6 Episode results for "Sarah Feinberg"

Episode 7 (Sarah Feinberg/MTA Board)

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

1:04:19 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 7 (Sarah Feinberg/MTA Board)

"Back to another episode of the Second Avenue Sagas podcast I'm your host Benjamin k back and my guest today is Sarah Feinberg the former administrator of the federal route welcome outskirts of Charleston we actually lived outside of the city limits so so that was my first experience with transit and in Washington to when I got to Washington right after college was the first time I had ever written subway I visited New York like once with my mom when I was the biggest city so obviously there's no subway there there is a bus system I actually took the city bus for an increased urgency and investment station accessibility it's just another year for the MTA but it hasn't all been bad news though as Omni the governor and his way of inserting himself awkwardly into the MTA's affairs and there's an ongoing debate over the role of the board governing the MTA the board formation while the board recently approved a fifty one billion dollar capital plan the largest five year investment plan in the agency's history the MTA came under Eh Bloomberg and facebook she served as chief of staff at the US Department of Transportation for heading up the F. R. A. for the final two years of the Obama Administration Group in Charleston West Virginia which is actually usually the biggest biggest city in West Virginia except during WVU Football Games morgantown and You know the bus that I rode before it came up the hill to get me serviced even more rural part of of the school most days and when I wasn't playing sports took the city bus home and so I was bus rider from early on Thank you so somewhat rare among MTA board members these days is your background you grew up in West Virginia spent twenty years in DC with a stop in San Francisco before arriving fire from transit advocates who charged the governor with delaying the public release of the plan advocates for New Yorkers with disabilities have been flooding MTA board meetings for years urging is act as a buffer between the governor and the agency it's that role and her experiences at the federal level that Sarah and I are going to discuss today Sarah thank you for joining me not as long awaited Metro card killer debuted earlier this year and this month's launch of the Fourteenth Street bus way has been hailed citywide as a transit success story with the N. responsible MTA allow voice speaking up for some of the more powerless transit riders during MTA board meetings the first eight months of fiber time on the board would have been anything but quiet for the MTA the L. train work has loomed over the city while a fare hike went into effect in April meanwhile the governor has been pushing for MTA Trans on Tuesday so I've spent a lot of time living near a system that is clean and beautiful and accessible capital plan largely supporting Andy Byford fast forward initiatives and the launch of the bus way the MTA seems to be on a better path lately but I still hear lots of skepticism towards the how did the transit systems in the places that you've been to compare with New York's and what can you learn from these places great question yes a growing up in West Virginia work in so many people on the MTA board to seem to be New Yorkers for the duration of their lives or their adult lives their careers I think it's important to have a diverse array of voices on the Board Sara joined the MTA board in February after serving as a judge of the governor's genius challenge in twenty seventeen over the past eight months. She's been a vocal advocate for responsive city but people love it because they say it's cleaner and I guess getting to be more reliable than it used to be yeah I mean and look when I was a dot we were in the about like putting my card in and I would frequently take the train in the wrong direction and get off and turn around and come together way and and obviously got got used to it over title we didn't take the subway I don't know why and and I remember to this day I used to feel so grownup when I would ride the metro and I get nervous of of the rail system that way and then at the F. A. Obviously tons of of safety issues that we're working on work you have to shut down the system so those were not good times they are such a better place now than they were anyway already gotten distracted real lesson that you may WanNa talk about it at some point in in pushing a bureaucracy when I was chief of staff at dot and then F. R. E. Administrator we were in the middle of this debate about whether we needed to actually shut down for some amount of time because the system had not unlike New York had reached a maintenance level that where it had just fallen off a cliff and we were having we try to use the system and were frequently like waiting for ten or twelve fifteen minutes for train not at two o'clock in the morning three o'clock in the ears but but I am still frequently in DC because my family they're my partners families there's were there a lot and but in terms of safety lessons I mean it it it always has to be priority number one and then everything else can get done after that but if you're not able to keep people's thing smoke incidents fire incidents which were really really dangerous and you don't know how much you paid attention at the time but it we F- Attala the If the administrators willing to move safety deadline we will have much bigger problems and so and so the reason they moved it was because was because we refuse to move it it seems like a commuter system almost that is sort of masquerading subway stops are very far apart and don't go to a lot of areas there's not good inter connectivity across the safe then you can't do anything else so after your departure president trump named former railway executive to the IRA which sometimes people viewed as asking the read by rail issue which was the movement of volatile crude Oughta added the BOC into the to the coast and figuring out what we could do to improve the safety of I'm first priority because nothing else matters you can't get that right right so that was very much the the priority when I was chief of staff we spent a lot of time working on the and the congress eventually moved to the deadline because they because they failed to get me to move the deadline because the administrator said I will not move this deadline because from smoke inhalation and it was horrifying and so we were in the process of and obviously it's one thing to work in transportation at the federal level and then the system that Sir at a time when the Senate decided to push out PC compliance deadlines but it's still been a big focus of the administration and something that you are speaking out for you nation is willing to stop a project in its tracks for no good reason whatsoever that anyone can determine mta all that much look I mean secretary chows impact has been enormous even if you just look at gateway the fact that the admission reference the Senate pushing back that deadline first of all that's probably a whole other podcast we could do an it's an actually the P. T. C. debate is into guard the Fox to guard the Henhouse and Elaine Chao is hardly been a friend to urban transit agencies has the shift in federal policy harmed the MTA in meet a challenge that it does not think that can meet and then it's not particularly interested in meeting and that was really it was a huge piece of the two years that I was there on Capitol Hill working with polly Bergen others you know this is an unprecedented really abuse of what the we'll get back to the capital plan do you think it's safe to still assume a massive federal contribution to the MTA's long-term investments sell so my successor Ron Batori been particularly alarmed by any safety decisions he's made he's continued to prioritize PTC when the easiest thing in the world would have been for him to walk in and find ways to extend the administration should be doing of what any administration should be doing I mean the responsibility is to keep projects moving not to kill them in the cradle so that that that alone has been the federal government to actually think about having to shut that down because you have safety concerns we were going through the steps of trying to figure out how you get an entire federal workforce to work here's what are your experiences and perspectives from the FAA have you been able to bring to the MTA discussions and meetings and how does their safety records stack up well anytime you're at a department of Transportation Transit Agency any kind of deal like that at an airline the whatever safety is the top there's some talk about about funding but in my experience in history and long before I was in the Obama Administration I spent many years was a CEO at At conrail and and you know that the the sort of knee jerk reaction is that's the Fox guarding the Henhouse I have to say I have not the ball and and well-built but boy leaves a lot to be desired the services that's always that's always the the DC New York debate that we all get into the from the president he doesn't want to support a region that's not going to vote for him didn't vote for him doesn't particularly like him look I I mean I don't know if it's secretary chows that's quite all right so safety it's part of the conversation safety I feel like has been a theme for you over the last few years you know when you're you started at the CIA and I think at some point someone will probably do this that you know we just we probably need to do a quick and dirty study about what the economic impact will be if we lose that tunnel out money funding let's have a debate about how the you know what exactly is included in the project maybe we should include bridge maybe we shouldn't include four whatever none that line so I I actually feel like he's done a great job and I I don't think that his tenure Fra's necessarily impacted you a whole bunch to get that car started but at some point the car just didn't starting anymore and we're dangerously close to that in my mind it's similar to what you were saying about the metro then you have to figure out so because again and you know there's a people who are focused on gateway in more and more people are understand what we're talking about when we say lose a tunnel aw I don't often by the way there are a lot of places you can't get so great if you're going to dismiss greatest going to Capitol Hill great if you're going you know harder if it's the president's part but it's hard for me to understand or imagine someone who's been elected by the American people intentionally wrist fatalities just by the number of people on the road and if they don't drive it's going to be the greatest it's going to be the largest work at home experiment the New Jersey has ever seen and a couple of hours in the morning to spend time with my daughter and soon as we woke up I was excited it was my birthday was mostly excited about the best way so genevieve got up and had had her bottle and breakfast only been a couple of weeks yep changes changes the whole area changes Fourteenth Street do see this as a model for transit growth the MTA should be aggressively pursuing and it's not that all of a sudden some of the tunnels going to go floating down the river and we're GONNA have a we're going to have a massive incident what's going to happen has an engineer is going to walk through that tunnel one day is gonna say that's it like trying to start your thirty year old car in your driveway on a cold day at some point you can you can asking the economic impact that we could be flirting with in New York I mean the the governor and I've had multiple conversations about this and I I've suggested really get into how much that can harm the region you know even if trump loses next year and there's a new administration and they sort of ramp backup gateway funding still four years let's get a ton of attention but I actually am equally if not more focused on buses because I think it's the workhorse of the system and has not gotten sufficient focused getting all these people through the region to work up back and forth between DC in Boston right and if they drive you're going to have massive increase in incidents injuries gonNA meet terrible for the economy of New York it's going to be a a sandy it's yet have a massive impact and it's not just work it's entertainment it's people coming in about it I'm super excited about it it is a game changer for the neighborhood it feels better it sounds better life is easier it's just good and we're not getting back right the time has been lost and to be clear like this is nothing short of someone sitting on a piece of paper so that the project won't move forward this is not let's have a debate it's sort of the focus of of your effort here the last few months WanNa start with something good we were talking about this before we started recording the fourteen seems to be an unqualified success so far on about so I would love to see it I would love to see it expand and for us to do other busways I've said repeatedly that as Transit Chair I cross fourteenth I don't know you know on a weekday at least four times a day on a weekend it can be ten whatever I'm constant New York can overcome that look I think this is I mean it's super frustrating right you've got small groups of people who will it seems like it's much faster than building a subway you can sort of say totally calls first of all I live in that in the neighborhood I live to I live on twelfth and that is being debated this is an administration sitting on a piece of paper because they don't want to move for and it sounds sort of like a silly question but is this just personal petty revenge and look the city can we can move faster on to your point we can move a lot faster on this stuff than other projects it's interesting too I think watching this whole debate and out of the city for dinner it's this whole region sort of works together because people can get through that tunnel they're gonna like invest in robots is not expanded the ferry system problem that if people are going to be fighting against each of these new busways as aggressively as the folks living in the West village did it can slow down progress how do you feel urge particularly because it's an ongoing lawsuit and they don't want to insert themselves in ways that would cause problems in the court I know any by talked about this but there's this who will seemingly stop at nothing to stop progress right and you know they feel very strongly about the reasons that you know the reasons that they're fighting we're hearing was twelve thirteen fifteen sixteen seventeen it's gridlock people can't move ambulances can't get through it's dangerous we have a huge problem we again I live on twelfth and there's not there's not some huge backup of traffic on my street in fact I think that traffic is actually improved on twelfth because there are fewer cars it's frequently small groups of people who feel strongly for one reason or the other but look I mean the the process is what it is much credence to the complaints of people who don't understand the traffic modelling if they get out there and aggressively sort of saying this isn't going to happen this traffic apocalypse isn't going to on or whatever but I was like you know look at this genevieve like fewer cars now honking you now so it's an total delight and my family's excited worked up and even if you're polydor whoever you're the expert here the traffic engineer and you know the answer people still want to have the last several years and I would love to and Craig and I talk frequently about the need for additional busways the need for additional bus lanes and so I think it's a beautiful model you know tell us what they think the today let's execute before since this is still a pilot I'm slightly afraid we're GONNA end up re-litigating all of these issues again in eighteen months when up costing yourself time and you know generally I come down on the side of let's let people having opinion let's let people have a voice let's let people you think this has been a lesson in you know let's if we think that we have an idea that will move more people and make the city work better make the system ended up I think there's a whole bunch of ways we could have gotten here right so an effort to be as transparent as possible in to give everyone to my in laws who has a metric fly but other than that you know you're you could be in some it's very much into the DC metro don't work better let's do our best to execute on it as quickly as possible and if it's a disaster we can pull it back right if like we're in the midst of if all of a sudden all we have a system of busways and a few years I hope so and I will do everything I can to make that so but I would not underestimate there will be people who will undoubtedly go find data that supports their side of the argument and so this is probably GonNa go to court again at zoom so it's most likely the bus stops busways projects result you know when you try to be transparent and try to be open and listen to people you end public face the governor of course looms large over everything the MTA does and he's been exerting more and more control over the MTA sometimes well stating publicly that he doesn't necessarily have we got in the stroller and we visited the best way and and of course she was like what are we doing and we just go to the diamond can we go to the player go down that road so moving moving on let's talk a bit about the MTA out about it has and so the best way went into effect on my birthday that's a good birthday birthday present and because it was my birthday I stayed home for eroded ministration and a current Cuomo appointee to the MTA board. Sarah joined the White House following Obama's election in two thousand eight and after brief St Dot says this pilot's been a success we're GONNA keep it but I think at that point they'll be enough of a drumbeat of people saying this has been great let's definitely keep it and also let's expand it and I think that can happen because it hasn't happened everywhere else that had traffic and put on a bus way you're not gonNA convince everybody but I think it gives them more authority and allows them to sort of take shorts the ability of the interest of some folks to to find examples and everyone you know and on the board seven eight months now what are your views of the biggest challenges the MTA faces and what have you seen that works and what doesn't so look if and that continued we would be looking at it like we need to do something we need to address it but sometimes you gotta just move and execute and the power to do so and I think there's been some frustration from transit advocates but there's been a recognition that the governor is willing to step in and pushed for heart solutions you've been older not the not really a debate but the legal fight the MTA and dot sort of stepped back from being the public face of the fight and I think we're happy to have the advocates take charge in the end of the day hopefully you know the curve towards justice but that doesn't mean we're not gonNA continue to end up having to have this fight in court so let's talk a bit about Ta governments in the MTA board it can often be a bit of a thankless job working for the MTA or serving on its board these days the MTA is a constant public whipping post the board is the the project more and they seem a little hesitant to do that sometimes because I guess maybe they don't want to over promise and under deliver well look who knows how you had you ended up in the place where you at their opinion and voice their opinion right and so is that a good thing or bad thing well sometimes hold up projects but like is it appropriate to say we know better than you and we don't really helps her to change the public conversation because you'll see other neighborhoods saying wow I only fourteenth street at that let's put this in flushing but this on thirty Fourth Street and hopefully choice and let everyone express their opinion about the project bus way this that the bus stop the MO- more bus stops best whatever means you got a whole bunch of people such a detrimental and it's I think people struggle with this because there's a drumbeat saying gateway cost too much but there's also been no progress in three years now and it's hard to an and see what happens I mean it's sort of experimenting it's I mean you've got to just execute on the stuff in order to do with impact I sometimes wonder too if dot itself gives WanNa know your opinion probably sometimes right but I mean we get into the same debate when we are trying to speed up buses and move bus stops or take your have fewer and I don't dispute that but look at it happens the federal level all the time like the end the process I mean the the environmental process can kill a project I am convinced that we can get back to a place where this system is the shining star of the city the shining ooh I would say suits but I think it's been seven or eight months like you said I would say that I am As optimistic a union management relationships is the operating budget is broken the culture around the system is broken working better as a team all the time but when I say everything is broken the system is broken the the is contradictory. I understand what you're saying when you say it could be much better I mean I've seen the inner workings of the MTA for a long time and things have not been working particularly well a and and again we have a huge opportunity and I think that we can get to a place in two years where the system doesn't look anything like it did I blame the governor and then we'll move on until you the news of the day and look it's broken right so I get it others get it and by the way I'm not are getting better every day I absolutely think they are but the entire thing is broken and needs to be fixed and we can get where we're going we have I am also as convinced as ever that the entire things broken the entire thing top to bottom is broken doesn't mean we're not making improvements doesn't mean things the way people view the system is broken the the interactions the public have with the system is broken the press corps a lot of that at this point re-litigating the past I think he's shown a willingness to take chances and to push the MTA out of its comfort zone of late and maybe there are ways the covers the system is broken. I have I have had that hard conversation with I think every border the covers transit and no one likes to hear it so I think that things are getting better every day I think the subways are the subways are getting better the bus systems getting better people are focused on improving service we are here two years ago doesn't look anything like this system now five years from now we can be killing it running on all cylinders providing a service that New Yorkers they like they can't live without that they're happy with it is pleasant that executes well and it's music town work but I'm but I make my case to all of them because I feel like it's part of my job and I want to be honest with folks I mean lately the thing I can say is competent ever been that we can get time it's funny you say you know the Governor I feel looms large over this and I feel like I could do a whole series of podcasts about the governor's history with the MTA don't take for granted how helpful it is to have a smart aggressive governor on your side right massive opportunity right now right never let a crisis go to waste where we are in a crisis we are in a worse crisis two years ago we are still in a crisis but we can take advantage of that crisis and stupid enough to try to tell the press corps to cover what's news and how to write their stories but when I say the whole thing that's broken the whole thing is rockin they come from a state where the governor doesn't show up he's a Republican and he doesn't show up because he stays at his mansion in a different part of the state and he runs is he can do it that are a little more friendly with some of the folks who I feel should be getting more support but ultimately he's the one in charge he takes the blame he takes the Credit Jeff not just back where we used to be but with a system that is the off the world that'd be great and I think as much as that yeah I mean one of the things I found myself talking about a lot around the time of the L. Tunnel was remember the the number one rule of Fight Club don't talk about me talk back by the number one rule of the transit press corps is always playing the governor and the L. Train project in particular I think has been a good indication that if you push hard enough the MTA will actually respond and there are other ways to do it he may be so hands on bothers you he may be so aggressive that it offends you it may be you may feel like he came late to the table guess what you have no idea how good it is do you have a governor who agrees with you and you just sometimes don't like tactics so I'm from West Virginia when I was the administrator the P. T. C. deadline was looming and literally everyone within the organization the all the time but Omni's being headed by somebody who cares passionately about it L. Putra is doing a great job and you can see it in the measured rollout stuff right so you can have your you can have your complaints that you know it was it was too you know too late in the process or you know why didn't this get addressed you're someone who as someone who came from years of bureaucracy I totally see how that happened like it doesn't surprise me Elvia reliving an absolute nightmare and it turns out that that accident was completely peachy preventable it was crazy you strangle money out of the system or Republican wants to sit on a piece of paper's Gateway Project can't get time so you know and look the tunnels a good example really broken it's a very silent organization I think projects live and die based on the personality of the person in charge of them I go back to on the village right it wasn't like that at all it was like it was the it's what happens in bureaucracies when you put your head down and you're executing on some Asian say hold on earth sure are we sure should we think about this again because if you do that you're causing people enormous amount of work an enormous amount of de hang and you're trying to meet a series of deadlines and one decision leads to another decision leads to another decision and you never pick your head up and go back to like the first decision or fifty we should we go back to that initial decision to make sure it's the right thing I've heard lots of reasons as to why that's the case and I think that gets back to your point that there's something within the MTA that's funded needed to be reminded every single day that the law was the law and we we're going to enforce the law our job was not to be convinced by aw and by the way you know anything wrong like there's not some bad guy in the bowels of MTA who was like boy I can really hose those people in Williamsburg Coleman's and he doesn't choke to work and it's the subject of a lawsuit right now so I'll take a hands on governor that's on mighty any day over a Republican who wants to it is not specific to the MTA it it it's a big problem with MTA but it's not specific to the MTA so let's go back to PTC for a minute so early and it's going to be really expensive and we had the Amtrak derailment which was horrifying incident and many of his spent days in a railyard and a deadline. I finally put up a banner I went to make your own banner dot Com I put up a banner that said the deadline is December thirty and we've got to start functioning a real board right real boards should not stay above the fray Laker holier than thou stave of the synced to happen none of them didn't implement PCC and it's the same at the MTA they're all good people absolutely they're all good people and you get beaten the would would actually real board right so you you are and I'm not singling out I'm this Dorky to you and I are the Dorks that watch location of efforts and you don't WanNa do that you don't WanNa be that guy you don't WanNa be that person meeting right but it's also like there's something that's supposed to be nine at you saying are you appointed working supposed to exert oversight it's supposed to you know act as a you know overseer down by the institution you get beaten down by everyone on the outside telling you you're doing a terrible job get beaten down by all the people telling you whatever you're trying to do is going to be hard and impossible that was a thousand person bureaucracy the MTA is seventy four thousand person bureaucracy by the way none of the people are bad people none of them want every month but they're not like me watching these videos or the folks who go to the meetings every month how much time do board members spend digging into the inner workings of the agency I know some are more involved than others but do you feel the board should be above the fray or involved in the day-to-day going goings on within the MTA. Well I mean in a perfect world was that Amtrak was farther ahead than any railroad in the country actually implementing P. T. C. I get home from that accident and and the FAA's still like Oh yeah they're never going to be we're doing work it's supposed to be above everything so it can like keep a view on what's happening below and try to help the organization execute the timeline but I think if you don't have that kind of person leading everything you can end up getting stuck in a Rut of the organizational bureaucracies pressing down on everything the we are so I spend often twenty to twenty five hours a week doing MTA work unpaid competition it it it it does seem to be getting worse do you are there ways that you see that are getting worse that are alarming to you I think so I what am I supposed to be focused on what am I supposed to be doing so let's peel back the curtain a little bit a lot of New Yorkers I don't have a sense of how the MTA board works they know me so in a perfect world the board would be above the fray and would be would be functioning like a real board we're not in that perfect world we're nowhere close and so there are a bunch of board members who it was too hard or that it was too expensive or that it was impossible or be convinced by the Congress of other news things it was to enforce the law so so so you're not micromanaging not you don't appoint a board so that someone else can micromanage things in the middle of the agency right you hire board because it's supposed to does came to the conference room they would see the banner and be like okay she's not messing around that was part of it seventy five percents reason pedestrian rock was because my own bureaucracy and and management from the top all the way down to the bottom get super annoyed with this board which means we're doing right because every company gets annoyed I two thousand sixteen it's the law right and I hung it in the conference room and the reason I hung in the conference room everyone thought was because when freight any produced a report calling for some incremental reforms that could help improve oversight of the board including shifting their scope of review two major projects for the CEO exposed to create policy exposed to block and tackle to the extent that it can for folks and you get beaten down by the fact that you're meeting deadlines and you're trying to execute on projects and and at some point you have to pick your head up and say like well we what's my north star again like what am I like Oh yeah no one's going to meet that deadline just not going to happen and I would do would you talking about why the freight railroads always didn't like the deadline and they always thought it was like to your duty to serve public so I'm into it but there are many weeks spent fifteen twenty twenty five hours a week on this stuff I shouldn't be doing that right if the board were if every that sort of parallel to the governor and doesn't necessarily have the same level of do -ciary oversight that aboard would have at a Boeing recently reinvent you every company when they're in the middle of it and in the thick of it puts their back against their board and that means everybody's doing their job so in a similar vein then rather than all the smaller ones that show up handling policy discussions like fare hikes outside of the scope of major decision making and reforming the way in which appointments are made which would even give the board more power over management or ensure that the governor's the one directly appointing management do feel that these are suggestions the MTA should be looking thing we're functioning while I wouldn't be doing that but that's both my role as the transit committee chair and because I feel the need to dive into stuff to try and I'm not saying that happened the the the staff did but part of that twenty hours a week is getting on the phone saying what's the latest what's latest latest word after the oil spill now right so that's just it's part of being aboard and it's an served on Amtrak Board for for some amount of time and I think there's been increased attention on the structure of the board it's a little bit of a political issue because you have the governor who's in charge and you have a board talk to the vendor can we execute on this faster do you need more people I think that helps put people sort of out of their comfort zone talking about before right and that I thought some of it was useful I mean I think it's I mean I think frankly it is we should be so lucky to be having that debate right now like the board meeting and before it was on the board I was like watching the videos web stream so I'm right there with you and two you've heard my mantra that you also risk a bunch of people spending three months writing a piece of legislation that restructures aboard and good luck getting stuff done and frankly I think some of the some of the debate over who should appoint and how should happen it just feels like the to block and tackle for people to try to execute to try to keep people focused to say you know to to sort of beat a drum saying where are we on bus lines where are we on bus lanes where we invest lanes you probably heard anything on the cameras where are we on the cameras where we want to turn the cameras on I want to get bustling violations out there landscaping that we should do later you know so because the problem is when is that policymakers only have so much bandwidth I wish they had more but provides us with a massive opportunity massive opportunity we've been looking for and that we need to change everything so look the the report at one point calls for so it just feels like that's not what she spending time on right now so let's fix the place let's put the fire out three both the house and then you know like sure I I it's I think that a lot has been made of a blueprint I think it's a really helpful document I think it provides some guideposts knock guardrails but a guy posts I think that it blueprint but if we go over the next year from seventy four thousand employees to seventy one thousand people and then consolidate some stuff we will not have made it people on board who are appointed by column Special Interests or advocacy whatever you WANNA call them we've got people on the board who are aligned with the person who appointed them we've the organization do you feel that this transformation is part of the rebuilding of the roof that you were just talking about is this where the MTA is going to fix itself it's a blueprint right the report found some if it helpful I felt like a lot of it was too being dead horse but but yet I realized there are political decisions intimated Albany but would that help with the board would harm the board I mean I read the report this is like one hundred fifty yard like you know consolidate a couple things here a couple of things there you know somewhere between two and three thousand jobs the house is on fire and so we got to put the fire out and we got away put a new roof on and we got to like rebuild the house the agency while moving some power around centralizing management some folks have noted that looks like it's adding some more bureaucracy to the top of an early topic then let's do a lot of navel-gazing about who should be on board and what they should be doing it's certainly not a perfect setup we've got people on the board who don't vote we've got the other thing though there is will glaze over in asking you about the bus stop that was moved from one quarter to another which is all the time but if you are successful in that conversation different nope that's showing it's yeah and it's I mean and so I think it's a really helpful blueprint I think the brilliance of it was getting don't have much and so if you go to Albany new say I three priorities for the MTA this year and one is restructuring the board and governance and one is whatever and okay that's a fine blueprint if that's if we execute precisely at that massive failure like it's a it's a so this is I mean I think the segues nicely into the MTA transformation effort that's been ongoing the Alex Partner's report released over the summer seems to envision reshuffling the inner workings the on board who you know are appointed by someone and are probably aligned but are actually digging and doing a huge amount of work like is this the way I would build board no but like you know you you go fix the MTA board you have you don't wait till you have the perfect board and then you fix the MTA and execute on really massive change so looming over all of this too is the fifty one billion dollar capital plan which I think was a great board when the temperature is turned up right so you think you think Boeing likes their boy definitely not right do you think you know BP liked there rating budget because we've heard a lot of tension a ton of tension we've heard transit officials repeatedly over the past few months warn that there are potential service cuts need to understand that we need to reorganize the entire place I think it's really hard to tell us an organization to go reorganize yourself I think you need outside it's the road that's when like the real change happens right and that's when it's going to be really incumbent on the board and on the senior management people to come in with fresh eyes have experienced at other organizations to say think about this way think about it that way here's recommendations when the rubber way for the MTA to present what needs to do it was aggressive it shot for the moon it wasn't sort of just beating around the Bush laid out here's what we need to do to fix the great we can be great we can be big we're going to do big things are we struggling yes but we're going to get there and so against that but at the same time like of course we have to continue to do the day to day work of just running system that's losing money that it says worst struggling to execute on day to day life and maintenance and running this system but we know we can service around the margins to save a million dollars and investing billions into the system I mean I think it says the right I mean I think it's the right thing to the public this is Albany State legislators MTA management the public advocates all everybody has their Look there are all kinds of things you can you can find an operating budget that are problematic not lose sight of the fact that we have to address the day to day needs so like you know clan to have the best system in the country execute da over the next five years. I think there's this is what we can be there's a little bit of tension between now the capital plan and the star of the state the best transit agency in the entire country like the queen of the city. I'm absolutely convinced we can get there is coming up at some point before the end of the year with the budget sort of hanging in the balance what does this say to the public how do you sort of help reconcile the tensions between cutting the governor and on the mayor and the people who really matter here to to come up with insists and insist on is in a state of disrepair much better than it used to be a couple years ago but that is a constant source of of stress and struggle there is like look keeps coming up at board meetings and it should you've got to think big you've gotta shoot for the Stars but we've got we can a whole bunch of who we should wait until they figure out what the Billard should be restructured as and maybe we should just I don't know if we should procurement because who knows who's going to be here search for the joys of being ridiculed on twitter fan I do enjoy it and then I love public service and I feel like it's baby right that gets thrown into things like an operating budget we're running a shuttle service my favorite one is the shuttle service for running one hundred and eighty first street the reason we're running it to be clear is because there are a lot of folks who need us to take them up the hill okay so got it I Uh-huh if these plans are important forcing mechanisms they help you determine your priorities they act as a catalyst to get things moving but is my preference that Albany stays out of it sure because then it's one less one less entity in the mix right but they're not written in stone and they're always subject to change and you know again island on the side of transparency but anyone who argued gateway tunnel failure which means we have to pick up slack somewhere right so something will always happen and so the capital plan is these parents you fight was a little bit small to me because here's the reality which I the the reort plan is a blueprint to you know scroll back thirty minutes in our conversation generally you know I'm for people telling me what they think I frequently say at Transit Committee meetings the capital plan is a blueprint it's a plan plan beaten beats no plan Rutland always beats no plan plan also only lasts till the guy he ah a ten year budget that you see at the federal level does it mean that what we've said is going to happen year nine is going to happen but it's a it's a plan for how you get there and so estate is gearing up to hold some hearings on the capital plan next month is there concern that Albany is gonNA start putting its foot in the door here and try to change the plan fifty people telling you what they thought in New York whatever no-one calls me so so that's stunning to me but that's why I think the Tree uh-huh into a ways and means document the president's budget the President Obama's rhetoric president trump's budget

MTA MTA MTA Benjamin k Obama Sarah White House FAA two years eight months fifty one billion dollar five years fifteen twenty twenty five hou one hundred fifty yard twelve fifteen minutes seven eight months twenty five hours eighteen months
James Whelan 7-19-20

CATS Roundtable

08:28 min | 8 months ago

James Whelan 7-19-20

"Jay Farner here CEO of rocket mortgage, making the right financial decisions has never been more important. When you turn to rocket mortgage, we can help guide you to those right decisions now when they matter most mortgage rates are near historic lows, so now is a great time to call eight three three eight rocket, and if you need some extra money, a cash out, refinance could give you that financial boost. You're looking for call today at eight, three, three eight rocket or go to rocketmortgage. ROCKETMORTGAGE DOT COM to learn more call for cost information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and MLS number thirty thirty good morning new. York this is the cats round contacts between here Sunday morning. We all love New York. What's going on? When is our city opening up? I have one of the most important people in our city on with us this morning. You're saying is James and he's president and real. Estate Board of New York or otherwise known as. And he's quite concerned and good morning Mr Whalen. How are you? John Good morning to speak with you. Thanks for having me on the show. New York we we. We all love it. And, we all wanted to get. Opened up again and we wanted to go back to normal. Give us your view from the real estate industry, but something in terms of the reopening, some things have gone well. The reopening process has been in place in New York City now for about seven weeks. for those portions that have reopened reopening has gone smoothly, so you know construction sites are up and running would very few problems outdoor dining you know I has been well received by the public and yet life's about. About priorities and we gotta keep in mind that it's critical that we reopened safely from a health perspective because we don't want to replicate what's been experience in other parts of the country in half to close up the economy that restarted. We've been able to keep the spread of the virus down for seven weeks now since reopening starting and we just gotTa keep that going as more and more parts of the economy reopen. New Yorkers waiting. For a virus vaccine. What's what make them feel? More comfortable I. Know You're on the phone with the governor. A week to go, and he was very much concerned about getting the city back again, what do you? What do you think the next steps are going to have to be to reopen? New York the right way. But I I think there's a few steps to it I mean first off so we gotta keep taking the approach we're taking in governor shown a lot of leadership on this, but you know folks have the practice the basics about where mass practicing social distance washing hands, the state and health officials right now are trying to figure out what's the safest way to get indoor uses reopen like restaurants gyms, folks are would love for indoor dining the return to the city in gyms and we just gotTa make sure we can do it in a safe way that makes sure we control the virus you know next. There's an issue of public confidence. Confidence in public confidence in a few respects, one is building public confidence in the mass transit. System had foy Sarah Feinberg in their team. They've done a superb job under incredibly difficult circumstances and is places around the world like France. Hong Kong and Japan that have been able to successfully reopen their mass transit system without problems without spikes and a virus, so it much more attention needs to be paid to building public confidence in our own mass transit system. Because you know again. They've done a terrific job over the last few weeks preparing it for more and more people to use it then you know the other thing is building. In the city's quality life I I mean let's admit it's been a pretty few rough weeks. In New York, shootings are up dramatically. The homeless population is not being well served in there was looting and midtown. We really need our local leaders to send a message that things are gonNA. Get better that they have control of these issues 'cause. It's going to impact a variety of situations. We need city residents. Come back to their homes. The New York Times. Times reported in May. That five percent of the city's population is left. We need these folks to come back, but you know one of Barry's them coming back. IS THEY WANNA? Be Coming back to a city. They feel is well run. You know also we need employers and employees stock coming back to the office buildings in Manhattan, Brooklyn Queens That's GONNA start helping retailers. It's going to start generating more economic activity. It's going to generate more tax revenue. Revenue like sales tax revenue to help pay for government services, but part of that is our local leaders, really stepping up and sending a message that you know they have quality life under control that they want folks back you know the city's been through tough times four we've come through each situation better and stronger. We're going to get through these tough times, and we really need our local leaders to start sending a message in with their daily. Daily actions show. They have the situation under control and new. York has better days at We find I I. I know that we were a breakfast together at one time and and the statement was made sixty two percents of all monies contributed to politicians comes from the real estate and state related industries. What do we do about our local politicians and our local state politicians that they worry more about common sense and worry more about our. Our citizens then we worry about a criminals. It seems like the criminals are are being more respected than our politics, then our citizens and more so than our police department by two things come to mind I is education I think of a a a statistic to put out there, which is about the numbers, fifty two percent and fifty two percent represents the amount of real estate taxes. Share of real estate taxes of all. All the taxes the city collects on an annual basis. Fifty two percent of it is real estate taxes, and it just goes to show that elected officials need to appreciate that the better the real estate industry does New York City the better off. The city's going to do in terms of having the resources available to pay for basic government services, and then the second thing is a matter of building coalitions and you know an example of that is. Is If you. Remember one of the controversies when Amazon, you know was a essentially driven out of Queens driven out of new. York City had to deal with the economic development incentives you know like one in particular cold reap which encourages the location of jobs that boroughs outside Manhattan. Well, that was up for renewal this year in Albany and you know organizations from throughout the five boroughs teamed up and work together and made sure that those. Those incentives got renewed for another five years, so part of it sort of a new way of doing business real estate, working with others really to put pressure on to try to get elected officials to focus more on more on job creation, the creation of housing and generating new tax revenue to pay for basic government services I'm not saying it's going to be easy. We have a lot of challenging days ahead and some very tough conversations, but it's doable. we've got a minute left MR whaling What would you say to all New York City or One time or another that have temporarily hopefully temporarily escaped. You, know New York has had tough times before you know most recently nine eleven and I remember back in nine eleven I was dealing with redevelopment downtown Brooklyn and and the day after nine eleven, folks were saying that was the end of basically the end of the commercial market in new. York City companies are gonNA hurt their businesses throughout the the country and throughout the world, and the fact that a matter is a New York never had a stronger commercial market than in the years after nine eleven so If all work together we're GONNA get through this crisis and when to come out of it. Stronger and better than we've ever been before. That's what I tell people. New York has always done back in new. York is the greatest city in the world from your mouth to God's ears and I'm behind you and thank you for coming on Sunday morning and God bless God, bless America John. It's a pleasure. You're the best thanks for everything. You're doing thinking. We'll be right back.

New York City York City York The New York Times York Manhattan Brooklyn John Good Jay Farner CEO Mr Whalen Sarah Feinberg James Albany
Episode 66: An Opera For Plants, China's New Domestic Abuse Law, Facial Recognition on the Subway

Strange News Daily

13:20 min | 8 months ago

Episode 66: An Opera For Plants, China's New Domestic Abuse Law, Facial Recognition on the Subway

"Home where families connect and memories are made. Find your new home with pen fed a mortgage partner who brings confidence value to your home buying experience they offer low rates and no lender fees, and can even help you find a real estate agent through their trusted partners. Let Penn Fed bring you home, visit Penn Fed dot org slash home or call one, eight, hundred, nine, seven, zero, seven, seven, six, six to receive any advertise product. You must become a member of pen fed insured by NCUA, equal housing lender. Strange News daily is a production of iheartmedia. In a world full of bizarre events, unsolved mysteries and two billion stories from all corners of the globe, some news gets lost in the shuffle. This is your gateway to the stories of the fringe of the mainstream map. These are your dispatches in the dark I'm Ben Bullen, and this is the strange news stable. Our first story, today. And Opera House in Barcelona reopened its doors on Monday for the first time in over three months they held concert, but not for human beings. Instead the audience was loosely plants, nearly two thousand three hundred house plants one in every seat organizers say the intention was to reflect on the absurdity of the human condition in the era of the coronavirus pandemic, which deprives people of their position as spectators, executive producer Eugenia Pujo said. Nature advanced to occupy the spaces. We snatched from it. Can we extend our empathy? Let's begin with art and music integrate theater by inviting nature in. After the concert, which was live streamed the two thousand, two hundred ninety two nursery plants placed on every seat were donated to frontline health workers. This concert for the bio scene was made possible by the ending of Spain state of emergency on Sunday. It featured a string quartet playing Italian composer Jacome Puccini's Chrysanthemum was chosen for its requiem sadness. The. Opera House observed all the usual rituals of regular musical performance with announcements given over loudspeakers when the concert was about to begin, both before, and after the six minute performance for elegantly dressed musicians respectfully bowed to the audience of plants. The. Opera House says it hopes the show will reaffirm the value of art music and nature while serving as a roadmap for returning to normal activity after the pandemic Spain has been one of the nation's worst affected by covid nineteen. As of this week, the country officially has twenty, eight, thousand, three, hundred and twenty three cove, nineteen deaths, and a total of two, hundred, forty, six, thousand, two, hundred and seventy two cases so far. Our second story today a city in eastern China is introducing a new system that will let people getting married if their partner has a history of abuse. The town of you who is launching this inquiry service, and it will be available to residents starting this July. People who are ranging to get married will soon be able to fill out a form to see if their partners have any history of violence, either between family members, or during times of cohabitation. All they need to do to access. This information is to produce a form of ide- as well as personal information on the person. They're planning to marry. One. Person is allowed to make a maximum of two inquiries per year. The Women's Federation in the city welcomes the move, saying the system will help protect people from domestic violence. The domestic violence registered database will begin by using information provided by the courts and public security organs from two thousand seventeen onwards. This system also got approval from academics like law. Professor Han. Who says this system protects a person's right to be informed about the personality of their significant other before tying the knot. The systems also been praised on Chinese social media and many social media. Users are calling for this program to be rolled out across the country. Some, say the new system should also include child abuse, noting that it's geared toward giving transparencies of beatings and physical abuse rather than sexual violence. There have been growing calls in China in recent years to recognize hold accountable people who have a history of domestic abuse before two thousand and one physical abuse wasn't even grounds for divorce. Domestic violence only became punishable by law in March of two, thousand sixteen. Concerns about victims of domestic violence have been growing amid lockdowns during the epidemic. Domestic media sources are Nudie police reports on domestic violence doubled or even tripled in some areas where citizens were under lockdown. And just last month fears about domestic violence grew after China made it more difficult for couples to divorce introducing a new thirty day. Cool off period that was meant to allow both parties time to rethink their decision. Social media users at the time. Reese concerned that this law could lead to some people being coerced into backtracking or that it could deter victims from speaking out or leaving violent relationships. This law which will come into effect at the beginning of twenty twenty one is not applicable to families with a history of domestic violence. However, they're also standing concerns that not all cases can be detected. Will keep an eye on this situation. An update on its progress as the program kicks into gear. Our third story today takes place in New, York City where transit officials are exploring a controversial plan to use AI software to track how many subway riders or wearing face mask and where they're wearing them. This technology is already used in Paris. It's one of a host of ideas presented in a consultant's report released to the public earlier this week. That could help transit authorities measured the level of facemask compliance at specific subway stations. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority commissioned this study inmate. Though forty one page document details, the best practices from transit systems around the world in combating the spread of Covid, nineteen. The list includes things like high tech tools such as thermal scanner temperature checks as well as UV lamps, or even robots, which China has deployed on buses to kill the virus on various surfaces. Andre Behrman a spokesman for the MTA says. We're exploring the feasibility of a wide range of tools and approaches for helping to keep our employees and customers safe. A is one of those tools and will continue to research whether it might be effective, and if so, how it might be deployed in an appropriate manner to continue ensuring best public health practices are followed for the safety of our customers and employees. So. Why is facial recognition controversial? Well? It has strong potential to be weaponized and using this in such a widespread manner will likely continue the debate around privacy and transparency. But. The current debate over a is much more complicated. New! Yorkers are struggling to resume their lives amid the shadow of a pandemic. That's already killed more than twenty two thousand residents of the city. Knicks. As the executive director of the Tri State Transportation Campaign's said. We have to juggle the Chitimia. Privacy concerns and concerns about public safety and public health, according to see as the evidence suggests that the MTA needs to prioritize mask enforcement over arguably more expensive and unreliable technology, I e temperature scans. He says the goal is one hundred percent mass compliance. The public health threat that you pose is certainly much greater than the privacy threat as a noncompliant individual. Supporters say concerns about privacy could be addressed by using anonymous data where the system would remove personally identifiable information. That's what's happening to the Paris metro system. The software is not used to punish individual writers, but instead to collect information. That'll help. City officials anticipate the location future outbreaks. The technology can also be used to measure the level of mass wearing at specific locations, and this could allow transit officials to direct resources to stations with low compliance. Still critics of this surveillance technique remains skeptical in twenty, nine, thousand, nine, the MTA acknowledged a Wall Street. Journal story that it was already running a pilot program to record an identify faces of drivers driving through the Robert F Kennedy Bridge the initial efforts here were not successful. A spokesperson said the information was only being used for security. Albert Fox Foxconn. The founder and Executive Director of Surveillance Technology Oversight Project or stop for short notes that the MTA has a standing trust gap with the Public Cure. Stop recently sued the MTA over its refusal to provide information about video monitor installed time square to detect fare evasion MTA officials said that the camera was not using facial recognition technology, but stopped demanded to see internal agency documents about the cameras installation. In May Supreme Court, Judge ruled that the agency had wrongly denied Fox. Requests without any explanation. Con Warns that the use of surveillance technology could give way to a predictable result or police encounters, more needless arrest and more violence. He pointed out that MTA's cameras were being used by NYPD to locate and remove homeless individuals in subway stations. He also says excessive surveillance is a matter of life and death I am terrified that we will see writers of color singled out by and arrested for not wearing masks. Early on information from the city showed large racial disparities in the social distancing and mass wearing policies of New Yorkers in mid-may Mayor Bill De. BLASIO announce that the in PD would no longer enforce the facemask rule after video of Brooklyn mother getting handcuffed in a subway station for not wearing a mask went viral another challenge here the MTA will soon be managing a growing number of mass transit users as the city continues to reopen, so we ridership past one million on Tuesday June twenty third, and that's a more than one hundred and fifty percent increase since April before the pandemic weekday subway ridership was around five point five million. Sarah Feinberg. Who is the interim head of the New, York, Metropolitan Transportation. Authority recently said the key is going to be masked. Vigilance Danny Perlstein the policy and communications director for the advocacy group Riders Alliance still voices concerns is urged the MTA look more broadly at other solutions like increasing the frequency of service, especially during off peak hours in terms of safety, he said that giving passengers, even just a little extra breathing room would be better than resorting to surveillance technology. Ultimately, he summed it up by saying using machines that can profile riders will make people less comfortable than giving them an extra six inches for their elbow. That's all for now. We've been asking you to Chime in with suggestions for stories. You think your fellow listeners might enjoy to hit us with your best or worst puns and bad jokes, and to tell us about your personal experience, covid, nineteen, the ongoing protests or strange local stories from your neck of the global woods. Let us know tag, Hashtag strange daily on twitter or reach out to me directly I'm APP bullying H. W. on twitter or at Ben Bullen on instagram. Thanks as always to our super producer Dylan Fagin. Our Research Associates Sam tea-garden and. Thanks to you, I'm Ben. Bullet will see you tomorrow until then stay strange. Jetta, Credit, card, that gives you what you need now. A low interest rate on everyday purchases an placed a transfer high interest rate balances the pen fed gold contactless card is our lowest interest rate credit card. You can even earn a one hundred dollars statement credit when you spend fifteen hundred dollars in the first ninety days. Join Penn Fed and together they can help you. Keep more of what's yours visit? Penn Fed dot org slash gold card to receive any advertise product. You must become a member of pen fed insured by NCUA.

MTA China partner MTA Penn NCUA Opera House Paris MTA Strange News MTA MTA Ben Bullen Penn Fed Albert Fox Spain Barcelona
Monday, June 1, 2020

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

36:03 min | 9 months ago

Monday, June 1, 2020

"ABC's Aaron Katersky and this is bringing America back what you need to know. Already in the grip of a deadly pandemic, the nation has been convulsed by days of protests over the death of George Floyd in many cities, demonstrations have devolved into vandalism, looting, fires and clashes with police, a country of shut. Ins is now outdoors together again. Country reeling from public health and economic crises exploded after just the latest incident exposing deep-rooted. In all aspects of American life from law enforcement to healthcare mass protests against police have brought thousands into the streets, and they're raising concerns about new corona virus outbreaks. How many super spreaders were in that craft? Well, they mostly young people. How many young people went home? and. Kiss their mother hello. Or Shoe can't with their father or hugged their father or the grandfather or the grandmother or their brother or their sister. and spread of ours that was new. York Governor Andrew. Cuomo earlier today Dr John Brownstein is an epidemiologist at Boston Children's hospital and an ABC news contributor from an epidemiologist perspective. How do you view these crowds of demonstrators? It's an unfortunate situation that we have. Competing public health crises happening at the exact same time, and so it creates a challenge in dealing with both of them simultaneously when the activities of one are not aligned with the activities that required for the other. And as we've said all along mass gatherings create. A great opportunity for virus transmission. On the other hand. These protests are incredibly necessary. And, so the best thing we can do to offer guidelines and practices for safe participation in these events, clearly, it's not bringing risk down to zero, and we expect to see increasing cases as a result, but again these are necessary activities in this moment in America, and so, what is one to do if you are moved to go out into the street? I think it's every one's right to be able to go and do this. On the only thing we encourage is of course mask wearing hand sanitize Asian. Proxy social distancing where you can. Try to do so. Participating as safely as possible you know that's the best we can do and hope that. These events don't sort of have secondary consequences, which of course would be emergency a new waves of transmission? The other concern clearly is that in situations were conflict arises in the use of pepper spray. comes into play. These can induce coughs. I'm which again further might worsen. Virus transmission people have been shut in. They WanNa Co Express themselves and yet. This precise kind of gathering does pose a risk of transmitting the virus. Yeah I mean at the end of the day. We're calculating risks and you know in times before you know. It wasn't a necessity to go out and demonstrate solidarity in an imporant, you know position of the need for change. Right this moment that is more critical and so clearly. There's a balancing of risks, but again you know were. Police brutality is and other public health crisis that needs to be addressed just as much as the pandemic does. How concerned are you that there could be a wave of infection that results from all of the protests that we've been seeing clearly the protests of maintained plays in places that are still at the very early stages of reopening here in Boston. That's true same is true New York City other places that have experienced the worst of the virus, so these are not places where transmission. Has Come down to zero. They're still active transmission happening in the community, so we expect to see. Cases Rise as a result of this Dr. John Brownstein with us from Boston amid all of this businesses are reopening from their corona virus closures. As of today. You can get a haircut again in Connecticut. Chris Roses the owner of professional barber shop in downtown Hartford where he's been cutting hair for the last thirty odd years. How is it to be open again Chris? It's great to be opened again. After two and half months. Of being close. With zero income. It's It feels good again. It feels like. Countries, getting back to normal now. Slow pace but. Seems like things are getting back to normal. Did. You have a crowd of customers waiting for you to open this morning. A huge crowd! People calling like crazy. They can. Appointments for today all week long. and. It's just yeah, it's. Today's Mondays there usually are slow day. Because you know. barbershops closed on Mondays And it feels like a Friday. Over here at the barber shop, but I. A good feeling for you after as you say, a couple of months of being closed. Fantastic. It was. It was tough to just sit at home. For two and a half months. And just. You, know what it makes me definitely. Definitely feel you know I definitely. Don't want to retire anytime soon and. Nice to. Go back to work. How are you taking precautions or anything? You're doing differently to make sure that everybody's staying healthy and safe. We're following all the. Rules with the state of Connecticut. Everybody's got masks on. we have no waiting room. where? Disinfecting everything. Warren after customers. So we're definitely taken cautions and. Nobody getting sick spreading anything where Tim taking people's temperatures when they come in. We're not even letting people hang coats or jackets or anything and you know just. Just very. A different. It's definitely different. Now the barbershop Feeling, but it's it's. Coming along you know I mean I know I'm desperate for a haircut. How rough shape or these people's heads in? I feel like we're a nation of mullets. It seems. Everybody is walking in here. It's like GOING BACK TO THE SEVENTY S Got A big head full of hair. Look like Welfare Anchorman. Chris Rosa from Professional Barber Shop. In Connecticut, it probably won't take much convincing to get people back to a barbershop, but what about the subway or a commuter train or a bus? As New York City prepares to begin phase one of its reopening next week ABC's amy robot spoke to the interim president of the MTA. Sarah Feinberg about safety and the subway governor Cuomo has said reopening doesn't mean going back to how things were in the past. So how is the MTA preparing for this phase one of reopening? That's right well. It's good to be with you, so the first knows we've been planning for this reopening. Sense the beginning, so we've been planning for this now. For many many weeks. The first thing that we've been doing is cleaning and disinfecting the system, so we now clean and disinfect the stations twice today, and we clean and disinfect all of the fleet of railcars multiple types days. We're doing everything we can to make sure that the cars and the station that the buses that people getting on our as clean and safe as possible or also taking a. A lot of other steps, making sure that we've got hand sanitizer on hand stations in a mass will absolutely be required, but will also have a few masks on hand for those who, for that first day or two forget their mascot halt, so we're trying to do everything we can to sure that the system is aging clean as possible and also communicate with our writers at what they can do to keep themselves safe. I'm curious what you think about. The CDC recommendations that workers should avoid mass transit like the MTA. What do you think about that? We'll look at. It just doesn't work in New York. City, so if if people in New York City. Decide not use mass transit and everyone gets in a car instead. No one's getting anywhere. No one is getting to work that day at all you will run out of gas on one of the bridges, and you will be stuck in bumper to bumper traffic on the SDR of other road, but but no one's. One's getting to work that day. So you know look, I think the CDC's doing the best they can under very tough circumstances I absolutely disagree with them on this. Let that might work in some places. It might work in the suburbs. It might work in rural. America is not going to work in New York City and even if you did get to where you're a going good luck, parking all right Sarah Feinberg. Thank you very much for joining us today for all of your efforts. During these times, we appreciate it. Great to be with you. Concerns growing that widespread protests may cause corona virus, cases and death tolls to rise with me now as ABC chief medical correspondent Dr Jen Ashton. There are so many concerns today, but a lot of people are starting to go back to work. Cities are reopening, so workplaces are trying to figure out if testing can be used as a way to get employees back to work well, we're certainly. Certainly, looking at that, and that's the hope. We even heard the Atlanta mayor say if you were protesting this weekend, you should be probably tested for corona virus this week because you're close together, you're yelling in terms of testing. Here's what we know right now for a deep dive. The FDA authorized the first home option saliva. Test back on May seventh. That may be hugely important as As people try to go back to work, it was developed by researchers at Rutgers University. There is one FDA authorized at home nasal swab but the thinking is really that saliva testing, because it's so much less uncomfortable than the nasal swab may be better as it gets brought into the mainstream, and we don't have long term data on the saliva testing, but what is thinking about? About saliva versus the swamp well, that's a really important question. Amy, anytime you talk about a test. You have to look at how accurate it is, and what kind of results it gives. Theories are that it likely results in lower exposure to healthcare workers, which is why so much attention is going towards this type of saliva testing, and in terms of data, it may actually give more. Consistent results then the nasal swab so again with that's referring to is false positives or false negatives. Test is only as good as the data results. You can get from it so a lot of enthusiasm. Our hope about this saliva test and yet we talk about this a lot. There are still so many unknowns right, and so one of the biggest is how or if this will be utilized. Let's say in workplace or even school communities how it can be manufactured, and then processed in massive quantities, because that is a key that re- that involves supply chain issues, and then again cost. You have to talk about cost. If something is available like I'm hoping for, let's say on. On the drug store shelf it has to be inexpensive enough that people can go get it and use it in many cases repeated right because there's not one and done probably not all right Dr Jen, thank you very much. Over the weekend. As we mentioned, a wave of protests swept across this country in response to the death of George Floyd, in Oakland as in many cities with started as peaceful protests turned violent with reports of vandalism and looting here to discuss this Oakland Mayor Libby Chef and mayor chef last night's. We know that shots were fired at the police administration building, and unlike other city is cities in the bay area. You have not imposed a curfew why? We've not imposed a curfew at this time because we want to focus our law, enforcement resources on people who are committing criminal acts of violence, vandalism looting and we did make sixty arrest last night. And we recognize that we will. We are not taking that off the table. We are constantly assessing the conditions and the intelligence that we have, but if we do impose a curfew, it's with the knowledge that historically curfews have been used as tools of government, oppression and racial bias, and so it's very. That we recognize that historical context, should we choose to use what is pretty indiscriminate tool again last night we were able to be very effective at bringing people to justice removing them from doing the harm to our community, but it is at an unacceptable level. We certainly are looking at every tool at our disposal, even though we recognize that historical context of this particular tool and Obviously we are in really tough times, even before this with this pandemic business owner struggling. What would you like to say to those business owners in Oakland who are now also concerned about their property and their safety right now. We are in a lot of pain in this city to wake up and see our beloved community trashed with with hateful messages, graffitied everywhere and incredible damage to not just you know big corporate stores, but little mom and pops many businesses owned by people of Color and and that is what has been so painful. You Know Oakland was one of the very first parts of this whole country to go into a shelter in place. We've been taking the corona virus endemic very seriously, and so these small business folks are just hanging on by a thread already, and they are so sympathetic. This is Oakland. We're the birthplace of social movements. We we have been doing this hard work around racial social justice for a long time, and so to see these these store owners that have put their entire lives into their livelihoods. It has been heartbreaking, but we are continuing to create safe space for those who want to express their justifiable rage and grief at the national travesty of racism, but But we are also trying to protect our community, and it has been very disconcerting just to see the national level of civil unrest. Certainly certainly and we and we've heard actually from the Atlanta mayor earlier today about this next question. How concerned are you about the potential spread of the corona virus in your city now as a result of all of these people gathering in close contact during these protests. I am terrified because let's be clear. This virus spreads so easily and I am very concerned that two weeks from now we will see a tremendous spike on Friday night. We had nearly eight thousand protesters all in a single tight group. That is not safe. I will commend other kind of. Activists organized a CAR CARAVAN A to demonstrate yesterday two thousand cars that was socially distant and also expressing appropriately during the daytime. The rise raising up the issue that is really in people's hearts right now, but people cannot afford to get sick and many of the impacts last night were in the very neighborhoods that have been disproportionately impacted by the corona virus, and that has been just what has really been painful as a mayor that that is so committed to the safety and wellbeing of my convene mayor chef over the weekend to federal officers stationed outside a federal building there in downtown Oakland were shot on. One of those officers was killed and a senior official from Homeland Security tells ABC, News that shooting is related to the protests over the death. Authorities are calling it an act of domestic terrorism. What can you tell us about this investigation right now? Yeah our hearts go out the friends and families of Patrick Underwood. He is the federal agent who was killed on Friday night. And this level of hatred and Animus is is just killing our country. It is ripping US apart. All this harm is not advancing the message. My understanding is that whether or not it is related is still under investigation. It is being seen as an act of domestic terrorism, and we certainly hope that the FBI and federal investigators bring Mr. Underwood's killer to justice and we certainly WanNa. Thank you, Oakland Mayor. Libby shaft for taking the time to speak with us today during these times. Thank you up next right here when we come back Dr, Jen Ashton joining us with your corona virus questions plus the beloved tradition looking a lot different this year for many families, the virtual summer camp that may offer a getaway without ever leaving home. There's not a person in. America hasn't been impacted in some way by the coronavirus pandemic, but at every community there are pockets of people who suiting up every day. Last. Seventy stretch these. Essential workers the people who are keeping our world moving. To drop off, produce for one of our tenants, and now in a new podcast from ABC News. You're going to hear from them in their own words, but there's always the risk that I could bring this home to my kids or my husband or my parents. This is the essentials inside the listen on Apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP. Welcome back to what you need to know. We have Dr. Jen Ashton here in the House and Dr Jen. There's a new study out. That is looking at the connection between diabetics and complications with covid nineteen. Yeah, this was really interesting. It was a study done in France and they were looking at patients with diabetes both types type, one and type two, because usually when we hear the word diabetes without even saying we're really. Dealing with the people with type two diabetes, but this study in France found that one in ten patients with diabetes died in the first seven days after hospitalization for nineteen, one in five patients with diabetes needed ventilator support in terms of breathing needs to be put on a ventilator in terms of this group they found higher rates of death against with men with diabetes with obese men with diabetes, and with diabetes alone, and they teased it out. Eighty nine percent had type two diabetes. Three percent had type, one diabetes, and again the thinking is that just having diabetes can alter our immune response our. Our basic inflammation level which a May then interact with cove nineteen, and so learning more about this population, really really important, because we've known really from the beginning that there are much higher risk, and so you always say, it's important to know how you can use results. So what can we do Dakhla, and so I think one of the the hopes or directions in the future is that if you really understand how high risk this group is, then, could they be screened differently? Could they get aggressive treatment that differs from patients who don't have diabetes? That's the key in medicine. Once you make that observation. Observation Tailoring to actually improve clinical outcomes right from the onset when they walk in. If they know they're diabetic, maybe there could be more aggressive former literally, rony beginning exactly that's the hope next question now that things are opening up. Should we be concerned about using currency rather than credit cards? So many people wondering the same thing? Amy and I think first of all. It depends on how you felt before about using currency. Remember that the virus has not disappeared. It's still there, so we have to learn how to live with it. Good News. Is that just recently? We heard the CDC say they believe. Believe that contact spread or foe might transmission to geek out with the technical term is not a major route of spread of corona virus so again handwashing is the most important thing and we have to balance. We can't live our life in a sterile environment, and that's right this next question I'm going to be listening to because I haven't seen my mother in five months. So this you were asks. I haven't seen my mother in four months because she lives twelve hundred miles away. What is the best way for me to visit? Is it safe to fly or is driving the best method well in? You know what we know about. The transmission of various respiratory pathogens in air travel is not as bad as people think. It's actually a lot safer than you think. Depending on various conditions, obviously spacing hand hygiene wearing masks. That air is circulated every four minutes through heap filters on major airlines. So that's good news. Driving of course can be safe as well but again when you stop. If you need to get gas, use a bathroom, eat stay overnight in a motel or hotel. You could get exposure then so it's about balancing that and making an individual decision about what's best for you. Next question! Could a microwave or oven kill covid nineteen on surfaces like paper, plastic or food probably but again to go back to the CDC, reese and finding. They really don't think that surfaced contact. Transmission is a major concern here for this spread, so microwave or intense heat kills almost everything. But where are you going to draw the line then right? You can't obviously microwave or heat everything so I think it's a balance and again the respiratory transmission much much arrests. Yeah, that's important to remember when you're weighing what? All right next question. Do you think we will see requirements for international travel that may include showing testing and results for both people entering and leaving the US well very interesting question because again you and I have spoken about this so much. If you test someone, it doesn't catch everyone who's infected. That's just a basic premise of infectious disease, because there's a latency period from when someone is exposed to win, the disease starts to manifest either with symptoms, or in this case forty percent up. Possibly don't have any symptoms, so if you screen based on symptoms, you're GonNa Miss. Miss People, any test can have false negatives so whether we're going to see that coming soon to a theater near US unclear at this point I'm sure people are looking at it country by country, but again that's not the only infectious disease that we have to worry about. It's just added to the list and right now it's at the top of the list. That's true. That's true all right. Dr Jen, always giving us that good perspective, we appreciate it, and you can submit questions to Dr. Jen on her instagram. At Dr J. Ashton, this summer is going to look. Look a lot different this year. Due to the corona virus, many camps are closed or are operating unlimited capacity, which means parents will have to switch from home schoolteacher to camp counselor well here to help and tell us all about her virtual summer camp called Happy Camper. Live is Allison Miller. Thanks so much for being with us and tell us how you created. Happy Camper live so I'm actually a real life summer camp, director I've Been Camp Director for twenty two years, and about two and a half years ago, my husband and daughter volunteered a global camps Africa and And they spent two weeks working with kids from the poorest townships of Suadeau, when they came back light their lives for change, and they kept talking about their experience in the impact. It had on the kids that they work with and day after day we'd being conversations and I said to my husband I wanNA bring summer camp to every kid in the world, no matter where they are geographically no matter what their socio economic hands I want to bring them the magic summer camp, and so this was created two and a half years ago when we spent two summers. Building and Engaging real camp counselors in producing these hundreds of camp activities that are part of our website today all right and so yes I can understand how that might happen in person. But how do you bring that experience to these kids virtually? Well great is. We have so many things that we can bring kids in our world. We have live activities every day where we have these real camp. Counselors that are engaging with the kids inspiring in terms of what their passions are, and then we have hundreds of other activities that we have produced that have sports and music and art and fitness and dancing, and all of the things that we do at summer camp bringing that. That right to their homes. We also created this three hundred sixty degree virtual experience where they actually go into the camp, and they can try those activities and experience them the actual facilities in a campground so while we can't bring them all to camp. We are bringing camp to them. Pretty Cool, and I'm sure parents who are listening to this or thinking. This sounds pretty nice, but the next question will be. Does it cost money to participate? So we have free content every single day for kids and we make that accessible. That's part of my mission. We have live content as well as recorded content that they can experience as well as a subscription model, which is four, nine, thousand, nine for a month or eleven ninety nine for three months, so we tried to price it very reasonably, but there's plenty plenty of things for the kids to do. That's pretty and also have a great blog that gives parents, tons and tons of ideas of what they can also do too well Allison Miller. Thank you for all that you're doing and I'm sure parents everywhere are applauding your efforts as well. Thank you so much and have a wonderful summer. Thank you you too now. The rising problem of dropping vaccination rates a casualty of the coronavirus pandemic ABC's Diane Macedo with the warning from doctors and some creative possible solutions. The world anxiously awaits vaccine for COVID nineteen experts warn children nationwide are falling behind on other vaccines, leaving them vulnerable to dangerous preventable diseases, a recent survey by ABC News Shows Every one of the twenty states that responded reported a rapid decrease in the number of children receiving routine vaccinations this after the CDC reported the number of vaccine doses order for mid March to mid. April was down from last year by two point five. Five million doctors warn the drop could lead to so called many epidemics measles. There's also protests were really worry or going to see untold cases of measles, measles is way more infectious than coveted sir now, trying to assure patients that the doctor's office is a safe place to be as I. recently took my son for his own vaccinations. The waiting room was completely empty, and his doctor assured me precautions in place we see. In the afternoon and we clean everything. Overnight start everything all over again. Kirk, you and Some are also finding creative ways to make these visits as easy as possible here in New York. My pediatrician has teamed up with adult doctors to, offer family checkups? Everything is seen by the. And the adults who may have. Their own healthcare. All the same time for me, it meant I could just walk down the hall and get my own checkup long-overdue. Check otherwise. The trip I was fearing for me and my son ended up bringing me much peace of mind for his health and my own. And our thanks to Diane for that a challenge, parents and caregivers are facing right now is understanding the importance of getting your children vaccinated, even and maybe even especially during a pandemic to shed a little more light and answer a few questions on the topic of vaccines, please welcome Dr Harvey Carper Noun Pediatrician Sleep expert inventor of the SNNU and New York Times. Author thanks for being with US Dr Carp so if you can start by telling us the importance of getting your kids vaccinated before during and after a pandemic. I know it's a crazy crazy time, and of course everybody's been sheltering. Get home, and so that's caused a real drop in visits to the doctor and immunizations, but you know we would. Parents would line up around the block if there were a vaccine against cove, it and we have great vaccines against so many illnesses that are even much more serious for young children than coke. It is measles. I'm Menigitis like that whooping cough, which can be quite quite serious and land children in the hospital. Hospital or even worse, so we it. It's understandable why there's been a reduction in the number of of vaccinations. Some states like Massachusetts and Minnesota show sixty or seventy percent drop, but now that we're kind of inching back into our lives, we also have to get back into getting children protected, and there are so many ways that doctors are making that easy and safe professionals. That's right and I know you say there are two reasons. We should not put off those vaccines. What are they? Well of course, one is to protect your child right I. Mean You want your child to be protected against getting some serious illness? The other to protect all the other children in your community, because these are very contagious, diseases measles a huge outbreak in in Washington. State earlier in the year. Measles is like a thousand times more contagious than covert is and so just as all of the other children who have gotten back stated, and all of the parents were brought their kids to the doctors to get vaccinated over the last ten years are protecting your child right now, so there's less illness around the babies are born a month in two and a year from now are depending on all of us to get our vaccines. The keep the rates of. Illnesses low, so they're not at risk. Yeah, no, that makes perfect sense and obviously we know it's important to keep our babies and our children safe, but sometimes as parents way, forget that we're important, too. So explain what parents can do to stay safe and healthy while keeping their family safe. We know his JEN said earlier. It's all about good hygiene right now you know, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer and wear masks when you're out in public and try to get your sleep, which is hard to do as a parent, but you know you WanNa? Do the best. You can to avoid Kobe right now. That's the big scary thing and the last apparent wants is to get sick with that. Babies don't do so badly with it. Adults can be seriously ill so probably. The number one thing for parents to do right now is to do all those good hygiene recommendations that that all doctors are talking about. Yes, because if we're not helping, we can't take care of the people. We Love Dr Harvey Karp Thank you so much for that very important vice. We appreciate it. Thank you same to you. The Camden Coalition is a nonprofit organization based in Camden, New Jersey, that works to improve care for individuals who have complex health and social needs will now the organization has helped a local New Jersey hotel into a shelter for individuals recovering from covid nineteen, who are either homeless or do not have a safe place to quarantine here to discuss the incredible work. The Camden coalition has been doing. Is Michelle dynamic a registered nurse and clinical manager at the Organization Michelle? Thank you so much for being with us and tell us just how the Camden coalition happened in the first place. Thanks for having me. The Camden Coalition for years has worked to serve vulnerable individuals in the community and around the Camden community. To improve their health and wellbeing, and we've always really live by the philosophy that it takes a village to support the communities needs, and so we've always had strong partnerships, and when the pandemic hit we worked with existing partnerships with the volunteers of America who run the local shelters and the county, and we all share the understanding that was gonna be people within our community who test positive for Covid, and would need a safe place to go to court teen. Give that's that's a beautiful story how it happened organic waste. Can you walk me through your daily routine? What the care processes like for these people? So, many most of our people who arrive are come as referrals from either the hospital or community organizations, and then when they arrive, we the stay at the hotel are nurses. Call them on the phone mostly to make sure that their symptoms monitoring their symptoms and making sure they have their needs met, and then we do a lot of coordination with their primary care. Doctors Medication Coordination things like that. That and in some instances if we need to do more thorough assessment than we will go into the hotel to do that, that's incredible. I know all the while making sure that workers like yourself are staying safe as well as the patients. What happens once? An individual is ready to leave the hotel, so somebody is ready to leave. We get really exciting. We say hey. You kicked covid and. We make sure that they have a safe place to transition to for housing, so the volunteers of America has been doing a great job of helping individuals get into transition to a shelter or another option to where they can go and continue to heal. That is beautiful in every way. Thank you so much for all that you do Michelle Edina for the work from you and the Camden Coalition. We appreciate it. Thank you. You and we turn now to our Dr Nash for final thoughts on this Monday, so amy I want to give people a prescription to deal with the intense emotional and psychological stress, as well as the physical stress that everyone is dealing with right now so that's going to be the theme of the week, and I'm going to kick it off with one of the most important things we can all do for head to. To Toe Health, which is sleep we've talked about before. How sleep has been very commonly disrupted during the pandemic for a slew of reasons, sleep has a major PR problem in this country. We look at it like it's a luxury. It is a medical necessity, and if people are listening, that wanted to do something to improve their immune system, start with sleep on adult seven to nine hours a night. There are powerful associated. Associated Effects and causative effects that being sleep deprived can have on your immune system, so make today the priority to set a regular sleep schedule. Make your bedroom cold, dark and quiet I promise you that getting seven to nine hours of sleep will improve how you think how you feel and potentially really improve your immune system as well. Thank you very much Dr. then and that's our program today ME ROBOT! Thanks for listening. Okay so in the New York. Times tells you. One of the eighth news. podcasts worth listening to well you to say. Thank you to go on Start Smart. We start here the ABC News daily podcast. Take us with you. Listen to us now free on apple podcasts.

New York City America CDC Dr. Jen Dr. Jen Ashton diabetes Oakland ABC amy robot Camden Coalition Measles Connecticut vandalism George Floyd US ABC cough ABC News Atlanta
Episode 10 (Transit News with Jose Martinez)

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

54:31 min | 1 year ago

Episode 10 (Transit News with Jose Martinez)

"Welcome to season two of the Second Avenue Sagas podcast. I'm your host Benjamin K back and I'm bringing you all things transit from subways to buses and everything. In between after a short break this winter we're back with new episodes. New guests new pandemic and a newly departed trained daddy. Today we're catching up on the transit beat with Jose Martinez senior reporter at the city and a longtime transit beat writer. Martinez is one of the veterans of the transit. Beat New York originally a newspaper man. Martinez started out with the Journal. News in Westchester in the mid nineteen ninety s before jumping to new glorious tabloids. He spent over a decade covering courts for the Daily News and the post before transitioning to New York. One where he covered the transit beat and hosted the popular in-transit newsmagazine segment. I've appeared on his show and in his stories countless times over the years as the first three months of twenty twenty have been busy ones for the MTA. I wanted to welcome Jose to the podcast for discussion on everything. That's been going on lately. Jose welcome and thank you for joining me. It's always good to see you been my pleasure. Thank you for having me this great countless times. I think I can count on one hand. The number of times. I put you on T- well I've been in your stories. Maybe not so before we dive into the news. And there's been a lot of news lately. Let's talk about your current Gig. I'm a big fan of the city. I think the coverage has been top notch and at a time when local news outlets are dropping like flies around the country. The city offers a voice in the wilderness. But not everyone is familiar with it. Can you give a little overview for those listeners? Who Don't know what the city is. It's an online outlet it's at the city dot NYC so were available online though. Our work does go out via other venues. But this is what's known as a nonprofit news outlet it was started officially we launched in April of Twenty nineteen though the team that we have together there which is a mix of veteran reporters and some younger ones. We all rive in January of two thousand nineteen. So what we do. Is We publish stories pretty much every weekday sometimes on the weekends and it's what's known as count ability journalism so you want to call people out We are covering politics recovering. The Correction System I eh was recruited specifically to cover transportation and the transit. Beat which is something. I've been doing now for about seven years on that front and it gets into things that other outlets perhaps don't have the chance to because they're feeding the beast daily and what we're trying to do is do enterprise work do investigative work Chase documents to freedom of information things for me. Personally it's been refreshing It's been reinvigorating. And a chance to in a year come up with more exclusives than I had in six years at new ones. So it's it's been a blast and I would encourage people to Sign up for our newsletter which you can do it the city dot NYC into Rita's and check this out when we go and do other media appearances as well the the daily newsletter. I find to be very valuable. It shows up in my inbox right around when I wake up every morning. And IT'S A. It's an easy accessible breezy. A couple bullet points links to the stories. It really sort of fills in the gaps of what's going on in the city and that's great to hear you're not the first person who's used that word breezy Which is a goal of ours. You don't want to be weighed down too much. By having the read something with countless links we tell you in a in a short punchy manner. Here's what's up on our site. Check it out and Several people told me they they liked the newsletter. So it's a way to get our work out there and hopefully more and more people are doing that as we go along and I realized this is a little insider baseball but one of the interesting elements of the site. I find is the ability to reproduce articles. You guys have a very liberal reproduction policy. You encourage people to get your stories out there. That's correct so our stories can be published. Really why anyone who's willing to follow our code Which is available on our website that they have to follow certain rules and then you can publish as is so for instance I've seen my byline and am New York. I've seen it in the Brooklyn papers. I've seen it in New York magazine and I have to tell you as an old time print guy. That's very cool Back when I was starting out in the in the early nineties I would have killed for New York magazine. Byline and I know. The businesses changed. But it was a kick see my name so it's always a thrill to see that byline that's shit is now you've covered the MTA since early twenty thirteen and you've been in the news Biz for far longer than that from the L. train shutdown too fast forward fifty one billion dollar capital plan to the are 179. Getting pulled to transformation. And the recent Byford Cuomo drama coming to ahead with allowed resignation and now with corona virus dominating the conversation it's easy to get lost in the flood of stories. It feels like the last few months or among some of the wildest and craziest we've seen in ages doesn't it it does and you know a previous. Mta had a while back said to me. You're never going to have a shortage of stories on this beaten. I thought yeah you're right. They're they're really never is a shortage of stories and the beauty of what I'm doing now is I can be pretty selective about what I'm doing and Jump in and try and do as as indepth reporting as possible. But it's wonderful. There's no shortage of things and it runs the gamut and before I started covering transit I rode the subway like everyone else. But I didn't really think about it in the way that I do now in its own world with its own rules. Its Own Code of conduct and it's it's a world unto itself runs the gamut from politics the real estate to crime to culture to health. Look at Corona virus thing that we have now It is a fascinating world and I am glad that I got the chance to cover it. Starting when I went to New York one so it's been a few months since my last podcast and I thought we could try to digest some of this news. That's been going on and and I think it makes sense to start with the krona virus which I guess is the scarier stuff. It's hard to escape the onslaught of coverage over Corona virus and the subways and buses which are petri dishes on a good day. For Everything New Yorkers carry around with them seemed to be under the microscope. The trains are a bit emptier. Politicians are focusing on them as potential carriers though our leaders don't always know what to say the governor and the mayor this weekend both urged New Yorkers to simply wait for the next train. If one arrives it's too crowded and they earned a lot of derision for that advice. It seems to be something that politicians who aren't regular rush hour writers would embrace an MTA leaders. Were trying to thread the needle. They know who their bosses are on Monday. Pat Foy couldn't seem to get his story straight though he said. New Yorkers should avoid transit if they can but then he also said the subways are perfectly safe sending out these mixed messages. What should we make of this public health crisis on the subways? And how does the MTA's response addresses writers concerns? You know it's going to be something that's got to evolve and it no doubt well because it was very curious yesterday at this briefing Down at MTA headquarters. Broadway Pat Foy begins by saying the subways are safe within seconds. He shifts to saying if you can find another mode of transportation. Walk if you can Telecommute if you can and let me just tell you for the last couple of months. I've been walking to work or offices in Herald Square have been walking from the upper west side. I started doing that when there was a water. Main break Near Lincoln Center and ever since then. I've thought like well. I'm just the smartest guy in town because I got ahead of this but I still do. Ride the subway every day though I've I've certainly Limited that by taking these these long walks to and from work and it's really interesting to see a clear shift in ridership. There's a little bit more space Rush Hour is not as crunched You will of course see people wearing masks Ridership habits are going to change. I've just considering my own on the subway. Ride down here on the I went from the e to the D- Or I'm sorry. I went from the seat of the day and then switched over and I was trying not to lean on anything. I was trying not to grab hold of any poll Doing the old surf simplisafe's off subway surf while the train moves. So this is something that the MTA is going to have to work with over time. It's messaging They've got a lot of announcements out there in terms of how the public should handle this. They've certainly put a lot of effort. into cleaning stations in the cleaning Rolling stock a little bit more frequently. They say the entire fleet is being disinfected. Every seventy two hours but as you said. It's a petri dish. So you can. You can clean the subway as much as you want. There's always going to be One new layer of grime. It's interesting I've noticed. The trains have been emptier. Even today was the first day that I've really written in at the heart of rush hour have been trying to stretch out my commute a little to the extent. I can and even today getting on a train at eight. Thirty eight forty. There was a lot of space platform. Didn't seem as crowded. I think people definitely are changing their patterns. It'll be interesting to see both. How this impacts ridership numbers that the MTA relies so heavily on in their budgeting and how this changes long-term commuting and teleworking trends right. That was the the advice from from four yesterday and for Mantilla officials was Think about new ways but they say that at this point. They don't have figures that they can release they plan to at the next board meeting In terms of whether there's been a dent in ridership there isn't really a an apples to apples comparison from last year to this year. But I don't believe there's any doubt that it gets into one's mind and suddenly it's possible to get a seat on the train that is if you're daring enough the Gal when it does strike me though is telling people to change their commuting habits is a bit more tangible than saying wait for the next train or wait for the next bus. That might not be as crowded considering the trains are credited for most of the day and the buses. Don't run too frequently. And you know. We've heard some variation of this in the past of Change Commuting Habits. You remember several years back when there was the Big Spike and delays and overcrowding was a big issue on subway lines and at the time. Mta officials said the people you might consider changing your habits I don't know that that really made any dent. But this might yeah this this really might people seem to take it more seriously when their health is at risk rather than just when it comes across as being something the MTA can't do which is provided emptier subway train at rush hour. Is it just me Ben or or is this one seemed to strike more of a cord and Previous Ebola and other similar. It's more immediate. I think you you see it more here. You know the Ebola scare there was the one guy who ran around the city but didn't manage to infect anybody and it was not it wasn't a pandemic that was happening here. It was happening somewhere else. But we've seen the numbers here. We keep hearing stories about tests. You do have the governor and the mayor for the grief that I give them around their messaging. They are being publicly out there. Multiple Times a day trying to stress the importance of changing habits and being mindful so it hits home it does and I think it's gotten through an all you need to do is take a ride on the train. People are adjusting. So you mentioned this the MTA is now in disinfecting. It's train cars and much more frequently. And I think there's been an element of surprise among the riders at the. Mta wasn't already doing this. It's sort of peeling back the curtain on their cleaning practices. Are we finding out more than we used to know about the state of the MTA and sort of how it treats its infrastructure? They changed their practices. Yeah people like to crack on the MTA for that sort of thing like wait a minute. They actually clean their cars sir. They weren't doing this before I yesterday was Tweeting out a story that I didn't twenty eighteen where I went to the aptly named Corona Yard to do a story on cleaning of subway cars. That's what they appear to be doing now. More frequently heavy cleaning disinfecting the chemicals that are to go beyond what you see At the end of the line where there's a guy with A bucket and you know a mop and SCRUB DOWN. Maybe spray some Something to keep it clean as possible or to look out for you know serious spills. So they're also going in the stations in terms of the things that are touched frequently so that would be The Metro card vending machines. That would be the The rails that people go hold onto as they go down the stairs. One of my colleagues on the transit be showed me some photos. He had taken of some rails yesterday. Handrails and I said I I couldn't from the Angleton. I couldn't even recognize what it was. She's look at that because it's sparkling. It's so brilliant. And so you know it's got shine on it but If the ridership declines who knows whether that that many a number of people will be able to enjoy the newfound China beauty and we we don't. We don't have any idea yet what this is doing to the budget because they're clearly using a lot of resources to keep these cars clean. They haven't cut service so they're getting the cars cleaned overnight. They're getting them cleaned in the off hours. They're making sure that they're maintaining service. And it's just at some point it will put a strain on the budget but it seems that right now rightly so. The focus is on the health of people absolutely four. Did mention that in in somewhat of passing form that there will be some impact on the MTA's finances and the MTA's finances are always In a shaky state so to have this come into play. It's certainly an impact and in fact last night this funny that we're talking about the cleaning. When I was walking Home Down Eastern Parkway. I saw the mobile wash unit. Which is one of the. Mta's vehicles that drives around and clean stations and it had it's emergency lights on. I don't even know that vehicle had emergency lights but they seem to be taking this very seriously. The do yeah at the same time. You have to consider that. There are a lot of places in the system where there are a lack of cleaners so that was a story we did in the city. We broke months ago about the the increase in the number of soil car reports so at terminals there are places where there aren't staff available to clean cars it come in filthier that then go back in the service so those are some issues as well and I'm seeing some. Some people have asked me about this and I saw that. It came up yesterday or Monday Tuesday right now a Monday during the the session. There's a question about how the MTA changing its approach with regards to the homeless people who are who are living in the subways. Or who sort of camp out and some of the subway cars and you know The answer I think was that they're still engaging with the task force. They haven't said anything more about that. And I know that that's a concern for some some writers as well. Yeah because there are as has been acknowledged by the MTA and the city is well. There's been an increase in the number of homeless. And I could tell you I was out early this morning at the ends of a couple of subway lines checking on this and there were a lot of people more than well. Let's let's acknowledge it was two in the morning three in the morning. Lots of people in Orange shirts and police officers just going around checking on homeless knocking with stick or whatever on the on the subway poles and saying do you need help do you need shelter I did see a couple who were led off of the train But these are things that are gonNA come into play as well because there there are people who are needed help and that's really what the MTA contracts for with places like the homeless services in the bowery residents committee to try and get the people in who are using. The train is rolling shelter some form of shelter some help. And there's there's there's also an element of The T. W. very involved in this as well I know yesterday. They had been pushing for a couple of things that they. I think we were able to get towards the end of the day. There they were concerned about the biometric clocks that they're using the high contact area. So I think for now the. Mta's said we're okay waving the bio metric lock requirements and Transit workers can now. We're masks if they feel. They need them. That had been an issue because that can Project an image of a problem. There might not be one. That's something that the union had been pushing for that its workers would be able to wear masks the MTA was late Sunday night. I got the tipped off that that was now No LONGER AN ISSUE. They won that round. Also the bit with the Cronos Those are the timekeeping machine. So it's like a metro card vending machine it a lot of fingers on it and I guess that's off for now But this is going to be evolving in a lot of different ways and we'll see more and more of As as we go on here and I know that so far for now the governor said he has no plans to shut the subways. But I guess if if it came to a city wide quarantine that option sort of always in the back of the mind you gotta figure there's a plant somewhere right in some form Boy As of now no. We're we're away from that one would think I would think But you have to figure in some form that's out there somewhere so switching gears a bit for a few hours on Friday. It seemed that corona virus had been pushed from the transit headlines. Cbs's Marcia Kramer made a big splash by letting the first post resignation interview with Andy Byford. So let's talk about train daddy himself. You've covered numerous nyc transit president since early two thousand thirteen but none of made quite the name for themselves. As by did it wasn't a reputation. He tried to seek out but rather one bestowed upon him by public whose trust he came to earn. What's your take on? Byford his time in New York and the things he accomplished it was short. It was two years and I'll tell you this much When he came in in January of two thousand eighteen they hired him in December of two thousand eighteen or seventeen. I'm sorry I am time. Traveling there When they hired him I remember at the time all of us transit reporters were as we do. You know talking sort of Joking among ourselves. Well how long do you give them? And my thought at the time was he'll make it two years in that in no way in no way at all is that a Commentary on his ability or his talents. Man's obviously very good at what he does and he did a fine job. Here in New York made an impact in a short time. It's more commentary on the tenuous nature of that position if you go back and look at who has been in charge of New York City transit over the last ten eleven years. It's hot seat. No one stays in that job for long and Andy Byford Made quite an impression on New Yorkers quickly gained their trust. He became recognizable in a way that I've not seen for many. Mta official in the past and beloved brilliant in in some ways but ultimately and he lets us all out in his interview with Marcia Kramer. He was overwhelmed as so many of us had predicted he would be by the nature of the job. It's a tough job. It's a tough tough job. And he went out quietly in his last days transit but then not so quietly in that interview with Marsha crime come back to that interview in a second. I think one of the things to me that Byford shows is that if somebody comes in and sort of takes a look at the place and says here's what we're GONNA do. You can do it and I wonder if part of that is because he wasn't a creature of the system which isn't a slight the folks who came before him but each of the previous New York City transit presidents kind of came up through the MTA organization. They were very much a part of the organization. And it's not quite as easy to change things when you have that culture as your background. Do you feel that? His role as an outsider is really what pushed to the ball. More than than we've seen in the past. It's entirely possible. Sure I I do think that because he came in with new ideas with ways to challenge the conventional wisdom the thinking of the organization and I keep thinking back to something he said back in January of twenty eighteen we stood out there and Nicole. Knee ran down. His four points The things he wanted to concentrate as he got going on this new job but but the one thing that that stuck with me is he said something about. I just want to be left to do my thing. He didn't quite say it that way. That's me saying in my way than in his Better Alison English. He said he said to to Marcy said you. Tell me what the outputs are what you want. And I'll deliver. Yeah she wanted to be left to do his thing with his team. And when that became as he said in the interview with Marsh Kramer when that became Too much to bear than he said. That's enough and he made his second resignation. His final resignation from New York City Transit. His mysterious first resignation is still out there somewhere but the letter seems to have disappeared from from all existence. The one that's being pursued by numerous reporters through the freedom of information law. No it's Apparently vanished In that Jim Dwyer article in the New York Times that Gave some hint at it. Said it was really an explosive ladder but the second one that he gave out was also fairly sharp but I wouldn't call it explosive now. You mentioned the letter. He this is the letter for for those who don't know. It was a letter that that Anti Byford Center in October. He called it he. He described it as a three page letter to Marcia Kramer over the weekend It's never materialized the. Mta has told anybody who's filed a request for that they don't have a copy of it Which is an interesting rub on their compliance with freedom of information laws? And Right. Now we're all wondering what it said. Perhaps we will be for a long time to But I think you can get a good sense of it just by watching that interview with Marcia Kramer Clearly Byford was not Thrilled with the way things have gone with the way that His role had evolved and would be changing further under the MTA's transformation plan and he said enough and I'm out so is this an example of Somebody who sort of clashed with their bosses expectation of their work. I know there's been a lot written about the Cuomo Byford relationship there's been indications that Cuomo wasn't happy with efforts press there was a New Yorker article shortly into the beginning of efforts. Tenure that really focused on his role in attempting to fix the subways. There are some some butting heads over approaches. You know it was. It was Cuomo just trying to overstep his bounds here or was Byford unable to work within that system some of both some neither probably a little bit of everything really And and you mentioned the New Yorker article you should mention also the sixty minutes profile That Byford received sixty minutes treatment He was a guy who was a strong and clear voice for the transit system. A good salesman for the transit system. Someone who gained public trust and restored some lost confidence in the system. But I have heard this from people who were have been in in the MTA for a long time that perhaps the beginning of the end was that sixty minutes profile. Where it was about Andy and not about anyone beyond that now. Andy always made sure to talk about his team. But you know the captain is ultimately the governor. I think the L. train shutdown had more of an impact than people realize too. Because you know Andy. Byford was appreciative of the fact that people came in took another. Look at this said. Hey we have a plan where we can maintain service. He asked for this independent safety assessment. And I think the governor's office interpreted that as a challenge to their authority to come in and really set the agenda and perhaps that was a great miscommunication. Perhaps this was just a train guy saying we need to make sure everything's safe and then we'll we'll do this better plan that doesn't involve changing traffic patterns in and throwing everybody's commute into disarray. But they never really could get past it after that moment. That was one of those big bumps in the relationship Byford that point. This was back Early in twenty nineteen was to have been on this And he said At the time that you know governor Cuomo came in and move things around and rearrange the furniture in a very big way. This was a plan had been taking shape for years with lifers predecessors at the MTA and New York City Transit Suddenly Byford comes in. He jumps on board with that plan. But when the role was reduced things changed significantly. And I do think that that's one of those that it's perhaps you know understated but I. I don't think there's any doubt that That was one where You Know Byford may have taken it as a slight so I WANNA get back to The idea of the slight in a second but one of the things that we heard during the Marcia Kramer interview was Byford sort of ringing alarm bell. He talked about intolerable interference from Albany minimizing of his role concerns over some interference in the safety aspects of running a transit system. When I hear somebody talk about safety and transit systems I get a little worried. How should we be taking his words? What do you think he's trying to tell people? Safety is one of the keywords in transit system safety and efficiency does are right there at the top and when he sounds an alarm if you will by saying others are stepping into turf. He can't tolerate something that could potentially put Safety on the line. That's worth digging into a little bit more. I think we'll see more about that. I think in in the coming weeks if if Andy Byford 's out there on his exit tour so to speak. I'm sure that will come up again now by out. Approximately three to eight years before he wanted to leave New York. Feels like it lost something and you've covered the MTA's legal battles against disabilities rights advocates and Byford push to promote accessibility. Do you think the MTA will still embrace this. Push to make sure that every station is accessible or that. There isn't there no more than one or two stations away from inaccessible station before the end of this capital plan. Well when I when I mentioned the four things. He talked about on his first day coming into New York City Transit. That was one of them a wanted to improve bus service. You want to improve subway service. You wanted to boost para transit. He wanted to make it more accessible subway system so this guy came out with a push to have in his fast forward plan. Fifty more stations become accessible in turn the MTA in its current capital plan at not fifty stations to the plan but sixty six so they want even beyond what Byford had pushed for which you can see that as a win for him. The guy made the sale on that now. The question is will they stick to that plan? I've heard from the people in the Advocacy community for those with mobility issues. That they're concerned that it's not binding that that could change that The plan could shift. I think the MTA is very much aware and also as it says committed to a more accessible system otherwise they wouldn't have laid the groundwork for it but it's expensive. It's complicated You know they they. Did this study. I don't know how many millions of dollars on on how much it would cost to Make all the systems all the stations in the system and that includes on the Staten Island railway as well fully accessible. It would cost a bundle. We don't know exactly how much but I got my hands on the first one hundred stations and basically it's at yet there they they can be done. It can be done boy. The question is an and it's not there. And how much is it going to cost? And that's always the issue. How much is it going to cost? But it can be done other cities have done it. there are some stations in those reports where it says the consultants found. It's not possible for X. Reasons and and and there are legitimate reasons but for the most part it can be done now. We'll see whether they stick to it. That's the real trick so one thing interesting to me When I spoke to Sarah Feinberg in the fall. And she's the incoming interim New York City Transit President. Who's also an MTA board pointy named by the governor? She stressed to me. That accessibility is not really an option. It's the law. So it'll be interesting if she continues that and she said when she was at the F. R. A. This was her her mantra. It's not you can't just choose to make something accessible. You're required by law to make the system accessible so if I think that's one area where she may continue the path that they're on though I completely understand why any of these advocacy groups are skeptical of the MTA's claims they have decades of history behind them scoring back to nine thousand nine hundred and even before that here is a system. That in the subway has four hundred. Seventy two stations fewer than a quarter of them are Accessible to those who have mobility issues it cost a lot of money to install elevators to bring the system in the compliance and it is always a hurdle for people to get around. Of course you have the buses a nurse Para transit hair transit's tremendous money loser for the MTA. But I think the most efficient way is what they're gunning for which is to to make the subway more of a welcoming environment. It's a goal. They have now to get those sixty six plus four more to make it seventy seventy more stations accessible but Well we'll see if there's an end result to take them longer speaking of Feinberg she's taking over for Byford right now on an interim basis she was very much a political appointee to the MTA board. And IT'S A. It's a much different path than what we've seen from past presidents. What do you think we should expect from her? She has been a voice on the MTA. Board I find her to be Her presence on the board A solid one Of course she was in federal government before I had been told that she had been offered the job as head of the MTA previously Before Mr. Foy took the job and she said no But ultimately settled into this role on the MTA board as chair of the Transit Committee. She's a good board member now. She's in a different role as the interim president of New York City Transit. Who knows what what becomes of it. She's got a little kid Whether she wants to stick with it full time I know that the governor can be Very persistent and in a good salesman on that sort of thing. But she stepping into the role with an interim label. We've seen interim presidents in the past and I find it interesting that these interim presidents. I didn't see them get the rollout that Ms Feinberg guy were. You've seen her in lots of television interviews Becoming very much face that the MTA in short order in a way that some of her predecessors in that role have not. I think her roll out to his is sort of indicative of the chambers recognition that they have to do a little bit of damage control. What the public here. They need to make sure that. Somebody's out there who understand the need for continuity and the ability to continue. What Andy I was doing in a way that assures the public service isn't GonNa Start to backslide was a few years ago. Well the public certainly had something of a reaction to Byford leaving and it's again it's interesting because This is a guy who draw response from the Public. That is unusual The MTA let's face it it's An easy target. It's easily vilified in spite of the invaluable service that they provide the millions of people every day but they're easy to pick on and easy to lampoon and Byford Reduced some of that. He restored some faith in what they're trying to do. Got The public to rally behind him and when he went. I think that that as you said. Van Dented some of that and then it has to be restored With someone that the public may look to so one of the other elements of Byford departure. That he talked about in the interview on Friday was the fact that his role has had been reduced as the president of New York City Transit. And I think this is something the public may not be very aware of right now but the MTA's going through this sort of nebulous transformation process. And when I've talked about transformation before with variety of people I've had a tough time really putting my finger on the problems that I have with transformation part of it seems like a political plan designed to minimize at first Byford but really the roles of agency presidents ensuring that the governor can more firmly enforce his vision on an agency that he controls. And that's fine. That's his perogative. But it also involves bringing in a lot of C. level executives without experience and transit without experience in New York City who are here to transform something for the sake of transforming and I wonder if it's just not a very thoughtful plan the MTA needs this reform. But I don't know what to make of it. What do you make of transformation if you recall going back more than a year or so where the governor would frequently mock the MTA he used the MTA as a punching bag? He would make appearances at the Association for better of New York. I recall one speech where he just you know turned it into a standup Appearance for pretty much the whole time and Byford push back against that but that was teeing up what ultimately became known as the transformation plan for those who don't follow what is ultimately a dreadfully dull. And it is but it's also incredibly important a plan that is something that's fundamentally altering the way the MTA is organized altering the duties of agency. Presidents Metro North Long Island Railroad New York City Transit. The bridges and tunnels. And it is. It's it's it's a massive restructuring and people were going to lose their jobs and he's brought in these consultant types and given them the run of the the the MTA is brought in these consultant types and they've been given the run of the place in terms of deciding What's next who stays or goes How the agency will be reformatted. And like I said it. It strikes you as dead for dreadfully doll. If you read the documents and they are they're really boring. And they're written in that horrible consultants which is say nothing and It's it's really tough the read but it's massively important because of what. It's doing a denying that one of one of the problems that I have at the transformation is that it doesn't really set out an end goal in a transit perspective. Basically says we need to save a few billion dollars and that's our goal. It doesn't really explain why we need to save that money. It doesn't say how that's going to improve the MTA's ability to provide subway and bus service. How it's going to improve rail operations? It just sort of says we're here for saving money as a government agency and then outcome be damned and lots of buzzwords about silos centers of excellence and best in class which. I hear that in my eyes glaze over Years in everybody else's I think yeah. Yeah and you know I remember when they they had these consultants for Malik partners. Come in and they did a briefing before an MTA board meeting. I had gotten a hold of their the draft of their plan In written a story about it before everyone else and then they've met with the press the next day and I'm sure they're great guys but they met with the press and in their forty five minutes. There may have been two sentences that they use that. I would have used soundbites when I was in television. And maybe one that I would've used as a quote so it's a very dry Very hard to grasp concept that their spelling out but the bottom line is it's going to save the MTA A lot of money cut a lot of positions but after you heard the presentation from the chief transformation officer at the last board meeting I would have been Feeling pretty uncomfortable if I worked at the MTA and heard that presentation because if you look at the unresolved the end result if you boil it down to. That is that jobs will be lost. A lot of jobs will be lost some of them just for the sake of cutting jobs too. I mean that that that's my concern. It's I do find this plan. Very hard to analyze and talk about it. Maybe because it's not very definitive as you're saying it's mostly just buzzwords there's something about it that doesn't seem like it was produced with the right outcome in mind and I think Andy. Byford spoke about being minimized in his role where he's just in a service delivery role which means that all he's doing is making sure that the trains are running and there's no recognition that the head of an agency also needs to be in charge of growing the system or solving problems. That are wrong with it and instead it's sort of moves everything under General Lebron's umbrella which is fine. He's he's a smart guy he's a competent guy Not Quite sure he's GonNa tackle the MTA's internal costs problems in the way. A lot of outside observers would like him to but he seems to have the governor support and seems to have the support of people who worked for him but it really seems to be just moving things under one person in a way that really silos it further than it is right now. That word silos. Yeah you've been reading the Alex Partner's hat haven't you can't escape it. Yeah it's What's what's happened. Is that as you said? And as Byford noted in his letter he was essentially going to be in a reduced role where he would be in in the role of service delivery no more in terms of big picture planning phased out and the same could be said for other HD presidents Across the MTA. So it's it's a fundamental alteration of the way things have been done there and that's something that the governor to his credit has said all along he wanted to do. He wants to change the way things get done at the MTA to change the way business gets done. This is his way of doing it. The I think I think there's no doubt that improving the way things get done at the. Mta is ultimately an admirable goal. And hopefully they can get there one way or another. I forget who it was. It asked Pat Foy Probably Clayton Goose because Clayton always asks the questions that PAT immediately responds with lied. Disagree with your premise. And that was I believe. Clayton's question was one that just tick them off in that way because he he cut to something else that you know about people losing their jobs or something of that nature and the MTA and also the governor will see it differently. They'll see it as Restructuring that is ultimately for the betterment of the emptier and of course there was there was dance question that that drew a lot of attention when some of the new transformation chiefs were brought in he asked if their hatchet men and then they refused to answer that one anthony mccord who is the MTA's chief transformation officer Brought in from Canada makes his first appearance at the. Qna that follows Every empty board meeting and Dan Straight Out. Ask Them. Are you the hatchet man? And I have the screen shot of that moment. Mr mcchord just sort of look struck by bewildered throws both his hands up in the air and and Pat Foist that that was not the appropriate. It was the end of the Cuna too. I believe that was that that was. It's it's interesting. You know you you talked about how everybody felt. Byford with last two years. I wonder how long some of these new chiefs that they call them. We'll last as well. We'll see what we yeah. We'll see This thing will play out. It'll take shape They're all newcomers He has another gentleman that he's has been brought in his name's. Mario Peloquin came in from Canada He's now the chief operations officer seems to be taking more of a central at the MTA. you have this mccord who is the transformation officer you have someone Brought in as the title is chief people officer a lot of new names and faces at the MTA and that that comes with transformation and it's a fascinating time it's always a fascinating talk some will last somewhat all right. So let's talk about your beat with the city. We have a few minutes left so besides the INS and outs of the day to day of transit news you cover the in depth stories is well you know you just paging through some of your recent stories include deep dives into the sandy repairs or the train The long just dating study for Better Transit Service along UTICA avenue problems with the the switch at Bergen Street and of course Chapel the raccoon took up residency at the Nevin Street station. A few months ago you and I have also had a long running back and forth on the. Mta's plans to install an elevator at sixty ninth street which never seems to come to fruition. While transit is all encompassing. It's also hyper local. How do you approach that element of the be? How do you find these stories? What draws you to them or it's got to speak to people beyond just those at that corner at that station. So for instance the elevator At Sixty Eighth Street Hunter College station sure that could be a story. Just about How this station has for more than a dozen years had An elevator planned but because of complaints from people in the neighborhood because of issues with Hunter College here. We are in twenty twenty and it still hasn't been built okay so that could be a very local story just about that station but to us at the city we see something bigger there We see something that speaks a little bit more broadly. And that's what we're trying to do with all of our stories here look at other projects that have taken a long time That's that's what we're trying to do with all of our stories one local thing one local angle can say something broader and affect more people so that you read it and you say Oh that's interesting. That's wild but it goes beyond that and to me. The UTICA Avenue story too is one of these all encompassing stories. Because it's about a subway extension or a transit extension that was originally planned in the nineteen twenties. It's never materialized and it's about transit it's about the city's inability to grow the transit network but it's also about land use. It's about changing the way people get around reducing auto independence reaching a neighborhood that wants that where some people want subway. Some people probably don't some people like the the less dense the lower density that comes with some people want to see it up zoned. And it's interesting that you guys are covering these stories so early. That was the goal when we started putting this thing together was to do stories that over time. Unfortunately you're seeing less and less of because of the way that our media business has has gone has taken shape and there are a lot of great outlets out there but what we're able to do at the city which is which is nice. The rule is every story should be exclusive. Every story should move the ball forward in some way that no one else is doing like I said there's tremendous Coverage in this city in spite of How the news? Business is taking shape but we have a chance to do something that in its own way. Hopefully we'll stand out and I like to think that we're doing that. And that's what appealed to me when they started Put trying to get me on board A while back and it's it's been a refreshing change to not just do the Daily News. That's the story of the day. It also speaks to the depth of the things the MTA is doing that. We don't often see they're they're constantly. Studying these corridors. You have UTICA AVENUE. You have multiple studies going on in. Staten Island. They sort of released them. They don't put out a press release. Nobody knows about them. But through your reporting you can bring these two light and make sure that people know what's going on. Thank you for reading first of all. Appreciate that and yeah. There's a lot of stuff that Is Out there and pilot programs studies things of that nature that get floated once and then just sort of vanish sort of go away. So I have a chance to revisit some of these things okay. Whatever happened to you know like that was the story. I did with the Sixty Eighth Street Hunter College station. Whatever happened to that thing? Yeah kicking around for Since the early two thousand. That's one of those stories where I think we've cycled through a few pressed representatives at the MTA who've been fielding questions on it since for for years. Now it'll happen someday one day one day so as our time draws to an end let's gays into our crystal balls at that congestion pricing remains a bit in limbo with a dispute between the state and the feds. The city's contributions to the MTA's capital plans aren't quite clear yet and the MTA's using accessibility as cudgel there and transformation is very much a work in progress what do you see the future holding for the MTA. In Twenty Twenty we've heard for so long about congestion pricing being so essential to the MTA. And then we hit this point and I. It seems that we're now sort in neutral so it doesn't happen. What impact does that have on their planning? What impact does that have? On their capital plan. A lot is hooked pricing. So that's got to be squared away. obviously the corona virus for the short term is a big issue how that impacts their bottom line there ridership the public faith in transit. How PEOPLE GET AROUND There is the leadership at the MTA always seemingly on shaky ground there or I just. It's never quite solid. There's that there is just so much and and I'll go back to what I mentioned at the top. There's never a shortage of stories. And that's good for me. That's good for everyone on the beat And hopefully will get at them. It doesn't always become an easy way. Certainly not when freedom of information laws are a request aren't being handled all that quickly Certainly when some things are just not as easy as it used to be to get out of the MTA and that can be frustrating ultimately. What all of us are trying to do. And that means every reporter in town is just getting information and it's really important. This is too important to be to leave it uncovered. But I'm glad that we have a lot of really good reporters covering it I i. I remember when I started in New York when I was the only television reporter. Who would go to those meetings every month? Now you see them covered all the time and I think that's good because it puts them on the spot It gives attention to something that needs attention. this cannot go on covered so one of the things you mentioned. I think as as a last question. This is an interesting conversation to have the. Mta has not been as forthcoming with information over the last few years as they have been in the past. And you've seen that sort of coincide with the time period where Governor Cuomo has taken more of an interest in all things. Mta How has that impacted your job? And how does that impact? The ability of the transit beat writers to get information out of a government agency to the public. Some things that you even have to put in a request for are things that in the past you could have just called up the press office and said here's my question and now unfortunately in A number of cases you were told. That's the foil and foil yet to persistent about it because it is A slog trying to get anything out of that and this is vital information Pat Foy He says the right things about the MTA needing to improve its its foil process and and and he's right however you want to see the results and that stands for all that stands for myself at Stanford. The Post the news the times anyone that covers this beat. Tv stations So that's troubling but foia at his words says things will improve. We'll see we'll see I. I have a request for a report from years ago that I know exists. I put in the request In early January they just they said thirty business days and then they sent me and follow up saying another twenty business days. So it's this process of really trying to pull something out of them and I think it. It helps to remind people that this is a public agency. This is a government agency. All of these things are supposed to be available to the public. That's right it is and the MTA twits. Credit is transparent on a lot of things. They are more than there used to be too. Yeah more than they used to be. They do put out a tremendous amount of Data and things that are accessible if you go after them and look for them and If you go under their contract so a lot of it's out there but too much of it is not and that is the problem That a lot of reporters on the speed of run into I think with that we've come to the end of our time. Jose thank you for stopping by. Thanks for helping me catch up on the fast moving world of transit news. Thanks for having me anytime. We've come to the end of another episode of the Second Avenue Sagas podcast. I'm your host Benjamin K back. Thank you again to Jose Martinez joining me for this episode. You can find Jose's work at W. W. W. Dot the city dot NYC and on twitter at J. Martinez NYC that's J. N. A. R. T. I N. Easy nyc special. Thank you as always to Joseph Chaco about ski for production duties. If you've been enjoying the podcast please consider leaving review on itunes and remember Second Avenue. Saga is is entirely reader listener. Funded these days to help ensure the site and podcast continue join my patriot. Www DOT patriots dot com slash second ads Sagas you can always find more at. Www DOT second avenue sagas dot com or on twitter by at two AB eight? That's act to APP SAGAS. Thank you for listening Benjamin K back and I'll catch you next time.

MTA New York Andy Byford MTA MTA Pat Foy Marcia Kramer governor Cuomo Byford Byford reporter Jose Martinez Byford Cuomo president twenty twenty Benjamin K baseball NYC
Legal expert analyzes Reade's Biden sexual assault allegation

AM Joy

1:48:10 hr | 10 months ago

Legal expert analyzes Reade's Biden sexual assault allegation

"I was working and next to guy and we kept pumping. Nt Other and like my I worry was what if he has the virus and he keeps pumping engine me. And like it's GonNa know he's GonNa come to me and then I'm going to bring it home and then like all my roommate my son my everybody get it. Good morning and welcome to A. M. Joy as this morning there are more than a million confirmed cases of corona virus in the United States. Just take that in four moment and the death toll reached a grim milestone this week the nearly sixty five thousand dead has surpassed the number of Americans killed in the Vietnam War. We've yet to see an adequate number of tests swabs or protective equipment or ventilators in many hot spots around the country and despite pleas from governors and members of Congress Donald Trump was reluctant to use the defense production act nationalize production and distribution of these crucial items. That could save lives but there was no such reluctance on Tuesday. When trump invoked that very same law to classify meat plants as essential infrastructure. That must remain open because while healthcare workers are forced to reuse masks until they fall apart they should at least be able to score from chicken. Nuggets I'm right for the kids priorities. The move forces low wage employees. Many of whom are Black Latino or immigrant to work in conditions ripe for the spread of the virus already more than twenty meat packing plants across the country have closed due to concerns about illness according to a new report by the CDC nearly five thousand meat and poultry plant workers in one thousand. Nine states have been diagnosed with Kobe. Nine thousand nine hundred twenty people have died. The federal government has also failed to coordinate the national food supply which is why you're hearing about farmers dumping millions of gallons of milk. The chicken processors Sanderson farms destroying seven hundred and fifty thousand unhatched eggs per week and farmers left with tens of millions of pounds of food that they can no longer sell to restaurants or hotels were schools while in a seeming to stoep in paradox grocery shelves are empty in lines for food. Banks are snaking around arena. Parking lots for politico. Trump's agriculture department has been slow to respond to this crisis just as trump lagged on using power to supply workers and six citizens with life saving supplies instead using it to make people work in harrowing conditions risking their lives and their health and the health of their families joining me now is California Congresswoman Katie. Porter who's calling for more transparency in. How the trump administration is using the defense production. Act Andrew Zimmer host of. What'S EATING AMERICA. Dr Ezekiel Emanuel. Msnbc senior medical contributor and former health policy adviser for the Obama Administration. Thank you all for being here and I'll start with you congresswoman. You wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post on Tuesday and I'll read a little bit of what you wrote to you says I'm like most government contracts. Gpa ORDERS ARE NOT public documents leaving Americans in the dark about one of the administration's key tools in its covert nineteen response. Explain what is DEEPA? What our DP orders and explain to me a deep humming the Defense Production Act explained to me how the Defense Production Act is supposed to work. And how in your mind? That's failed to work here. So the Defense Production Act was passed during the Korean War and the idea was to allow the United States to harness its manufacturing capacity to me critical national security needs and so if an essence when the president invokes the Defense Production Act they CA- government in order manufacturers to prioritize producing certain kinds of equipment in can prevent price gouging of taxpayers. As it does so now. We're a lot of things that we might use the defense production act for you wouldn't necessarily be able to reveal to the American public what you were producing for national security reasons but in this case it's exactly the opposite. We need to know if the president has used the defense production. Act what he is ordered when it has been a calm on how he plans to distribute that because without that we continue to have all of the supply chain disruptions that we've been facing and so just to to put a pin on it had donald trump initially invoke the defense production act leaves shortened DEEPA. Had He done that initially could? In theory of the Federal Government Have Donald Trump's administration have said. Okay we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA have these industries that normally make cars right make ventilators and we're GONNA distribute those ventilators in this way. We're going to make sure every state has an X. number. We're going to make sure that they have enough. We're going to do the same thing with test kids. And then we could do the same thing if he wanted. Now with the Food Supply. Could he have done a national coordinated strategy if he had wanted to absolutely? The president should've used the defense production. Act to get ahead of the needs that were seeing the personal protective equipment. The test kits all of those things not just protective equipment. But also I should add the testing supplies. He could've used the defense production act to do that. That's why we have law so this isn't a this is a better example just like the ability for the CDC to provide for free testing where there's a law that's there for very good reason but we have in this case of administration that fail to make good use of it now all of a sudden when. Tyson and big corporations want him to use the defense production act though to keep meat packing plants open and put workers lives that risks. He jumps to do it. So it's a huge reversal of policy. But it's because this time it's coming at the request of big productions rather than what we saw before was big corporations lobbying against the use of the defense production even though we're protecting our frontline healthcare workers. Yeah and Dr Manual. Let me go to you on this. Because here's the challenge. The food supplies already disrupted. It's becoming more disrupted by the day. We're going to talk a little bit more with Andrew about some of the at the farm. The farm ended but in production element of it right like once Meat is getting to these production plants. It's now in the hands of people who are exactly in a position to get sick there. Working in these close quarters. Nbc News has been running and MSNBC's been running this video all week of these plants. Were there trying to find ways to separate people but as you can see just looking at the screen here. People work closer than six feet and they're supposed to be a part by six feet and when you think about who this is the people who maybe Donald Trump doesn't think that they're important but their families do their their their loved ones do Mrs Forty A. Z. Cohort that is forty. Four point four percent. Latino it's twenty five five point. Two Percent African American in terms of meatpacking workers. These are low income people. Frontline has doubt put some of the data out as well fifty one percent fifty one point. Five percent of these people are immigrants. Forty five point. One percent of them live in low income families and fifteen point five percent lack health insurance so these are the most vulnerable people who are were literally processing our food. Your thoughts Dr Manual. Yeah I think you're one hundred percent right. They are immigrants. They're low. Wage workers typically not very well organized and even when they have a union with the Defense Production Act that can act for them in order to protect them. Society needs to protect them. We need them if too many of them call in our sick. We don't first of all we don't want them handling our food and second of all. I'm what's surprising to me? A little bit is that we know from South Dakota the original outbreak in smithfield processing. Plant that it you know. Infection doesn't stay inside the factory. These people go home. They go out into the community often. They don't know that they're infected. They may be asymptomatic and they could spread it in the community. So it's not like they only keep it inside the factory. It's a wider issue for all of us to be concerned about and we should. You know one of the things I think is important for all of us as we're in this together we're a community. We shouldn't be trying to exploit these kind of workers for our own good. It is very important to have the food chain and the food supply chain working and to have it without infection so that we can all be assured that the food we have is pure that if we take out that chicken somehow virus on it so I think that's an important element but we can't exploit people for our own good. We have to ask everyone food. The Government worked together to push this to wash this infection out and it does seem to me. They're you know making these workers go to work. Sick is one of those episodes that we're trying to exploit the weakest person in our society for the benefit of all of us and that just doesn't seem like the right thing to be doing indeed absolutely well said Andrew and the other end of that food supply chain at the start of it. You know we're hearing about cattle ranchers happening to euthanize cows or eggs being destroyed because even getting the food to where it's processed or to be able to fill in where food banks are going without while food is rotting on farms. There's something wrong here with the coordination nationally obviously the. Usda has clearly not done enough. But can you talk a little bit because at that into you're seeing a lot of suffering well? I just can't believe where we are. We've been talking about this joy. I think for five or six weeks going back to my first appearance on your show. We predicted this and I'm not sure which is worse the cult of secrecy. That's been built up. Between the government. Osha the weakening of the CDC guidelines and big big food companies like Tyson and J B s or the cult of lady distant stupidity that Congresswoman Porter was referring to and the doctor Zeke was referring to. It's absolutely going to me. We could have been using the defense production act six weeks seven weeks ago we could have been enrolling fema to be out and distributing the food that we know is perishable. Look you know. Chickens lay eggs on a regular cycle. Cows need to be built on a regular cycle vegetables. Grow on a regular and predictable cycle on farms. That have been doing this. Many of which for generations as the weather warms up in spring starts creepy north with the vegetables. The milk the eggs. That's a distribution issue. Fema could have been you talk about laws on the books. For people to be invoked there are aspects of the national emergency acts that The USDA that Department of Ag that the White House could have invoked to allow female to come in and distribute the food to where it's needed remember the biggest customer for food many foods seventy five percent efficient. America is consumed in the restaurant chain. That goes from the ocean to restaurants when you take restaurants out of the equation when you take schools out of the equation. Those are massive massively large customers. We could've taken that food and redirected it to community resource kitchens to food banks and of course to grocery stores. So this is. This is just a stupidity issue. This is a lack of vision issue. I'm I'm just absolutely stunned by it. Do I think there's enough public outcry that we will correct it? Yes but I'm petrified about the cult of secrecy. That's going on in our plants. Those videos of the Tyson meat plants that you see are from April eleventh. April twelfth is when Tyson started requiring people to wear face shields in their plant and it gives the illusion that things are quote unquote safe despite people walking past each other. It's not it doesn't continue to be. And we're putting our communities at risk because of the lack of transparency and our food factories. Yeah and then you have. The vice president is showing up in plant showing up the Mayo Clinic with no mask on so they're not setting good example but on the on the secrecy side of the secrecy and Stupidity Matrix. The Andrew just talked about congresswoman almost secrecy side. We just found out that there's been yet another. We're starting to look like Friday night massacre like every Friday. There's a dump of an of an inspector general. Donald Trump has now moved on Friday to replace a top official at the Department of Health and Human Services. Her name is Christie Grim. She angered him. Apparently with a report last month highlighting supply shortages and testing delays at hospitals during the pandemic the White House waited until after business hours to announce the nomination of a new inspector general for the department. Who If confirmed would take over for her? That's a point one. The second data point. I'll give you is Dr Pouching. Who has been being made more and more scarce in terms of? He's the one person in this administration that most Americans trust and now he's been blocked from testify before a House panel next week. The White House says it would be counterproductive to take him away from his work. They're saying they will let him testify at a Senate Health Committee hearing. I guess they like that body better because it's controlled by Mitch McConnell on May Twelfth but are you concerned from an oversight perspective congresswoman that Dr Doughty is being made more scarce to Congress and that these issues are being run out of town because Donald Trump doesn't like the truth. They're telling this is also a crisis of oversight and president trump is exploiting that to his advantage and the losers here are the American people and so this late night Friday nights. Which you personnel. You're right it's it continues to happen. It's a real on. That's part of the reason that I introduce the accountability for acting officials. Act because right. Now we don't have actually Senate confirmed permanent appointees in so many critical jobs and so by using these acting officials which he can quickly fire and replace. We're not getting the information that we need. And so the absolutely I think doctor felt she should testify an all point out that during the critical weeks leading up to the announcement of the pandemic in February in late January even on throughout March. Doctor testified in a bipartisan. Congressional briefing for all members each and every single week and he was terrific and helpful in providing members with education and things that we could take back to our community so I think he absolutely should be allowed to testify and I'm very concerned about how the president continues to attack our inspector general community which exists solely to protect the American taxpayers fraud. Waste and abuse to make sure. These programs are effective on the ground. Yeah Dr Manual. I think about you know in George W Bush and the incredible screw up on the part of the administration when it came to Hurricane Katrina. Eventually wised up to the idea that you needed somebody to handle this that that this was beyond the scope of his capability to do himself. And you think about Russell on original Russel Honore coming in there and just handling and being the sort of czar the person in charge is that what Donald Trump needs. Does he need to put someone like. The doctor has a lot on his plate. But somebody else like somebody that is in charge of this because he seems to be running point on it himself and that seems to be the problem. Well how look I early and suggested that what we needed was a lot of different groups responsible for different elements of this. I think is Andrew mentioned. We've got a problem in the food side of it mainly distribution problem because we you know food. The plants were already planted the chickens. Were already working on and producing eggs. And it's a distribution problem. We need a whole group that would handle that distribution similarly. We need a group that would handle testing in this country. That is still more than two months after they promise at every American could get attached. We're not they are and we have a whole series of problems that need to be addressed. I'm not sure one person can manage all of that but I do think you could have very well defined areas and have a group that is in control of each of them. I'm Tony Vouching. I note that Tony. She has been at these press conferences. Day In and day out standing up there for two hours maybe having ten minutes of time the podium over that stretch of time. That didn't seem to be a waste of his time. So I'm not sure why going to Capitol Hill for a briefing. That would be maybe two or three hours once would constitute a waste of time obviously valid explanation. Yeah they just don't like he would say things that are true. I'm very last question to you on this Andrew and by the way by putting someone in charge. That doesn't mean jared Kushner okay. It doesn't always mean jared Kushner because that has not worked thought worked in the past Last question to you on this Andrew because among many people who are not getting properly access at tested I assume that people picking our food are not getting tested are not being treated and we have no no way of knowing the scope of potential outbreak among the people who are at the very front line in the agricultural industry. You and I've talked about that before but I'm GonNa give you the last word on that my friend. You absolutely read my mind. It's odd how this always comes back to testing. Tyson is standing behind. Hippy hippy laws using them as a shield saying we can't tell you the results of the tests in our plant Governor Ricketts is doing the same thing in Nebraska. The J. B. S. Company is doing the same thing in Greeley Colorado. It all comes down to testing. Big Food thinks that testing is something that they can't really talk to us about and the reason is that it's going to reveal really really scary numbers to people when you test you will find out results. They say it's a one time result. I disagree I think it tells us where we need to be focusing our attention and we hear reports from the field. I'm talking to my friends on farms in and six other states who were saying that nominees. They're not testing going on farms. But they don't have the same stories that we hear from meat plants that there's there's hot water but there's not enough soap. There's masks shields. There's gloves but there's not enough protective headgear. I mean it's just absolutely dumb. Founding to me IT GOES BACK TO THAT SAME. Old Song is it. Is it ineptitude. Or is it a cabal of conspiracy and I am praying that it's ineptitude because we can get people in there is Dr Zeke said who can run different aspects of this and solve the problem and I pray that it's not that I'm not being delusional paranoid? But something tells me there is something else going on. Yeah why I said when Donald Trump I got elected that what all of Americans have to learn to use your lurid imagination. Because there's almost nothing that they wouldn't do at least too. Mushoo language look at the mushy language against being forced into our CDC and Osha guidelines. That's a big change. That's coming from somewhere. Someone is changing that language. And I don't think it's Dr Redfield. Yeah absolutely well. You don't test for things you don't want to know the answer to that is part of the answer a doctor thank you very much. Dr Ezekiel Emanuel Congresswoman. Katie Porter Andrew Zimmer and my friend thank you very much guys a great be safe please and please be sure to check out Dr Manuals podcasts. Making the call all right next up we will introduce you to Nacro politics a term. You should know fewer an employer and you offer to bring your employees back to work and they Decide not to voluntary What's the word I'm looking for? Pardon quit okay volunteer. See we don't have it happen very often. It's a voluntary quit. And so therefore they would not be eligible for the unemployment. The unemployment money. That's called the quiet part out loud. We're waiting on a press conference from New York. Governor Andrew Cuomo but first many workers across the country are now faced with an ultimatum. Risk your life and show up to work or lose your job and your livelihood. As the number of coronavirus cases continues to grow nationwide. Several Republican governors are still pushing to reopen their states and for those workers who do make the potentially life-saving decision to stay home. Some Republican governors have signaled they could be stripped of their unemployment benefits. It's a move that will disproportionately impact hourly and low wage workers who are disproportionately black and Hispanic. My next guest describes this very reality using a term that I just learned about this week from her called nickel politics. She's here to break it all down. So let me now is Britney Cooper associate professor at Rutgers University and author of eloquent rage. Also joining us is Steph Harris former acting secretary of labor under President Obama and Brittany. I'm going to tell you the way to make me obsessed with you is to tweet complex words that I have to look out and so now I'm obsessed and so can we get around the show. I'm going to read a little bit of the tweet that sent me into a swoon. Literally I looked it up and then read I went into deep wormhole on it but I feel like you. You tweeted most black. People are clear that this utterly that this utterly absurd push to reopen. The country is all about a gross necora political calculation that it is black people dying disproportionately from cove it and just to back that up. Let's look at the disproportionate numbers in state after state after state after state in Washington. Dc You you're talking about forty five percent of the population but seventy five percent of the debts New York nine versus Nineteen Louisiana thirty three verses Sixty Five Michigan. Fourteen forty six. You can see it all there on the screen. I had friends last week when we were talking about. Georgia say to me. Oh that's why campus doing it. Because they're out of money and they don't WanNa pay unemployment benefits and then while people are saying your turn to talk. I will stop talking. Yes thank you joy so you know. I'm from Louisiana to my home. State and those numbers are absolutely staggering. And when I saw beginning to happen this narrative about how we were just going to go ahead and reopen the country. There was a clear racial tinge to it There was this sense that as a news outlets like yours have begun to covered these racial disparities that conservative politicians around the country made a big shift in the way that they were talking about this and said okay well. We can reopen the country and underneath that underlying that. Is this idea that that these lives don't have value so when I use the term necker politics that is a political theory term it was coined by man named she'll in Bombay and it really refers to the politics of death. How GOVERNMENT HOW STATE POWER ENTITIES US policy to determine whose lives are worth protecting whose lives are valuable and whose lives are expendable and I know that we don't typically like to think about our government is acting in that kind of way but we are really facing a pandemic in which we have lost almost sixty five thousand people in a matter of a of eight weeks or so so we are absolutely at this point talking about the politics of death and we need the kind of terminology that helps to think about. How is the government government determining how it's enacting policy set when you when you think about it all the way back right? You know the life of an enslaved person was only as valuable as how many could reproduce of more people who were thought to be owned by the person they call themselves the owner. You go all the way through the history of American work. The immigrant workers in the nineteen twenties and in the gilded age. It's not like people thought their lives had any value than how many times they could crank the wheel and you know the idea of giving them a day off or not. Giving them eight hour day people had to literally strike and they have violent strikes that violence against them so the idea about American work. The people at the lowest end of the work pool has always been a sense of. Do you value this human or are just a means to an end and it feels like we're back there again. I almost feel like we're reliving. The Calvin Coolidge era. Your thoughts that I think that's precisely right. I think it's a continuation of a long history. In the United States of devaluing working people particularly Brown and Black Working People This order that president trump place under the defense production act that essentially forces the African American Latino workers overwhelmingly also some white workers back into chicken and pork and beef production plants so that they can be responsible for getting the food supply back shape. Those are some of the most dangerous workplaces in our country. And so what we're seeing is an exposure of the inequalities that have existed in our society for a very long time and if we can start with the health inequalities there is an unequal distribution based on race of healthcare and health insurance in our country this administration in a crisis easily could have responded to that with extending health insurance reopening. The obamacare exchanges making health insurance more widely available. Take picking up the call to pay for all Cova treatments for any worker peculiar frontline worker whose exposed none of those things have been done. So you can't say that you care about workers if everything you do. Every policy taking ocean off the bead not giving by not providing health insurance results in those workers having a much increased likelihood of death alley pretty we. Have we have a story that Mitch? Mcconnell just talk about making real clear who you care about right who you give a damn about Mitch. Mcconnell now wants to shield companies from liability in corona virus related lawsuits. I'm sorry I interrupted you. Oh No thank you. So one of the things that people have really struggled with here is the idea that because black people have disproportionate levels of co morbidity things like asthma and high blood pressure diabetes. That we are personally responsible for them that there is a real resistance in this country. And I've seen it across the political spectrum to thinking about the way that structures produce those commodities. And that's what we're talking about Moore talking about nick politics so we're not only talking about disparities in health insurance coverage we're talking about things like food food desert. We're talking about things like lack of access to help the poor to save parks places to exercise right in addition to this wage crisis and so part of what that means is that black folks already. Go into this with a disadvantage. Because we're over. Were over represented in the essential worker economy. The other thing that I'm thinking about I'm thinking about the educator in Brooklyn Raina Mongan who passed away on Monday choose a one year old. Wellesley educated at educator in Brooklyn. Who began going to the hospital in the middle of March asking to be tested? She was turned away three times before. Finally she was intimated in an ambulance and then hospitalized and after nearly six weeks of fighting for her life she passed away on Monday and that tracks with all of the research that we have about how there is a racial empathy gap in this country so that healthcare workers even our heroic frontline healthcare workers. Still don't believe what folks own account about what is happening in their bodies and literally methods. This sister did not make it even though she thought even though she advocated for herself part of the reason focus on go ahead go on go on part of the reason. That folks are so uncomfortable in this moment is because we are being exposed to all of these racial disparities that we would rather not talk about. Of course we have seen an uptick in these things in the trump administration and so this encouragement of these conservative governors backup by the trump administration. And then taken up in all of these places Iowa Georgia etc is all about an underlying devaluing of these lives and look. That's not just racial conservative. Politics also be values the lives of the working poor and so we're not talking only about a racial problem in this country. We'RE TALKING ABOUT ABYSS. Dane for the people who do the hardest work but we can't have a conversation about that unless we begin to value the fact that many of workers are black and latte tonight. I think it's pretty fair to say that. If you work standing up if you do your job standing on your feet you probably are not the concern of the Mitch. Mcconnells of the world. They like get your behind to work because I need X. Right and you know to go back a little bit broader seth. You've got all of these nurses and we all have. We all know all of us that know a lot of home care nurses. It's a lot of west Indian older west Indian votes within the and nurses. You've got people who are working in nursing homes where there's a lot of debt like disproportionate amount of death going on. You've got frontline workers you've got you know. Sort of across the board these professions that aren't necessities to keep the rest of us comfortable and comfortably at home are the people risking their lives. You put that against this on employment number which I'm just looking at here. Thirty point. Three million unemployment claims just three point eight three point eight four million just in a week. We're heading toward what feels like the depression. And so the question is what do right like this simple thing and the thing that seems obvious would be to pay people to stay home. That's what other countries are doing. Is that what we should be doing? Should we be saying we're just GONNA pay people to stay home? Yeah that's what we should be doing. V This cares act which created the paycheck protection program which was a series of small business loans and also provided lending facilities to the Federal Reserve. Bank was supposed to do that. The loans were supposed to go out and become forgivable at least a small businesses if they kept people on the payroll but as we see the unemployment claims numbers climb over thirty million plus the seven million people who are already unemployed. We see that it may not be working. That small businesses are shutting down. Because they simply don't have the capital to survive. We also know that the distribution of that money has not been in the least bit fair. It has been overly represented in rural communities and others. So I think that there's a real challenge for war communities of color that for a longtime were excluded from this program functionally because their lending institutions were not getting the money those businesses close down and people lost their jobs in those communities so as a consequence I think we really in retrospect made a big mistake. We should have done what Europe did and just paid workers directly and kept them on and that would have kept these unemployment rolls much much smaller states would not be in crisis websites wouldn't be crashing and we would have a much better functioning economy and maybe we won't slip into depression but that's not where we are eight weeks in. What happens oftentimes when you get into these debates that we start to creep back into hearing me sort of conservative themes of laziness. Well the reason people don't WanNa go back. They could make more money on unemployment. They'd rather sit home. You go right back to some of those knee-jerk themes and it's not always just Republicans. Who Do it? This was an error. The Kentucky Governor Andy who actually quite a good governor overall. We're he actually apologized to somebody who he had accused of of unemployment fraud. Take a listen. We had somebody apply for unemployment for two core here in Kentucky and that person probably thought they were being funny. They probably did. How somebody in apology tonight Last night I spent a little bit of time talking about fraudulent claims holding us up and mentioned an individual that filed in the name of two boxes core. I didn't know And it's my fault that we have a Kentuckian who goes by maleek whose name is to pacture court. I talked to him on the phone today. Apologized and people sort of had a laugh about it because the the the young man's name is to record the two-pack trended underlying thing is that there is this. Lindsey Graham has been saying. Oh you can't give people unemployment plus they're just going to be lazy and stay home. They it goes right back there to these tropes that generally targeted at Black and Brown folks your thoughts absolutely so look ducks the way that the welfare queen stereotype got started in the first place. There was one story of welfare fraud in Chicago in the nineteen seventies and Ronald. Reagan created a whole narrative. About how this is just what black women were doing. So we've got to be extremely careful in this moment where people are in real crisis we are seeing it and we are seeing it across our communities. The other thing is the. Us is having a having a reckoning with our deep investment in in a world where we think that the job of folks is to work to live now that is typically what we expect a black and Brown folks that their job is to be servants that their work is to make the world comfortable for everyone else that is built into the fabric of this country but the reality that many of us who've had the privilege to actually shelter in place at home with relatively secure salaries are understanding. Is that all of us. Were working too hard that all of us were pushing ourselves far too much anyway and for what purpose right and so there is this narrative particularly coming out of the right agenda by capitalism. That says that our only purpose in life is that we live to work right and the challenge of that is that you can't work if you can't live can't breathe just to sort of flip it. What the corollary into really begin to get us to think. I'm not on this particular broadcast today. Trying to say that we need to have you know trying to full scale kind of push against capitalism on anti-capitalist precisely because it puts us in these kinds of ethical calculations. But I'm asking folks to really begin to think about what our relationship to capitalism is when you begin to do that then you have to think about the ways that we tax the most vulnerable folks in our populations the ways that we fundamentally don't value them the ways that we keep on saying that these workers are essential but the idea that making meet clans. Go in making people's grocery deliveries easier that all of that stuff matters more than keeping people say helping people take care of their families. Helping people have food to eat. All of which are choices. The government can make all of which are choices at the government made the last time we were in a great depression to see the. The lack fundamentally of empathy on the right is the thing that I find most disturbing because this is not just a political conversation. It's also immoral conversation. You begin to talk about macro politics. You're also talking about how we think about life itself and many people have set. Budgets are moral documents what we do about economies. Have we value people making money in the conditions in which they work? Also tell us something about where. We are spiritually as a country. We're in a deep place of of just making the wrong choices about cool matters here and so it starts people when I make claims you know I said on twitter as part of this necker politics threat black lives matter but that call never meant that only black lives matter it Mitt. That when you begin to think about how the least of these in our society are being treated you create a context for everybody to have a better set of working condition. Yeah indeed indeed I WANNA I wanna add to this conversation because we're having a bit of a truncated broadcast today because we've got this presser coming up so I want to add into the conversation former. Us Housing and Urban Urban Development Secretary. Julio Castro also was a candidate for president I want to throw this to you. Because we're seeing people line up in these I don't want to call them rallies they're not. I don't know what you call them when you when people are showing up with a AR fifteen's brandishing weapons intimidating workers intimidating government workers. And you know with these hideous signs that are offensive and in some cases anti Jewish are racist and demanding. What like it's not clear what they're demanding demand to infect other people demanding to make other people sick but in a sense is a it is very busy mono racial whatever you WANNA call it. Protest that does feel like it's directed at the fact that this policy of staying home at least is attempting to save the lives of people who were dying or that are primarily black and Brown. Your thoughts are and said to be with you joy this morning all of us had seen the video and the images coming out of Michigan and other places of these folks Storming the state capital brandishing. Their weapons demanding a that. The state be reopened. We saw the tweets. Donald Trump sent out a week or so ago about liberate Michigan Liberate Virginia and so forth In what is in you. Put your finger on. What's amazing is that if you took those images and you compared them to eleven years ago the first year of President Obama's presidency and auto the signs in the messages in the spirit of those rallies basically the same thing. It's basically the same thing and so I think it gets at this long standing grudge. That many people have that in parties raisch allies and is racially motivated. And I also believe that you know when journalists have an opportunity to investigate some of these these rallies what they're gonna find is that that They are organized in perhaps partially funded by the same organizations for right wing organizations that have an interest in stirring these these passions off. So you know it's it's astroturf basically And this time. What's different is that it's endangering public health. It's making it harder for exactly. Get past this cove in nineteen crisis and to just really quickly before. Because we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA add more to this to this panel if you were still running hard because the other issue. We're having to sort of conversation about this political moment where people are deciding. Who's were who who is worthy of living who is worthy of preserving their lives and who is not right and you think about public housing a group of Americans that are often not thought about not not you know not really paid that much attention to who live in very close quarters who are sort of by default living in situations where it is easier to get sick because you're on top of each other. What should be in a world where we had a normal presidency? What should be being done about that? Well I mean first of all we have something like twenty six billion dollars worth of overdue housing repairs that need to be done in public housing. We lose ten thousand units of public housing every year to disrepair in so many ways we've underinvested in public housing we'd to make those investments we ensure that people can live in good safe sanitary conditions that they're not crowded with each other in the Nineteen Ninety S. We had we got into this mode of demolishing of these big high rises in Chicago in other places in some ways. I think that we went too far because public housing does have real value and it has real value going forward in being able to provide people a safe decent affordable place to live. However I do think that along with that we forgot about in many ways the residents who live there and We need to be going in the other direction of investing in them. We also need direct rental assistance. That's a huge gap and I WANNA commend off folks like Representative Presley and Representative Denny heck who proposed different pieces of legislation to provide rental assistance to people. That desperately need it. Yeah and as if as if by magic I happen to have congressman. I enter Presley here. She was holding. We had we had a little bit of a different show plan today but we are. We are working on the fly so I want to bring in Congresswoman Ileana Presley. Thank you so much for being here congresswoman. Add you to the conversation because rent relief is now a day. It's a DEFCON. One situation yesterday was May i. It was not just made. It was rent day for a lot of people in the countries. Were having this whole conversation about who is being valued in this moment when we have this pandemic crisis and who is not renters are in trouble. Renters are suffering. Talk about the ideas that you have for trying to alleviate that sure well I I just want to commend my My colleague Representative Omar for her legislation. Which I'm proud to be an original cosponsor of which would cancel rant You know we're in the midst of a pandemic of public health crisis. People are quite literally navigating a new normal. Just trying to stay alive. And you're housing. Is your most expensive bill and also to the points made by Secretary Castro and also the professor. I'm housing is is a critical determinant of health as well. So many of the health disparities that we see also why we need quality safe and affordable housing but housing is your most expensive bill. So why folks are navigating normal. Just trying to stay alive. They shouldn't also be worried about paying the rent in. So we should just cancel that and eliminate that worry and carbon mortgages. Oh absolutely but when when they hear that then then you think twelve hundred dollars. That won't pay the rent in anywhere in New York City. I can tell you that. Nowhere near paying your rent in most big cities that's not paying. I'm sure in Boston. That's not paying your rent. So you know the challenge. People have as they're watching. They're watching the legislation happen. They're like this isn't helping me right. So what what can be done to to to change that dynamic yeah joint? Let me to say what happened yesterday. So we're experiencing unprecedented her ch- and in the wake of that. We're also seeing unprecedented activism. But folks should not have to organize and mobilize around what should be so obvious. This hurt is unprecedented. The relief should be felt by everyone. It requires unprecedented solutions. Unprecedented leadership and we need a relief package that puts the people first and that does mean many other things which hope to a new right later but it certainly means cancelling rent and You know I think the reason this administration has such contempt for workers and for everyday families is there calloused in their disconnected secretary. Mnuchin thinks someone. Some family can live off of twelve hundred dollars for ten weeks. That is seventeen dollars a day and I think Donald Trump has contempt for workers. Because he doesn't know anything about doing work all he does is play golf so of course he has contempt for workers but even when he plays golf he's utilizing low income oftentimes undocumented workers to make sure they're cleaning up after him and serving his food and making sure the green is. Kim knows what look like they look like black and Brown people and work gets done by workers and while many people are just now getting the memo that these are essential workers They had for too long been treated as if they are not essential but they are disposable and so they don't have essential rights. Think about if we already had universal paid leave universal health care how we would have more effectively in better weather this storm in so this is why I partnered with Senator Warren in representative Kana to introduce the essential workers bill of rights. These workers deserve a personal protection protective equipment. They deserve hazard pay deserve to know one. Another Co worker has tested positive and they deserve paid leave and Justice Center. This constituent called me at eleven o'clock at night. Essential worker a single mom the schools or close no one else to care for her child. She said I feel sick and I need to stay home with my child. Can You promised me representative Presley that if I stay home that I won't lose my job and I could not guarantee her. That and so this This bill would take care of that and it needs to be included in the next relief along with the cancellation of rent on the ring. Cancellations they want to stay with for just a moment secretary Castro. Not only were you. Also were mayor big city mayor and I wonder if the cancellation front. I imagine it would be very difficult to get a bill like that through Mitch. Mcconnell the grim reaper but governors can make a lot of decisions and in a lot of cases. They're acting sort of mini presidents here because Donald Trump is not acting. Could've governor in theory implement rent cancellation in their state. Could Governor Cuomo when he's cut when he comes up. His press conference announce that he is going to issue a rent cancellation not just for individuals but also for small businesses who by the way have to also pay rent. It's a great point. I mean governors do have a lot with authority up there. And fortunately as we've seen during this crisis. Governors have picked up the slack so have mayors in cities across this country In fact in a lot of places local communities they instituted protections against eviction They have also started direct rental assistance funds. But dance your question. I do think that a balanced package that provides rental relief is urgently needed and in Representative. Omar's legislation for instance. Both sides of this that are addressed right. We need to address the side of the renter. Who's panicking right now? Because it's already the second of the month and usually on the fourth or the fifth. That rent is delinquent and a landlord. can take action at the same time with respect to landlords in the bill addresses this as well a lot of these landlords are not landlords that own twenty-five thousand properties. They're people that own duplex or four lacks in people have brought up which is a legitimate point that many of them have a mortgage on that property and so That legislation is thoughtful and beginning to address all sides of that equation but to make sure that all of those vulnerable American families. That are panicking. Because they don't have the money for red are taken care of. That's what we need to do. And Are we just going to be home with a Gordon? Oh I just want to build upon that and say yes This legislation is very thoughtful. It's holistic because knowledge that again the scale and scope with this pandemic. The hurt is unprecedented and the relief must be felt equitably. Yeah and by the way banks were handed sight unseen one point seven trillion with a t dollars by the Federal Reserve. So the money is there the trick of we don't have the money that will work on America's anymore because now we know they have a lot of money when they have a lot of money in bank surgery get it? So they could mitigate loans or they let people go on mortgages so that way that people can not charge rent because the mortgages there can be mortgage. There's plenty of money on set and allows you just wanted to say to your point about Our state legislature is in our governors. I do have to give it up to you. Know Mild Comma Waltham Massachusetts where our state legislature has stepped up and there is at least a moratorium addictions and foreclosures. But in order for us to really get at this holistically we do need to cancel ran in PAS mortgages. And that's why I'm proud to be an original cosponsor representative Omar's legislation and we hope that place. I was just a joy in my hope. Is that that we're going to learn a powerful lesson from this experience and that we're going to begin to treat. Housing is a human right in this concert that this kind of movement will be will be the beginning of longer lasting change. We won't treat housing as a backburner issue in a way that we have for a long time. Yeah and appreciate that begins with no absolutely and you know. I want to bring seth in Brittany back in the sense that it's a holistic thing I think as the congressman the congresswoman and the former secretary said it's holistic. It's can you pay? Do you have any money? Do you have any income? It's can you then turn around and pay your bills and pay your rent? It's all it also goes together and at the job end of it. It's very difficult to get around the the the sort of simple idea. If the United States was doing with some European countries we're doing instantly providing enough of a monthly income. I think Senator Sanders has been for this. That's not at twelve hundred dollars. One time it's money per month. Is that something that the United States could theoretically be doing? A lot of these dynamics. There's no question about it and I think we're going to have to do that. Because that twelve hundred dollars which by the way has only gotten out to about half of the American people people who are going to get paper checks in large part haven't received that money at so that's really just a hope at this point for them but yes we're going to have to do that again because this economic recession that we're in heading towards a depression is going to last and twelve. Hundred dollars. Doesn't run out quickly in New York and Boston and also runs out quickly in Omaha and it runs out quickly in Butte Montana. It's not enough money to support a family for more than a short period of time and unemployment insurance benefits are not getting out to everybody who should be getting them either. That's the other big economic support that folks have and we know that small business start laying off and large businesses are laying workers off in in large numbers. So we're going to have to figure out a way for the government to cover the difference because he can't pay bills with money. You don't have so to eat money into workers who are unemployed workers who are in trouble workers who are low wage already and we're struggling so that we can send out of the deep economic depression which were headed right now. Absolute lack of an FDR problem without an FDR. I'm going to give Brittany the last word since we did. Start this whole thing with a tweet. That she posted inspired me to have her on the show today. So I'm going to give you the last word. Britney it's absolutely true that we need a universal basic income in this country. The right is resisting this because they are worried. That left is going to get all of our the things that we've been pressing for In this crisis look crises. Expose the places that we need to go in the ways that we need to grow. We have an opportunity in this moment to get better and we'll do that by focusing on how least of these in our country are fearing those folks are disproportionately black and Brown. This housing crisis is driven by this cable. Perception of black women as the undeserving and lazy for that is that is driving. So much of this so these policies will get us there. But we've got to go farther. I hope that we can start. We've gotTA start by deciding that living and our government doing things to promote the living thriving all of our citizens and not just the chosen. Few is the way to the future that we want. Amen well I think this panel. This is sort of on the fly. Thank you all for being so flexible in two panels together. You guys are Great Britain's Cooper Seth Harris Congresswoman ianna Presley Houlihan. Castro could not have been a better panel. Thank you all. Stay safe please. We are still waiting on this. Press briefing near Corner Andrew. Cuomo this morning but we will have a angel after the break. Hey Guys Willie geist here. Be sure to check out this week's episode of The Sunday. Sit Down podcast where I get together with the legendary Woody Harrelson for a wide ranging conversation. I promise you don't WanNa Miss Woody. Get it now for free wherever you download your podcasts. All Right Governor Andrew. Cuomo has taken his seat. We're going to go to him now. Closure to get out of the state capital tell you the truth and talk to the people who are actually doing the work. I am McQueen's boy so it's coming back home for me. Corona Queens was called Corona Queens before the corona virus. There was no connection between Corona Queens and the Corona Virus Levin introduced my colleagues who here from my far left Pat. Foy Who is the chairman of the MTA to my immediate left. Sarah Feinberg who runs the New York City Transit Bureau to my right Gareth roads? Who is Deputy Superintendent of the Department of Financial Services but has been with me for many years and is now helping on this up in Albany? The today is Saturday. I know that because it's on the slide otherwise I may not have known that But I follow the days by. What's on the power point? Everybody talks about. This is uncharted waters. That we've never been here before and that's true but even when you are in uncharted waters that doesn't mean you just proceed blindly right. You'd get whatever information that you can because you want to stay informed even in the old days when sailors would sail into uncharted waters. This is before. Gps radar and depth finders. They would throw out a piece of lead with the rope. The lead would fall to the bottom and they would call back to the captain. How deep the water was the letter you've been had on the very bottom a piece of wax. That would pickup. What was on the ocean bottom? Whatever sand rocks etc so the captain could tell basically where he was so unchartered? Waters doesn't mean proceed blindly right. It means get information. Get data the best you can and use that data to decide where you're going so especially in this situation. We have so much emotion your politics. You have personal anxiety that people feel social anxiety social stress. Let's stick to the facts. Let's stick to the data. Let's make sure we're making decisions with the best information that we have so. We do a lot of testing a lot of tracking to find out where we are. We test number of hospitalizations. Every night we find out how many people in the hospital the day before. And we've been tracking. That good news. Is that number down a tick again? Today the net change in hospitalizations is down a tick. Intimations is down which is very good news. The new cases walking the door the new cova cases. The number of new infections was also down a little bit eight hundred thirty one. It had been relatively flat at about nine hundred every day which is not great news. Yesterday was a thirty one will watch to see what happens with that. The number that I watch every day which is the worst is the number of deaths. That number has remained obnoxiously and terrifyingly high. And it's still not dropping at the rate we would like to see a drop. It even went up a little bit two hundred ninety nine to one hundred and eighty nine the day before so that is bad news. Two hundred and seventy six deaths in hospitals twenty-three in nursing homes as everybody knows. Nursing homes are where the most vulnerable population is and the highest number of the most vulnerable population but again use the data use information to determine actions not emotions not politics not what people think feel but what we know in terms of facts. We've been sampling all across the state to determine the infection rate. So we know if it's getting better if it's getting worse and we've done the largest survey in the nation testing for people who have antibodies. If somebody has antibodies. It means that that person was infected. Right that's what the antibody test does for you. It tells you that person was infected. They've now recovered so that they have. Antibodies I went through this with my brother Chris. He got infected. He now has the antibody so you test him. He tests positive for antibodies. So we've been doing. These antibody testings all across the state. We have the largest sample now over fifteen thousand people which is an incredibly large sample and when we started on the twenty second we had twenty nine hundred people surveyed. At that time we had about a thirteen point. Nine percent just about fourteen percent infection rate statewide then went up to about four point. Fourteen point nine and today it is down to twelve point. Three now. Statisticians will say this is all plus or minus in the margin of error. But it's a large sample. It is indicative fourteen to fourteen point nine down to twelve point three and as you can see we test about every four or five days. We have so much at stake so many decisions that we have to make that we want to get those data points as quickly as we can and seeing it go down to twelve percent in. May only a couple of points but it's better than seeing it go up. That's for sure and again. This is outside the margin of error so this is a good sign and it is fifteen thousand people surveyed. So it's a large number. You can then start to look at where in this state. Who IN THE STATE? So that will inform our strategy. You can see. It's a little bit more male than female. Not exactly sure why that is a New York City. You see the number one from twenty one to twenty four and it's down to nineteen point nine so again. That's a good sign. You Always WanNa see the number dropping rather than the number increasing within New York City. You see the Bronx is high. Twenty seven percent Brooklyn Nineteen Manhattan Seventeen Queens Eighteen. Staten Island nine thousand nine hundred and we're going to do more research to understand what's going on there. Why is the bronx higher than the other boroughs? Statewide you see. It's basically about flat. This is predominantly an issue for New York City then Long Island then the northern suburbs then the rest of the state but Eerie County which is Buffalo. New York has been problematic. The racial breakdown. We're looking at to see a studied disproportionate impact who is paying the highest price for this virus. What's happening with poorer communities? What's happening in with a ratio with the racial demographics overlaid over the income demographics and also if there's any information in different ages that could be instructive were still getting about nine hundred new infections everyday walking into the hospital that is still an unacceptably high rate where trying to understand exactly why that is. Who are those nine hundred? Where is it coming from? What can we do to now? Refine our strategies to find out where those new cases of being generated. And then get to those areas. Get to those places get to those people to try to target our attack. If you remember we had the first cluster in the nation first hotspot even before they called them. Hotspots was new Rochelle Westchester and there was a tremendous outbreak. In New Rochelle. We then sent all sorts of resources into new Rochelle and we actually reduced that hot spot. So if you find a specific place or pattern that is generating infections then you can attack but you have to find it first and that's what we're looking at especially on the number of new infections that are coming and you see if you look at the location of it. It's not telling us much but where we asked to hospitals yesterday. We have all the hospitals on a conference call and I spoke to all the hospital hospitals and ask them to take additional information from people who are walking into the hospitals to try to find out where these infections are coming from. Are they frontline workers for people who are staying home these infections that are being spread in the home? Or are they frontline workers? Which means they're getting up every day. They're getting on public transit. They're going to work and maybe they're getting on public transit. Maybe they're getting it at the workplace but getting more information on where these new cases are coming from. Where do you live not just borrow? What community within the borough all the different health factors that are affecting the new infection. Rate Co Morbidity. He's how were they traveling? Are they in their cars? Are they on public transportation? Is that the New York City Transit System Long Island railroad etc so we asked the hospitals to collect that data. Yesterday will be getting that over the next couple of days and that will help us again. get more information. In the meantime we know that vulnerable populations are paying the highest price. Seniors are nursing homes and our poorer communities. They are the ones where you have higher infection rates and you have higher risk and higher exposure. We're GONNA distribute today seven million masks to just those communities in nursing homes poorer communities people in public housing in New York City New York City Housing Authority. So we'll be doing that today. Seven million masks is a large number. There's about nine million people in New York City. Total so seven million masks is obviously will make a big difference. We're all so funding food banks the more. This has gone on the longer people without a job longer. People without a check our without a check basics like paying rent and buying food become very important. We have addressed the rent issue. The immediate urgent need nobody can be affected for non-payment of rent and that's true through June so people are stable in their housing environment. Next basic need is food right and we're operating foodbanks. Twenty five million dollars more in food banks. All the food banks will tell you that the demand is way way up and we need help in funding foodbanks philanthropies a lot of foundations. That are in the business of helping people. Well if you're a foundation or not for profit or philanthropy or a person who wants to help? We could use more funding for food banks. The state budget is also very stressed with what's going on so we don't have the state funds to do what's needed but we would appreciate donations for the food banks as I said. The antibody testing has been very important and We're going to undertake a full survey of antibody testing for transit workers. Transit workers have very much been at the front line. We talk about essential workers people who are out there every day running the buses running the subways all through this. We know that there's been a very high infection rate among transit workers We've said thank you and we appreciate what you're doing one thousand times but I believe actions speak louder than words if you appreciate what we're doing and help us do what we do and we're going to be doing that with more testing and more resources that's going to be going on right now. And to keep our trees and workers safe and to keep the public safe the rioting public. We're going to do something that has never been done before. And that is that the MTA is going to be disinfecting every train. Twenty four hours. This is such a monumental undertaking. I can't even begin to describe it to you The New York City subway system has never been closed. It operates twenty four hours a day because we have a twenty four hour city. We're taking the unprecedented step during this pandemic of closing the system for four hours at night from one. Am to five when the ridership is lowest. The ridership is lower to begin with. It's down about ninety percent because of everything but its lowest during one. Am to five am. We're going to close it from one. Am to five am the MTA is going to Literally disinfect every train and just viewed the operations on how they're doing it. It's smart. It's labor intensive people have to wear has matt suits. They have a number of chemicals. That disinfect but literally. You have to go through the whole train. With a misting device where they spray disinfectant literally on every surface. You know this virus just studying it now but there were reports and say the virus can live two or three days on some surfaces like stainless steel. You look at the inside of a subway car. You look at the rails you look at the the bars. They're all stainless steel so to make sure the transit workers safe to make sure the riding public is safe. The best thing you can do is disinfect. The whole inside of the car as massive challenges that is but that's what the MTA is doing and they're doing it extraordinarily well and it's just another sign of the dedication this the capacity of our transit workers which is indicative of the story of New York. I mean they are stepping up in a big way. Not just the cars are also doing stations all the handrails etc and it's good and smart for the transit workers who have to work in that environment but it's also right for the riding public and we want people to know who need to use the subways and the buses because they are working that they are safe and the essential workers who have kept this entire society functioning have done an extraordinary job and we want them to know that we're doing everything we can do to keep them safe. You know. This was the delicate balance all along. We needed New Yorkers to understand how dangerous this virus was and we communicated that early on so that when we said stay home people understood. They should really stay home right. New Yorkers can be a cynical bunch and just because it governor says stay home. They're not going to stay home unless they understand why they need to stay home. So we presented those tracks but at the same time we're saying to essential workers after just hearing how dangerous viruses and by the way you have to go to work tomorrow and they did. And if the essential workers didn't then you would have seen a real problem if you don't have food on the shelves if you don't have power to homes If you don't have basic services if the police don't show up if the fire department doesn't show up if the EMT's don't show up if the ambulance is don't run. The nurses don't show up the doctors. Don't show up then. You are in a place where you've never been before so after communicating. How dangerous the situation was. The next breath was but frontline workers. You have to show up and they did and they did and they did their job and that is an extraordinary extraordinary example of duty and honor and respect and love for what they do and who they are and love for their brothers and sisters in the community and they demonstrated it. They didn't say they demonstrated every day when they get up and they leave their house so God bless them all but we also have to do what we have to do to make sure we're doing everything we can to keep them safe. And this heroic effort on cleaning the subways is part of that and we will continue because we are New York. Tough but tough. Jessen doesn't mean just tough. It means smarter. Means United amused disciplined. And it means loving. You can be tough and you can be loving. They're not inconsistent. Sometimes you have to be tough to be loving. And that's what New Yorkers all about questions comments governor homeless we'll have to be leaving subway system. What resources what actions is your administration taking to provide? You know hotel rooms funding any other resources to make sure they don't just move the problem from one area to another Louis. I've worked with the homeless communities since I was in my twenty s. I ran a not for profit. I was the largest provider for homeless families. In the country I then went to Department of Housing and Urban Development which for the federal government is in charge of homeless programs. Came up with a whole new program to help the homeless nationwide and implemented that did more for the homeless than ever before so my knowledge of helping the homeless. I think is sufficient. And I know there's a lot of politics about helping Hamas you do not help the homeless by letting them stay on a subway car and sleep on a subway car in the middle of a global pandemic when they could expose themselves or others to virus. That does not help the homeless. I mean it is common sense to these. People need a safe clean decent place shelter. We should provide that. Even more. To the to the extent people need services and help with an underlying issue mental health services substance abuse job training et CETERA. We should provide that so the notion of what you should let everyone sleep on the train and just stay on the train homeless because that's good for them. It's not good for them we. We are funding. An unprecedented amount in housing and services for the homeless part of what the problem has been has been connecting a homeless individual with those services. That is the difficulty because homeless people have an underlying issue have been homeless for a period of time. It's not as simple as saying come with me. I want to help you come. I'm going to bring you to a community. Group residents. That connection is very difficult. It's not that we're not funding services finding housing. You have to get that homeless person to a position where they trust and they're accepting. I think this actually poses an opportunity to engage homeless men and women who have been sleeping on trains some of them for years four years. Now to disinfect. You have to get the people off the trains. You have to engage homeless men and women with the appropriate skill set. And I think it's actually an opportunity to get the most trains and actually connect them to the services. They need it but it is governor. There's been talk of using FEMA money. Money emergency aid from Hud to paper hotel rooms for the homeless especially street homeless. Have you taken any actions to make that those sort of resources available we have funding for local governments? It's up to the local government to decide the best strategy. But I think there's an opportunity here. This picture that are editor took this morning about nine thirty this morning on an F. train at Westport and unfortunately there were three men sleeping in the car spread out I mean. Do you realistically think that with this. Increased outreach because you push them out in the middle of the night can we see an end to that Japan realistically or is that will will you? Can you end all homeless people? No I don't believe you were. I would like to say yes but I don't believe you will. You always had a certain number of people who were homeless for one reason or another going back decades. I mean not like it is today but you always had some people who for one reason or another wanted to sort of get away from society drop out of society had an issue that they were dealing with. I don't think you'll help everyone one hundred percent but I don't know that that's that's the real question you help as many people as you can and this'll be the first time that I can remember that. Every homeless person by definition has to get off that train at one point. You know to disinfect. The trains everyone has to be off the train. And I think that's an opportunity to actually engage homeless people and find out what they need and try to link them up with the services in the help. Will you get every? Will you help everyone but you help everyone that you can't can't pay the rent now and they don't pay the rent. They cannot be evicted by the landlord period. You cannot be victim for non-payment of rent. I did what's called an executive order but it's basically a law so a landlord cannot evict the person for non-payment of rent. If you can pay the rent you should pay the rent right. I'M NOT SAYING. Don't pay if you can pay morality in this but if you can't pay many people can't pay because of circumstances you cannot be addicted and that is a law that is in place through June and then come June. We'll see where we are and we'll figure it out sir. Romney wore officers are going to be needed and the need to travel. Is there anything? We are Chairman Pat Foy with us And Sarah who runs the Transit Bureau alternative to them to give you some more details. Well let me start with the Alternative Service Plan and Sarah will talk about the Program of closing the subways from one. Am to five am What we are going to do. Well let me say that step back. When the pandemic began we've reached out to the Hospital Association to Labor Unions Trade Associations to get data on where they are employees. Lived what hospital they went went to what food preparation facility as an example. They went to we. Did we did that in early. March as a result we have very granular data as to the number of passengers that travel from one. Am TO TWO AM. We know that in the period from one. Am to five in approximately ten to eleven thousand. A of our customers travel what we have done in connection with the announcement. The governor's announcement earlier in the week in Albany about closing the subways I in a bunch of my colleagues at reached out to the AFL CIO to the Transit Workers Union New York state in New York City to the Hospital Association. Eleven ninety nine thirty two J. The building trades grocery stores and grocery store unions that that's a partial list and we're getting very granular data where their employees or members travel fun and to and we are going to to the extent we can tailor service to accommodate their needs. And I'll turn to Sarah in terms of the alternative service program. Sure so thanks. So Pat said ten to eleven thousand of our riders travel between one and five. Am over the last several weeks. We know Which subway stops they use? We know a lot of origin and destination information. Look we're going to prioritize best service. We're we're a public transportation agency and so we want to prioritize best service. It's we're going to be running a lot of buses in most places. The subway headways were about twenty minutes. So we'RE GONNA have bus service that matches the subway headways if you were if you were depending on the subways. We're GONNA try to match bus service that you are We were listening to Governor Andrew. Cuomo he has now turned the briefing over someone else. Who's talking about empty? Those of you have heard the term. Mta being thrown around if you do not live in New York City and are not familiar with what they're talking about. The Metropolitan Transit Authority runs the buses and the subways and of course in New York City. The buses in the subways are really kind of the main artery of getting around. An- illnesses that impact. Mass transit obviously can shut New York City down and make it very difficult to end. This coronas crisis because people ride very close together. People are on subways a quick couple of data points five point seven million people ride the New York City subway every day. Metro North has about three hundred thousand riders a day riding in from Connecticut and New Jersey. So that's kind of the context of why you're hearing a lot of talk about the M. T. A. From Governor. Cuomo in from the person who's speaking right now. Seven million masks have been sent to nursing homes and to at risk communities per the governor. He's implemented in order saying no evictions through June meeting. People who were unable to pay their rent have rent relief through June and is a month from now and the question is does that mean that when June comes they have to pay all the back rent. Because that's a problem. If you get to the end of your relief you still have to pay the rent. That was not answered. No one followed up on that or maybe somebody will follow up on that. One of the questionnaires antibody tests for all transit workers in the New York City region. That's being implemented again because transit is the artery of New York City and Cuomo announced that the M. T. A. M. Metropolitan Transit Authority. That runs buses. And subways isn't going to disinfect. All the trains from one PM to five am that matters to you. If you live in the tri-state area if you live or work in New York City so we will continue to monitor the krona virus updates in New York but up next the latest on the sexual harassment allegation against former Vice President Joe Biden and also his response some coffee and we'll see on the other side of the break. Would you please go on the record with the American people? Did you sexually assault terror? Read no it is not true. I'm saying unequivocally it never never happened. Do you remember. Do you remember any any types of complaints that she might have made. I don't remember any type of complaints. She may have made. It was twenty seven years ago and I don't remember nor does anyone else that I'm aware of on Friday. The apparent Democratic nominee former vice president Joe Biden appeared on Morning Joe and categorically denied an allegation of sexual assault against him. That's been leveled by a former staffer in his Senate office named Tara Reid and a trigger warning here read alleged that in nineteen nine hundred three then senator pushed her up against a wall in the Senate office building in penetrated her with his fingers under her skirt. Read alleges that shortly after this incident she official complaint with the Senate personnel office alleging that she had experienced harassment and that shortly after that. She says she was fired. These claims must be taken seriously full. Stop not least of all because we are in the middle of a presidential campaign and so the obligation that we have on this side of the virtual desk to tell you what we know and what we don't. So here's what we know. As of today misread made her allegation publicly for the first time on. March twenty fifth a few weeks ago. Nbc News reached out to five people. Who Ms Reid said could provide corroboration of her claim. One did confirm that misery told them about the alleged assault at the time another says she recalled some of the details but nothing regarding the alleged assault the other three said they were called no such conversation since then business insider has published an interview with a former neighbor of reads who says misery. Toltar- about the assault at the time. This is not the first time Joe Biden. Myspace allegations of unwanted touching last year. Eight women including misread came forward to say that Biden hugged kissed or touched them in ways. That made them feel uncomfortable. Read is the only one that has since alleged assault to that point. The New York Times led an investigation into these allegations and contacted nearly two dozen people. Who WORKED WITH MR Biden in the early nineties? None were able to corroborate any details of misery delegation and many even said Biden's office had the reputation of being a supportive workplace for women. We also have to talk about. The timing of all of this is read. Made her allegations public in late March when the primary was down to just Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders and days before Sanders announced. He was suspending his campaign. Some Biden supporters have questioned Ms Reeve's motives because of that timing misery voted for Sanders in the California primary. And that of course doesn't mean that. She's not believable but some sanders supporters have used the allegations to call for Biden to be replaced on the Democratic ticket because of these claims with the implication that sanders should replace him. Ms Reed story also has changed considerably over time in significant ways she initially allege a year ago that Biden inappropriately touched her neck and hair and only later up the claim to sexual assault. And there's been a change in the reason why. She says she left her job early on. She says she was pushed out. After declining to serve drinks at an event and last and also most weirdly back in two thousand eighteen read wrote a series of blog posts extravagantly praising Russian President Vladimir Putin who intelligence agencies say wage cyber warfare against the United States in order to get donald trump elected president and one such blog post which she published on medium and has since been deleted entitled. Why a Liberal? Democrat supports bladder near Putin. She wrote quote. President Putin has an alluring combination of strength. With gentleness his sensuous image projectors love for life the embodiment of grace while facing adversity misery. Now says that her praise of Putin misguided meanwhile Joe Biden isn't just any old Democratic candidate. He was vice president to the first black president of the United States. And before that a senator with a decades long record during the very same era in which this accusation lives Biden wrote and passed a controversial crime. Bill that also contained the violence against Women Act and before that as chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee he was accused of failing to take a NIETA hills. Sexual harassment claims against Supreme Court nominee. Clarence Thomas nearly seriously enough all things for which you will have to grapple as a presidential candidate in all of this is taking place today in the Metoo era when women are finally being given the space to have these kinds of claims taken seriously but also in such claims have had widely different consequences for powerful men from Harvey Weinstein R Kelly and Bill Cosby and even Senator Al Franken. Who was literally run out of town by his fellow. Democrats to conservative men like Brett cavenaugh. For whom the accusations by Dr Christine Blasi Ford got little more than a cursory. Fbi investigation and now. She has to live in hiding to avoid the death threats while he sits on the Supreme Court for life. Right Beside Clarence Thomas History how you rhyme. Here's what Joe Biden said about the cavenaugh gay allegations at the time for a woman to come forward to the glaring lights of now. The national spotlight. You've got to start with the presumption that at least the essence of what she's talking about Israel whether or not she forgets facts whether or not it's been made worse or better over time and here's how he reacted to Mika Brzezinski reminding him of those words yesterday. Look from the very beginning. I've said believing. Women means taking the women's claims seriously when she steps forward and then vet it. Look into it this. This is true in this case as well women have right to be heard and the pressure rigorously investigate claims they make always a poll that principle but in the end in every case the truth is what matters this case. The truth is the claims are false. Anything News has reached out to Tara Reid for reaction to Biden's comments but it's not her back we've also invited her to appear on this show. We did not hear back so far. And while we're contest you take contextualising. Any claims of prominent political leaders facing the political risk and the personal embarrassment of sexual misconduct allegations. We must never ever forget that we are living right now in a world and in a country where the American President Donald J trump stands presently accused by two dozen women of sexual misconduct including harassment and sexual assault. All of which of course even as the entire country heard him on tape bragging about sexually assaulting women with Impunity. So there's that Aaron Hanes editor at large for the Nineteenth Adrian elrod former senior adviser to the Hillary Clinton Campaign Michelle Goldberg columnist for The New York Times in Msnbc Contributor Cynthia oxy who was a former federal prosecutor and MSNBC legal analyst. We should note that. Cynthia wants intern for Biden Senate office. Thank you all for being here and start with you. You write for the nineteenth which focuses on issues of concern to women. Give me a sense of how this story is playing out among voters who have already seen this choice. Basically made in the primaries. Yeah Good Morning. Good to be with you. I think that it is hearing important. To point out is somebody who's covered this primary for for the past year and a half you know. Conversations around women and their safety in the workplace and in public spaces was largely left off of the campaign trail and the debate stage. But at least for now This issue is front and center with with this Terry allegation and it is important to remember that women are the majority of the electorate and survivors. Frankly are an important constituency. That is weighing. How these kinds of issues could affect how they choose to participate in democracy both in the primary and headed into the fall. I think is important since the now that the former vice president has finally come forward and address these allegations for himself about what these women voters are going to make a what he said if his statements yesterday in his interviewer Orla even lingo If they were satisfied with his response and inhabit that is affecting. But but you're right. I mean now this. This isn't election where we are having a conversation about Two men who have been accused obviously different levels of accusations for the former vice president and and our and our incumbent president but nonetheless this now is a conversation that has finally entered this twenty twenty election cycle and and women voters definitely paying attention. Yeah and you know Adrian. It strikes me that you know started off talking about some twenty people running for president including many many very qualified women And we came down to what will essentially be to silent generation. White men will be going up against each other for the presidency. Both of whom have some issue or other. That's related in this general area. I'll though the scale is quite different with Donald Trump. I think that has to always be said And we can even put up the list of the number of people who've accused him. I think we have a picture of it. We can never really forget those accusers. I think it's important to keep their their stories top of mind as well but there. There are similarities to the twenty sixteen race in those trump's accusers their similarity to the two thousand sixteen race in the sense that Bill Clinton's issues from back in the nineties were used against Hillary Clinton. You'll recall that infamous moment when Roger Stone paraded out some of these Bill Clinton accusers to try to essentially equalised Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump to say. Neither of these people is better. They're both just as bad and her email situation is just as bad it level the two of them when you look at poll about they were both equally terrible which means you could just make a jump ball choice without any sort of moral implications. Now what we're seeing is. The New York Times had a piece that came out overnight editorial calling for an investigation of Tara Reid's claims it said this Biden has said that he would like to see his Delaware papers released that he would like to see you all of his Senate papers released and they are. This is a start but it does not go far enough. Any serious inquiry must include the trove of records for Mr Biden Senate career that he donated to the University of Delaware in twenty twelve. Currently those files are set to remain sealed until after Mr Biden retired from public life. The common arrangement there are growing calls for Mr Biden and make those records available to see if they contain any mention of misread perhaps others who raise similar complaints about his behavior that he was asked about repeatedly by me. Cooper Jetski. Is this his emails or is this a legitimate call release every piece of paper. That's associated with him. Well joy first of all I want to thank you and congratulate basically acknowledged the fact that the way you laid up this discussion by laying out all this tax by you know going through a chronological time line. And then of course you know talking about what we went through in two thousand sixteen. I mean these are all important factors and I think before we really into these discussions. It's important to lay out the facts because oftentimes we down in. Then we have this sort of you know like equalised playing field. When it's really not the case to the point that you made twenty four accusers of Donald Trump. One person with some with some missteps perhaps in her stories what she said so far against Joe Biden when it comes to the New York Times editorial. I was pretty disappointed to see that this morning because it did remind me of two thousand sixteen. It did remind me of everything that we had to go through her emails. A couple things to push back on the New York Times editorial Biden was vetted we've got to keep in mind joy when he went through the vice presidential vetting process in two thousand eight to become Barack Obama's running mate that is no joke of a process every aspect of your life unturned. Everything is researched. You are you. There is no more stringent vetting process in the United States than going through that process. So he has been vetted if something like this had happened. I'm confident it would have been overturned. And we also. Of course joy heard from the attorney who oversaw the vetting process in two thousand eight? He said we never saw anything that accused him of sexual harassment or sexual assault would come crossing that process in secondly he took such a monumental step yesterday by saying you know what. I want the Senate to release these records. I want him to look into all of my documents. That are in the Senate archives that live wherever they may live and cover them. Something like this wouldn't live in the University of Delaware. It's important to keep in mind that when a public official elected official anybody who served in public office decides to archive their records from their Senate time from their time working in the White House or wherever they were. This is a choice. This is a choice that is meant to document their body of work for educational purposes for legacy building purposes. So something like personal records wouldn't live at the University of Delaware. If they exist anywhere they would live in the Senate they would live in the archives. He took the unprecedented step to ask. Those records be released. Should they exist? GotTa give a major props for that. A lot of individuals don't always take that step especially if you're the nominee for for running for president so props to Joe Biden I thought was credible. Very truthful yesterday Nigga. Brzezinski was very tough on him. It was a very tough interview and to me. I think he came across about as credible as one could be when when going through this process and just to fill in some of the data that you just heard a moment ago. William Jefferson for the audience did come through. This was the lawyer who handled the betting of Joe Biden during Barack Obama's vice presidential search. So he oversaw a team of nearly ten lawyers who spent nearly two months digging through records and interviewing dozens of people about Biden. This kind of complaint Terry any kind of complaint about Senator Biden and sexual harassment never came up. We just never had an occasion to interview anyone on an accusation. Like this. Because we've got Nelson's accusations that's fair to put out also. The University of Delaware has released a statement saying the University of Delaware received the Biden senatorial papers as a gift from Vice President Biden. We are currently curing the collection process. That we estimate will carry on to the spring of two thousand twenty one and as the curing process is not complete. The papers are not yet available to the public Nbc News has reported that Joe Biden has requested that the secretary of the Senate release all of the records that would mean the actual personnel records. And would be any records that we're actually directly related to personnel. So I just want to make sure I get that out. I want to go to you. Michelle Goldberg because the couple of the challenges that I think people are having with the whole way. This is playing out. Is it on the one hand? There's concern for Tara Reid for her to have closure you know her accusations to be looked into properly and then there's the sense that that the people who are pushing this. The hardest don't primarily care about her. There is this subtext of this. Being some kind of an opportunity to maybe ultimately get four Senator Sanders a nomination that he didn't win the old-fashioned way right. So you had clear. Sandberg who was Senator Sanders Twenty Twenty national organizing director. Tweet now is the time to deal with the ramifications of tariff reductions. Are this cut nine for my producers. Not this fall. There is simply no moral justification for Biden to continue as the presumptive nominee out of respect for survivors and for the good of the country. He should withdraw from the race. That kind of thing is what's a nerve. I think a lot of people about how this is going your thoughts Michelle clearly. I think there's a lot of bad faith among both people on the far less and people on the right pushing this story although that doesn't really tell us that much about whether the story itself is true or false right excuse me. I think that you also had immense bad faith among many of the people who persecuted Bill Clinton even though it's pretty clear that Bill Clinton did in fact engage in sexual misconduct. What's difficult about this case? Is that instead? Because it came through these intensely part of channels right because Tara. Reid pleaded sort of gleefully before she went public Keno. Just wait. You know timing tick Tock and so it was clear that she wanted to deploy this bomb for maximum political effect. That doesn't mean it's not true. It's entirely plausible to me. That if something like this happen to you you would want to use it to take down the person who victimize issue but it does. I think make it harder for people who you know. I think it does make it harder for Democrats particularly not to receive these allegations with a lot of suspicion. I actually not on the editorial board at the New York Times although I work On the editorial side I like the idea of the DNC. Doing some sort of investigation may be getting some sort of outside law firm in the same way that companies sometimes do when their sexual harassment complaints because people are comparing this to Christine Bazi Ford and Brad Kavanagh and I think it's important to remember that Christine Blasi board testified under oath and was cross examined under oath and the demand at the time from the metoo movement was that the FBI You know fully investigate her case. I don't think anybody wants William Bars Justice Department to fully investigate this case. But I do think it would be good to have Has Everybody has defy under oath? Gather all the relevant documents gathering. Whatever information is out there and presented in one coherent package as opposed to this kind of drip drip drip of confirmation half confirmation rumor? Innuendo yeah and I think that I think for a lot of people the worry that people have about the the. Delaware records is that it becomes a feeding frenzy like the emails did where the media demands. Don't we want all those records? We WanNA come through them. Would see what we find. And then we'll find news in there. I think that's what a lot of people do worry about but I want to go to the US. Cynthia because just from a you know this is also a potentially of illegal story although Ms. Read says that she no longer has the complaint that she filed. So that's not available and we're not sure you know. I don't believe that Mr Biden was named in any complaint that she fathered a tie but that being said here's what we know about the allegation and the changes in it. There were three people this pretty times in Biden Senate office who read claims that she told about the alleged harassment here. Three cultural from those three people quote number run in an interview with Mr Take Kaufman. A longtime friend of Mr Biden who was his chief of staff at the time. He said I did not know her. She did not come to me if she had. I would have remembered her number two. It's just so preposterous. That Senator Biden will be faced with these allegations and this is Dennis Turner. Who was the deputy chief of staff when Ms Reed worked in the office? I don't remember I don't remember this conversation. I would remember that conversation Quote number three never once witnessed or heard or received any reports of inappropriate conduct not from Israel not from anyone this Marian Baker Mr Biden's executive Assistant I've actually no knowledge or memory of misreads accounting of bans which would have left a searing impression on me as a woman personal and if the manager there's also there are three tweets from March by misread. That that they. They migrate in March Fifteenth. And this was around the time that I believe Senator Sanders was losing in Michigan. I worked for Joe Biden. She says in one thousand nine hundred eighty. I complained about sexual harassment. Me I was fired. My full account never was told in public last April Joe Biden former staffer called me a Russian press. I have been silence. Mark Seventeen my full account. What Biden did to me is being silenced. Some people know what by did to me yet a does not public I would disqualify. Disqualify him then. She says Biden sexually harassed me and more do not let me be silence and she also tweet ahead not us which is the Bernie Sanders Hashtag and then March twenty fifth. This is an expert of the Audio interview where she says it's assault so can you just from a legal standpoint? Give us what. What do you make of this? These claims well let me just say I. I think it's important that we've been heard. I think it's important that it's taken seriously. Which obviously we're doing today. I think it's important that Vice President Biden had a chance to confront the allegations. And now here. We are at evaluation from from a professional prosecutor. Who's tried a lot of sex crimes? Cases here's what I see. I see a case that started in one thousand nine hundred three where the victim did not say. She was sexually assaulted by her own account. We don't have the written record of that. We do need to find what we don't have the written record and then we have twenty six years pretty much twenty six years of her not accusing him of sexual assault. There is one witness that says she did but for most of twenty six years out of her mouth. We have not heard that and in March it morphs to include pretty graphic details. Her own family member has changed his story. A little bit and so the case has inconsistencies. That require explanations. That require maybe. There's a good explanation but you would have to have a serious interview to find out. Why is it that the story has changed so much? It's a big problem in a case like this. And there's also the question of the change in the outcry witnesses and the very odd tweets about Putin. Yeah I wish we had more time. We were a little truncated today because of the press conference but we will continue the store. We have invited ms read on the show. We hope she will accept our invitation. Aaron Hanes Adrian elrod Michelle Goldberg. Sent the money. Thank you all very much and a reminder you can hear more from Joe Biden tonight on Politics Nation with whoever now sharpton stay with MSNBC. Hey It's Chris as this week and my podcast wise is happening. I'll be talking with my friend. Heather mcghee about the book. She's writing about how American racism ends up hurting us. All societies that has a public health system that is highly functioning well coordinated and well resourced are obviously going to do better in a public health crisis and we have resisted that in the richest country on the planet in large part for the past one hundred years because of racism. That's this week on. Why is this happening? Search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribed.

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