off of the basting at the foot of the board a sirloin of beef flanked on either side by a leg of pork loin of mutton seemed placed as a bastion to defend spend innumerable bowls of gravy plates of vegetables disposed in that quarter goose and pair of ducklings occupied side stations on the table. The middle title being greased as it always is on such occasions by that rich burgomaster of the provision called a chicken pie. This pie which is wholly formed of the choicest parts of fouls enriched seasoned with a profusion of butter and pepper and covered with an excellent puff paste is like the celebrated pumpkin pie an indispensable offensive part of a good entry yankee thanksgiving the size of the pie usually denoting the gratitude of the party who prepares the feasts and then it goes on to describe subside boards laden with a whole other course plus a collection of desserts including pumpkin pie. I have made some thanksgiving meals and thank thank goodness. I did not have to make all of those different fouls. This is simultaneously familiar sounding to a lot of people in terms terms of the turkey and the pie and the vast quantity of food but it also seems even bigger than like over the top thanksgiving's that a lot of people have yeah yeah by the time we got to mutton i was like are you kidding me. This was also depicting meal that was going to be for a whole lot of people but still it's a lot but there are other references to thanksgiving inhales work after that and then in eighteen thirty seven she wrote an editorial in goethe's ladies book that advocated thanksgiving bring holiday to be celebrated in every state on the last thursday of november. She started contacting state governments with this proposal along with contacting a series. He's a u._s. Presidents continuing on until president abraham lincoln gave his thanksgiving proclamation in eighteen sixty three that proclamation said in part quote it has it seems to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole american people. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the united states and also those who are at sea and those who are so in foreign lands to set apart and observe the last last thursday of november next has day of thanksgiving and prayer to our beneficent father who dwell within the heavens at this point the thanksgiving holiday wasn't really the associated with a romanticized first dinner involving the pilgrims and the woman that association didn't really evolve until the late nineteenth and early twentieth his centuries so a few decades after lincoln issued his proclamation it was decades after that before thanksgiving officially became a national holiday that romanticized first thanksgiving story was reinforced in the early twentieth century through school lessons connecting it to ideas like freedom and good citizenship and construction paper pilgrim hats in my case yeah and problematic yeah kabaddi head headdresses yes quotation marks so today the first thanksgiving story and consequently the holiday as a whole has been really criticized for erasing centuries of exploitation and genocide of north america's native eight of people's at the hands of colonists the government but even without that connection to that romanticized story hails thanksgiving campaign has its own problems. What are other reasons. She was so dedicated to a national thanksgiving. Holiday goes back to her thought that slavery might tear the nation apart so she thought a national thanksgiving escaping holiday might help unify the nation in the face of its division over the issue of slavery so in other words she thought this holiday might help keep the country together together without actually addressing the underlying issue of slavery. I have so many thoughts that i'm just gonna keep in my head. <hes> hail fought slavery was wrong but and she also didn't agree with radical opposition to it she advocated the resettlement of enslaved africans in liberia where they would be free rather than the abolition russian of slavery within the united states this resettlement plan. We've talked about it on some episodes before had a lot of advocates arguing from all kinds of perspectives including meeting people of african descent who thought that this was the only way that they might truly be free and people who were simply racist and wanted the enslaved population removed for more detail. You can check out our previous episodes on marcus garvey and thomas morris chester so this same mindset also influenced the editorial direction of goethe's. He's ladies book. When hale was editing american ladies magazines she'd written various editorials that clearly stated her political opinions but goaty wanted ended the lady's book to appeal to women regardless of what their political views were and of course this wasn't a distinction he was consciously making in his mind but the default woman here was white and usually middle-class he was also interested in avoiding nationalism or any political entanglements within the pages of the journal and he also said ed quote i allow no man's religion to be attacked or sneered at or the subject of politics to be mentioned in my magazine so sometimes you'll see these ladies book described arrived as not being political but it would be more accurate to say that the magazine avoided overt political controversy really it was incredibly political nicole. It avoided direct discussion of the civil war or the movement for abolition. That's an inherently political decision instead in the years leading up to the u._s. Civil war or it published poetry essays and stories that highlighted the potential tragedies of war and also emphasized the idea of national unity. Although the hope hope was that this would avoid offending either side in reality invented the magazine's readership peaked in eighteen sixty just before the war afterward people started started gravitating toward publications where they could get news about what was happening on top of that in a different political direction goldies ladies book heavily reinforced enforced a very specific idea of what a woman should be sarah jeff. A hail believed that women were more moral and compassionate than men were inhales words quote. God has given man authority to woman influence. She wanted women to influence men's. It'd be better so that men could put their authority already to better use the magazine focused on the idea that a woman's role given by god was to be a moral force in her sphere of influence which was the home although the magazine never took a clear position one way or the other hail herself was against the idea of women suffrage because it was outside of women's sphere of influence lewin's and because women have fewer opportunities for education and political engagement thus they were less likely to be informed voters instead goads ladies book look really enforce the idea that a true woman was pious pure submissive and domestic a collection of ideas known as the cult of true womanhood or the cult hold of domesticity. Yeah that's up in a few episodes lately. Including packard versus packard incredibly common idea of what a woman was supposed to be the at the time and the elements of it continue to today. Hey you did advocate for better opportunities for women but only within this framework concluded supporting elizabeth blackwell and her efforts to become the first woman in the united states to earn m._d. Inhales mind medicine could be within a woman's spear. You're in her words written. In march of eighteen fifty to quote the study of medicine belongs to a women's department of knowledge. It's practice is in harmony with the duties of mother and nurse which she must fulfill it is not going out of her sphere to prescribe for the sick. She must do this by the fireside. The bedside in the inner chamber where her true through place is it is man who is there out of his sphere hale also advocated for women to have better educational opportunities especially when it came into an education in the liberal arts she was a huge advocate for vassar female college after its founding in eighteen sixty one as well as corresponding extensively lee with its founder matthew vassar on everything from the students dress to the number of female faculty to whether to keep the word female in the name but there were also a lot of limits to hale's advocacy for women's education all connecting back to the idea of a what a woman's sphere was for example. She didn't seem to think that women and should study the physical sciences for their own sake various articles and go. These ladies book suggests that science has a use in a woman's life like hell understanding manning scientific concepts can help keep a better home but it doesn't really support the idea that a woman should just become a chemist or physicist because she wants to and there they were also limits to which women she was writing for her and depicting in the magazine the women in the magazines famous fashion plates some of which were large enough that they were printed on fold. Doubt pages were all white all affluent with similarly attractive features and the same slender body tape they reinforce the ideas of heterosexual marriage bridge and motherhood as unifying forces in women's lives really for most of its existence the win the magazine didn't address the experience of native people or enslaved. If two people or free black people or immigrants at all in the words of a piece in the july eighteen ninety seven issue which was after hale and goaty had both died quote a little over a century ago colored women had no social status and indeed only thirty years ago the term womanhood was not large enough in this christian republic include any woman of african descent. That's from a piece that was clearly written for white women to let them know that quote the thousands of cultured and delightfully useful people women of the colored race who are worth knowing and who are prepared to cooperate with white women and all good efforts are simply up-to-date new women in the best sense of that much abused first term even so the magazine was widely read and widely respected in the words of the philadelphia city item in eighteen in seventy quote. It has been well remarked that we're go- dis is taken. There is domestic neatness comfort elegance virtue which we think is saying a good deal for the american woman. God bless cody's and keep it with us. Many years goaty sold the publication to john. Hill says hailan beak in eighteen seventy seven even after he and hailed both retired as of their retirement she was eighty nine and he was seventy three so they worked on this magazine. Almost until the end of their lives. Louis antoine goaty died the following year on november twenty ninth eighteen seventy eight sarah j hale who called herself in editors died on april thirtieth eighteen seventy nine she had continued to write for much of her life publishing poems fiction essays recipe books etiquette manuals and women's encyclopedia titled woman's record or sketches of all distinguished women from the.

united states hale Louis antoine goaty sarah jeff goaty cody goethe britain Victoria philadelphia liberia packard elizabeth blackwell north america marcus garvey abraham lincoln
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Known as ladies magazine and literary gazette. It's believed to be the first magazine edited by a woman after a while. It's name was shortened to just ladies magazine and then expanded to american ladies magazine. This was supposed to distinguish it from a different ladies magazine that was being published in britain and also to highlight what hale saw as the magazine's american focus at the time most magazines being published in the united states were being created aided primarily through a practice called clipping that was just republishing material from other magazines without any kind of acknowledgement or attribution or payment to its original creators creators most of the time the clip content in the u._s. was coming from british publications and we've talked a little bit about <hes> publications that worked in that style and we have talked about <hes> pose era and his rivals and also also other <hes> other people that worked in in literary efforts etc came up i think in in our winsor mccay episodes possibly <hes> but he'll bless her did not approve of this practice because of clipping and she wanted this to be an american magazine by and for american women meaning middle and upper class white women she did the vast majority thirty of the original writing herself in the magazines pages included poetry fiction essays news articles household tips and editorials where she advocated needed things like property rights for married women some things that they did not want this magazine to include were fashion plates. These were illustrations of people poland fashionable clothing and appealing surroundings usually done as etchings or engravings. She really wanted her magazine to be dedicated to the education and enrichment richmond of women and that did not in her mind include fashion in her words quote there is no part of our duty as editor of a ladies journal which which we feel so reluctant to perform as to quote or exhibit the fashions of dress this is where i retract my blessing upon her but fashion russian plates were incredibly popular and hail started losing subscribers as competing magazine started publishing more of them by late eighteen thirty hail realize that she really did have to include fashion plates. She wanted her magazine to stay afloat. So the first few issues that included fashion plates bemoaned the lack of original american fashions wants to feature or offered commentary that criticized fashion or printed an essay on the facing page that used the plate as some kind of moral lesson eventually though hailed moved onto publishing plates without all of the judgy commentary. Yes she was sort of like if i have to do this. I'm just going to be as put draghi and complain about it as irony is though she wore black hole life because she thought it made her look stunning so she was into fashion she just would acknowledge it yeah and also that this magazine and then also goes ladies beck. We're gonna talk about more in a bit. I mean they became incredibly famous. For all these fashion plates so ladies magazine stopped publishing fashion plates toward the very end of its run but it's not clear whether that contributed to the magazines decline by eighteen eighteen thirty four the magazine had started to struggle in part due to the financial fallout from president andrew jackson's efforts to try to dismantle the bank of the united states hale started appealing to her subscribers to try to support the magazine and for the ones whose subscriptions were in arrears to pay their bills so during these lean years there's a man named louis antoine goaty approach tale about moving to philadelphia to edit his magazine. His name does appear french. He was born in the u._s. So we're going with the louis. Pronunciation goaty was born in new york as i said in the u._s. On june sixth eighteen o four kale most of his education had come through self study he had owned a small bookstore or and new stand for awhile before he became a scissors editor at the philadelphia daily chronicle in eighteen thirty he started publishing a magazine called ladies book which was has like so many other magazines created through clipping and it also included fashion plates but cody also didn't want this magazine to just be your standard clipping clippings shop he wanted it to be in his words quote the guiding star of female education the beacon light of refined taste pure morals and practical wisdom him and he hoped that if he hired hails she could take it in that direction in spite of her own magazine struggles hail actually turned him down. This was largely because she didn't want to leave boston. Her son william was about to start college at harvard and she didn't want to leave until he graduated and she also wasn't quite ready to give up her own when magazin at this point she was co owner hale had been very busy during her whole tenure as editor of american ladies magazine she had written numerous books because on top of all the writings she was doing for the magazine but included publishing poems for our children including mary had a little lamb which was published in eighteen thirty. It's it's poems written to inculcate moral truths and virtuous sentiments. She was also hugely active. In fundraising efforts for the completion of the bunker hill monument and she helped found the seaman's aid society and become its first president she kept up this pace as her magazine struggled but she really was not able to turn things around in eighteen thirty six goaty made another proposal that he could buy american ladies magazine merge it with his lady's book and let hail at at the combined combined magazine from boston until her son william graduated from college in eighteen forty one this time hale agreed as of its first issue in eighteen thirty-seven she was the editor of goethe's ladies book and she took it in a similar direction she had taken american ladies magazine which is what goaty had been hoping for moving get away from clipping toward original content hale also focused on hiring women for as many roles as she could eventually this included a staff of a hundred and fifty fifty women's. You hand colored the fashion plates that means hand coloring them for every copy of the magazine which was a a feat and also meant that sometimes different people's copies would be in different colors because they ran out of one. Obviously that's one of the things we said before that this magazine became really famous for for also in keeping with her distaste for covering fashion and a lady's magazine at all fashioned was the only section of goaty ladies book that hailed did not personally oversee z. There was a lot in the magazine beyond the fashion plates and other fashion coverage hail still wanted to quote provide quality material to benefit and educate the female email reader so like her earlier magazine godinez ladies book began publishing poetry fiction essays biographical vignettes news advice and household household tips she introduced stories and articles for children meant to be read to them by their mothers. Each issue included sheet music and they were also sewing and embroidery patterns also recipes anything that hale thought would be educational edifying and useful for american ladies. This meant that cody's ladies book also so became a publishing outlet for some of the united states leading writers at the time the magazine published work by nathaniel hawthorne harriet beecher stowe ralph waldo emerson emerson henry wadsworth longfellow washington irving edgar allan poe was a contributor as well publishing stories and poems including the cask of a moncia do you under the leadership of hail as editor and goethe's publisher goldies. Ladies book became incredibly successful. We mentioned earlier that hails american ladies magazine gene was the first women's magazine in the u._s. To last more than five years goethe's ladies book lasted for almost seventy from eighteen thirty to eighteen ninety eight eight. It outlived both its editor and its publisher. It also became hugely popular. It had about ten thousand subscribers. When hail came on editor at its peak in eighteen sixty it had about a hundred and fifty thousand subscribers which was the largest circulation of any magazine in the united states at at all this was in spite of an annual subscription cost of three dollars which was considered expensive for the time. It's always tricky to make these comparisons but this is is usually cited as between eighty five and ninety dollars a year. Today it's also tricky to compare that to current magazine subscription rates because there are so many bundles khalil's and digital only subscriptions and whatnot but the current bundles subscription rate for vogue is twenty one dollars ninety nine cents a year and the cover price for a year ear of martha stewart. Living is forty nine dollars ninety cents that is according to each of their websites. It was also read well beyond its subscriber base. It's intended audience was ladies in the mindset of the time that meant white protestant women who were mostly middle class or more affluent but it was also read beyond that demographic with women pooling their money to share a subscription or boarding houses sharing one copy among all its residents or patrons reading copies in libraries and reading rooms so today cody's ladies book is a huge source of information about middle class white women in the nineteenth century and it and hail were also enormously influential which will get to in a moment after a quick sponsor break listeners. I'd like to tell you about another podcast called family secrets. When dani shapiro whimsically dna tests she was shocked by the results because the story she'd been told about who she was where she.

american ladies magazine ladies magazine editor hale american magazine united states cody goethe boston winsor mccay president william dani shapiro publisher bunker hill monument new york martha stewart literary gazette britain
"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"sarah josepha hale" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"I'm tracy nielsen and i'm holly fry lately. I've been thinking a lot about etiquette on the internet and how sometimes there's not any how etiquette isn't something that just springs forth from people unprompted the idea of what is and isn't polite or rude has to be kind of cultivated and created and reinforced intentionally including through things like etiquette manuals and advice columns and magazines and that whole line of thought led me to something that has been on my list for a long time and has also been requested stood by a lot of our listeners. That's goads ladies book and its editor. Sarah yourself a hail. I will say that i have heard historians and archivists say this as goethe's and as gatti's i have also on occasion heard good days. I think that's just people trying to make a sound fancy. I that that does sound like an attempt for a bunch of folks that i have listened to from vassar who she was associated with all said goat cheese so that's the one that we're gonna go with. This was the most popular magazine in the united states the middle of the nineteenth century and although it's mostly well known at this point for its hands tinted fashion plates the content of the magazine was collection of all kinds of material including poetry and fiction and household tips and music and yes etiquette and it was is incredibly influential in terms of both the actual magazine content and hails work outside of his patients and a lot of ways that are still felt today in europe. The first magazines were launched in the seventeenth century. Thanks to advances in printing technology and mail distribution as well as increased literacy rates. The word magazine is much older than that but it was i used to describe a periodical filled with works by various writers often on a range of subjects aimed at a general audience and that was in seventeen thirty one that was when edward cave started publishing the gentleman's magazine he called it a magazine because the words earlier meaning of storehouse storehouse the gentleman's magazine was meant to be a storehouse of knowledge magazines aimed specifically at women were part of this whole ecosystem by seventeen fifty nine nine. That's when the royal female magazine or the ladies general repository of pleasure and improvement was first published in england and the united states the first i women's magazine was called ladies magazine and it was founded in seventeen ninety. Two various women's magazines came and went on both sides of the atlantic in the u._s. Most of them folded within a year or two until sarah. Josefa hail started publishing her ladies magazine which was the first women's magazine in the u._s. That lasted more than five years on that is in fact a different ladies magazine than the one that was founded in seventeen ninety two and we're going to go back up for a minute and talk about how how hale got there. She was born saroj assefa buell in newport new hampshire on october. Twenty four th seventeen eighty eight parents were captain. Gordon buell and martha whitney buell on her father had fought in the revolutionary war. Sarah was the third of their for children. Sarah's parents thought that girls should have access is to education and for the buell daughters that meant being tutored at home by their mother along with their brothers. It did not however mean that sarah could go to college of of all her siblings. Sarah was close to her brother horatio and when he went to dartmouth he actively encouraged herself study and he shared his books with her when he was home in her words quote. He seemed very unwilling that i should be deprived of all his collegiate advantages. Sarah became a teacher when she was eighteen and in eighteen thirteen eighteen when she was twenty five. She married david hale who was a lawyer. David encouraged her to continue educating herself again in her words quote we commenced soon after our marriage system of study and reading which we pursued while he lived the hours allowed from eight o'clock in the evening till ten two hours and the twenty twenty four how i enjoyed those hours and all our mental pursuits it seemed the aim of my husband to enlighten my reason strength in my judgment and give me confidence in my own powers of mine which he estimated much higher than i but this approbation which he bestowed on my talents has been of great encouragement to me and attempting attempting the duties that have since become my portion sadly. David did not live long. He died of pneumonia in eighteen twenty two nine years into their marriage by then they had four children together. They were david horatio francis and sarah joseph. The elder sarah was pregnant with their fifth child. William mm who was born not long after his father's death. Sarah was understandably devastated and she wore black for the rest of her life. Although this was also influenced by the fact that she found black flattering on her and she also thought it made her look taller. Sarah knew that she was going to have to work to support her family but that a teacher's salary was never are going to be enough to support her in five children before her marriage. She hadn't even been supporting herself on teachers. Pay she'd been living at home and using that salary to help cover her father's others medical expenses david had been a freemason though in his brothers at the masonic lodge helped get sarah and her sister in law hannah established with a millenary sorry business that along with dress making was one of the very few business opportunities that were considered appropriate for middle class women the masonic lodge also funded the publication of a book of poetry that sarah had written that was called the genius of oblivion and other original poems and it was published under the byline a lady the of new hampshire sarah earned enough money from this book that she was able to leave hannah in charge of what actually seems to have become quite a thriving millenary business and instead sarah sarah focused on writing sarah submitted poems and stories to magazines journals in eighteen twenty seven she published a novel called northwood a tale of new england and northwood contrasted a woman's life in new england to what she imagined to be a woman's life in the south at this point hale was really concerned that the issue of slavery slavery was going to lead to a civil war or otherwise just destroy the country and northwood reflects these spheres as well as the era's prevailing racism inhales hails owned biases the book condemned the institution of slavery and the idea of a widening divide between the north and the south while also treating white white women of both the north and the south with a lot of sympathy northwood was very well received and it caught the eye of the reverend john lewis blake who approach tale about starting a magazine for women. This was not an easy decision for her. If the magazine was successful she would probably make enough money to send all five of her children to college but taking the job was also going to mean leaving her older children with relatives while she moved to boston to work her oldest child. David was thirteen at this point and was getting ready to head to west point but the rest of her children were years away from leaving home and her youngest child was only five in the and hale did take this job. She spent a few months at home in new hampshire preparing and planning out the magazine i issues before sending her middle three children to live with various aunts and oncological. She took william with her when she left for boston in the spring of eighteen twenty eight and we'll talk about that magazine after we i paused for a little sponsor break. Everyone knows about the risks of driving drunk. You could get into a crash get arrested incur huge legal expenses loser job or hurt or even kill people but that still doesn't stop everyone. We all know the consequences of driving drunk but one thing's for sure you're wrong if you think it's no big deal drive sober or get pulled over the magazine. That's a hail launched in eighteen twenty eight was initially.

sarah sarah ladies magazine david hale word magazine sarah joseph David david horatio francis royal female magazine united states William mm editor new hampshire tracy nielsen england europe goethe newport northwood Gordon buell edward cave