19 Burst results for "Sarah Crespi"

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 4 months ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

sarah crespi Rachel danske rachel nancy first Vaslav kuna each week africa Two thousand twenty one
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"The novel coronavirus and prison is dangerous combination in the united. . States. . One hundred and twenty thousand cases have been detected in prisons and one thousand incarcerated people have died so far these deaths and the danger of more have driven prison and jail reforms that have been long delayed staff writer. . Kelly Servic is here to talk about De car Suray Shen in the US what is happening how researchers are weighing in on the process and how it's affecting public safety and Health Hi Kelly is there the US is unusual not just? ? In a large number of corona virus cases that we've had, , but also in the size of its incarcerated population, , how does the United States compare with other countries? ? In this respect? ? The US is is sort of the leader in terms of mass incarceration. . Unfortunately, , the US has the highest prison population of any country in the world with over two million people in in prison right now, , it was very clear from the beginning of the pandemic that the system of jails and prisons in this country was going to be especially dangerous for. . The people living in them because not only are they not designed structurally to allow for social distancing but many of them are already extremely overcrowded. . There's been calls for years to D Karsh straight or to cut down on the number of people in prison and jails, , and now there's been a big push to make this happen quickly what's happened with the number so far have we seen a big decrease in incarcerated people? ? So some analyses have suggested a decrease pretty early in the pandemic of about twenty, , five percent of the. . Population of jails in the US, , which is pretty dramatic. . That's something that a lot of jails have not been able to achieve in any other way but jails and prisons are are a bit different in this respect. . Jails are often holding people who have not yet been convicted and are awaiting sentencing are waiting trial prisons meanwhile told people who are already convicted and serving sentences have not budged nearly as much in terms of population despite some efforts by states to reduce populations of seen figures of eight percent thirteen percent so still. Pretty, . , modest reductions there the numbers are going down how is this happening who's getting out or are people just never going in in the first place it's happening for all those reasons is happening in a bunch of different ways which was one of interesting things in talking to corrections administrators about this some jail systems have focused on, for , example, , eliminating the bail requirement that was keeping people there if they couldn't pay to get out or eliminating the requirement of people, , sit in jail on parole violations of picking out specific populations. . Of People that they felt didn't pose any public safety risk and and were there sort of on technical violations of various kinds prisons, , it's been a little bit more complicated in that they've had to select groups of people. . They don't pose any public safety risk and also are particularly high risk for covid. . Some governors have commuted the sentences of people in prison because they're medically vulnerable or older, , for example, , or if they have a short time to serve on their sentence and then beyond all this, , there's also the factor that A. . Major reason that jails strength is simply because arrests went down particularly early in the pandemic as police officers were making fewer arrests, , fewer people out on the streets, , but also likely officers were seeking to avoid physical interactions where could so yeah, , all these factors are complicated and some of them are are a bit more locked in place, , and some of them are likely to fluctuate again as states reopen and things change with the pandemic. . So it's really hard to to sort of know what's GonNa happen next

Sarah Crespi Allegra Pellet staff writer Kelly Services United States
Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

Science Magazine Podcast

08:01 min | 1 year ago

Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

"Welcome, science. I've Casper June two thousand and twenty I'm Sarah Crespi. First up this speak staff writer Meredith. Bodman discusses a link between Corona. Virus, sex hormones and male pattern baldness. It turns out. This link might be behind the higher numbers of men dying from the infection next we have researcher Jason Chen he talks about a system for tracking objects using DNA. Bar coded bacterial spores. We spray the spores on something like lettuce, and then if you ever need to know where that led us came from, perhaps if it was contaminated with dangerous bacteria, you can collect the spores and read out the bar. Now, Ashraf writer Meredith Bodman. She wrote this week in science on a potential source of the male bias. We've been seeing in severe cases of Corona. Virus even corona virus deaths. Hi Meredith Hi Sarah. How are you? I'm okay I. GonNa, Say Okay for now this has been a mysterious, but persistent skew, and the number of deaths with regards to men. How big is the spy us? Well, it's considerable on. It's consistent from the very first days that we getting reports out of Ruhan China. Men have been made sicker by covid nineteen in the died at higher rates than women. From covid nineteen at the same time, children have been largely spared that two lines up with this theory that some researchers putting forward that Andrew Johns which are male hormones may have a role to play in how badly people get sick from woven So there's this new research linking sex hormones and the severity of coronavirus. Where did this idea come from? At first blush. It really landed with a paper that was published in cell online in early March. And it designated or describe a role for a particular enzyme that is bound in cell membranes called temperatures to. And it is an enzyme that cleaves the spy protein on the virus, and in doing that it allows the virus to enter host cells, so it's important for viral entry now. A bunch of prostate cancer researchers looked at the cell pay per and said Whoa. Wait a minute. We know that protein know that protein. They knew the protein because years ago. It was described as being culprit in prostate cancer, this very same t. m., P. R. S. S. two or temperature to enzyme in a mutated form. It was discovered early in this century was responsible for about fifty percent of prostate cancers PSA. Prostate researchers were intimately familiar with this this enzyme in one of the things. Things, they knew about it was that it was controlled by male hormones. At least in the prostate gland, known as Andrew Jackson's of which testosterone as the most famous, actually increased the production of this enzyme in the prostate gland when the enzyme was in a mutated form, it causes prostate cancer, basically in simple definition, and so from that you can take away that if you have more testosterone or other androgen, you're going to have more of temptress to, and so that's kind of the thinking behind this that you might have something that makes it easier for infection to take place, absolutely more tempus to on the cell membrane more opportunities for the virus to knock an inter-. It's almost that simple. Though, of course, it's way more complicated, but basically right and there's there's some other interesting observations that a link to this in your story, and one of them out relates to male pattern baldness. How does that fit in? There's not a clear scientific explanation for why it would be that a couple of studies in Spain have observed that man with male pattern baldness seemed to be over represented in male patients who are hospitalized with covid nineteen, and that's not related to age. No, interestingly, the peak baldness decade among these Spanish patients was in the fifties. Fifties whereas male baldness, typically as most common in the eighties or even older, and there's a link between baldness and temperatures. Well, that's what's not entirely clear. What is known is that one very powerful male hormone named dihydrotestosterone or D. H. T. for short, which is a derivative of testosterone, is abundant and thought to be causative of male pattern baldness. When there's lots of it in the SCALP, it's not causative on its own. It also take some genetic predisposition had a couple of conditions, but one of them is high levels of this hormone dht, and that is. Is the hormone that returning to the prostate we know binds androgen receptor, which in turn kicks up production of T.. N., P. R. S. to compress too

Meredith Bodman Corona Testosterone Sarah Crespi Andrew Johns Staff Writer Jason Chen Ruhan China Scalp Spain Ashraf Researcher N. Writer Dihydrotestosterone Andrew Jackson P. R. S. D. H. T.
Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones

Science Magazine Podcast

11:57 min | 2 years ago

Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones

"Hello. This Welcomes the science podcast for may seventeenth two thousand nineteen. I'm Sarah Crespi this week show Meghan. Cantwell talks with science writer Saratova's about a nonstick chemical that sticks around in groundwater, and I talk with sham. Ota about his science translational medicine paper on using a smartphone. So listen for ear infections. I'm here with Sarah helps who wrote this week's feature to talk about how a small group of citizens in Rockford Michigan uncovered groundwater contamination in their town. And with the greater implications of this discovery are thinks much joining me. Sarah, thanks for having me, Meghan, of course. So could you talk about what prompted these citizens to investigate whether the shoe company factory in their town? Wolverine worldwide had contaminated their water in two thousand and nine wolverine worldwide announced that they would be closing their tannery, which had been inoperational for over a century. And the citizens were requesting the company I do a comprehensive environmental assessment of the property before the demolition. They knew from other tannery closures that Henry's often use hazardous substances when they're transforming rawhide. Hides into leather. And so they wanted to be sure that those same substances had not been sort of left behind on the tannery grounds. They were told that because there was no evidence of contamination on the property, that there was really essentially, no way require that testing be done. Meanwhile, will Verena had said there was no known contamination on the property. They asked the city to assess the site, but they did not want to instead they went and got the help of a scientist and launched their own investigation. What did they find from this, they uncovered helped uncover some of the highest levels of Pecos contamination in drinking water wells anywhere in the country and after many years of trying to get the company to test, the tannery grounds discovered that the tannery grounds are also contaminated with pitas, what exactly is p fasten? How long is this chemical been in production p bosses are a class of chemical? Nls known as per in Pali fluoro- alkyl substances. They were first synthesized by American chemists in the nineteen thirties and forties and their salient chemical feature is that they have a carbon fluorine bond, and that's among the strongest of all chemical bonds. It doesn't degrade naturally an environment that can be very useful for some products at lens durability. And also, these compounds can repel water and oil and stains, and so they're widely used in products, such as firefighting foams, nonstick, coatings, carpets, food, packaging, even dental floss some dental floss, it was discovered recently, there are over four thousand of these compounds. But the two most widely studied are called PF OA sometimes referred to as PICO and PFOS those two are no longer in production in the US. What are the impacts of these? Goes on human health were still looking into that. There was a massive epidemiological study called the seat health project, fat looked at people exposed in West Virginia and Ohio, they were exposed to fella, and their drinking water. And in that project what they found was a probable link to six conditions that included high cholesterol, all sort of colitis by ROY disease, stickler cancer, kidney, cancer, and pregnancy induced, hypertension initially, a lot of the Pecos research, focused on these communities, where there had been this high level of exposure, more recent studies, have started looking at the general population, and I think that that's where this gets really interesting because what they're starting to find is that studies are suggesting that even people exposed to what might be referred to his background levels of p fusses show, negative health effects, most interestingly and may be most concerning laid. Some of these negative effects are on the developing fetus babies. So researchers are saying that it can affect, for example, the immune system and these populations. Is there a standard level for what's considered a dangerous p fast level or is that something that's still also being determined? That is very much being determined and a believe it was two thousand and nine the EPA established a health advisory level of six hundred parts per trillion of PF. Oh. A and PFOS combined drinking water. And then in twenty sixteen. They dropped that level significantly to seventy parts per trillion and that in twenty eighteen a branch of the CDC came out with a new study suggesting Twenty-one parts per trillion for PF away and fourteen parts per trillion for PFOS, and then you have some researchers one at Harvard saying one part petroleum is where that level should be. So there's a lad of conversation around. What is a protective level in drinking water, this investigation in the small town has also prompted other areas to look into what their p Fasces levels are, and what has this unveiled one of the interesting consequences of the concerned, citizens work is that shortly after the state of Michigan launched what I believe is the most comprehensive statewide survey searching for pizzas, and they found is that here in Michigan. Nearly one point four million residents are drinking water from orces, contaminated with pitas. It's also showing up and things like foam, that's on our rivers. And so there have been a number of advisories. Do not eat befo. Don't touch the phone fish advisories, dear advisories. It's really extensive ubiquitous exposure to these compounds. And then other states also. Oh, are just starting to look, but nobody has looked quite as comprehensively as the state of Michigan has right. It interesting that all these investigations are being prompted but this also isn't the first time that p asses have been under investigation happened several decades ago as well. Right. Are you referring to the DuPont trial? Yeah. Sometime around nineteen ninety nine early two thousands a cattle farmer in West Virginia suspected that something was going on. Some of his farm land had been purchased by DuPont and not long after that his cattle died, and he wasn't able to get much help locally. And so he ended up going to a Cincinnati-based Turney who sued the company and in the process of that he was able to obtain a lot of internal documents from DuPont. And what he found in those documents was that both DuPont, and three who. Had been making pieces as well. Head Ben documenting negative health effects from exposure, experienced by humans and animals, and that they hadn't done enough to make this available to the PA, for example. And so the attorneys sent these documents to the EPA, and subsequently DuPont, was fined, and three m was fined believe a year later, was around that time that both companies agreed to voluntarily phase out PF away and PFOS. So when they phased them out, they replace them with a different chemical is this one actually safer persists lessen the environment. Well, that is a matter of conversation. They replaced PF away and PFOS those two compounds are known as long chain pieces. They replace them with shorter chain passes. So molecules with fewer carbons and. What we do know is that those carbons don't bio accumulate the same way as the longer chain compounds. And for that reason, there's an assumption out there that these are safer, but there are studies, just starting this is just starting to be studied suggesting that this might not be the case and the national toxicology program. For example, is in the process of starting study of believe it's one hundred twenty five of these lesser known. Short chain compounds to see if they really are safer than the longer chain compounds after this, this fine that they received were their cleanup efforts, or is there, a way to clean up these P asses from water supplies. What we know is that you can use something called granular activated carbon to filter out in particular longer chain passes, so PF away, and PFOS from drinking water, however. That approach. It has variable success with the shorter chain passes which can sometimes break through the filter and they can break through more quickly. So one of the things that water systems are starting to look at is using perhaps a combination of granular activated. Carbon with reverse osmosis, which is a little bit more effective at filtering out short chain passes. All of this though is very expensive. And so that has really put especially some of these smaller municipalities in a tough spot, and others Superfund cleanup sites that kind of thing is there any sort of fund that these local communities can tap into that ole pay for this remediation, one of the things is that because pizza's is not as needed as a hazardous substance. It doesn't qualify as far as I know for cleanup funds through Superfund now, some states are starting to pass their own legislation. In New York, for example, does designate FOSS as a hazardous substance so you can get funding through there. And then the other thing that states are starting to do is actually sue the manufacturers to try and recuperate some of the costs of updating their drinking water systems. Would you say this whole investigation all across the country is still kind of the first step of finding where these sites are? And then the next step of cleanup is still a little bit murkier. Yes. That's very true. Historically are understanding of pizzas and exposure has really been concentrated in these areas around particular very few limited number of military, bases, and also communities that are near manufacturing facilities, and what we're starting to find now is, especially as we have the tools to detect passes at lower levels were finding that these are in drinking water supplies and places, people would never have suspected. But not everybody is looking. And so that's one of the things that I think different states, and different municipalities will be grappling with for years to come. Thank you so much. Sarah. Yes, thank you. Sarah helps is a freelance, writer and senior editor at undock. You can find a link to her story at signs MAG dot org slash podcasts. Stay tuned for an interview with Shaam Gula KOTA on using phones to listen to erections.

Sarah Crespi Dupont Pfos Michigan EPA West Virginia Writer The Shoe Company Meghan Verena Cantwell Rockford Michigan Wolverine Saratova United States Shaam Gula Kota CDC Henry
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Two thousand eighteen i'm sarah crespi in this week show rich stone former international news editor is back with a story on a possible acoustic as in sound attack on the us embassy in cuba is there such thing as a sound gut and did something really happen ritual be here with the latest and staff writer gretchen vogel joins us with a story on the bones of an extinct given found in the tomb china's first emperor's grandmother will impact all that and a little bit first up we have rich stone former international news editor for science he's left us for tangle big studios but he got in one last hurrah this week hi rich sarah okay this is a story you've been following for quite a while and it's about a potential or possible noise attack on the us embassy in cuba when did that happen well the first cases cropped up in november twenty sixteen the diplomats there havana reported symptoms all the way through august of twenty seventeen so this happened over the course of several months what exactly have people said has happened like was there an actual incident where everyone reacted or was it more a slow buildup of people saying something funny had happened very complicated so initially three intelligence agents for the us based in havana experienced symptoms and they felt that they were under some kind of sonic attack from a long range acoustic device and that was the working theory that work in hypothesis of the us embassy in havana initially that there was some kind of sonic device which was causing these symptoms in more and more diplomats over the course of months reported similar symptoms what are some of the symptoms that they've been reporting several can diffuse symptoms that are hard to pin down to any one particular mechanism or cause they include insomnia vertigo headaches nausea difficulty sleeping there's been this broader controversy about whether the symptoms that they reported are psycho genyk so right the worried well feeling because some of their colleagues said suffered these mysterious symptoms that perhaps they too were also under some kind of attack is there actually such thing as sound weapon a weapon that you can deploy that would hurt someone that uses sound waves will certainly are hearing can be damaged by high decibel sound if you are near a jet engine a tower of loudspeakers at a rock concert you're concertedly damaged what is unusual in this case is that the symptoms were reported after the diplomats heard for at least stopped they heard unusual sounds like a very grading sound like grinding metal that was loud but not at the decibel level that would automatically cause hearing loss or or hearing damage are you calling this a coup stick attack sound attack a potential sound attack a potential audit i dunno i've been kind of messing around with the different terms for it the state department is called it a socalled health attack and the scientists i talked to who are speculating that if there is a weapon it may not be aku stick it might be directed energy so i've tended to lean toward describing it as directed energy attack there's some new findings on what's going on with these people that are going to be published very soon can you talk about those a little bit michael hoffer at his team at a at a medical center at the university of miami were evaluating the symptoms so their findings which are as yet unpublished but which are expecting to come out from pure of you journal in the coming weeks will reveal that at least a couple dozen of the diplomats have symptoms that cannot be faked some of these symptoms at least like for example the feelings of bro dizziness the testing which they did shows that these are are real symptoms are linked to changes in their inner ear precisely this is very strange do you know anything else about you know what might have caused this is something that's been studied an audible noise that you can hear but that also damages your ear at the.

sarah crespi
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Two thousand eighteen i'm sarah crespi in this week show rich stone former international news editor is back with a story on a possible acoustic as in sound attack on the us embassy in cuba is there such thing as a sound gut and did something really happen ritual be here with the latest and staff writer gretchen vogel joins us with a story on the bones of an extinct given found in the tomb china's first emperor's grandmother will impact all that and a little bit first up we have rich stone former international news editor for science he's left us for tangle big studios but he got in one last hurrah this week hi rich sarah okay this is a story you've been following for quite a while and it's about a potential or possible noise attack on the us embassy in cuba when did that happen well the first cases cropped up in november twenty sixteen the diplomats there havana reported symptoms all the way through august of twenty seventeen so this happened over the course of several months what exactly have people said has happened like was there an actual incident where everyone reacted or was it more a slow buildup of people saying something funny had happened very complicated so initially three intelligence agents for the us based in havana experienced symptoms and they felt that they were under some kind of sonic attack from a long range acoustic device and that was the working theory that work in hypothesis of the us embassy in havana initially that there was some kind of sonic device which was causing these symptoms in more and more diplomats over the course of months reported similar symptoms what are some of the symptoms that they've been reporting several can diffuse symptoms that are hard to pin down to any one particular mechanism or cause they include insomnia vertigo headaches nausea difficulty sleeping there's been this broader controversy about whether the symptoms that they reported are psycho genyk so right the worried well feeling because some of their colleagues said suffered these mysterious symptoms that perhaps they too were also under some kind of attack is there actually such thing as sound weapon a weapon that you can deploy that would hurt someone that uses sound waves will certainly are hearing can be damaged by high decibel sound if you are near a jet engine a tower of loudspeakers at a rock concert you're concertedly damaged what is unusual in this case is that the symptoms were reported after the diplomats heard for at least stopped they heard unusual sounds like a very grading sound like grinding metal that was loud but not at the decibel level that would automatically cause hearing loss or or hearing damage are you calling this a coup stick attack sound attack a potential sound attack a potential audit i dunno i've been kind of messing around with the different terms for it the state department is called it a socalled health attack and the scientists i talked to who are speculating that if there is a weapon it may not be aku stick it might be directed energy so i've tended to lean toward describing it as directed energy attack there's some new findings on what's going on with these people that are going to be published very soon can you talk about those a little bit michael hoffer at his team at a at a medical center at the university of miami were evaluating the symptoms so their findings which are as yet unpublished but which are expecting to come out from pure of you journal in the coming weeks will reveal that at least a couple dozen of the diplomats have symptoms that cannot be faked some of these symptoms at least like for example the feelings of bro dizziness the testing which they did shows that these are are real symptoms are linked to changes in their inner ear precisely this is very strange do you know anything else about you know what might have caused this is something that's been studied an audible noise that you can hear but that also damages your ear at the.

sarah crespi
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Alone welcome to the science podcast for june first two thousand eighteen i'm sarah crespi in this week show staff writer daniel cleary is here with a story on finding mid sized black holes did you know they were missing and joseph pores here to talk about his research toting up the environmental footprint of food production globally and how we can use it information to reduce the footprint now we have daniel cleary staff writer for science and he's here with a story on missing medium sized black holes or finding missing medium black hole would you say dan yes i mean astronomers have been looking for them for decades black older new toria slee hard to detect because they don't emit any light you can see them various ways but the medium size ones of always been missing and what is a medium sized black hole how big is that you measure black holes usually in terms of how many equivalents of the sun's mass we're talking about so you can find ones quite easily which are a few times the mass of the sun or a few tens of the mass of the sun and also you can find supermassive ones which are millions or billions of times more massive than the sun but the ones in between there are thousands or tens of thousands they just are hiding themselves or else they're not there that's what people want to know right and the news here is that some have been detected can you talk about how these researchers found them or think they found them yes the way him storm is usually flamed back holes is by rays because black holes although they don't shine themselves when they suck in a lot of matter as it's approaching the black hole it gets heated up to incredibly high temperatures in shines in xrays so you can see an x ray signature from the center of a distant galaxy or from a particular star and that's the sign of the super haunt matter getting sucked in so they wanted to look for small alexy's that might have a medium sized black hole in its center but there aren't good x ray survey tila scoops that would be able to find it you have to look for x rays with a satellite because the a blocked by the atmosphere.

sarah crespi daniel cleary staff writer joseph
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Hello welcome to the science podcast for may twenty fifth two thousand eighteen i'm sarah crespi miss week show staff writer gretchen vogel is here with a story on using genetic information for for renzo purposes this is like taking dna from a crime scene in using it to tell what color suspects is my chill fernandez is here to talk about her research from science advances that looks into testing mosquitoes i zita on the cheek by shining inva red light on them and in our monthly book segment jennifer go back talks with sarah jane blakemore about her book inventing ourselves secret life of the teenage brain now we have staff writer gretchen vogel she's here to talk about using genetic information to try to catch criminals hi gretchen i the story was sparked by a new law being passed in bavaria so what is this law do what is it trying to either rule in or rule out the law that very passed last week deals with situations in which the police believe there is an imminent threat of a crime about to be committed it doesn't actually deal with crimes that have already been coming governed by federal law in germany and other law still prohibits the use of dna beyond the sort of wellknown dna fingerprinting where you can match dna founded a crime scene with an exact match of a suspect so what is this bavarian law allow them to do if there is an imminent threat if there's an imminent threat and they have a dna trace whether that's on say a cache of weapons or bomb making materials or another example that the police gave was if there's a stalker who seems to be stalking someone then they can use that dna to run some tests that can help police predict what color of hair what color is and what color skin the person might have no k they can also use to predict what age the person might be and they can also try this is more difficult to predict where the person's ancestors.

sarah crespi gretchen vogel fernandez sarah jane blakemore bavaria staff writer renzo germany stalking twenty fifth
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Alone welcomes the science podcast for me eighteen two thousand eighteen i'm sarah crespi this week online news editor david is here with a story on tracking silver smelting in ancient rome by looking at ice cores from greenland sarah girls here talk about her research into the rise of fungi resistant to fungicides and what it means for crops and public house and in a bonus book segment staff writer jennifer cousin franklin talks about our review of the book bad blood secrets and lies and a silicon valley startup now we have david grimm online news editor for science here with a story on looking at greenland ice to track the activity of ancient romans hi dave so that's a good intro but can you just make the connection for us it's not like ancient rome conquered greenland right no no but the ancient romans were big polluters we often don't think about but the you know they these smelted their precious ores and klay furnaces and this to extract silver for coins and other things and this belched a lot of lead into the sky what happened was that this lead traveled cross atmosphere settled on greenland's ice cap and mixing with the ice there as years go by more and more ice qatada that and so what researchers can take these ice cores almost like trees you can see these levels that have a lot of lead in them versus levels that don't and what were they doing to make all this lead while they were smelting.

sarah crespi rome news editor dave greenland staff writer jennifer cousin franklin david grimm
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Alone welcome to the science podcast for march thirtieth two thousand eighteen i'm sarah crespi in this week show online news editor david grimm is back with a story on a possible tipping point for chimp retirement in the united states so fiu chen or freelance science writer brings a story on ghost imaging or using single pixel detectors to take pictures deputy news editor david malakoff is here with a rundown of the record funding boost in us science research and finally we have our monthly book segment with jan goal back she interviews stephanie elizabeth more about her book i in fly to safa research and biological discovery now we have david grimm online editor for science he's here to talk about his recent story on chimp retirement hi dave so we've talked quite a bit about chimpanzees in research here in the us and they're basically nogo but can you remind us why people aren't using chimps anymore because basically there's been growing movement for long time to end research z's sort of both for moral and scientific reasons and people are you the so close to us they shouldn't be in a scientific laboratory but others have argued that they're really not that useful scientific research but we grows to the reasons in twenty fifteen the us fish and wildlife service declared all chimpanzees in the us endangered which effectively meant that if you had a chimpanzee to lab you could do research on anymore at least invasive research you could still come into some behavioral research and then the nhl quickly followed in basically said we're not gonna fund anymore chimpanzee research surveys assumed at the time well there were you know maybe about seven hundred chimpanzees.

sarah crespi david grimm united states writer david malakoff stephanie elizabeth editor dave nhl news editor fiu chen
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcast for december fifteen two thousand seventeen i'm sarah crespi in this week's show david grim is here to talk about the whales and dolphins that can naturally muffled sounds potentially protecting themselves from loud underwater noises and then staff writer jeff murphy's discusses the future of driverless cars what can science tell us about how the law affect our lives herself we have david grim the online news editor he's here to talk about a new study that suggests certain sound sensitive cetaceans dolphins whales you know maybe have all to protect themselves from loud noises high dave haiser okay let's start with the idea that sound can hurt you i mean yeah i have had my ears hurt at a rock concert right for example but what about a dolphin what's the problem with them encountering really loud noises underwater will get a couple things we've got navy sonar which makes loud noise but also loud noises in the frequencies that the dolphins and whales are hearing now with the remind we cetaceans it is that they can echo locate and so they have to have supersensitive hearing because the way these were navigating fine things is they make these click sneeze cliques can balance hop objects the rupture twenty meters away some abc's odd resource small's a ping pong ball solely to the up click the at the week the click it's that object got a listen for the echo coming back from at object to figure out where it is how big it is all that require supersensitive hearing much more sensitive than you and i have so sounds it may not bother us or that may be out of the frequency of our hearing can be really devastating to them things like navy sonar things like seismic surveys that use these really loud your guns that search for oil and gas the problem is that these things the thinking is can temporarily death and whales and dolphins in caused them to lose their way to strand themselves on beaches and navy seal norin world ruling have been linked to at least five hundred marine mammal deaths since 1963 okay so it's almost like being blinded temporarily length blundering radically are shannon they all you're going to.

sarah crespi david grim jeff murphy news editor abc seismic surveys staff writer dave haiser twenty meters
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Well it could be a problem if they are cells that are dividing because as the cells divide only one of them is going to have the loop of dna and so the effect will be diluted overtime but neural cells do not divide so for that reason it should be a permanent affect it could stop working for other reasons though the gene just could stop being expressed or turned into protein for some other reason and so researchers really won't know until they have watched these kids for years this really does sound like a breakthrough nobody wants to say that word on that area right but do you see this as a just one among many successes that gene therapy is having now and we're gonna start to see it really come into its own yeah i'd say that there have been several successes already and this is another and hopefully it's going to lead to even more okay joscelyn thanks for talking with me good to be here joscelyn kaiser is a staff writer for science her feature on gene therapy appears in this week's issue and that includes this edition and the science podcast the avenue comments or suggestions for the show right us at signs podcast a s dot org or tweet to us at science magazine you can subscribe to the show on high tune stitcher and many other acts or listen to us on science saint show is the production of science magazine jeffrey cook composed the music i'm sarah crespi a bath of science magazine and its publisher to bless.

joscelyn kaiser staff writer science magazine jeffrey cook sarah crespi publisher
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Hello welcome to the science podcast for october 20th 2017 i'm sarah crespi in this week's show who's you weighed talks about the soon to open it museum of the bible in washington dc kennett recover from early accusations of forgeries and illicitly obtained artifacts and catherine radisic is here to talk about stories from or online news site now we have catherine radisic editor for our online daily news site she's here to talk about some recent stories welcome catherine highs there for so we have a story on vote latest lie go find um i don't even know where to start with the slump i mean sometimes big things happen in science it's not every day but when it does it makes me really happy county clears away some of the blues from other areas of her life to put it simply my favorite fact about this one this big science fine is that many many papers were tied this event and authored altogether by about forty five hundred astronomers that's according to our newsrader onethird of all he is strong orders in the war when i saw that i thought it was a typo again i went back and was like oh my yeah it's just amazing so okay catherine sarah gushing over what event did lago observed did all of these people work together to observe okay so now that your guy shing is over news that mean i can take over gifts for garwe excellent so um lie goes to observatories and its european counterpart in pisa italy detected the merger of two superdense neutrons stars each larger than our own son you might remember that legos previous detections of gravitational waves four in total were all from the merger of black holes those signals that came through lasted only seconds but this new signal lasted a hundred seconds and rippled in it extraordinarily fast frequents.

sarah crespi catherine radisic editor catherine sarah black holes catherine lago pisa italy hundred seconds
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Judicial actions when it comes to climate change in history including massachusetts versus epa k okay let's switch gears heroin second sabrina uni actually know each other and we have done so for years but you know i primarily think you view as the filmmaker you know as well as well as a sociologist a professor and a triple ass science policy fellow so how does this particular paper fit in with your work in are you making a movie about this yes i mean as you know most of my film comes out of my research so we are already in production on a new film about this exact topic and you know we're the way that we're making this film and we're really in the very early stages is to to show how climate change and the issues that we see in the courts around climate change actually also represent some of the most pressing questions we will face during this administration and and questions that are really central to upholding justice in society like how do you prove the cause of an adverse event or of or harm how do you make someone responsible for harm pay for it and you know water the stakes for judges and juries who who must really end up making the call when faced with these questions in these climate change lawsuits so you you can expect to see this film you know i'm not sure exactly when but hopefully in the next year or so all right sabrina thank you so much for coming on the show my pleasure thanks for having me sabrina mccormick and colleagues right about using climate science in us courts this week in science and mack includes this edition and the science podcast the avenue comments or suggestions for the show reina set signs podcast a s dot org or tweet to us at science magazine you can subscribe to the show on high tunes stitcher and many other or listen to us science saint show was a production of science magazine jeffrey could composed the music i'm sarah crespi on behalf of science magazine and his publisher triple thanks for joining us.

climate change massachusetts epa professor reina science magazine sarah crespi heroin sabrina mccormick mack publisher
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Primarily its nuclear security and safety scientists working together from the two country now there are some interactions between us and chinese weapons researchers this is one of the interesting facets of this relationship the rekindling of ties between the two groups of weapons scientists but right now it's been on relatively benign topics that the two countries agree our priority bought they're able to work together without any political consequence the north korea nuclear program has a lot of political consequence and that step has not been taken by the two countries to actually get together and plot out the strategy for dealing with the crisis if it were to occur okay thanks so much rates for common and talking to us pleasure thank you sir stone overseas sciences international coverage he writes about a us china project to secure bombgrade reactor fuel and this week's issue of science one more especial thanks to hack of all a new podcast from mcafee they wanna remind us that we are all connected digitally this show with the help of cyber security experts in that experiments and of course pop culture explores how safe we are from cybercriminals can they access here digital life through something as simple as wi fi or your connected car listen to hack of all to find out now in apple podcast spotify stitcher and more and that concludes this edition of the science podcast the avenue comments or suggestions for the show a at signs podcast eight a s dot org or tweet to us at science magazine you can subscribe to the show on high tuned stitcher and many other or listen to us on science site show is the production of science magazine jeffrey could composed the music i'm sarah crespi on behalf of science magazine and his publisher to bless thanks for joining us.

nuclear program us mcafee science magazine sarah crespi publisher north korea china wi apple spotify
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the signs podcast for september first 2017 i'm sarah crespi in this week's show bridgestone at talks about nuclear cooperation between the us and china will recent coordinated efforts on a reactor in ghana lead to more and david graham gives us this week's hits from or online news site now we have david grim editor for our online daily news site he's here to talk about some recent stories welcome dave thanks earth first up we have his story on negotiating with an artificial intelligence why why this is something you've actually probably done unknowingly for example on the ebay when you enter a bid in other people have also entered bids that are supposed to with those are computers rape yacht this is a very simple form of negotiation this is not the kind of thing were really talking about here this negotiating theory complicated deals may be real estate deals may be swopping solar credits with your neighbor and so the a eyes would take care of this are they already doing it well they're not already doing of the idea is is that we were talking about these kinds of decisions a special were talking about like the go shouldn't that could change very quickly very complicated maybe even be happening continuously like every fifteen minutes whether that's something as simple as ebay or something as complicated as selfdriving cars need to make decisions maybe even every second every few seconds this is the point where you'd want something that actually can make decisions more intelligently hopefully in certainly faster than you could all right now this wouldn't be ice tori if we didn't have some concerns right of how led this technology could do that would be dangerous so what might people be worried about will one thing is that you know even though we like to think that were were making associations were always good faith.

sarah crespi bridgestone us china david graham editor artificial intelligence real estate deals ebay ghana dave rape fifteen minutes
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcast for august 11th 2017 i'm sarah crespi in this week's show and lizzy weighed talks with us about the arrival of humans in america could they possibly have calm down the coast in bones and david graham gives us this week's hence from or online news site now we have david grim editor for our daily news site he's here talk about some recent online stories okay dave the first story we're going to talk about is trees doing it for themselves the amazon rainforest gets rained on a lot earlier than one would expect about two to three months before seasonal wins bring in moisture heavy air from the ocean the rains have been drenching the forest now scientists think they know why the trees are making their own reign now i know how how gosh how could trees make their own weather trees engage in a process called transpiration we're plan so she release water vapor from small poors on their under side and then this water evaporates goes up into the atmosphere so it's been there's been this idea that may be the new of you got tons a treason the amazon dear releasing tons of water be the air lizzy it's missy may be the the trees are ceding their own clouds and maybe that's what's causing these rains to come so early but there hasn't really been conclusive proof for that in the proof now comes in a form of satellite data what can we see from space that might help figure this out was so this is thanks to nasr's or a satellite which is spacecraft dedicated to studying the chemistry of earth's atmosphere and what's really interesting is that when water comes.

sarah crespi america david graham editor amazon lizzy nasr three months
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:29 min | 4 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcast for august fourth 2017 i'm sarah crespi in this week's show in as cut though talks about the biology of color how we can learn about making seeing evolving in moving colors near soon lee is here with some elemental haikou hundred nineteen poems drawn from the periodic table and david graham gives us this week's hits from the online news now we have david grim editor for our daily news site he's here to talk about some recent online stories welcome dave i sir i hope we have a story on alzheimer's disease in chimps let's turn out with this possibility that chimps the chimpanzees actually get alzheimer's do they get alzheimer's dave and do other primates get alzheimer's well you need three things to be considered having alzheimer's one used dementia and either to orchard abnormalities in the brain one called amyloid plaques which are these were sticky accumulations of misfold proteins another one called neuro fiber larry tangles these are sort of foreignborn proteins called towel the clump into these long filaments twister out each other's of both these are thought to cause damage to the cells in the brain and none of these things have all been seen in the same animal except for humans okay and now we're gonna talk about how there may be some clues at this is happening and chimps but i want to get out of the way this problem that in the us chimps are considered are now considered endangered animals and invasive studies of them are off limits how can there be new evidence for what's going on in the brain surgery questions or turns out this study had to rely very heavily on a knew refounded center the collects brains from chimpanzees after they die food diet zoos or research centres or whatever this facility has access to their brains of the research all this research was actually done on brains of chimps had already died and what did they see when they looked at this cannot believe dead cimh brains well strikingly they saw that thirteen of the twenty brains that they looked at had amyloid plaques and four of those also had the nor far brewery tangles of this nation pens he's the first animal were both the plaques and the tangles had been seen in the same brain as they are in humans.

sarah crespi lee editor alzheimer us refounded center david graham dave alzheimer's disease
"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"sarah crespi" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcast for june 9 2017 i'm sarah crespi this week's show aleman david talks about a selfish janine share one a toxin and the other in in enter that have been masquerading as jeans important for development what does this mean about what we think of essential jeans and about how we makes ici's rachel bernstein is here to talk about recent science careers columns and ryan crosses here with online news now we have ryan crossen intern for our daily news site is here to talk about some recent online stories i hope we have one on racism and the police in the united states video has changed the national conversation on policing in this country we've seen beatings and killings of black people again and again and the assumption is these incidents are racially motivated but it's really hard to pin that down you can't ask people who are on trial if race had something to do with it you really want something a little bit more quantitative a little bit more authoritative so here researchers in california have tried to do this worthy do ryan will a team from stanford university decided to tackle a more subtle form of racial bias that begins long before any of these acts of violence so they wondered if police officers talked to white and black citizens that the just pulled over with the same degree of respect since the oakland police department equips their officers with body cams the researchers were able to listen to everything the police said from about a thousand traffic stops made back in april 2014 so by transcribing the interaction's they came up with more than thirty six thousand turns of conversation so these were phrases like sorry to stop you or can i see that driver's license again and next the recruited a bunch of college students to score how respectful those phrases were so the students got to sue the officers language in context of what the drivers said right before but they didn't know the drivers race.

sarah crespi rachel bernstein intern california stanford university oakland police department aleman david janine ryan crossen united states