6 Burst results for "Sarah Dresdner"

"sarah dresdner" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

11:38 min | 4 months ago

"sarah dresdner" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"The person correctly like the first name last name from and all that stuff but also like it's an art to drawing out people to have conversations without being the main one talking yourself like it's easy to keep talking but you want your guest to contribute and like doing that in a way that balances out between commentary and just keep the conversation flowing. It's actually really really difficult riding. You really good job at the thanks. But I'm pretty sure I talk a lot to talk more I think. So don't you? Don't you make this figure? We talked the funny thing is the podcast is also supposed to be a discussion. It's not supposed to be even when we have guests like I think we always say like. Don't expect that you have to be the only one talk even. Probably they are the subject matter expert. It's like we're all going to be contributed in having those conversations which I really enjoy too so you all have asked the questions the same way. So it's not just me having to host either before we go into picks. What do each of you hope to see for future episodes or the future of the podcast travel? I think could be really interesting to like. Open up the kinds of guests that we could get to like conferences but also just sort of different parts of the country where we could get Halt like different guests from just like opening up a community a bit more. That could be really that like if people invite us. We will come. Sure why not doesn't come to New York but I'm not paying for her but he's like we're just going to sleep in your house. We're just GONNA out. I'm sure Sara will love to have us all stay. There has been on many episodes favorite guests. She's basically a panelists thinks she's probably been on the most as a guest. I would think so. Yes yeah I have one that I'm going to bring on you Unannounced is maybe you consider doing a few remote episodes from time to time for possibly people that have been on the podcast before that. Like being on the podcast but can't afford that frequent of flights to just throwing it out. It's finding we've had to learn I with covert nineteen. We've had to learn how to be remote and so we've always been in the same room but now we're learning so it is nice having Brian Derek. Back like I feel like it works pretty well put an IPAD on a stick. Ooh I like the remote guest stick around the Tele presence robot no nothing anti robot just like duct tape but I like to Augusta's back or something like that. I'd say more feedback from the community. Those are always helpful. One of I think one of the most satisfying things is traveling abroad even to a different state or different country. And so it's like. Oh you're happy are and love front and happy hour. I love the picks usually about stacy's music picks but They're just like. Oh I I love how casual and approachable. You all are and you work at like the biggest tech companies though. I WanNa get to some day and I just really appreciate your downward style and advice and usually the episodes are people are like. Hey you're upset on this. They usually turn out to be really upset. Because that's like we're doing so we can help the community feedback. Those are good either. Recruiting upsets are usually with some favorite ones. Just because they're tangible and they're there to the point that people WanNa talk about and they wanna like Kinda demystify all this stuff recruiting interviewing things like that. I guess for me. Plus plus one to actually Bryant Stole Ivica's I also would love to see us to a lot more remote. This whole coveting thing has been very adjusting kind of thing that we all go through and I duNNo. It's really cool to see us. We're still trying to make an effort to make this all work. Yeah I also WANNA plus one the feedback. Because although I've always been concerned we'd run out of ideas. There's like always like crap. What are we GONNA do next time? We've talked about react twenty out but so I think if the community was open about hearing talking about what they WanNa hear you know. There's always new things coming out and we can always try to look into it. Find people that know a lot about it and we can talk to them about it. Does anyone else worried. That will run out of topics not anymore. I'm the only one I feel like unfamilar topics. We can have something new to say. And I don't think we we haven't really recycled topics much. But I think that the same topics can come up with different flavors and depending on what's going on the community we could start over from episode one and just start talking to that again and it would all be different because things have changed from forgets to go back through the list and nothing's changed. Let's see we still don't have web components really and like any day now. Trey Trey was on full of components. That was two years ago. Yeah any change at all. Nothing has changed. A frameworks have changed a little. Bit View come along when it wasn't really a thing for years away I started. I mean Sarah. Dresdner wasn't on the team at when we first started talking that they're now she is. That's sure true. I've I think what what's changed. Most is what we we've said on previous episodes where web development isn't just Java script and I do html on your css and all the stuff. It's now like you do the back end either node for the front end or you support you do excessive ability or you do the style sal components and things like that like front and has changed a lot since we first started and it's only been four years which is crazy but now it's true it's really weird to find all around person who just does like everything on the front end. It's more specialized at this point. So we we do an upset on that. I feel like we might have now. We haven't yet. I think the reason that a show centering around front end will probably could last forever. Is that this. Entire layer and stack has changed so much since the late nineties until or even mid nineties all the way until now it's massively changed every few years and all of us of had to like learn something or learn it and apply it in a different way a different framework a different way of thinking about something. And it's like that's I think that's why maybe a lot of us have stuck with it too is that's interesting it never gets boring. It's always a constant new challenge. You are always learning throughout my entire career. It's just something new that I've had to learn or even something that I thought I knew I learned something brand new that made it easier or better or more efficient. I mean as long as as long as their computers in the world is not fully. Programmers will always be for a front end of some sort doesn't matter how vast computer is you got to build something that people can interact with and that's what we do all right. Let's stop into. Another favourite piece of our episode is picks which since we've been sharing a few different stats and updates. Did you know that we've had eleven hundred and twenty three picks already in from hundred episodes actually so from the ninety nine episodes? But we're GONNA cheers. Anyways cheers cheers. Cheers here at the end of each episode. We liked to share picks of things that we found interesting share. Let's go around the table and chair. Picks for today's episode. Wants to start it off. I mean all started since I usually go over time anyways because usually get some brandt. Then tunnel bake fickle golf another aunt and I want to watch. Yes I can do rats and my dad have to listen to them now. It's very satisfying One of my picks not officially picked. But I'm going to give a shout to drew town on twitter. He went through all of our front happy hour picks and he parse them out then he listed out who did the most picture dude second most picks and all that and he's really an APP right now so like sort out all picks that's awesome. I love that kind of community involvement. Let's go nice job. You're what happens out of that because I don't even know are Pixar but my first pick is my valley conflict because people do love the Valley. Silicon pick stays my favorite. It's just ludicrous but my first pick is not valid silk on it's a TV show that I've been binging hard. It's on Netflix. It's called rhythm flow and essentially it's a rally competition for hip hop and it's just ask someone who's really in a hip hop in just the various styles in work. That goes into making like one. Good Song I love the shop in Beijing it so hard the talented incredible about the fence about Cardi B. I. She's one of the judges are the judges are chance the rapper you've heard of Ti and Cardi B. and Cardi B. Like plays kind of like she's like I don't really know what's going on ha ha funny but I'm like she's acting she's really really smart because you don't become that successful by accident anyone's that's again a tangent. The show is worth watching. Watch one episode. See if you get into it. If you like hip hop I guarantee you gotTa Love The show. Because it's just a really fascinating. Look at the industry. Have you looked up all the artist on spotify yet? I haven't finished a season yet so I don't know what happens. Everyone's on spotify. The I guess. Most of the finalists looked up. Maybe the top six or seven. They all have albums on spotify right now. Hey like to when you I met like that five left or so I assume at that level. They're all pretty talented and they all make a pretty good album. I know they're looking for next superstar but the level of talent is just impressive Especially in different styles from Chicago Atlanta in The East Coast. Just they all sell different. I think a lot of people don't realize hip hop is sounds different. Depending on where you are and west coast thousands area from down south so anyways I'm rambling been putting a lot of rhythm flow since late. Sheathing my son. My second PICK IS MY VALLEY SILICON PICK. And what's the problem? You all have right now especially with the current affairs toilet paper citing yes. Yes real problems. I told her so. I'll send it to groceries. That's a real problem you know. How do I get my groceries into my house? Though right so I go out. I can get them. But how do I get them into my house? I can get whole foods or Walmart or whoever delivered groceries to my house. But there's no one there to put them in my fridge for me. This is a real problem. Fortunately Silicon Valley and there's a startup that just started that they. If you order groceries not only what they bring to Your House. They will stock up your kitchen for you. So they'll put your groceries away nice and organized a picture to show you that. They're in where they're supposed to be and they're solving this really real this very real problem. You know like who's GonNa put away. Don't worry there's a venture capital money now starting after just as the real thing. I'm not making this up. There's a startup that will deliver groceries into your kitchen for you They said with the corner virus outbreak. They're no longer doing that. Which is kind of the main appeal this startup. I don't really get how the difference Carter that point but hey who am I to judge valley silicon too crazy. Do you have to give them your key or like? Y- makes no sense like the level of trust you have for some start up with no no accountability reliability to you give some stranger. Ki- like hey don't don't steal anything. We don't foot my housewere author all right. I've got two picks both music related as usual. The first one is united we stream. It's a I guess. A group of musicians in Berlin. That all got together to try and save club culture and DJ Culture in Berlin. Just because they're in the same sort of lockdown scenario and people aren't allowed to go out and they're just worried about kind of a lot of people losing their jobs and losing that culture in Berlin Berlin got such a great culture for Techno and electronic music so they are streaming so they'll have some of these musicians like spinning live in one of the clubs. And tell you when it's going to happen and then you can just watch and enjoy from the comfort of your safe at home orders.

Your House spotify Berlin Augusta Dresdner Berlin Berlin Trey Trey golf Silicon Valley twitter Netflix Sara Brian Derek stacy New York Bryant Beijing Walmart
"sarah dresdner" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"sarah dresdner" Discussed on ShopTalk

"You. That's nice that's research. That's journalism. That's interesting to me, and I'd be happy to publish something. Like that even if it is kind of opinion based, but there's a lot of submissions. That are just like, you know, there is no such thing as back end or something I got that some other day or something I'm like, I kinda get what you're saying. But that's weird. And I don't wanna like I don't to have that be. That's just you just spouting some stuff, you know. Like gimme gimme more than that. What I'd prefer to pay you money for because you know, and this is just my site. This isn't all sites in the world is that your. Giving me some referential content like your helping expand our almanac, which is like technical, documentation or. You've googled something. And you've not found something and you struggled through something. And you've come to a good solution. And I'm gonna write that up because I can imagine somebody else googling in the future. That's what I wanna pay you to right? You know? Because whatever we're a little business and. Yeah. I I think I got burned on my last submission to a popular list. And yet it was like totally rejected and. Had this. In some ways. There's a good thing. But I just was like what more do you want from me? You know, like you ask for some issues in this omitted in the new said dude didn't want this. And it was like I was a little burned a little sour by it. But to be honest, it kind of kicked me off on blogging my own site because I just was like, you know, what? You you lose out fan popular blog. I'm going to do my own. So that's it, you know. And that's I mean, that's all the say in Britain for that public before. That's it's like I was like surprised when I got like basically denied a lot harder to get into than than, you know, there's probably some that are really easy. Just take any old damn thing that you write for them. And some are I I'd like to think we're medium that's a strict like, I don't have time to be like, a real true editor or I'm just gonna like give you the nine on your article, and just, you know, just subject you to the the the hellfire of editing, which is good. If publication will do that for you like a feeling this site would. I don't know then than just asking a lot of you to write this post, whereas we're kind of medium like it's gonna go through editing. It's gonna probably go through at least two editors. But a lot of it is just like, hopefully, it's good to begin with. And if it's not pretty good already to begin with. I'm just going to tell you know, you know, is like a grammar check and one's kind of tech. Check is kind of right. Any would be pretty like it's not often that I'll be like, why don't you rework this whole section here and actually move section three dissection too. Because I think the flow is a little better and stuff like Ed generally, don't do that. 'cause 'cause I kinda don't have time. And it's not really my expertise anyway. But I will tech check it for the most part like I may not like NPR, install your entire thing, and whatever, but I'll look at you know, like, I I have some experience with technology. So I kinda know what's gonna work. And what won't you know? And a look at the demos carefully and things like that. And then sometimes there's like is something that's just not good enough. Like, I'll have a flood where there was a major civility problem with the thing. And it's like, oh, that's you know, I got my face for letting get by. But hopefully, we learn from those things and stuff, you know, what I mean. And you know, so I'd say the bar is like not particularly high for ceus strikes were always looking for stuff. That's it right. At this moment. It's a little higher. Just because we're kinda I'm out like a month with with guest posts. So that's as like as long as we ever get out. Yeah, it's nice. And Jeff Graham are is the lead under the assists now has been endure negotia over year. Yeah. That's nice because for me, I get to get to step back a little bit. And do some of the stuff that I'm better at doing. Which is like maybe even soliciting authors once in a while being like, hey, come right for us. You're good. And that kind of outreach stuff is is sometimes more valuable to me than just sitting back and seeing what we get, you know, like if you wanna have a good publication, you probably have to do a little more work anywhere. That's I think back to the asking a magazine, you're maybe not as desperate not the right word. But something along those lines, you're not like desperate for content writers. I mean, even brought people on for regular columnists like like, Robin Rendel or Sarah Dresdner like they're kind of contributing somewhat regularly kind of. Think of them as staff writers. Really, right. Yeah. Not desperate at all. I'd say even if nobody's have been at anything. There's nothing in the queue. And there was nothing from staff writers or anything. I still wouldn't think it's that big of a deal. I have promised to nobody not like a daily newspaper or they're better as heck be a newspaper on your on your friends stoop in the morning, otherwise people get weird about in. It happened to us last year. We subscribe to the newspaper here in bend, Oregon. And there was like a one section newspaper in an an like a slip of paper on the front of it. That's just like, whoa. Sorry, bro. Just like couldn't get our crap together to like make like a real newspaper today.

Oregon Jeff Graham Britain editor NPR Ed Robin Rendel Sarah Dresdner
"sarah dresdner" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"sarah dresdner" Discussed on ShopTalk

"I think I would like to say your bed friend developer at that point. You're sort of. Ignored ecosystem that's made for, you know, getting the pixels to the user be ignored like sixty percent of what's out there. So I don't think you can write JavaScript in vacuum unless you're writing again super server node code in. Which case your users are somebody else and not directly the, you know, the human that's getting the pixels. Which again, you don't have to call yourself. Honestly, call yourself, whatever you want. I call myself in a motion year. What does that even mean? I don't know still right. The scoops. Title. There's great stuff in there, though, that that that it's not this like, it's not necessarily two separate jobs. Like, even if you're this super Java scrip- focused engineer, let's say that if that doesn't absolve you of of understanding the rest, I think you there's no way you can like pray away the web stack you have to know what it's there and how to use it or else. Do you know deliver something that looks nice? But it's probably really slow or I don't know the browser kicked up demise can't cash or whatever it is. I think the reason why this is a hard question is because front-end sort of has like stigma associated with it. Like, it's the person who, you know, ten years ago did a site in front or whatever dream Weaver, and we've been think of them as real developers. So now, there's more of us that do this. But because we think front end developers bad word. We don't really wanna use it because. Yeah, it's not like real development and just like, you know, CSS real. It's real you don't need to you. Don't need to be a real developer to do that. Like, this is sort of like the kind of book can hear from like elders have been around for a long time. And I think it's absolutely. Yeah. That is that is that whether or not we like it, I think people always have some kind of their old school, and I'm new school. Is there like an old school new school to believe that changes over time? It was what does that mean? But. Put or no. I don't know what I'm trying to say. But in somebody's mind that will always be that whether you want it or not. So what about you know? Specialization though, also can't go away in a way. Right. Like you have specialties and sure naps. I think are my specialty OD on the web. So. Keeping native apps. When you have a Sleepytime. Native naps the native. Yeah. Native net the ones. Wow. Now, very good. Yeah. I think I definitely have things that I'm bad at I I'm way better at knowing what I bet than what I'm good at like, I'm very bad as his enemies. I don't really get it. Vid. Trying to be better with. I did the stupid Tober experiment where I learned how to translate things and that was nice. But I look at things Sarah Dresdner makes she just, you know, Adam mates, the PGN. I'm like, I don't understand how that works. So I'm definitely not that kind of said junior, for example. But I can Java scripts. I really like the Dom. I can really right that you think of your specialty is in things that you're not good at. Yeah. Yeah. Leftovers years specialty. Yeah. It's like an exclusion. Not a not a explicit list yet. But that means that. So if you you would you you probably know enough to know, if you're on something that needed that kind of treatment that that again, doesn't like it doesn't you can't just be bad at it. You just ask somebody exactly I I usually go to ceremony service arma. Hey. Look at it. And he goes, you're painting all the time. Why Monica why shouldn't any meat left? You should always enemy to translate now. I know. Yeah. That's a good one. Yeah. I did a shortlist of could animate. Yeah. So kind of things like this. Where like, I know it's not my strength. And I know I have to do it when I do it. I like get somebody who knows how to do it. I'm like, please look at my garbage. And you know brush it out put a room by their sort of clean, the stump. But like so that one seems clean because it's kind of like, oh, I'm not I don't specialize enemy. So I'll have somebody. You know, look at this in helped me..

developer Sarah Dresdner Weaver Sleepytime engineer Monica Adam sixty percent ten years
"sarah dresdner" Discussed on The React Podcast

The React Podcast

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"sarah dresdner" Discussed on The React Podcast

"Was it's just, I say, here's here's the props. You should apply to your input and now all the you don't have to worry about. So it's a little bit more work, but it's not so much that it's unreasonable. Sure. And like the alternative was you have to render this downshift input. Now you can render anything you want and just apply these props. So it's it's just as much work. It's just different work. Some props, things like assess -bility. Yeah, accessibility and as well as interactions. So as you're typing on change on Kia and things like that yet? Exactly. Also, I should mention Ryan. Florence built a react auto complete longtime ago. I think it was one of the first components Bill, and I stole a lot of things from him. Like if you look at at react to complete and how it interacts with event handlers on the input and then look downshift, it's like copy, paste in some some areas. They're so big, thanks to to Ryan. Again, always seems to be a head of the curve somehow. Oh, he is. Yeah, he's great. And now he's working on all this react suspense stuff. He's he's got like workshop material almost ready for it. It's not released yet. Yeah, he's. He has all the problems like that that require these solutions. Yes. And so he, that's why he's head of the curve as he recognizes like lots of us, we just like, this is the world we live in for Ryan, he recognizes, no, this is a problem. It doesn't have to be this way. And so he finds the solutions which is cool. And then the react teams doing that as well. Of course. So anyway, one last thing on building downshifts or maybe a couple more things. So prop collections is great, but. So I I'm playing on change, but what if you want to add your own on change to the put now you're going to override mine. And so that's when I changed to prop debtors where it's a function that you call and any props that you want to add to the input. You add those to the prompter. So instead of input props and spread that across your in, but it's get input props that will return an object that you spread across. And so then you call that with any other props, you wanna plied and then we'll compose that for you to call yours and mine together to to make it work together. So that's prop collection or went to getters. Okay. So that was cool. So how has how has that project continued to go? It's been about a year. Yeah, good question. I think not quite a year. I think it's I think, built at this year. I can't remember. Maybe it was around like the winner. I feel cold. Yeah. Yeah. It's called dark kency Dodds of merge snow. So I, I'm pretty sure I built downshifts of few months after glamorous, maybe six months after glamorous and glamorous was April last year. Okay. So yeah, I'm probably around November or something. Gotcha. And it's still servicing the components at pill? Yeah. Yeah, lots of components. People are being it's being used in there code sandboxes using it. They were the first actually, the either was the first one to ship downshift to production. Wow. Yeah. So he beat me. Another another human that's in front of the curves. Yeah, right. I yeah, that that guy's just incredible. I proud supporter of UBS for sure. He's great. Yeah, I was. I was blown away just the rapid trajectory of coats box in the rack community. He was just love it. Yes, taken over. I'm featuring at mytalk during coating in code sandbox because it's just so great. I actually I built downshift in code sandbox, so the livestream I just couldn't be the developer experience. My editor wasn't good enough, so yeah. Yeah, great. And now I can use Sarah Dresdner's night. Owl theme in code sand. I'm all set like I'm pretty happy there. I love concern, especially do use it for your trainings. Yes. So like my advance react patterns course in my beginner or an intro to react. You can do the whole thing, including run the tests in code San. Box. That's awesome. It's incredible. It's he really, he really. Came across something awesome. There I particularly for teaching it is such an invaluable tool. And I had a friend who's just who's learning coating for very first time knew a little bit of HTML just because he had a, was it a squirt space segments, a couple things that he would like doing HTML. Whatnot. Go to Whitson. Yeah, and and so he was starting for the first time. And so I was like, okay, us like there are no other editors on the planet, except for code sandbox is the only editor and so he he worked on it and you tell at some point he got a little bit of a little bit like tired, just kind of being the sandbox. I was like, dude, I'm betta blow your mind like you push like, you got to create an account, but then just push this button and was on the internet. And that is the feeling that I remember having when I started or as I could put in each team file up on the internet and like anyone could see it. Yeah, you call your friend across the street like dude, Goto. This euro like thirty characters long and it's got like three dots. Yeah, that's one of the things that I love about that project is that he's, he's he's found a way to kind of bring that that awesome experience of like, okay, I'm learning something and now it's on the internet. This is awesome. I am amazing. Yep, Yep. Yeah, that's that's a wonderful feeling. And I've built several applications that I'm using on a regular basis. One hundred percent cut sandbox and deployed him never downloaded the code. Yeah, it's, I mean, you download it in your browser, but. But never opened in I d locally. So it's amazing. So what are some of the things that you find when you're teaching classes on composition that people have the hardest time understanding even people who have been easing react for a long time, like what is the thing that kind of holds them back from these compositional patterns? I think a lot of people assume that. These patterns are reserved for highly reusable, inflexible components. Where that is true. It's not reserved it's, but they're very applicable to those kinds of components. But they, these patterns are also real useful for a separation of concerns. It's probably the biggest thing is like downshifted separation of concerns were separating the logic for an auto complete or a drop down with the way it looks. It's it's almost like classic model of you controller. The model and the controller live inside downshift in the view is all yours, but it's implemented in within reacts composition model, and so exposes a really nice and declared of an explicit API. And so, yeah, like it's perfectly fine to implement. And it's a great thing to implement these patterns for one time use component as a mechanism for separating concerns. I think another thing that that really trips people up is.

Ryan editor Kia Florence Bill Sarah Dresdner UBS Whitson developer One hundred percent six months
"sarah dresdner" Discussed on CodePen Radio

CodePen Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sarah dresdner" Discussed on CodePen Radio

"If you think you have a cool navigation menu show it to us because people need those you know it and it who knows it can take off can affect the whole industry if it absolutely likes the proof yet or every meal we all have a taste for artistic things then you know beautiful things on coq ten but the practical things are also tremendously useful and very important to the community as well so don't hold back if you've got something that you think his two basic we wanna see that to uh even even taking other people's work directly and crediting it and showing it off his great i there's this there's this what is his name steve shraga or something i don't think he's the code panesar although maybe years but he has these tweets that get really really popular about like this is how you can design better here's just a tiny tiny tip about uh uri designed and how to improve something like don't set light grey text unaccounted background it always looks a little off you should pull a little hugh from that background color to put into that light grey texanol just look a lot better and you're like oh dang because you always shows like before and after stuff in the tweet and what number sixty eight on this list tile pie rail rummaged took steve's tweets and made demos out of them encode panin struck a chord with people on the implementation of that which i really think is cool and that's really collided united i was not familiar with that said i didn't realize what i was looking at here sunday super cool it's good to see it's good to see a lot of the fifg you know the classic code pen super favorite son here you know chris gannon sarah dresdner or beyond the people that you're the big names your perhaps used to go yeah absolutely ensure their ele making a very strong showing this year chris ganymede some cool stuff this year i loved that he has won on here that at an egg flipping inatoll goal which is think is so cool land that one blue uh yeah he's been he made tons of toggles but for some reason that ag1 really took yeah you know i think it's just it's his funny he now.

steve shraga chris gannon sarah dresdner chris ganymede
"sarah dresdner" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"sarah dresdner" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Most user interface is that we interact with our not animated we click on the button in a form blinks interview we click on a link and the page abruptly changes on the other hand when we interact with an application that has animations we can feel the difference the animation's are often subtle and if you aren't sure what i'm talking about you can pay attention the next time you slacker facebook messenger or i'm message airbnb values animation's in there you eyes so much that they built lahti a library for animation that we did a show about a while ago in an animated application the user interface feels alive when a software team take the time to build animations into small interactions the user perceives the animation's as polish and attention to detail sarah dresdner has been evangelizing the value of animations four years and she's an expert at implementing complex and beautiful animation's on the web she works at microsoft as a developer advocate and george the show to talk about how to build animation's if you are building a web application and you want to create a unique uri then you might find this show useful jobs script supports detailed animation's often through the manipulation of s vg files as fiji stands for scalable vector graphics a file format that represents an image in its own dom spg is so flexible because of this dom format which defines the different parts of the spg just like your web page dom defines all the different parts of a web page we know how easy a web pages to interact with this is in contrast to a bit map which is just a single matrix of dots without any rich meta data so bit maps are not very easy to manipulate programmatic louis you could manipulate s fiji with raw a script but most people use of frontend javascript framework like react.

user interface sarah dresdner microsoft developer advocate fiji vector graphics file format web page bit map meta data facebook airbnb george four years