35 Burst results for "Sarah I"

Why Did Meghan McCain Block Todd Starnes on Twitter?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:57 min | 2 d ago

Why Did Meghan McCain Block Todd Starnes on Twitter?

"Chad McCain was a conservative. How dare you? Oh, really? Well, why would he hire a leftist like Steve Schmidt to run his campaign? Steve Steve Schmidt, the founding member of The Lincoln Project, a former McCain campaign manager. Also, a political analyst for MSD and C? That's exhibit a let's talk about exhibit B Nicole Wallace. A former senior campaign adviser, she was the one who handled Sarah Palin. She was the one responsible for literally bludgeoning Palin in the back with a political knife. And what is she doing now? She's one of the lady host on MSD and C. But the real reason she blocked me is because you see, we have a mind like a steel trap. Here at the Todd stern's radio program, ladies. So we don't forget anything here. And that's why she blocked me. You see, misses Dominic, Meghan McCain. Misses Dominick, she blocked me because I reminded the nation about her daddy's most egregious sin. Would he betrayed every single one of us. He had the power in his hands to kill ObamaCare. And while the cameras were rolling on C-SPAN, what did he do? He looked up at that C-SPAN camera, and he put his, he put his hand in the air. With his thumb exposed, and then he did the big thumbs down. A big blank you to America. That's what he did. All I was doing was asking misses Dominic to explain her daddy's political strategy. But you see, this is what the establishment thinks about all of us. You vote for Donald Trump, you're an irredeemable deplorable. You vote for Donald Trump, you're a Neanderthal.

Chad Mccain Steve Steve Schmidt Lincoln Project Nicole Wallace Steve Schmidt Todd Stern MSD Sarah Palin Mccain Meghan Mccain Dominic Palin Dominick America Donald Trump
Employers added a whopping 528,000 jobs last month. So why does the economy still feel off?

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 5 d ago

Employers added a whopping 528,000 jobs last month. So why does the economy still feel off?

"American employers added a stunning number of jobs last month despite raging inflation and recession fears 528,000 jobs Here at The White House President Biden is celebrating and many economists are surprised after employers added more than double the jobs predicted It was the best hiring month since February The economy has now recovered all 22 million jobs lost in the pandemic's early days and the unemployment rate is down to three and a half percent matching a more than 50 year low For now Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah House says one debate is over The recession clocks hasn't started taking yet The economy did contract in two straight quarters a common but informal definition of a recession Some economists say what the Federal Reserve likely to keep boosting interest rates in a bid to ease inflation a recession may be coming At

Biden Sarah House White House Wells Fargo Federal Reserve
Sourabh Sharma on Why Democrats Are Better at Staffing Government

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | Last week

Sourabh Sharma on Why Democrats Are Better at Staffing Government

"I have Sarah is that why is it that the left is so much better at this than we are? Why is it that they understand navigating and building the administrative state? And we as conservatives have failed so terribly because Sarah was not because of a lack of resources. You know, there's been hundreds of millions, not billions of dollars that have been deployed into the conservative movement in Washington, D.C., lots of white papers have been written, but when Donald Trump won, where was the, let's say, battle plan to properly staff the government, why is it the left gets this so much better than we do? I think there's a couple of reasons why one if you think about the resources at the left of center has available to it. We think that we have a ton of them on the right and it's true that we do. A lot of patriots, you know, a little old grandmas have been cutting ten, 15, $20 checks to conservative organizations that promise to save the country for something close to 60 to 70 years. However, the left has even more resources available to it. And what do I mean by that? The right of center gets to recruit its people out of conservative think tanks, congressional offices, maybe a few conservative leading businesses, and that's it. Meanwhile, on the left of center, they get the universities. They get all of the career bureaucracy. They get all of the quote unquote nonpartisan civic organizations, which as we know, are completely taken over by the far left, and they basically get a revolving door with Fortune 500 companies, the C suites and presidential administrations are basically coterminous, especially when it comes to places like big tech, the Obama administration was full of big tech flax, the Biden administration is no different. And

Washington, D.C. Sarah Donald Trump Patriots Obama Administration Biden Administration
'The View' Goes After TPUSA Students

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 2 weeks ago

'The View' Goes After TPUSA Students

"Ended up happening. The view because in a desperate plea to try to become relevant again, decided to go out of their way to go smear and slander 5000 turning point USA students. So the view started with saying the following, they uncut 47, Sarah Haynes from the view decried the turning point USA event because it explodes young exposed younger people to conservative politics and how it started. I don't like because it caters to younger Republicans. You have a lot of hope that younger people won't choose parties, yeah, okay, play cut 47. Well, the turning point thing, I think, is I don't like it because it caters to younger Republicans, which you have a lot of hope that younger people, especially in politics. We see so many bipartisan groups that say, let's not pick a party. Let's all come together. And this was geared towards that. And if you listen to a lot of the rhetoric, it's on point and on brand for them these days. Yeah, let's just all come together. I wonder if she says that about BLM or AOC. No, no, they only don't like partisanship when turning point USA does. By the way, we're not even a partisan organization. It's a wrong label where an educational organization. We are anti woke pro American pro liberty pro constitution. We are not pro Republican. We do have a political arm turning point accident hosts that Donald Trump and Ron DeSantis, but they won't be bothered with facts. Joy behar then talked about the turning point thing and I have to just say this. Do you know how much joy it gives me that turning point is an extended topic of conversation on the view? It's a phenomenal accomplishment for our entire staff for our team for everyone involved at turning point USA. They got nothing better to do than talk about this goes to show that we are the center of the conservative universe

Sarah Haynes USA Ron Desantis AOC BLM Joy Behar Donald Trump
Jan. 6: Trump spurned aides' pleas to call off Capitol mob

AP News Radio

01:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Jan. 6: Trump spurned aides' pleas to call off Capitol mob

"The house January 6 panel has ended its summer of hearings detailing Donald Trump's failures to concede his election loss and to call off capitol rioters Panel member Elaine luria says when Trump returned to the Oval Office after whipping up backers at a rally he was quickly told about the riot Within 15 minutes Yet for 187 minutes luria and Adam kinzinger said the president simply watched the violence on TV He chose not to act Instead White House aide Sarah Matthews who quit on the spot said in a prime time hearing the president poured gas on the fire with a tweet calling vice president Pence a coward for not going along with his false stolen election claims It was essentially him giving the green light to these people The president eventually told backers to go home The next day in a previously unaired outtake of a speech to the nation This election is now over Congress has certified the results I don't want to say the elections over Sagar Meghani Washington

Elaine Luria Adam Kinzinger Sarah Matthews Donald Trump Luria Oval Office White House Congress Sagar Meghani Washington
Yamiche Alcindor's Infatuation With Trump's COVID Case

Mark Levin

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Yamiche Alcindor's Infatuation With Trump's COVID Case

"Yamiche alcindor was on MSL as Steve today and she had this profound contribution Cut 5 go Think about the fact that now we have two U.S. presidents in a row that have had tested positive for COVID And I think what we're going to see here is likely a different sort of approach to it Let's remember his predecessor took off his mask even though it was sort of in the period where he could have possibly infected other people He didn't want to talk about getting vaccinated at The White House Why do they keep talking about Trump I mean it's amazing Isn't it how sick they are how obsessed they are Much like Sarah rump with me I think there's an infatuation I think yamiche alcindor has an infatuation for Donald Trump Otherwise what explains this Biden is the president at least he's in the Oval Office He's the one That has COVID and they spend more time talking about Trump

Yamiche Alcindor Steve Sarah Rump U.S. White House Donald Trump Biden Oval Office
Mark Levin's Advice to Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf

Mark Levin

01:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Mark Levin's Advice to Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf

"I want to give it a little advice to our friend Sarah rump Right about things that you know at least something about You're going to take cheap shots against people Well some people have a bigger platform than you do Some people have bigger platform than you do over there at the magnificently huge mediaite If you have a disagreement that's perfectly fine but if you're going to say that people are ranting and he purposely ignored this and he purposely you don't know me You don't know anything about me I'd say we ought to match our wits but you have to have wits in order to match them Sarah You know nothing about this topic nothing And just because Dan Abrams and his fellow clowns give you a platform doesn't make it does it make it otherwise

Sarah Rump Dan Abrams Sarah
Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

"And it puts some really vicious stupid people to work Now I would not call Sarah rump a vicious stupid person I don't know her All I said is she seemed like a 12 year old Her lack of substance in her writing style she took grave grave not even great grave offense She pointed out I'm a lawyer And she was upset at my ranting And she said of course I didn't provide any substantive information in response to her genius Of course I did it's right there on the video that she attached But she's a slow listener She said you know there's four elements for elements in greenhouse gases really Who knew Sarah I've studied this issue at great length many many years ago When you were 12 years old doctor Edward wegman from page one 32 of liberty and tyranny I wrote that book I thought you should know A professor at the center for computational statistics at George Mason university Chair of the national Academy of Sciences committee on applied theoretical statistics Board member of the American statistical association More than just a lawyer was tasked by congressional committee to lead a group of experts in examining the hockey stick evidence Now this evidence but like getting into great detail you see Sarah broadcasting you have limited time Which is why when you write a stupid essay you have all the time in the world

Sarah Rump Edward Wegman Center For Computational Stati National Academy Of Sciences C Sarah George Mason University American Statistical Associati Congressional Committee Hockey
Former White House aides to testify at next Jan. 6 hearing

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Former White House aides to testify at next Jan. 6 hearing

"The house January 6th committee will hold a hearing on Thursday On Norman hall two former White House aides are expected to testify at the committee's prime time hearing according to a person familiar with the committee's plans the focus will be what Donald Trump was doing as his supporters broke into the capitol former deputy national security adviser Matthew pottinger and former press aide Sarah Matthews are scheduled to testify according to the person the two witnesses resigned immediately after the insurrection Lawmakers on the 9 member panel have said the hearing will offer the most compelling evidence yet of what they term trumps dereliction of duty Norman hall Washington

Norman Hall Matthew Pottinger Sarah Matthews White House Donald Trump Washington
DOJ Commits More Resources Against Trump Allies Over 2020 Election

Mark Levin

01:36 min | 3 weeks ago

DOJ Commits More Resources Against Trump Allies Over 2020 Election

"Justice Department is adding prosecutors and resources to its investigation into the actions of former president Trump's allies to overturn the 2020 election According to people familiar with the matter is the related congressional hearings have turbocharged interest in mister Trump's own role in that effort And I always told you that the committee was basically a front for the Department of Justice that they are colluding And the committee is gaining access to information through the back door circumventing the protections at each person has as a means of turning that information over the department of injustice A Justice Department team focusing on elements of the investigation beyond the violence that the capital on January 6th has in recent weeks been given more personnel office space and an expanded mandate the people said Now we have a criminal investigation of the Trump campaign Of Trump Trump surrogates and Republicans Prosecutors have charged around 850 people A connection with the January 6th violence Including more than a dozen members of right-wing groups charged with engaging in a seditious conspiracy against the United States Have you ever heard of one of these marxists charged like this I can't think of one Certainly not a modern times Maybe Sarah rump can tell us Maybe she'll call nassar the EPA

Mister Trump Department Of Injustice A Just Justice Department Donald Trump Department Of Justice Trump Trump United States Sarah Rump Nassar EPA
Media Matters: Levin Claims CO2 Isn't a Pollutant in Sunday Show Rant

Mark Levin

01:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Media Matters: Levin Claims CO2 Isn't a Pollutant in Sunday Show Rant

"Media matters but nonetheless Sarah rump I don't know who she is She's probably 12 years old Here's the headline But I'm going to prove a point Mark Levin claims carbon dioxide is not a pollutant quote unquote in rant about Biden's greenhouse gas policies This is about my show Sunday which was superb if I say so myself Thank you Fox News host Mark Levin declared that carbon dioxide was not a pollutant in the opener to Sunday's episode of life liberty and Levin offering an inaccurate and incomplete definition A greenhouse gas is drawing a rant about president Joe Biden's energy policies Wow And here I thought I'd dug in all these facts but quote I'm going to prove to you in the next ten minutes that Joe Biden and the Democrat party responsible for sabotaging our economy on quote living announced to kick off the show He dug into his monologue complaining about European environments environmentalists during the 70s the Green New Deal and playing one of his favorite tunes a brief critique of Karl Marx and how he hated the industrial society before accusing the Biden White House of supporting a war on capitalism See this is a young lady I guess a birthing person I don't know Maybe transitioning who can tell Utterly ignorant has never read my books knows nothing about carbon dioxide nothing

Mark Levin Sarah Rump Joe Biden Biden Fox News Levin Democrat Party Karl Marx White House
Dinesh Examines the Ongoing Feud Between Trump and Musk

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:27 min | Last month

Dinesh Examines the Ongoing Feud Between Trump and Musk

"There is a public skirmish going on between Donald Trump and Elon Musk. Which I think is unnecessary and in fact kind of pointless for both sides. But let me describe it first and then comment on it. So this got started when Trump was in Alaska. This was a rally that Trump did for Sarah Palin. But also for Kelly shabaka, who's been on the podcast running against Lisa Murkowski. And Trump began to talk about left wing censorship. And then he goes, quote, Elon is not going to buy Twitter, he goes, where did you hear that before from me? So this is actually Trump being correct. Trump actually predicted that that Musk would give up on the Twitter deal and pull out. And in fact, when Trump said that, no one really else was saying that. Most of us thought, well, Musk is going to want this platform, and even if he ends up overpaying for it, what's it to Musk? I mean, when you have $250 billion and you spend 44, yeah, it's a sizable chunk, but on the other hand, you get to have fun on Twitter, you are the boss. And so this is not I didn't think and others didn't think that Musk would sort of nickel and I am this. But Trump was right. So now, Trump comes back on to say, well, he might later. He's got a pretty rotten contract, not a good contract. So Trump evidently thinks that Musk is over a ping. For Twitter, but then Trump goes on to say he's actually talking about Musk's statement that he first voted. His first Republican vote. Said Musk was from Myra Flores. Another one of our pals, who's been on the show, but Trump then kind of marks Elon Musk and he goes, you know, he said the other day, oh, I've never voted for a Republican. And then Trump says, he told me he voted for me. So evidently, Musk met with Trump for earlier. And apparently Trump says that he told Trump, I voted for you, so that's the case, obviously Musk has voted for a Republican before, and then Trump this, I think, is the unnecessary part, calls Musk a quote BS artist.

Donald Trump Kelly Shabaka Musk Elon Musk Twitter Lisa Murkowski Elon Sarah Palin Alaska Myra Flores
Sarah Lopez, Pro-Abortionist, Does Not Denounce Infanticide

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:10 min | Last month

Sarah Lopez, Pro-Abortionist, Does Not Denounce Infanticide

"Ralph Norman, Republican from South Carolina, and share a Lopez of James due process. Some organization that's described as an abortion rights group. Listen to this. I assume you agree with him fantasize the killing of a child, a perfectly healthy child at birth. I don't accept the basis of that question, but I do believe abortion is healthcare. I'm talking about do you agree? I get that, but do you agree? I mean, are you in do you support infanticide, killing a child after he's born? I do not agree with the basis of that question. I believe that abortion is healthcare. Okay, so I'll take that as a yes. I mean, how hard is it to say yes, I disagree with infanticide? Congressman Norman. How hard is that? Can somebody anyone tell me why she wouldn't answer? Abortion is a health is a right. I do believe horrible. Ma'am, do you believe a woman has a right to have her baby that she's just delivered killed if she and the doctor agree to do so. I believe abortion is healthcare.

Ralph Norman Lopez South Carolina Congressman Norman James
Caller: Sarah Palin Would Not Be Good for Vice President

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:09 min | Last month

Caller: Sarah Palin Would Not Be Good for Vice President

"Okay, so I've been hearing rumblings about president Trump's picking Sarah Palin as the VP. Just rumbly. I don't know that it's true, but I've been hearing it on Twitter and stuff. And I just wanted to say, I hope he doesn't. Because and this is my reasoning. More than half the countries in this world have no use for women. And if it's kind of the purpose for a vice president to run up to being elected president. And so I just don't. So what, you don't think Sarah Palin would be respected by other countries? Is that what you're suggesting, Kathy? Yeah. I don't think she would be simply because she's a woman. And I'm not saying that's the way we are. I'm saying that there's a lot of countries that don't like us already. Yeah,

President Trump Sarah Palin Twitter Kathy
Child Star Mason Reese Dumped by Model After Sex Confession

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:38 min | Last month

Child Star Mason Reese Dumped by Model After Sex Confession

"About. Do you guys remember mason Reese? Remember the kid that commercial, he did a TV commercial in the 70s for Underwood, devil ham, the kid who couldn't say smorgasbord, right? He was like a dwarf, and we all laughed. Nowadays, if somebody pitched that commercial, they'd go to jail. You can't do that. But I know mason Reese for many years, he was in New York or a staunch New Yorker. And by hooker by crook, he's managed to still be a fixture in town. I love the guy. I just said, I know him Greek guy. And this is story going around that make it while you listen to this show. I need you to Google mason Reese. And look at the commercial he did when he was a kid. Just understand that first before I get into this sexual side of the story. Mason Reese has been dumped by as much younger girlfriend, just days after he claimed she was not the best lover he had. Now remember, this guy's under four foot tall. He's 57 years old now. And that is it. He shot to fame, starring in a series of popular commercials in the 1970s. And he began dating an only fans model named Sarah russie, who's 29. He started that three years ago. Now, this whole new thing of an only fans model. I understand as many beautiful girls out there, but this is a whole new thing. In my day, it used to be like if you date a model, she was either catalog or runway or. Working Europe, but now everybody is a model because they have an only fans page and most of those pages are them stick of their tits out for people for $9 a month or whatever the hell they charge. So everybody's a model now. Let's just make sure we understand that. So this chick russie ended the relationship last week after mason made this rude remark about her bedroom skills in an episode of the web TV series love don't judge. He said it's been messy, but actually she said it's been messy, he said, mean things to me and I said being things in, but our relationship sadly just became like

Mason Reese Underwood Sarah Russie Crook Hooker New Yorker New York Google Europe Mason
Biden to award Medal of Freedom to Biles, McCain, Giffords

AP News Radio

01:05 min | Last month

Biden to award Medal of Freedom to Biles, McCain, Giffords

"President Biden has announced the next recipients of the nation's highest civilian honor The Presidential Medal of Freedom They include former Senate colleague John McCain John was a hero A limping gymnast Simone Biles who has called out officials for not protecting fellow sex assault victims Enough is enough And fellow gold medalist Megan Rapinoe who soccer teammates have pushed for pay equality We're forcing ourselves into that conversation You answer me when I ask you who is your daddy Actor Denzel Washington will receive a medal as will late labor leader Richard trumka Fight fight fight Former congresswoman Gabby Giffords a shooting survivor who's pushing former colleagues to crack down on guns There's nurse Sarah Lindsay the first American to get a COVID-19 vaccine in public I want to kill public confidence Among the others will be honored next week We are calling it iPhone Late Apple cofounder Steve Jobs 25 years after the iPhone's release I'm Sagar

President Biden John Mccain John Simone Biles Megan Rapinoe Gabby Giffords Senate Richard Trumka Denzel Washington Sarah Lindsay Soccer Steve Jobs Apple
Live updates | Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Live updates | Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade

"Another day of protests around the country after Friday's Supreme Court ruling ends nearly 50 years of constitutional protection for abortion You're outside the Supreme Court where barricades are up in police stand guard protesters continue to gather Sarah Bentley says abortion is healthcare If the Supreme Court is going to strike down the right to privacy and the right for women to access healthcare I think that sets a very dangerous precedent for everyone Claire signs says overturning roe V wade puts other laws in jeopardy They're coming after contraception They're coming after Marriage equality She's a lawyer who drove from Pittsburgh to protest I had to come here because otherwise he would have sat in my house and cried I'm Mike pozole at the Supreme Court

Supreme Court Sarah Bentley Claire Signs Roe V Wade Pittsburgh Mike Pozole
Chris Stigall Gives His Take on the Televised January 6th Hearings

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Chris Stigall Gives His Take on the Televised January 6th Hearings

"I assume that you were like the rest of the country and you're not watching the January 6th show hearings. No one is, according to Sarah Arnold at town hall, our colleague, ratings for the media's prime time January 6th commission hearing took a nosedive. No one really cares about watching it. And according to cable news watch 4.5 million people watched the hearing last week, I don't know if Seb had these numbers or not. I suspect he probably did. NBC and CBS got roughly 3 million viewers between the two of them. So according to cable news watch, you're talking about 7 and a half million people watched it in prime time. Now, when you consider that Fox on average, generally gets at least a third of that or more on any given night, that's really poor. And these were supposed to be very specialized, very heavily produced for your entertainment value. Hearings that just didn't pan out. And so I thought, I mean, I have to be honest with you, I didn't pay much attention to them last week, and I really thought it was a one shot, and that was it. No, they went on again into the new week. They started again today. And just by virtue of doing the morning show in Philadelphia, I have the cable news channels on. I monitor CNN and MSNBC and Fox. And Fox decided to jump in and carry these today. Now they didn't carry them last week in prime time. They put it on Fox business, but today Fox News went wall to wall with it just like CNN and MSNBC. You can make of that what you will. In fact, I would love to hear your thoughts as to why you think that might be that Fox decided to change course and carry these live while two other liberal networks or at least what we thought to be the only two liberal networks. We're going to carry it wall to wall. You would have thought maybe a smart counter programming strategy would be to not.

Sarah Arnold FOX SEB Town Hall NBC CBS Msnbc CNN Philadelphia Fox News
"sarah i" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:17 min | 5 months ago

"sarah i" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Be like, yes, and I'm also like, the older I get the less attached, I am too things. So for now, it feels like, yeah, I'm fine with Sarah shook being the public name and this being the private name. But I also know that at some point that might change. I might feel differently about it. And that's okay. You know, be easy with yourself and give yourself room and time to change. Right. I mean, obviously you're in a, you know, in a certain circumstance, but I'm sure there's a lot of people who work any job that might be navigating this. So it's not, it's like a heightened version of something that I think a lot of people deal with in terms of workplace and household and how to manage those two things. And what choices to make? Yeah. It was different areas. You know? Awesome. Well, it's been great talking to you. You too. Yeah. I really loved it. I know you're touring a bit coming up in Europe, am I wrong about that? Yeah. Hopefully in August and September, everything's booked. We should be over there for about 30 days. Well, yeah, I mean, I wish you and all of the rest of us, the best. The best of luck with what the vibe will be like in August. Yeah, talk about not being attached to things. Yeah. Best of luck. To all of us. But that's awesome. And yeah, I really love speaking to you and hopefully, you know, maybe there's someday in the future when you're you'll be in LA or I'll be somewhere where you are. And yeah, I'd love to see you play. Be so cool. Thank you. Thanks. Yeah. Before I send you back into your day, I always ask folks that are on the podcast to shout out a queer roo, which is like a person place or thing that made you feel like you could be who you are today. So do you want to shout out a queer girl? Shout out to the cave in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Cool. That is a safe and welcoming place for all. I am gonna look this place up. Sounds rad. Yeah..

Sarah Europe LA Chapel Hill North Carolina
"sarah i" Discussed on VS

VS

16:11 min | 10 months ago

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

"I realized I needed in order to come back out of that was like, I really needed to make intentional pockets of joy because one of the things missing was the experience of live art that brought me so much joy going to show is going to movies going to galleries, whatever it is, listening to live music. So that was gone. And in its absence, I was spiraling. And so I was really looking for these little moments of joy that I could cling to. And I just listened to a lot of this podcast and it felt like hanging out with the all. And this was especially special because it was like sitting on the shoulder of friends and artists who I love and own multiple copies of your books. And the podcast is great all the time. And also this year, it felt like a real lifeline to grab for. I'm just really grateful that you have been making it and that you've been turning your attention and your time to these poems in these poets because it brings a lot to my life and like really, really, really save me from some dark places. So thank you guys a lot, a lot a lot. For real purpose. Thank you, Sarah. That means a lot. That means a lot. And also, I guess I'll just say, I mean, we could each of us could go on a long soliloquy about how much you mean to us as a poet and as a human being. This is one of our last episodes of this thing and it means a lot. For it to be with you, you know? I just, I wanted to make sure you knew I'm sure people have told you how great the podcast is, but really, really, you have created this archive of conversations with people who love poetry and getting to tap into that is like this like rushing river of joy and poetry and love and to get to dip into it and be overtaken by it for an hour at a time is like, I don't know. It's in a year when I couldn't. I couldn't just walk out and find it. I could have it in my hand was so valuable. And soon, I hope it will be safe enough for us to be in the same places and we can share poems out loud again, but in the meantime, what a gift to have access to that. Here here, okay. Y'all like, give me oh, sorry, my computer almost fell. Didn't it? That was the end of the recording. And then janez died. Oh no. No, no. Okay, so should I do, is that did I miss things? I just got to say this palm, and then we're out. That's it. That's how it works. Dang. Okay, all right. Let me take a sip of water. This is the last one we're gonna hear on Zoom. No. Wow. Weird. It's so treasure out of here. Oh, no. But this is the last time that we as people will hear. A poem. This is the last one. It was the last one. Okay, well, and that case, I wanted to share a poem that absolutely only exists because of franny and frannie's art and franny is a way of being in the world, I have turned to your poetry so much as guidance and as light. So this poem got permission to exist because I was reading a lot of your poems, I think. I used to think so much about poetry was about observation of what is and naming it. And I still believe that, but I also now think more about if I have people's time and attention, what if I also tried to put our attention on what could be and frannie really showed me how to dream out loud for what could be what should be and like the work of imagining other possible options. So I learned that in October, more people in Japan died from suicide than had died by COVID-19 in all of 2020. In the wake of that, the Japanese government created a new position, which is the minister of loneliness. I was thinking about what it would mean for someone to take on that work. And so this is called the minister of loneliness. The minister of loneliness has abolished email. He has installing tin cans on every windowsill with a piece of string to someone else's window, not several, just one. Each person does not need a lot of people to speak to, of course, just the one, but the one must be reliable, must be available when needed. We are employing a buddy system now. Every day is a field trip to the adulthood museum. And we don't go home until everyone has been accounted for. The way you find your buddy is a nationwide game of guess who, where you sing the song that is always stuck in your head describe the movie you can't get through without crying, the hardest you've ever laughed, the outfit you wish you could pull off and the only person who can spot you is the one you are assigned. All of Japan is a ball of string now. The economy has ground to a halt. Productivity is entirely impossible. Sometimes you go to talk into the can on your windowsill and a knot in the string, accidentally gives you someone else's conversation, the fading fabric of someone else's loneliness evaporating into the air between buildings. You are allowed to eavesdrop, but so is everyone else. The minister of loneliness has moved all kindergartens to the ground floor of elderly assisted living centers. There are daily story hours, animal shelters across the street, the minister of loneliness has not abolished Valentine's Day, but has employed a nationwide bring enough for the class regulation and nobody goes home empty handed. The minister of loneliness has prescribed therapy for everyone. Daily walks through the many gardens opportunities for meditation by a brook in The Rain under falling blossoms or along a snowy river bank, depending on the season. He has commissioned musicians poets, actors to create concerts and radio plays and poetry readings to be pumped across the knotted tin can radio lines every evening. When you order dinner for one, the person who delivers it arrives with an appropriate ability and comfort level dance instruction video and two hours to spare grieving is encouraged. And art making is rampant, but because of the knots sometimes when you are expecting a visit from a grief counselor, the dance partner food delivery arrives instead. Sometimes they are the same person. The minister of loneliness isn't tired. He is the most popular man in the country. He has a crush on a middle school teacher across town and everyone eavesdrops to hear the way he stumbles when she answers everyone is on the edge of their seats. Everyone forgets about dying because they can't wait to find out what happens next everyone has opinions, the minister has to start a hotline where people can call in to tell him their thoughts that tin cans rattle, nonstop the minister is grateful for the advice, but is nervous, his crush will hear the commotion. He is nervous. She prefers quiet, but he does not know for sure yet. He does not know what she is thinking. Does not know how she spends her Saturday's or how she prefers her tea or whether she likes to walk in The Rain, but he likes wondering when nobody is paying attention when the windowsills are quiet. Late at night awake, he does like to wonder. That was Sarah cuss words, K, yeah. Sorry. I think that my cat, it sounded like she just like headbutted the door, but. Oh, no. I hope you're okay. Anyway. Yeah, God, I love that poem. I get transported to a whole different world, you know? But that's also the same world. Just like Sarah's like a different her but the same her. Right, exactly. I really love when Sarah was talking about insides there, right? This is the motherfucker I got to be, you know, in this quantitative season. But like, you know, we've been inside versus for like 5 years now, right? Do you feel like the person you've been on this program has been you? You know, we got two more episodes left. So who I should be? First of all, it's like very, very weird to be at the end. I've been thinking about this. Who I've really who I've really been. Surely sometimes I've been like a more polished or like my net attitude has been more positive on the show than maybe in my life generally, but I think that in some ways like being in a room with you, whether that's a digital room or a physical room. I'm much more able to be a version of myself that feels like true to me here than if we are on a stage or even at a party or something, you know, because it feels I'm just sort of like, oh, I'm hanging out with danette. We're just like, chit chatting, and talking shit. It's kind of wild to think about other people very creepily eavesdropping. You know? Let's just admit that it's very creepy that y'all are just listening to us right now. You know? Yeah. Why are you as a man listening to a podcast about social media? Like, why are you obsessed much? Yeah. No, but how great how amazing. And how weird. And how weird. Yeah. What about you? Do you feel like you've been, do you feel like you've been you? I think so sometimes, you know, I think there's definitely like a podcast done as maybe who I will also say is like probably even less professional than like if you asked me to interview people for like an event. I'm like mush from a professional with like, you know, like my little questions like my rapport, but I'm very like, yeah, like that live audience makes me like, you know, stand up a little straighter. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But I think, especially on Zoom when we're doing these things because it's just me and you at the beginning and the end of these shows, it's been I'm gonna miss it so much and, you know, we are making our plans beforehand about how we just still need to keep just talking to each other. In this amount. And you know people don't know. It takes us an hour sometimes to start recording these intros and outros because we're just ten, you know? And I think at that end, if I've already talked to my friend for an hour, the next part of that conversation, even though it's like recorded and maybe like, you know, for this thing that we do, I'm already so in a space of comfort and love by the time we get there that it would be hard to become someone who wasn't myself in this space. And I think when we were recording in person, that was really wonderful too, but I think there were some entire interviews with certain guests or maybe just a moment where I did feel like, hey, like my anxiety about this being a podcast, my anxiety about that future audience turned off and it was just me, my friend, you know, Daniel, who's also become my friend in this process and a poet, you know, that we love, talking about poems, talking about life, you know, shooting the shit. I'm grateful to the format that we've done. I think there was another more sterilized version of the show that I didn't know how to be myself in. But this has been such a home. What you guess was it? I was talking about having a home for your mind. Monica sac. I'm so reminded of that. When I think about versus has been for me, a home for my mind, a home for my heart. I think there have been times over these last 5 years where this program is what sustained and saved my relationship to poetry. You know, any place that has my best friend and my love of poetry sitting on the inside has to be a place where I can beat myself. Well, I guess there may be a question that I have to kind of close this out here is like, is there anything that you're taking from the lessons about how we've been able to sort of be ourselves in this format that you might take to other other times when it feels hard to bring your full self to something? A lot of the lessons I think are honestly going to be as easily transportable, not easily, but I see their payoff and how I teach. And recognizing, I think that's another space where I very much like you were saying like, you know, you have doctor Francis schwa. Doctor professor, excuse me, doctor professor Francesca. You know, I think there are times where I walk in and I'm like, you know, I tried to be like, you know, reverend doctor professor, Daniel Z Smith, you know? And but I think the one truth I know about poetry is that humans write it. And the value that maybe this podcast is brought to me was like, there's value in shooting the shit about poetry, right? We can geek out, but also remember that we are very human within the midst of this genre and this craft, you know? I think that has made me realize like my job is to also facilitate a comfort within my students, the way I would in my guest where what can come up in the space of casual conversation or conversation that you feel at peace and that's what I mean by casual conversation. The same way I've seen guests get to a thought that I don't think they would have got to. You know, that's been some of the beautiful moments right to see somebody having a new thought, like live on this podcast. To make that happen in my students, right? How can I get you comfortable enough to think something new, you know, to be less guarded and you're thinking and to let those walls down. And I think that's where transformation happens. So yeah, I think this has made me a better communicator, a better teacher. Hopefully a better listener. I don't think you can do this for 5 years and that be changed. And I'm excited to meet my life after this. You know, and I hope it doesn't turn shitty. But I'm excited to like, you know, walk away from this and then be reminded like, oh, I feel like I'm on versus right now because I know that's a very wonderful feeling to have within me. Yeah. How about you? I don't really honestly I don't have that much to add to that. I guess the only thing I'll add is that I think that I've been so overwhelmed with how people that I think of as legends and heroes and like, you know, almost like living gods when it comes to how much I admire them as a poet. Like, to see folks like that also get nervous and also be interested and be here and be willing to talk and joke and stuff like I think that that is maybe something I'll take away that like poetry. It's written by people. And it helps you remember that I'm a person and it's okay to just be a person..

franny frannie janez COVID Japanese government Sarah Sarah cuss Japan danette Valentine Monica sac Francis schwa Daniel Z Smith Daniel Francesca
"sarah i" Discussed on VS

VS

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

"Yeah, also, I guess it would be sad to sometimes make jokes that aren't that funny and then to have that confirmed for you. You know what I mean? No, I'm taking it. I need those booze. I think you're right. I feel like we can get you a shoulder devil and a shoulder angel and not burden you with a whole ass audience. That's the thing I'm not gonna trust just the one angel and the one thing. And I would be cooler with the devil anyway. And so.

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

VS

08:01 min | 10 months ago

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

"A niece got on stage and did that column of his that ends with her backbone is a plum. Her backbone is a plum. And it was the most silent a room I've ever experienced. The room of poets, like, couldn't breathe. So those are the two live performances that I got to witness better just like stay with me forever. Yeah. Goosebumps on my arm. And I guess the last one that I'll say is oh my God, that was such a long answer. I know we're all good, it's good. It's good. The only last one is best thing for somebody to tell you after a show. Whatever is true to that. I will tell you that no one will ever top the woman who was pregnant and started going into contractions during a show and waited for the show to be finished. So that she could get our book signed before she went to the hospital. Oh my gosh. And so we got to the merch table and her wife nicely asked if they could cut the line. That's because they had to go to the hospital. And I was like, oh my God. And she was so calm. I'm timing up the contractions on my little app. Like, I'm good. No worries, and I was like, my heart to have an after show. Did they name the baby after you? Like, what the fuck do? It's just John no matter the wreckage. I was so much more stressed than they were. Oh my God. Well, Sarah, you want the game? Amazing. The pregnancy, too, somehow. That's incredible. Game two. All right, so this is this versus that. We're gonna put two things in a round of fist the cuff. So you tell us who would win in a fight, okay? In today's this versus that. And this corner, we have ten Sarah. Okay. And in that corner, we have two Sarah K's. With luggage full of bricks. Either stay inside of the luggage or they could be pulled from the luggage and lost at the Sarah's, okay? So it's like ten inside Sara's. Versus two. Sarah Kay's with suitcases full of bricks. First of all, just any number of me more than the one. A terrible idea. Do you know what I mean? We do not need more of this is what I'm saying. Just the one. Enough. Ten is so many. But the other ones have bricks and they're prepared to be in the outside world. They're at the top of the game. Yeah. Yeah, I do think that I wanna believe in inside Sara's because let me tell you what, inside Sarah has been working out. Yeah, I run now, which is absurd. Shout out to 14 year old me who could not finish the mile in gym class. And they were like, well, the period is over now. This is done, but it's okay. We'll just Mark you down that you completed it even though you did it. So inside Sara has really been learning how to be in her body. So times ten, that feels promising. But if I'm being really honest, the inside Sara would just immediately be fighting each other. There would be just a lot of in the ranks fighting. You know what I mean? They could not even notice that Sarah K is even beer bye. They're just fully fully fighting each other at all times. So really, Sarah Kate wouldn't even have to lift a brick. We were like, show up and be like, oh, this looks messy. You know what? Let's take care of that themselves. So I do think that the two staircase would come out victorious as well. And that one book. Yeah, well. Okay. Amazing. Well, you won that game. I mean, great. Yeah, you won it. So Sarah's one. I think we all the Sarah was lost. That's more like it. Okay, cool. So now we're going to ask, we're going to play our last game, which is called this versus something else, where we'll ask you if you want to stay in this reality or join an alternate reality that we've created for you. So Sarah, would you rather stay here in whatever this is or be in a world where an invisible audience applauds? Every time you do something great, but also that same invisible audience booze when you do something crappy. Yeah, that sounds terrible. No, thank you. What the heck? Absolutely. That's like literally what social media is. You've already got that. But it wouldn't be bad. It wouldn't be worth it for the applause? No. When you just make a good frittata and then an audience is like, yeah. No, no. But do you get booed if you burn the fritta? Yeah, exactly. Go, no. No, thank you. I'm trying to separate from audiences. You know what I mean? I'm trying to live audience free. That was a lot hard question at all. So easy. Okay, wait, can I modify what if the audience can applaud? And there's a laugh track. Also, so when you make a joke, then they laugh. Also terrible. It's never no. Yeah, yeah, 'cause it would be like, oh, that's like a fake laugh track. Yeah, now you're just like, this life was lived in front of a live studio audience. And I was like, yeah, yeah. Get that. No, it's outta here. I'm spinning this reality. We gotta make this decade better, pretty. We gotta stick around. Amazing. Well, I think that you've also won that game. One day, too. You want all three of the games? Yeah, I think I might be taken. I might take the applaud blue reality. I'm just gonna say it. Really? Yeah. Yeah, I think my love of applause and my fear of getting booed would make me the best person ever. Yeah, also because I think that sometimes you could use a boo. I couldn't use a bowl. When you're like, should I go to the orgy in the pandemic? And an audience is like, boo. Like maybe that would be helpful. That just sounds like what is it right shoulder? Yeah yeah, yeah, shoulder devil. Yeah, yeah, yeah. The audience thing is so stressful because it's like so many. I'm already nervous about trying to please and do good by whoever I think is coming for the report card. But to have many of them be like, how do I even know? How do I know how to appeal to all of these invisible audience members? Oh my God, what if they can have a mixed reaction? Audiences are not unanimous. Some persons like boo in the back and you're like, oh no. I thought that was a good one..

Sarah Sarah K Sara Sarah Kay Sarah Kate John Mark
"sarah i" Discussed on VS

VS

05:50 min | 10 months ago

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

"That I.

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

VS

07:43 min | 10 months ago

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

"Well. And it helps me whether I'm like at the front of a classroom or I'm on a stage or I'm hosting a dinner party or that's one of the skills I think I have. And when we first started going into virtual space, the first thing I realized is that it is impossible. To read a room through a Zoom space. Because you literally can not even make eye contact with someone. But what would happen is that my brain would send out all of the same questions it always has, which is like, did that joke land is so and so okay, do we need to have a moment of levity? Should we get serious for a second? Is this landing? You know, like all of those hosting impulses, my brain would send out all those questions, but it could not get the information back, and because it could not get the information back, I was suddenly thrown into this spiral of self doubt, which was like, wait, maybe I actually can't read a room, like maybe I can't do this at all. And then once that started to crumble, it was like, wait, maybe I'm also a terrible fret. Maybe like, I really thought I was, I knew how to do these things. And I was doing a good job of but maybe maybe I'm trash. And, you know, there were so many days, so I was like, try to write this big nonfiction project, and it's like so hard to feel like you're getting anywhere. And it just felt like a lot of failures. So that was happening at the same time that the one external validation machine that I used to have, which was a roomful of people being like, you succeeded. At St. Paul's for an hour. That was also God. But I was like, oh, no. What if what if I can't succeed at anything? Like, what if actually all of this is has been lying to myself this whole time. So that was like at the bottom of the bucket when it was Sarah really in the ring with herself, you know. Phew, yeah, not great. I was in a classroom with students for the first time in a long, long year yesterday. And I made a joke and they laughed. In real time and I heard each and every one of them laugh and I was like, she's so I became within two minutes like addicted readick to this feeling, and I just made so many jokes. And afterward, I felt like I could fight a Tiger. I was like, I can do anything I can do. Anything. Yeah. I was like, actually, maybe like a little bit too much for me. It was very much like boy eats too much cake. It's too big for him to eat. Energy. Yeah. But I did not realize how underrated it was until it had a little taste of it again yesterday. How needed like a useful drug to manage the fuckery of being alive in America. It is to have people applaud for you. In real time. It's also been first bad. And then useful to be like, okay, cool. So now no one's clapping. So what if you never perform again? Now what? Yeah, totally. That's not why I got into poetry in the first place. That's not the part of poetry I love. If anything, the part of the performing that I love is after a show when I'm standing outside the theater and I get to meet people and someone is like, this is my first time ever at a poetry show or my boyfriend dragged me here or I've come to every show you've ever given in this geographic radius or like that experience is the thing that I love the most. That allowed me to kind of zero in and be like, right, like the thing that you actually love. Is the sharing part. And the reminding yourself how poetry is this invisible thread that so many people are holding on to and oftentimes like the only thing they have in common is poetry. But people from all different walks of life gravitate towards poetry for different reasons and respond to different poems, obviously in different poets. But in the time when I was able to go literally all over the world and meet people who were building lives around poetry, the thing that I was constantly in love with was getting to see the way that people share poems with each other and what poetry can open for people and how you arrive to poetry at exactly the right time that poem got to you exactly when it needed to get to you. And part of why I love the different moments and projects in my life where I am getting to either curate or amplify other poets that joy of getting to watch someone be like, oh my God, I needed this poem right now. It's like, that's what I feel. Every time I read a poem that shakes my whole life up, I'm like, oh my God, like this, I needed this poem so bad right now. And so getting to attempt to recreate that experience for other people is such a such a joy. And I don't need a clapping room full of people to do that. I can do that in other spaces. And I can continue sharing poems in whatever medium has to be. And of course I miss live performance sometimes. And of course, there's something irreplaceable about that. But also it was a great opportunity for me to learn again about attention and I was receiving a lot of attention in this way, and then it went away. And I was like, cool. Now what? Like, what do I do? What attention do I actually want and what attention am I giving these things? And at first the absence of that room of people clapping, I think I realized I had started building like a pavlovian relationship to it, and then when it was gone, it was as opportunity for growth or at least an opportunity for self reflection, which I am grateful for. It is so important to me that it doesn't seem that I'm not coming off as though the Sarah K that the world has access to is somehow a prison or a burden or something I resent or anything like that. It is a 100%. Well, maybe not a 100%. But I would say definitely largely like the luckiest thing. It's also hard work. It's also a responsibility. It's also not in conflict with Sarah the human. It's just part of the universe of me. And sometimes I'm over there and sometimes I'm here and I've gotten to be here for a year and a half after a long stretch of time of not having a lot of time to be Sarah the human. So I'm grateful for that and I'm also a little bit nervous about what happens when I have to find my way back to that side of the universe. But I think it's all lucky or I feel very lucky for it. And it's just work that I have to do and be serious about so that I don't feel unbalanced or resentful or inauthentic or any of the things.

Sarah St. Paul America
"sarah i" Discussed on VS

VS

06:53 min | 10 months ago

"sarah i" Discussed on VS

"That? What does it look like to you when you have a band in that control? What does it look like for you to still be acting like you in control? Right. Right. I would say that something that I have been focusing on a lot in my life as a person before I get to my life as a writer or an artist, but Sarah the human. I think a lot about time and attention because I think that those are the things that are non replenishable resources and they are the things that I have to give. And I think it started to become really something I paid attention to back when I was traveling all the time because I used to travel constantly and I realized that I had all these people in my life who I love. And I would be like, oh, I think about that person all the time. Oh, I missed that person so much all the time. But that person doesn't know that and can't experience me thinking of them or loving them or missing them from afar. And the only thing that they can experience is when I take the time to show that these things, right? So when I was traveling a lot, that meant, you have to call them. You have to text them. You have to be in communication. You have to send them a gift in the mail, you know. And I think in general, what I put my time and my attention towards is the measurement of what I care about and what is meaningful to me. And sometimes that can be in a unwieldy category that I have no control over, right? So when I have really bad spirals of anxiety, I've losing a lot of time and my attention is on something that I really wish it wasn't like that. Time and attention back. But when I can be intentional about it. And when I have control over what I'm putting time and attention into, that feels important and special. And so I'm thoughtful about those things. And then if that's what's happening in my life is Sarah, then when I turn towards art making or poetry writing similarly, I think about time and attention in the poem, what am I asking someone to pay attention to in this poem? And what am I spending time on? I used to talk about palms and say like, oh yeah, all my palms are a celebration, even the ones where I'm angry or even the ones and I'm sad. I'm celebrating that emotion. But I don't actually think celebration maybe is nuanced enough anymore. I think it's more like I'm taking time with something and I'm putting attention on these different moments. And then in performance, I am very aware of the fact that this room of people have taken time out of their dwindling lives to sit with me and my poems and I have the ability to call their attention to certain moments and questions and thoughts and I want to be able to earn that time. I want them to walk away from a show and go, wow, that was time well spent. It's a real gift when someone gives you their time and attention. I think now we've got so much conversation about the monetizing of attention and clicks for eyeballs and all that. So it's not like we don't know how valuable attention is and how valuable people's time and attention is. And I think being thoughtful about that and where that comes up in this column, for example, there's a line in here about a constellation that I'm insisting into existence. And I really do sometimes think about poem making as constellation building because in a poem, I'm like, okay, I want you to look at this star and this star this star and now it's a bear. And everyone in the audience goes, it is a bear. Look at that bear, you know? And that's like a huge amount of trust that they're giving me to say like, yes, I believe in the constellation that you're that you've created for me based on the stars you've chosen to direct my attention to. And I think where the uncertainty comes in is I've been working on this big nonfiction project for a long time. And I have realized that when I was writing poems for years and years and years, I didn't realize that I had this confidence where I was like, yeah, it is a bear, duh, like no one questions me in my poem about the constellation I'm building because I'm the authority on this. So when I say is true, it's my poem. But that's not how nonfiction works. In nonfiction, I'm like researching and researching and researching. And then I'm like, oh no, what if I'm pointing to these three stars and those are the wrong stars or what about someone else is going to pick up this book and be like, I can't believe you forgot about this whole other part of the sky. Like you didn't even talk about this star at all. And I just heard something or you're pointing up being like, that's hydrogen and someone's like, no, it's not. Right. So all of my confidence like flew out the window. And then because I felt so much uncertainty in my authority in the nonfiction space, then all of a sudden I looked back at poetry and was like, oh, no. Wait a second. You thought you had authority over there too? Like, wrong. So that's the long answer to where is that uncertainty coming from? And just maybe being a little bit more honest about, yes, I've been stumbling through poetry for a long time and maybe thought that like, yeah, because I've been a poet this long, like when I say this is a bear, it is a bear, but like, maybe not or not, not even maybe not because I don't know if there's an answer. I guess it's more like a little bit more humility to say maybe the poems that I've been creating when they enter the space where they belong to other people. Maybe I have to also just remember that other people have a relationship to those poems and other people have experiences of those poems too, and there's a responsibility in what I'm asking people to pay attention to when those poems exist beyond me. That doesn't mean I can't and don't write like little poems about whatever for myself. But I do think that me realizing that there's this audience of humans who who is listening to a poem and then feeling things are thinking about things and being directed in certain directions and taking on.

Sarah
"sarah i" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"sarah i" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"That wall make it pass. Let us wrong your window. Starving kiss you're you're seeing into saw you know it's probably true. Song thing in this song plane turns out. he's wrong. You fairytale may pictured the love your lafrance song. Same richard all. There's a song song.

richard
"sarah i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"sarah i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"When i had young kids i Found myself by the time the stories were done and i was getting ready to sing them songs so once so now loved reading with actors but once i sort of had to take a break i had to get myself some voice rest and take a break and i got behind the camera i also thought wow i really can give better notes. I can see more clearly because when you're reading with an actor what you wanna do is key into them may be present for them. I also found that. I loved everyone. And because i was reading with them. And you're trying to be in the scene with them and not that. I don't let everyone. But i was a lot more objective once. I got behind the camera so most of the time. I'm behind the camera. Sometimes if i really want to push actor in a certain way if i know the c. Needs to go somewhere. And i know exactly what needs to happen. I'll get in there and read. But mostly i don't But we have. I have amazing amazing amazing team. A lot of my team has either a background enacting a really good understanding of it. And that's a question that i always ask because i want actors to feel. I think that's one of our biggest jobs. My job in the office job is to make people feel comfortable so they can create so they can do their best work. So if it's kids we bring in toys and pillows and kitty and and if it's adults i think it's letting them feel relaxed a lot of times the first thing i'll say as you don't have to get it right. We're gonna do this a couple of times where i want you to do what you came here to do. To just like. Take the pressure off. Because i think it's awful to have to walk into a room with all your own expectations on yourself and desire to get the parche and and think you're just gonna have one shot mets it white..

first thing one one shot times
"sarah i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"sarah i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Of doing that. That was incredible and carey mulligan and her first studio feature mom after an education. Yeah she's done all right for herself. She's okay yeah yeah it's been quite a. It's been a long journey. Thank you for bringing up by the euro. You see so many different people and especially because you've been doing this for a long time. So you'll see someone like carey mulligan that many years ago and cast them. And you know it's sort of like when you watch a it has a big ensemble cast at you. Look back and you go. Oh my god. They're so they're so and so they're so and so because most people have worked for a very long time very few overnight. Success story yeah. Yeah i'm thrilled at. What's happening with kathryn. Hahn right now. She's been talented forever right. Welcome back everyone with wicked leah. There's a he's another fascinating character. Now you got co producer credit on an oscar winning movie crash and that is as diverse in the truth. Many that were as diverse and ensemble. As i've ever seen in one film and not all of them were equally famous Or established at the time. Can you talk a little about the process of a working on that project. Yeah that was a challenging and long process it to end the part of the reason why i got co credited is because i worked basically for two years trying to get enough cast attached to get the financing going because at time people were reading it and saying no one wants to watch a movie about racism. This is really depressing. You can't talk about this stuff you can't. This is a too dark too dark. But don cheadle coming on board was attorney point and that really helped us and piece by piece we put the cast together and there were many cast members that fell out before we actually got the movie made because it took so long so at one point he's legend was attached. And at one point forest whittaker. We had all these different actors that we kept setting and then they get another job in and leave so it was a labor of law than it was a long A very long process but again kind of one of those miraculous moments that happen when its first screened in toronto on the audience reaction was so Still kind of vocal and emotional and and then what happened all the way through with the film it was able to.

carey mulligan two years kathryn first one film toronto first studio Hahn wicked leah one many years ago one point those many cast members oscar
"sarah i" Discussed on Sales Success Stories

Sales Success Stories

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"sarah i" Discussed on Sales Success Stories

"Hear Scott Ingram I'm sorry to disappoint you my name's Jeff and you're stuck with me for the next few episodes while I am recording interviews from the virtual hallway say at the sales success summit. At this podcast thing, I am better at asking questions though and I've got Sarah Brazier and Dale do pre or if you combine them together and triple your tongue, you can call them sale. That's fine. Actually works with the. If I think about it so. Sarah kicked off the whole meeting today or the virtual conference today with a great presentation in your take home. The one of the take home messages when you get a lot of really good tactical linked and stuff. But when your take home message was don't spam and then Dale, you came back and said, why is our outreach gross in your talk? So I think it's a great place to get started. I'm just going to throw that to you both I mean, what? Why do we as sales people? Insist on championing mediocrity. What why is spamming self-evident? Why isn't it more personalized people like you like me we've been saying this for a long time people listen. So I think that it stems from bad training when you Join sales typically you don't have a degree in sales. You're not necessarily familiar with the motions that make sense and it is an awkward thing to do to approach strangers in essentially asked him for business or least that's what it feels like. If you have good training, you realize, Oh, I'm just asking them for a conversation I'm asking for time and the more time spent sales you realize Oh, this is really this is to sell is human, right? But I think when I first started especially in the SDR roll, which is sort of the people that I was targeting that don't spam messaging because it get so much thing I get from eight to and I get it from CEO's of small companies. But you know you think like well. I know that if I reach out to one hundred people only X. amount will convert Wa-. Blah. Because those are what the numbers have been telling me and. It's just so hard to write personalize messages over and over and over again and I think if you kind of flip it on its head and you just really specific but who you WanNa talk to him why you WanNa talk to them if you chat two hundred people, ninety of them will convert because you're so specific it just takes longer. But I think I just I always feel like it comes from like a training knowledge understanding of what it is this weird business that we're in. It's true and I've seen the opposite of that where people just want to reach out and they're trying so hard to connect and build rapport and build friends that they forget to get to the selling part. It and there's a balance there but I think you know endowment cures, your thoughts you're pretty intentional guy I think there's an intention behind every interaction. There should be a reason that you ask every question and not in an overly scripted kind of manipulative way. But what are you really trying to learn and I don't think there are enough sales people out there trying to learn very much dale what do you think? That would be a waste of their time. If you ask their boss or their manager right mito because that wouldn't allow them to get their nine hundred, thousand, four, hundred, fifty, seven emails out two hundred and fifty thousand today right and that's the problems that everything is like over. We glorify the metric. We don't talk about the results enough at all. That's why sales outreach. So gross that's why like Sarah's talking about like spamming is timeless at a business owner that sixty five years old can spam you just as much as an SDR that just got started out of college can spam you. It is timeless thing because people have continued to negate the idea of we're all living on this earth together for a set amount of time instead of a set amount of circumstances, and you are literally disconnecting yourself those truths. By acting the way that you are in your outreach methodology nothing normal about it whatsoever. If you go to a party and you sit down with somebody, you don't know at some point you ask them very easy going question. Okay. Hey. So what do you do for a living and there's a really good conversation that typically comes out of that and you usually leave that same party going I can totally sell this guy copiers I met him at a party last super. Nice got a couple of beers chat ed in the challenged me. A couple of thought processes and it was great it somebody call me calm tomorrow. But then when you when you get on the phone and do that same dial, ask person as someone that same question because of the stereotypes of sales and the way that we have completely just saturated the culture of sales people don't hear at the same way. People don't want to have the same conversation because they just see you trying to sell them something I've got clients have talked to a lot of sales people and they say you know. I. Really enjoyed talking to that person they were so down to Earth as if they would be anything else if you can dictate the the conversation to be that way, there was a question that came up a deal I. think it was during your and I actually don't recall which talk it was Durham. But it was the someone asked, how do you take the conversation from that report building area over to hey, let's get to the point here. There's something I. Think we can help you with Sarah I. Think it was during your your presentation. How do you make that transition? Yeah. It's usually when it feels appropriate in the conversation. So I mean and I call it out. It's the sandler selling methodology of just like. Since it say like just be radically transparent. Yes. So I just say things like He. You know if this feels like an step let me now I always give people the opportunity to be like. Away. that. Really really well. Thank you and I think that's like that I think is key when you do make a transition and I think it only comes after you've. Collected, enough information to make the transition so I've had. Conversations at blasted days. On. Link. When was just trying to warm the personnel? and Dave voluntarily asked me, Hey, what is it that Gong does? I told them and they said, agree, let's book a meeting. I would not more about that and I've also had conversations that are directly to the point like. He you've been engaging in a ton of content maybe this isn't overstep, but it seems like there might be some interest in exploring what we do outside of our content and I don't know I think he's GonNa feel it out. It's like if the person downloads a ton of gone content likes every single on seven reads or Chris or lapse posts pretty good indicator that really familiar with what we're doing and if they're not a customer, but their organizations grew three hundred percent in the past six months then. Really, time to explore Gong, and if I say Katie you you WANNA look at it. If not go ahead and tell me know my feelings won't be hurt their leg. Yeah. Sure. Feel like nine times out of ten at works because I was picking people who were engaged instead of flake guessing and.

Sarah Dale Sarah Brazier Scott Ingram Jeff Sarah I. Wa CEO Katie Durham Chris business owner Dave
"sarah i" Discussed on GrowthBusters

GrowthBusters

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"sarah i" Discussed on GrowthBusters

"So that's not quite them doing it, but there are allowing us to participate, so they're giving us access to audience, but they don't have to take the heat for talking about population. 'cause. It's like coming from us. I would love to see these condoms have one right here. One of my favorites Dave sent it to me and my care package. I would love to see one. Some of these condoms being passed in sex education programs in schools high schools. Maybe call you know I. Guess College. You should hopefully know what's going on. But I mean because of the state of sex, though like a lot of them don't exactly exactly I did a presentation to a college, so not unlike your daughter trying to make the most of trips while I was in Milwaukee I also for the wedding expo also did a presentation for our college class there and it's funny, because like I'm also super desensitized to talking about this I. Forget some people can be a little shy about it, and then when I was getting feedback. Will the Little League tencent I in all the humor health does. Need to like. Stressing out. That's really good. We've doesn't work a planned parenthood day. Yeah, so brought the condoms and so these kids they're like. Advocates of their schools for access like they know the deal, but the whole population endangered species element was totally new to them, and they got a kick out of the packaging and everything we talked about like unsafe. Sex is also good for the planet, so does. That's the thing to keep in mind even when you get older and you want to start planning family, just something to consider. Is a true what I've heard that center for biological diversity is offering free emergency at home. Deliveries of endangered species condoms during the. Shelter at home, we have adjusted our distributions unfortunately. Most people are events or on the street like this is not a tiny hitting stuff out to strangers. So we have said if you have ideas for them out in a safe social distance way, we're happy to still help. We did a photo challenge for Earth Week instead of the big box of condoms for event. We sent like a package of four, so you participated in that that was a nice way to get. A little stash for home. It's interesting to see how it's adopting. We're trying to like figure out what works best with that so like I was talking about these programs. There's zoo in Pennsylvania. They're doing their big fundraiser. And we had given condoms or in person events before, and they are doing like a virtual gift box type things. If you get a ticket like there will still be things to access online, yellow, Global Guinea bag, and the condoms will be a part of that still so that message is still getting out there in a socially distanced Safeway. So if somebody is kind of anticipation that in the future they're going to be ready to. Be a volunteer distributor. Are you still accepting orders for these? Or if you kind of put it on hold, totally, we still encourage people to sign up, because even if it's ideas for the future and that if you have an idea for now to safely, central services like health clinics that are still open, they would like them like we will absolutely send them. Yeah, we're definitely people just trying to be very conscious because we wanNA. Make sure we're like. Projecting the rate recommendations for volunteers as well. And they have a limited shelf life, so you don't want to order them and then have to sit on them for a year. Yeah, exactly I mean they're pretty good like the bachelor have is good for a few years, but yeah. Actually do they have experienced dates? See they do and Erica. We know that boxes empty already. Unfortunately I wish I could say that day of but being under lockdown. It's been a very sad lonely time, not just for me. I'm sure for a lot of people. Sorry sorry. That's the other thing is sort of like a boom or bust right now. There has been talk of supply chains are being disrupted so. Potential for shortages, and like essentially any kind of contraception is a concern. Yeah, and there's been certainly two different theories out there that this lockdown period is going to result in a baby boom in nine months. Some people think and other people think that this is just too serious for people to. Go down that road. kind of go back and forth as well with I think what most of the data supports during times of recession, just tougher times. It's not likely the time. Also be very interesting of the people who already currently have their kids home. Tax. They're not gonNA. Want anymore. Yeah. I've been thinking that you know. Certainly you know. We've been seeing more and more young people really giving much more serious consideration rather than just default assuming that they're gonNA start making babies so I been expecting that the birth rate is going to decline even faster than it has been over the last couple years, probably just because of the state of the world, and because of awareness that you know every child that you bring into the world does have carbon footprint in. In ecological footprint in an impact out there I'm thinking that this pandemic is a reminder that we've kind of filled up. The planet were in every nook and cranny in our opening some new Pandora's boxes, and that coupled with just help utterly serious. The climate crisis is there's going to be a lot more people, appreciating those condoms or heading down to the urologist. Get a vasectomy or something like that I think we're just GONNA see the birth rate. Continue to drop faster. Yeah I think even to kind of like drop back from covid nineteen a little bit. It's just also the normalizing of it. The more people who don't seem as perhaps more legitimate in common lifestyle and people who are maybe on the fence can see like. Oh, that's like a perfectly fine of your life. All of them are people. MAKE YOU DO A. Before. We Close Erica, and Sarah I really want to subject you to something here that I hope you'll find to be fun used to be routinely on the growth busters podcast. We had a segment called. The load where we would do a segment where we would come and share something that we were doing that was unique or interesting or new in our lives, just to lighten our load on the planet, and I don't know why, but we fell out of that habit, and I think it's important that we get back into it. I'd like for us to visit that subject once in every episode if we can but I've never been crazy about lightening the load, so I want to propose a new title, I think we should call it honey. I shrunk by footprint any objections. Probably. One of my favorite movies in the eighties was honey. I shrunk the kids. Because when I was a kid, I used to call it honey. I blew up the kid. which I know, I know the way that sounds I don't know why, but when I was a kid I was obsessed with that movie and I would call it. Honey I blew up the kid. Take that as you well audience. We'll just keep doing plays on like great eighties movies. With questionable. Look back on the as some kind of cinematic day I think. The golden era, a lot of stuff came out of it. We're remaking it. So who wants to go first? We should let our guest gophers. Okay, so appreciate the heads up. On the fly I would've perhaps struggled. So at least when I think it was like my more like creative one is learning how to cook with food waste more, which is not as gross it sounds was gifted, a really fun cookbook for Christmas. That is basically using your leftovers so instead of going full of cooking show like a couple like easy examples for people saving your vegetables crabs in a freezer bag, and when you like Philip of the standard like gallon side you. You STU IT in water. Any make veggie breath, so it's like you think about all the veggie parts, the ends of onions, the tops of bell peppers like appeal stuff you save all the scraps, so you're keeping him out of trash and then visual super easy,.

Erica Little League Milwaukee Dave Pennsylvania Global Guinea covid Philip Safeway Sarah I
"sarah i" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"sarah i" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Very bad so the again of what is the every morning on a team as we our one oh six one issue he came close to me only I said I would just both my later if you want to but I sort of so if he can make and I know you think that I see and I know you've got a car maybe going by the little three other friends and I and I'm so I'm in the bag even and came close I mean you know so Nick cannon mornings on power one think it it's about the song in the name see one time we don't lack is that what you mean a must he must have converted of fiat though he was why he's not alive that was both hello there dear to me in an enemy I mean we like one never mind that yeah well you know does like this back in dot not really that yes Sarah I who's hi lack thank you no not these make.

Nick cannon Sarah I
"sarah i" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

14:06 min | 3 years ago

"sarah i" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"It's no wage concessions. No healthcare cuts three thousand jobs saved thousands of pensions saved. Our retirees are not taking any any pension cuts. We didn't go back in take from folks. the way we made this work is my family walked away from our way. So you know act look. I can build more equity some other time at I can't replace guys pensions who drove a truck for US thirty or forty years so I was proud to do it. We're very very lucky. It was a very hard process. The teamsters were amazing partners Linus. He couldn't have done it without them but we all had to sit at the table and say this is an existential threat to the company. We think these are jobs in a business worth saving will help us and to their credit the union the lenders. I am the pension fund management team all dead and it's been a it's been a very difficult process but it's a near miraculous out calm. Tom You know to come to the other side of what was effectively a pre-arranged restructuring that unfortunately has to go through at chapter eleven filing uh-huh for for a lot of reasons to get the kind of relief that we needed that protection we needed the bankruptcy code provides that but we come out the other side of that with the same management management team three thousand jobs saved no wage concessions. No healthcare cuts thousands of pension saved. I'm very proud of the work we did but I think it's not only family not something on hiding from talking about it by a lot. Actually it's the reason I'm running. I want people to look in the eyes of the people who who are asking for your vote or to the people like Senator David Purdue. WHO's been a cheerleader for this president's trade war. I want them to see what it looks like. I want them to look look at the United States Senate and understand how important it is to securing the economic future of working people all over this country you know the US House of Representatives unitive has something in the end of July called the Butch Lewis Act. It is way to save these pensions right. Might pension happens to be the pension that we're in happens to be one of the first to go under but the mineworkers aren't far behind. US actually go insolvent before us. There were fourteen hundred multi employer pension plans all over this country in one hundred twenty. Five of them are already critical declining and too many of these funds go under it'll also collapsed the pension benefit. Guaranty Corporation Federal Insurance Program designed to protect workers pensions rather than take up that got bill the books Lewis. Act that the US House under Democratic leadership has already passed rather than take it up. The Senate went on vacation then I mean literally went into recess rather than work through August recess to save Working People's retirement and I think that's shameful. I think people like David Produce should be held accountable for that. I've had to sit across the table from guys who drove a truck for us for thirty five and forty four years and explain to them that I've done everything in my powder. We're saving. We're doing our job. The House did its job but Mitch mecom calls himself the grim reaper for reason and until they choose to act on this working people everywhere in these multi employer pension plans should be very nervous they they may not get the retirement that they've invested in their owed that they've earned into our auto gift guys. This is the workers money they dutifully and rightfully invested that employers like me have invested in vacant for decades they're owed this money and it is the job of the people in the US Senate to take up the legislation. That's been done in the house to provide relief. You know the the companies those of us who are in these plans. The workers were in them. We don't manage these funds. We didn't create the underfunded ended problem. We didn't create right to work laws that have devastated union memberships accelerated insolvency these are things that we're trying to fix x and right now we don't have partner insecurity those pensions in the US Senate but one way yet it is to make sure we elect Democratic majority ready and I think voters deserve to hear it. I am going to be out there talking about this trade war. No one wins a trade war but the workers always lose the farmers in Georgia are losing this trade war and David produce should be held accountable. I think the GOP Senate majority should be held accountable for its abject failure to pension relief. I WANNA protect economic security for working families very simple your health care affordable housing your opportunity opportunity to make a fair wage your collective bargaining rights and I think in order to make sure we can always do that. We can also have to protect voting rights and election security thirty. That's my platform very straightforward so this has been formative for me but I also think it's exactly the kind of later I'll be in the US Senate for Georgia. If I see a problem I will move having to fix it. I will fight for your family the same way I fought for my workers pensions and further union and to save this business in their jobs. That's the kind of leader we need not a guy that refuses to do a town hall for five and a half years like David Purdue Sarah I would imagine between this formative formative experience of going through this reorganization with your company and with also incredibly formative experience of running for Lieutenant Governor what major lessons are you bringing both professionally and about sort of the the wider state of Georgia Georgia and the wider state of our politics in the nation. What did you learn from both of those experiences that your brain to this race. I mean one of the things that I love about running in in this. US Senate Race Georgia is I can bring the private sector experience. I can speak to what it's like to not only grow a business during the great recession in a union company in the industrial sector or no task to this great American icon of the American auto industry but I can now I speak to the trade war the pension crisis and at the same time because of the experience I had last year as the Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor running with stacy easiest brothers. I have the credibility of having run a statewide campaign and with very little money one point six million dollars getting one point eight to three million votes. You know we we had a shoestring budget so my answer was to go out and meet people right. AMAC traveled to a hundred and fifty counties might ten months and sat in a lot of living rooms and listened to Georgia's in what they're worried about so to answer your question Shen. The thing that I learned was number one. This has to be a statewide campaign right. You got running statewide as hard. It's a steep learning curve ungrateful grateful have already gone up but once and I look forward to improving on the performance this year but you have to run in hall all hundred fifty nine counties I also learned and that voters independent of their politics by and large have similar hopes for their families for families futures. They have a lot of fear her her about how the failure in Washington of people like David purdue the unwillingness to stand up for their families against special interest dress or the president or the majority leader. They have a lot of fear about how that affects kids. How it affects the economic onomic opportunity their family will have been so you know the lessons for me were unique to continue to engage voters all hundred fifty nine counties the lessons were make sure that you're listening in communities and figuring out what they need and what they want in how you can best represent their experience because we all live different experiences right that never forget? Most people want similar famous for their kids future. Nobody wants to see people who are poor because they're sick or sick because the poor is his twenty nineteen America. We're better than that. Nobody wants to see the kind of cronyism and corruption that special interests have put into our federal politics. Nobody wants the Senate of a hundred senators who fought tooth and nail to get those jobs sitting in a chamber in refusing to work with each other to do basic things like superior families pensioners attention owners future economically. Nobody wants to see a Senate that rubberstamps a trade war. That's devastating. Our economy are working people so I think thank you know the partisan divide is very inside baseball thing but when you talk the partisanship out of it when you talk about the issues these people share a lot of the same hopes and dreams and they have a lot of the same fears. Anna and I think they want us to robust robust investments in infrastructure. They want increased access to affordable healthcare. They WanNa know that no matter if they're a man or woman or gay or straight through and make the same money for the same job rate these are the kinds of of hopes that I think Georgians as a whole values we have those are the values. WanNa see Representative Office office said I can tell you they're not getting it from David Purdue Sarah. You've had a couple of years now of having to frequently speak carefully about incredibly complex issues. The results of your race religion governor continued to get national media attention because of the election security the issues that you've referenced. You've gone through the chapter. Eleven process bankruptcy is difficult word even when it produces as it can sometimes a really healthy outcome for everyone you have a crowded. Democratic primary field for the Senate seat and I would argue some bias coverage of that field and so I just wonder how it feels to you to always be threading those needles and what capacity you're finding as you spend time talking with and listening to people in Georgia for folks to engage with the complexity of those issues. I tend to be a pretty direct speaker you know obviously they're not a lot of candidates out there leaving by talking about their doctor. Levin restructuring in how that makes them a better candidate for the US Senate in in my case that happens to be true but I think I have a very simple philosophy which is tell people the Truth and tell them what you think. Don't pull test. What you believe not only does that not serve? The candidate while voters are lot smarter than a lot of people give them credit for right especially Republicans. You know I think the Republicans give voters the credit the road they can smell in authenticity from from a mile away voters now when somebody is speaking their heart when they're being earnest and honest and I think they respect the people who also will say look it has not always been easy road or my life hasn't been a string of untarnished successes in every direction bright pressure makes diamonds in in for me. I feel like sharing some of those struggles not just things like the restructuring structuring at work not just things like dealing with you know more than one hundred thousand votes missing from the machines in my election last year that was raised decided by about the same amount of margin not just you know the voter suppression that we saw writ large across Georgia last year but I think voters respect somebody who acknowledges when they've seen adversity and is willing to come forward and talk about what what they learned from it and how it made them better and Americans we have this incredible ethos where a the the old rocky Balboa Line Right. It's not about the number of times you get knocked down. It's how many times you get back up and spite smarter better and with more passion right for me. I think it was a very good candidate last year but I don't think I had the same sort of visceral roll connection to some of these economic security issues that I have now because I have been through that fire. I have had to not only go around the state and tell people what I believe in and tell people how I think businesses should treat their workers in how that can make your business better. The economy better the country three stronger our family stronger. HIF- now had the chance to show them that I meant it to be willing to walk away from Equity Eighty to save three thousand jobs all their wages in healthcare thousands of pensions and I'd do it again in a heartbeat and I think if you tell voters the truth breath in if you share your challenges and if you'd have the humility to reflect on what you've learned from them I think they respect it in more importantly they relate to it. I can't tell you the number of business people I've talked to who've told me about their own business struggles in how impressed they were to see us. You know fight the good fight and come out and show the good guys can still win..

United States Senate Georgia US Senator David Purdue Senate teamsters president Tom You Butch Lewis Linus David Produce David Purdue Sarah I baseball Equity Eighty AMAC Georgia Georgia GOP Washington
"sarah i" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"sarah i" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"A. Sarah hi Sarah I Tiana all right what kind of questions you have for us alright so my main question is I'm not a very big girl I work out here and there but I have a lot of cellulite my thighs and **** area. and I don't know what to do like I don't know if there's something in the spa I know you guys mentioned a lot of laser is there something that can help me in that area absolutely two ways to go about this Tiana we can do something called self fina which is good if you have just a little so you lie and by the way for the listeners out there so you later those dancer dimples that some people get on there but on their legs or some other places they're awfully hard to get rid of by yourself but we the yourself Pena if you have individual little dance here or there but if you have more extensive doubles and dance we use something called so he lays which is a laser that we use in done in the operating room will help to get rid of a lot of that now people think Serra that liposuction takes care cellulite but it does and we have to it's two separate things that we can do at the same time yeah a lot of times we do the cellulase people also want LIFO as well so will suck as much fat as we can we'll sculpt you will shape you and then we'll go ahead and do the site lays the life doesn't get rid of the temples the like the gets rid of the fat the cellulase goes into the same incision so no additional sessions with the SIA's and it actually breaks up the bands that are pulling the skin down so that's what creates the dimple so when you break those bands the skin pops back up basically any gives a smoother appearance so we combined the sideways with the liposuction sometimes we can also combine it with something called J. plasma so this is like a three step procedure the J. plasma hopes to tighten the skin to so you do get some skin retraction with liposuction but some people need a little bit more help so we'll go ahead and do the J. plasma which again goes to the same incisions no additional incisions it helps to tighten the skin so we do liposuction J. plasma for skin tightening unsightly is for the dimples yes there's tons of things that we could do to improve the legs now liposuction in general is an awesome way to strike you down it's great for the legs the internet are thighs. it's great for the abdomen or love handles or cry areas the chest in guys and light bill is really no downtime so it's something we can get your right back to your normal activities very quickly if you have so you'll at the same time we can get rid of the satellite all done in the office and military centers and back to work or school in just a day or so awesome that is your question yeah and one more question is that done under local anaesthesia or general I'm depends what we do liposuction is typically the patients or sleep and so this ad most some of the cellulite treatments it was just a few dimples here there we can definitely do it just.

Sarah I
"sarah i" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"sarah i" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"A. Sarah hi Sarah I cannot all right what kind of questions you have for us alright so my main question is I'm not a very big girl I work out here and there but I have a lot of cellulite my thighs and **** area and I don't know what to do like I don't know if there's something in the spa I know you guys mentioned a lot of lease or is there something that can help me in that area absolutely two ways to go about this Tiana we can do something called self fina which is good if you have just a little so you away and by the way for the listeners out there so you later those dancer dimples that some people get on there but on their legs or some other places they're awfully hard to get rid of by yourself but we'd be yourself enough if you have individual little dance here or there but if you have more extensive doubles and dance we use something called so he lays which is a laser that we use in done in the operating room will help. to get rid of a lot of that now people think Serra that liposuction takes care so you like but it does and we have to it's two separate things yeah we can do at the same time yeah a lot of times we do the cellulase people also want LIFO as well so will suck as much fat as we can we'll sculpt you will shape you and then we'll go ahead and do the site lays the life doesn't get rid of the temples the like the gets rid of fat the cellulase goes into the same incision so no additional sessions with the SIA's and it actually breaks up the bands that are pulling the skin down so that's what creates the dimple so when you break those bands the skin pops back up basically any gives a smoother appearance so we combined the sideways with the liposuction sometimes we can also combine it with something called J. plasma so this is like a three step procedure the J. plasma hopes to tighten the skin to so you do get some skin retraction with liposuction but some people need a little bit more help so we'll go ahead and do the J. plasma which again goes to the same incisions no additional incisions it helps to tighten the skin so we do liposuction J. plasma for skin tightening and slightly as for the dimples yes there is tons of things that we could do to improve the legs now liposuction in general is an awesome way to strike you down it's great for the legs the internet are thighs is great for the abdomen or love handles or cry areas the chest in guys and light bill is really no down time so it's something we can get your right back to your normal activities very quickly and if you have so you'll at the same time we can get rid of the satellite all done in the office and military centers and back to work or school in just a day or so awesome that is your question yeah and one more question is that done under local anaesthesia or general I'm depends what we do liposuction is typically the patients are sleep and service and most of some of the cellulite treatments it was just a few dimples here there we can definitely do it just.

Sarah I
"sarah i" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"sarah i" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"A. Sarah hi Sarah I Tiana all right what kind of questions you have for us all right so my main question is I'm not a very big girl I work out here and there but I have a lot of cellulite my thighs and **** area. and I don't know what to do I don't know if there's something in the spa I know you guys mentioned a lot of lease or is there something that can help me in that area absolutely two ways to go about this Tiana we can do something called self fina which is good if you have just a little so you lie and by the way for the listeners out there so you later those dancer dimples that some people get on there but on their legs or some other places they're awfully hard to get rid of by yourself but we'd be yourself Pena if you have individual little dance here or there but if you have more extensive doubles and dance we use something called so he lays which is a laser that we use it done in the operating room will help to get rid of a lot of that you know people think Serra that liposuction takes care so you like but it does and we have to it's two separate things that we can do at the same time yeah a lot of times we do the cellulase people also want LIFO as well so will suck as much fat as we can we'll sculpt you will shape you and then we'll go ahead and do the site lays the life doesn't get rid of the temples the like the good through the fat the cellulase goes into the same incisions so no additional sessions with the SIA's and it actually breaks up the bands that are pulling the skin down so that's what creates the dimple so when you break those bands the skin pops back up basically any gives a smoother appearance so we combined the sideways with the liposuction sometimes we can also combine it with something called J. plasma so this is like a three step procedure the J. plasma hopes to tighten the skin to so you do get some skin retraction with liposuction but some people need a little bit more help so we'll go ahead and do the J. plasma which again goes to the same incisions no additional incisions and it helps to tighten the skin so we do liposuction J. plasma for skin tightening unsightly is for the dimples yes there's tons of things that we could do to improve the legs now lepo suction in general is an awesome way to strike you down it's great for the legs the internet out thighs. it's great for the abdomen or love handles or cry areas the chest in guys and light blue is really no down time so it's something we can get your right back to your normal activities very quickly if you have so you'll at the same time we can get rid of the so you like all done in the office and military centers and back to work or school in just a day or so awesome that is your question yeah and one more question is that done under local anaesthesia or general I'm depends what we do liposuction is typically the patients or sleep and so this ad most some of the cellulite treatments it was just a few dimples here there we can definitely do it just when you awake under a little Nova can't okay awesome thank.

Sarah I