17 Burst results for "Sarah Chase"

"sarah chase" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

10:21 min | 2 weeks ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"A woman named sultana who grew up in afghanistan in the early nineteen fifties. This was during kings are shop. Where i think was the time which is sort of a renaissance in golden times in at least in my lifetime and from what i hear from my family and history. It was one of the better times of history of afghanistan in that land. I went to school. We had freedom. I didn't have to cover my head. My mother never covered her head. She was a teacher. My dad was an architect and We had a decent good life in a in a time where values were really important. Sultana left afghanistan in the early nineteen seventies. She moved to the united states. In december of nineteen seventy-nine the soviet military invaded afghanistan and sultanas father uncles and other men in her family. Were taken away. She says she never saw them again. Almost a quarter century passed and then of course after nine eleven came to united states invasion and the fall of the taliban sultana finally returned to her home country in two thousand three. I wanted to go there before. I got too old and see my home. And so i go back in. And i thought what a privilege to be a part of this international endeavour sixty plus countries come together to rebuild a country that has gone through half a century of war and destruction so tana stayed in afghanistan for another twelve years. She worked in several government positions and witnessed women's lives change especially in the literacy programs. She worked with. And i remembered they were women in class. Who are older. They wanted to learn to read and write ended there because they had to always go to their sons or children and go. What is this. What is the saying are what and it was so beautiful. And then there was agencies who are teaching them about democracy in human rights and women's rights and they're sick and tired of oppression by the radical extremism of the taliban time or the war times for example judges hundreds of more women winching diversity to become judges because taliban didn't allow for a long time for women to study. I think why was it passed fourth grade or seventh grade out sometime. Not open at all. Schools were closed for a long time for a woman in afghanistan. And just like all of a sudden like you opened a floodgate. In the women were just absorbing there was like a breath of fresh air for the pendulum of history though pull sultana back to the united states in two thousand fifteen and today. She's watching her country in chaotic transition. Yet again and she's worried about the many people. She knows still in afghanistan who want to leave. they want to live peacefully. They want their children to be raised peacefully. And they they don't wanna live again under this condition poverty and tyranny and suppression can listen to music kind of thing very simple things so they don't allow dinner and i totally understand would want to live like that so i think that's the that's why they want to leave to have a better for their children and i totally understand ed in honor died and i'm glad there are some who have that vision for a better life for themselves and and hope we can help that a sultana a friend of sarah chase who sarah met when they both lived in afghanistan in the early two thousands and sarah. I think we have you back on a phone line now indeed. It's okay i it was. It was naive of me to think that after a year and a half of having guests on zoom and other internet based communications that having a person in a studio would actually be a solid thing. But the you know. The world has a way of humbling us all even big ways and small. So but i'm glad we have you back here and let's just pick up with what sultana said can you. Can you describe to us a little bit how you witnessed women's lives in particular change in the decade that you were there you know. I'm going to give a different picture. Because again i lived in the south i lived in kandahar and there i would say there was a bit of an opening in those early years but you know the attacks the first serious attack north of kandahar was in two thousand and three and i would say the changes i saw were all a sliding backwards from a high point of about two thousand and three and so i had people in my Cooperative again these were villagers. I didn't have you know educated people but they did have their daughters in school. Originally and slowly they were pulling their daughters out of school And you had fewer and fewer people really able to Play the type of public roles. That sultana was talking about so. I think that there's you know if we think about what did happen. Over those twenty years justice we have to do. When we're thinking about the united states we have to make distinctions between the urban centers and rural areas and in this case between the north and the west and the south. The south is a much more socially and culturally conservative part of the country. So so tell me more about that. Because i think there are many things that we here. In the united states you know by virtue of Of distance and an ignorance of the complexities of afghanistan and perhaps ignorance of history as well just never fully realized about the country even after twenty years of kind of involvement there so how i mean how varied were women's experiences there because all the stories that we kept getting where the schools being built Sultana said the return of opportunity for women Just tell me more about what you saw. I mean schools were built And women did teach although there was a desperation to it and this was I wanna say Some of the earlier disappointment when i got materials together from towns actually around boston To help out schools in kandahar. And as i was bringing the supplies i found the teachers taking them. You know because they had been in situations of such poverty that that it was almost hard for them to give these up to their to their students and these were women teachers or later. I would find teachers who were not in school. They were having children teach the classes. I mean it was. it was always a a rough you know process the reconstruction and rebuilding process. I myself with involved in in building building Several schools girls schools in one case. Someone who worked for me stole the money you know. So i mean it was. It was tough And i want to say that it was appearing. It's not that afghans are inherently venal. It's the lived through twenty or thirty years that had selected for opportunism. Defeat means that the people who survived were the ones who didn't have the public interest at heart but rather their own personal interest because afghanistan had seen the better part of looking back. Now forty years in some kind of Internationally or foreign lead conflict. That's exactly right and so that selects for certain types of behaviour and indeed. i started reading into. Ptsd at the time because it occurred to me. I'm in. I'm in a town. That is suffering from collective. Ptsd here and what are the typical character traits or behaviors that come to the fore when people are suffering post traumatic stress and these were exactly the behavior that i was seeing no ability to look into the future No ability to trust All of these types of of of responses and reactions And then i would just say that my own cooperative members the women i women and men so that was quite interesting that i had women and men who were not from the same family indeed. I had nine different tribes and ethnic groups in about twenty people in my cooperative. But as i said these were villagers they were not the educated the types of women who typically got jobs in foreign ngos or or things like that and they would come you know. We were making care products. You're making soap and so it was largely manual Skilled but manual. I think one of the women could read and they would come in their burqas one by one they would not work in their burqas so that again with men and women in the same space We've kinda revolutionary in a quiet way. We bought a taxi in order to drive them home because that was a common sight a big group of women in a taxi. That was normal but they didn't want us driving them right up to their front doors. We would them off a few blocks away so they could. It would look just a little bit more ordinary. No one wanted to stand out in. This is beginning. You know two thousand five two thousand six in kandahar. No one wanted to stand out. Wow yeah yeah well. So we've just got about thirty seconds left before the break. I wanted to give if you could just quickly a chance to finish your story about why you had chosen to to leave journalism to to make this. Turn to trying to help rebuild afghanistan. It was about making a difference. It was about stop talking about it already and do something..

afghanistan sultana taliban united states kandahar Sultana sarah chase sultanas tana sarah boston
"sarah chase" Discussed on The Corner

The Corner

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on The Corner

"Just that quick, we are back and then. You look at the card is not as bad as people say it is right. said it was free. It's that bad. It's bad for pay per view. Okay I prefer it to be on regular ESPN because I think the numbers that would draw would be incredible. But it's a pay per view so i. still think there's good fights on here like I really liked the Sarah Chase super fight. I mean there's really good Faisali car, but I who the fuck is paying for this. Guy I don't know that that fight specifically is free. Keller versus a cody. Good fights on this card is just yet. The marquee power isn't there Let's go down and start making some picks. The sugar show was back. Is Just Wrexham won his last fight. Sean o'malley opens it up for Eddie. Wine Lynn I think it's going to be citing I expect shot o'malley to win again. Yeah just he just looks really good, but he's in there with a season former wireless I mean. He spent some time in WC. Why was been around for a long time and he's terrible, so that's key. o'malley's been able to just get guys out there with a few shots like last night. He's going to be in there against somebody who's going to put the action a wireless. So this is a thing. This is Sean o'malley Litmus test to see if he's really a true threat to the rankings, not even like top five. We won't go that far, but to enter the top fifteen. Be a threat in the division because that division benway stacked so you if you can get any wild out there like you've done the rest, I'm impressed I'm looking forward to this fight because I wanna see I, think he's GonNa. Win as well but I just WanNa, see how he does it and what he does when he faces them adversity. And you look at why inland hasn't been stops? It's twenty fourteen. So it's just man he's. He's good, so you you look at that is just. It's one of those you know trapped fights like you're saying it's one those. This guy has almost three times the amount of experiences you. Can make up that experience and show how special you are. So I think that's a really good fight, and it's a fight. That's really going to tell where o'malley is and I'm not sure, but I think. Is this the first time on the main? Card on a pay per view of so I think this is a step up so opening the pay per view helps a ton as well so I like that the next fight. We have magney versus Rocco. Martin. I duNno Martine. me new MAGNI. You'll make me weird fight and. FRAUNCES purposes. Really Long Really Awkward he's hard to figure out in terms of like when you look at him, so if you're not like an exceptional fighter, he's going to give you a hard time. In Rock Martin is solid the. This fight should win. I think he's pretty impressively. Rocko Martin's cool at. Seven seven inch reach advantage crazy. That's all I'm saying. You gotta be a special fighter to deal with somebody who those advantages. I don't think rob yet. So giving new MAGNI next fight. Algebra sternly who I thought could be fighting for. The title should be some reason. They want Josie Aldo to fight for this belt whatever sterling versus sent Hagan to me. This is the caliber of fight that could be a title fight. Both guys very good both guys very deserving. Kimmy out Jemaine Sterling, though because we just talked about experience and stepping up. Levels I thought San Hagan look great against a Sundial. be John Lineker. He's in there. It gets really really good guys. It's just when you go five rounds or excuse me three rounds you go. The distance and sterling goes the distance. He has a lot of tools to appoint someone and just so nasty on the ground, so give me that barely. You Split Decision Froude me. Yeah I'm having a tough time with his fight because. Josie album I should be in a title fight. Okay, he should be at a title. Find One of these guys should be in the title fighting Yan for the titles, complete and utter bullshit like you lost your fine. Even though some people thought you want a lot of people thought you beat Marlboros, you did. So, you shouldn't get title opportunity over guys who have winning streak San Hey one. Was it. Five zero six join UFC and algae has been on a role as well and now the fight, each other and eliminating the potential creating star who's given Josie out of the opportunity here. This is bullshit. I think those three and four in his last seven fights. All in one in the division. How do you get a title fight? Again it's not it's not like. A division where it's like light heavyweight where this guy's like in heavyweight where you go beneath the top three. It's like Oh i. don't know who's who's good on a real renaissance. These guys are winning fights. Like the again altos on on of Ryan like San Hagans run. They're running into each other during the street. One of should be fighting for the title. This is dome so anyway. This fight is hard as hell to pick. I WANNA. Go with Algebra Sega's. He's really good on his feet. My concern with Al Joe is Ju Jitsu in his wrestling is great. But? I hate that he kicks so much sometimes, and it could get them caught up in this fight. I mean that's his best. Offense is feeder better in his hands leads to the opportunities. Somebody taking you down. I feel like he's all right with that right like he feel like he's comfortable on. The ground is to not get finished and get another chance in the next round. 'cause I mean there's been fight, so he's gone taken down, but then he's one the other two rounds. It's just out of the three. Tricky game to play hard like I. It's hard to see this fight, not going the distance, and if you see a win, you probably don't see al knocking anybody out, and you're probably picking saying. Hey, get to knock somebody out. That's Algebra to tap him. Only way I see you fit I'll pick Arizona Tab San Hagans very capable of finishing Joe Zelda. Assamese theory that keeps on Bunch Seattle pissing me off Oh. But Yeah? Does a tough fight pay and you know when you when you kick a lot. Alison Lakes. He just does high kicks, and if you're an accomplished writer. As a round where on it's really difficult to get back in a defensive position when you throw a lazy kick in. Could Algebra caught up? Hopefully he's worked on the hands a little bit more I want to pick Algebra because I do think this fight does find a way to hit them at the Al Jitsu and his wrestling as good enough to get one of those tricky submissions I think Santa has like a brown bill. His his ground games, not that great. Can take advantage move insurance to striking Max this week. Possibly lose..

Sean o'malley Josie Aldo Rocko Martin San Hagans Sarah Chase Faisali Keller Arizona Seattle Al Jitsu San Hagan UFC Sega Lynn Rocco Jemaine Sterling writer John Lineker Alison Lakes FRAUNCES
"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"This has been clear and vivid. At least I hope so. Mike thanks to the sponsors of this episode all the income from the ADS. You here go to the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. Just by listening to this podcast. You're contributing to the better communication of science. So thank you Dr Jim. Green has had a distinguished career NASA from nineteen eighty five to nineteen ninety-two. He was the head of the National Space Science Data Center at Goddard Space Flight Center in two thousand six. He became the Director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA headquarters. He's written over a hundred scientific articles and he's even become a podcast or with a new podcast from called gravity. Assist to learn more about Dr Green to listen to and subscribe to his podcast. Go to NASA Dot Gov slash gravity dash assist. This episode was edited and produced by our executive producer. Graham Chedda with help from our executive producer Sarah Chase and our associate producer. Jean-pierre may are sound engineers. Dan Zuma our tech Guru is Alison Kostin and are published. Is Erica Hill? You can subscribe to our podcast for free at apple podcasts. Stitcher or wherever you listen for more details about clear and vivid. Sign up for my newsletter. Please visit Allen all DOT com. You can also find us on facebook and Instagram at clear and vivid and I'm on twitter at Alan alda. Thanks for listening. We started something new on clear and vivid called Patriots on and it allows you to directly support us in engage with us in a much closer way. If you visit patriotic dot com slash clear and vivid. Here's what you'll find for as little as two dollars a month listeners of clear and vivid can get exclusive behind the scenes access. You can find video extra content bonus episodes and all sorts of fun stuff including behind the scenes pictures. And for those of you who have seven questions of your own Mr Alan Alda. You might find some answers there too now. You don't have to subscribe for as little as two dollars a month to keep listening to this show. You can continue to listen to this show and supporters by hearing the ADS. But you can get all this extra material if you do decide to become a subscriber and most importantly your patronage directly funds are work at the Center for Communicating Science get Patriotic Try. That's Patria on dot com slash clear and vivid C. L. A. R. A. N. D. V. I. V. I. D. Next time when clear and vivid. I SPEAK WITH CARL. Zimmer who's a great science communicator Carl? Thanks so much for being on the show. You a wonderful thank you. What's the what's the most interesting thing? But this conversation made you think of and didn't get to say I'm still wondering what my microbiome is is making me do. I hope it makes you come back on the shows. Yeah well hopefully do Carl Zimmer. Next time when clear and vivid..

Center for Communicating Scien NASA Director Mr Alan Alda Carl Zimmer Jean-pierre National Space Science Data Ce executive producer Goddard Space Flight Center Stony Brook University Erica Hill Planetary Science Division Mike Dr Jim CARL Sarah Chase Dan Zuma Alison Kostin Graham Chedda producer
"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"I don't think in a arrogant way but I get more confident about it. Sounds strange counterintuitive. I know how much I don't know when you're young. You think you know a lot more than you do now and as you get older. You're so you're aware of how much I don't know and you relax into it as well said that's really nice. Very nice. Let last question. What Book Changed Your Life? Wow Man would. That's I'm GonNa go with dianetics around Hubbard. Suddenly it got really quiet and Alan. I'd like like you to come with me. There's a meeting we're having thank you. Yes I'd like to be hooked up to the machine. Yeah Yeah Hook you up to a machine. I man that I am hard pressed to say you know. I don't know that is unfair. I don't know that I can say say I love books. I don't know that I can say one book that change my let. I will say a book that was very important to me is the most of Most of S J Perelman which was a collection of essays. And I my dad add loved S J Perelman and so I read it and realize this is really funny really funny and this guy is very smart and these were written in the thirties and the forties and it had some great images in it just terrific images and very funny. I remember reading. That and thinking thinking comedy is something smart people can do Children died. I've noticed that. Yeah I'm so glad you came Minnie for this is This is You kidding this is a pleasure Real pleasure for me and I will love to come back again or maybe we continue you this on my show. Yeah I'll get back out here to New York and we'll hook you up to the machine. I'll start insulting your hair and we'll see how you end up doing doing the cell. Oh there's enough for me to work with. Thanks so much thanks so much. This is great really great. Thank you this has been clear and vivid. At least they hope so. This episode was made possible by presenting sponsor discovered all the income from the ADS. You here go to the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. Just by listening to this podcast. You're contributing to the better communication of science. So thank you for more information about the Santer. Please visit all the center dot Org Conan is one of the great witch of our time and these assesment amazing team of people around who help support his TV show his podcast and of course Conan Without Borders to find out all the ways. You can get your Coenen fixed. VISIT TEAM COCO DOT com. This episode was edited and produced by our executive producer. reducer Graham shed with help from our executive producer Sarah Chase and our associate producer. Jean Shimane are sound. Engineers Dammed Zulu our tech guru is Alison Causton and our publicist Sara Hill. You can subscribe to our podcast for free at apple podcasts. Stitcher stitcher or wherever you listen and don't forget you can always say Alexa. Play clear and vivid on Apple podcasts. For more details about clear and vivid and to sign up for my newsletter please visit Alan alda dot com. You can also find us on facebook instagram and linked in at clear and vivid. I'm on twitter at Alan Lowell. Thanks for listening. We started something new on clear and vivid. It's called Patriae Freon and it allows you to directly support US engage with us in a much closer way if you visit Patriot dot com slash clear and vivid. What you'll find for as little as two dollars a month listeners of clear and vivid can get exclusive behind the scenes access? You can find video extra content bonus this episode's and all sorts of fun stuff including behind the scenes pictures and for those of you who have seven questions of your own for Mr Alan Alda. You might find some answers there too so now you don't have to subscribe for as little as two dollars a month to keep listening to the show. You can continue to listen to the show and supporters by hearing the ADS. But you can get all this extra material if you do decide to become a subscriber and most importantly your patronage directly funds are work at the oldest center for communicating unicating science. Give Patriot try that's Patriot on dot com slash. Clear and vivid bye bye..

Alan Lowell Mr Alan Alda Minnie J Perelman apple Conan Center for Communicating Scien US Alexa Hubbard executive producer. reducer Gr Jean Shimane Alison Causton twitter Santer Sarah Chase executive producer facebook New York Stony Brook University
"sarah chase" Discussed on Proof

Proof

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Proof

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> wants something <Speech_Male> in this country that <Speech_Male> was so <Speech_Male> abundant <Speech_Male> and for such a long <Speech_Male> time <Speech_Male> and yet we took it for <Speech_Male> granted may even <Speech_Male> wasted it <Speech_Male> but the effect <Speech_Male> it had on us. <Speech_Male> It was remarkable. <Speech_Male> I mean it literally <Speech_Male> built this country. <Speech_Male> It built our homes <Speech_Male> our cities <Speech_Male> our entire <Speech_Male> economy. <Speech_Male> And then <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> when we thought it was all gone. <Speech_Male> The old <Speech_Male> growth virgin <Speech_Male> forest tight <Speech_Male> grain that we want so <Speech_Male> badly <Speech_Male> we discover <Speech_Male> this surprising <Speech_Male> treasure <Speech_Male> buried <Speech_Male> the bottom of <Speech_Male> lakes and rivers. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And when <Speech_Male> you see them <Speech_Male> and when you know ooh <Speech_Male> we have access <Speech_Male> to them again <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you realize that this <Speech_Male> resource <Speech_Music_Male> has <SpeakerChange> always <Speech_Music_Male> been a treasure. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Drop <Speech_Music_Male> us an email at clear <Speech_Music_Male> story at this old <Speech_Music_Male> house dot com to <Speech_Music_Male> let us know what you think <Speech_Music_Male> episode and <Speech_Music_Male> presenting else she <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wants to explore. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> liked what you heard <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> subscribed to clear <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sort and leave us a <Speech_Music_Male> review on Apple podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> stitcher <Speech_Music_Male> or wherever <Music> you get your podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> clear. Lear <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> story was produced <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Rococo Punch <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the soul house <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> support from Kath. <Speech_Music_Male> Annalisa Chris <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sarah Chase. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for our guests. Norm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Abram Sherry <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Davis and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> John Clayton. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Kevin <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> O'Connor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> war <SpeakerChange> next week <Music>

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"This has been clear in vivid. At least I hope so. My thanks to the sponsors of this episode mall the income from the ADS. You here go to the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University University. Just by listening to this podcast. You're contributing to the better communication of science. So thank you for more information about at the oldest center. Please visit all the center Dot Org C.. DARRAS first book. The emperor of all maladies biography of cancer was the winner of of the two thousand eleven Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction and it became the basis of Ken Burns Series on cancer for PBS. His latest book is called called the gene and intimate history. And it's the story of the quest to decipher the Master Code of instructions that makes in defines us as human when he's not writing Dr Mukherjee Assistant Professor of Medicine at Columbia University and cancer physician and researcher to find out more about his work is research his books. You can visit his website at Seductive Mukherjee DOT COM. This episode was edited and produced by our executive producer. Graham shed with help from our executive producer Sarah Chase and our associate producer. Jean Shaheen are sound engineer. Is Dan Zulu our tech guru is Alison Kostin and our publicist Sarah Hill. You can subscribe to our podcast for free at Apple. PODCASTS CAST stitcher or wherever you listen and don't forget you can always say Alexa. Play clear and vivid on Apple podcasts. For more details tales about clear and vivid and to sign up for my newsletter. Please visit Allen all DOT com. You can also find us on facebook. Instagram and Lincoln at clear and vivid. And I'm on twitter at Alan alda. Thanks for listening by. Burnout is a significant problem. Among healthcare professionals people join the field because they want to help other people and then they leave because they feel overworked and undervalued. Yeah and research shows that a lack of communication and empathy among among between healthcare teams contributes burn out and it also reduces the quality of patient care so to address this problem. The oldest center for communicating science has developed the Alden medical experience. This is in evidence based curriculum that focuses on helping healthcare professionals learn to communicate to collaborate and to connect with their colleagues clearly and vividly as a health care professional. You will learn to reconnect with your passion for your work which can help improve relationships apps with others on your team and ultimately make a positive impact on the overall patient experience. The older medical experience has been developed by healthcare professionals four healthcare professionals. So you know. You're getting the tools you need to adjust and thrive in any number of challenging circumstances so to learn more about the all the medical uh-huh experience and apply for the next program. Please visit all the center dot org slash workshops. That's all the center dot org slash workshops shops next in our series of conversations. Talk with Carl Safina car car. What are we going to talk about? We're going to talk about all the other animals we're here on this planet. With how great they are what they think about and how they feel what they I think about and how they feel other animals thinking and feeling next time when clear and vivid..

Seductive Mukherjee DOT Center for Communicating Scien executive producer Apple Dr Mukherjee Assistant Profess Pulitzer Prize Carl Safina Jean Shaheen Stony Brook University Univers Sarah Chase Alexa Ken Burns facebook Alan alda twitter Columbia University Instagram Dan Zulu Alison Kostin producer
"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"This has been clear and vivid. At least I hope show my thanks to the sponsors of this episode all the income from the ADS. You hear Shandra for Communicating Science Stony Brook University. Just by listening listening to this podcast. You're contributing to the better communication of science. So thank you for more information about the all the center. Please visit all the center dot dot Org. Lisa Calton ager is the director of the Carl Sagan instituted Cornell where she explores new world orbiting other stars hand and she's also a leading expert in modeling potentially habitable worlds because of a research in her impact on space exploration. Dr Calton Egger may be the first. I guess on clear and vivid to have an asteroid named after. So if you're searching the skies tonight look for asteroid Calton eggers seven seven three four. Some of you might also recognize her from her Max. Three D movie research for life in space. The first book are we alone in the universe has been published in German German and Italian for more information about Lisa Calton Egger and her work. You can visit the Carl Sagan Institute online at Carl Sagan Institute shoot dot. Org episode was edited and produced by our executive producer. Graham shed with help from our executive producer Sarah Chase and and our associate producer. Jean Shaheen are sound engineers Dan Zoom Tech Guru is Alison Causton. And our publicist era. Help uh-huh you can subscribe to our pipe. Cash for free at Apple PODCASTS. Stitcher or wherever you listen and don't forget you can always say Alexa Alexa. Play clear and vivid on Apple podcasts. More details about clear and vivid and to sign up for my newsletter. Please visit Alamo of DOT com. Yeah you can also find us on facebook instagram and linked in at clear and vivid. And I'm on twitter at Alan. Thanks for listening bye bye..

Lisa Calton Egger Lisa Calton ager Carl Sagan Institute Jean Shaheen executive producer Carl Sagan Alexa Alexa DOT Stony Brook University Apple twitter Alison Causton Sarah Chase producer facebook Alan instagram Graham
"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"This has been clear and vivid. At least I hope so. Thanks to the sponsors of this episode all the income from the ADS. You here go to the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. Just by listening to this podcast. You're contributing to the better communication of science nine. It's so thank you Camille. Zaky's book the War for kind building empathy and a fractured world. Should be on. Everyone's reading list this holiday today season and visit his website war for kindness dot com. You'll also find more information about his work at the Stanford Social Neuroscience lab and you can find more empathy games and challenges that will help you engage in connect more thoughtfully with others goodwin detest during the holiday season in this challenge. Number two how to spend kindly am I come in Handy. The next time you're caught up in the frenzy of doorbuster that website again is war for kindness dot com. This episode was produced by Graham. Shed with help from our associate producer. Sarah Chase are sound. Engineer is Dan Zula are Tech Guru is Alison. CAUSTON are publicist. Is Sarah Hill. You could subscribe to our podcast for free at apple podcasts. Stitcher or wherever you listen for more details about clear and vivid sign up for my newsletter police visit Alan alda DOT DOT com. You can also find us on facebook and Instagram at clear and vivid and I'm on twitter at Alan alda. Thanks for listening bye bye..

Alan alda Sarah Chase Stanford Social Neuroscience Center for Communicating Scien Stony Brook University Sarah Hill Alison Camille Dan Zula facebook twitter Zaky apple goodwin Graham producer Engineer Instagram
"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"To She's often very helpful in in in restoring my confidence and it's to create that same experience now with Greta with my say what I thought I'd finally shows. John was still arlene here. Here's the latest. What Book Changed Your Life Okay? That's good this. This is a funny one but actually it was Bernard Malamud The natural I read was like the first book I read. I think kind of like felt like a grown. Oh notebook how old were you. I was pretty young. I think it was like Like ten And I we were allowed to pick pick our own. You know at that point. You've been assigned books you know and I'd love to kill a mockingbird catcher in the rye great gatsby all the books that were that were part of the school curriculum at that time but then we were allowed to pick a book and I picked it because it was baseball. But it's really about mythology collagen about American mythology. It's a book that's just stayed with me my my whole life And they made a very good movie of it but they they've ch. They changed it in the movie and I like how they changed it as like as a separate thing but the book has always stayed with me as a feel like. There's a lot in it about wrote about the world and about ambition and success but also the American dream and what that really is that I think also it was the book itself but it was also the fact that I was reading something that felt like it was from the adult world when I was still a kid and that I understood it and liked it so so much it gave me confidence at way. Your questions twice. I know better her answers in the next question. Will you like let it takes. Yes thank you so much. No I really had fun me to thank you Allan. This is great and this has been clear and vivid. At least I hope so will mike thanks to discovery for being are presenting sponsor this season all the income from the ADS. You here go to the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. versity just by listening to this podcast. You're contributing to the better communication of science. So thank you for more information about the oldest center. Please visit visit all the center dot org no his recent film marriage story debuts on Netflix on December six and you want to check out some of his other films like squid and the whale and also Greenberg and Frances Ha both of which star his incredibly talented partner actress actress and writer and Director Greta Gerwig this episode was produced by Graham shed with help from our associate producer. Sarah Chase Are Sound engineer is Dan Zula are Tech Guru is Alison Causton. Publicist is Sarah Hill. You could subscribe to our podcasts for free free at apple podcasts. Stitcher or wherever you listen for more details about clear and vivid sign up for my newsletter police visit Alan alda dot com. Tom You can also find us on facebook and Instagram at clear and vivid and I'm on twitter at Alan alda. Thanks for listening bye. Bye and don't forget. Marriage story is playing in theaters now. And it'll be on Netflix. Starting December six Sarah. You did you love it as much as I love this movie. It's a great movie. It's actually my favorite Everett movie that I've seen this year and I can't wait to share it with a lot of people when it comes out on Netflix Netflix December Sixth Nixon our series of conversations. I talk with actor Ben Stiller Ben had worked with no in the movie Greenberg and Ben and I both both a lot of fun working together as actors on a couple of films including flirting with disaster. When we started that picture we really did know each other except for having seen each other on the screen? There's that moment of like okay. I'm with this person who I'm used to just watching. And now I'm interacting with with them and you know it's a bit trying to be cool and trying to like well. We were both trying to and the colder we got the more it amused us. Yes and then we got in trouble with the director. That's really starting to break each and I felt like we were getting in trouble for being funny and I mean that's the best. I think food the best feeling when you feel like. You're connecting with an actor Ben Stiller next time when clear and vivid uh-huh..

Netflix Greta Gerwig Ben Stiller Ben Alan alda Ben Stiller Greenberg Bernard Malamud Tom You Sarah Hill Sarah Chase baseball John Alison Causton Center for Communicating Scien arlene Allan mike twitter
"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"This has been clear and vivid. At least I hope so. My thanks to discovery for being are presenting sponsor this season all the income from the ADS. You here go to the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. Just by listening to this podcast. You're contributing to the better communication of science. So thank you. For more information about the older center please visit all the center dot. Org phillies new memoir. Homework is terrific. I think you'll enjoy reading it. It's available in bookstores and online and as MSN. She Julie have collaborated on over thirty books together. Many of them for children. You can find out more about Julian. Emma including their book tour engagements by visiting Julie Andrews Collection Dot Com. This episode was produced by Graham. Shed with help from our associate producer. Sarah Chase our.

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"<SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> This <SpeakerChange> has been clear <Speech_Music_Male> and vivid. <Speech_Music_Male> At least I <Speech_Music_Male> hope so <Speech_Music_Male> my thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> discovery <Advertisement> for being <Speech_Music_Male> are presenting sponsor <Speech_Music_Male> this season <Speech_Music_Male> while all the income <Speech_Music_Male> from the ads you here <Speech_Music_Male> go to the Center for <Speech_Music_Male> Communicating Science <Speech_Music_Male> at Stony Brook <Speech_Music_Male> University <Speech_Music_Male> just by <Speech_Music_Male> listening to this podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> You're contributing <Speech_Music_Male> to the better communication <Speech_Music_Male> of science <Speech_Music_Male> so thank <Speech_Music_Male> you for <Speech_Music_Male> more information <Speech_Music_Male> about the oldest <Advertisement> center. <Speech_Male> Please visit <Advertisement> all <Speech_Male> the center <Advertisement> dot <Speech_Music_Male> org <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> as you'll you'll. Oh <Advertisement> said he's <Speech_Music_Male> already <Advertisement> halfway <Speech_Male> through <Advertisement> thirty <Speech_Male> six concerts <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> in the Bach <Advertisement> project <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his <Speech_Music_Male> next stops <Advertisement> will be <Speech_Music_Male> in Beirut Seoul <Speech_Music_Male> Sydney <Advertisement> Melbourne <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> Christ's Church Church <Advertisement> New <Speech_Music_Male> Zealand <Advertisement> he <Speech_Music_Male> can find <Advertisement> out much <Speech_Music_Male> more about <Advertisement> the Bach <Speech_Music_Male> project <Advertisement> about <Speech_Music_Male> Silk Road <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and about <Advertisement> Yoyos <Speech_Music_Male> many albums <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> by <Advertisement> visiting <Speech_Music_Male> Yoyo mud <Advertisement> dot <Speech_Music_Male> com. <Advertisement> That's <Speech_Music_Male> why <Advertisement> Oh Dash <Speech_Music_Male> Y. <Advertisement> O. <Speech_Music_Male> M. A. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> DOT COM. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Music_Male> episode <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> was produced <Speech_Music_Male> by Graham <Advertisement> shed <Speech_Male> with help <Advertisement> from our <Speech_Music_Male> associate the producers <Speech_Music_Male> Sarah Chase <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> our sound engineer <Speech_Music_Male> is Dan Zula <Speech_Music_Male> are Tech <Speech_Music_Male> Guru <Advertisement> is Alison <Speech_Music_Male> Causton <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and our publicist <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> is Sarah <Advertisement> Hill <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to our podcast <Speech_Music_Male> for <Advertisement> free <Speech_Music_Male> at apple <Advertisement> podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stitcher <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wherever <Speech_Music_Male> you <Advertisement> like to listen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> for <Speech_Music_Male> more details about <Speech_Music_Male> clear and vivid and <Speech_Music_Male> to sign up for my newsletter <Speech_Music_Male> please <Speech_Music_Male> visit <Speech_Music_Male> Allen all <Advertisement> the dot <Speech_Music_Male> com <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> you <Advertisement> can also find <Speech_Music_Male> us on facebook <Speech_Music_Male> and instagram <Advertisement> at <Speech_Music_Male> clear and vivid <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and I'm on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at Alan <Speech_Music_Male> Alda. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for listening <Speech_Music_Male> bye <Speech_Music_Male>

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"I'm alan alda and this is clear in vivid conversations about connecting acting in communicating welcome to a preview of what our fifth season will be like. I'm sitting here with my producer producer. Graham shade in our associate producer sarah chase hide ram hi sarah hi there hi on so we're going to play you a little bit of some of the show's coming up and talk about our reactions to them what we felt in learned <hes> in those interviews in those conversations i one i wanna play for you is is the <hes> the first show of the fifth season which is a wonderful conversation. I had with melinda gates of course melinda is partners with her husband bill gates in the largest foundation in the world and they are successful at what they do. I think to a great extent because they follow a theme that we cover every show on this on this podcast which is listening they listen to the people they wanna help and they find out what they really need how they can really be helpful not how they think they can be helpful but how they really can be helpful. Melinda goes out and lived. Komo people very often learns from their daily life. What's important to them and how she can end. The foundation can be helpful. Can we play a little bit from our conversation with melinda yeah. This is <hes> she's talking about time that she spent with a daughter actually tanzania living with the family and <hes> <hes> she tells a story of unusually actually in africa the family all ate together but then off to dinner things change when dinner was over the interesting thing was it was ten at night darkest can be out on the planes and tanzania moons out. We're out in the dust as a group of women on and her daughters in her sister and my jenin me doing the dishes in the dust in the dark and yet one of the <hes> sets of children in the home were twins twins boy and twin world girl and they were just switching for primary school to secondary school and had to take their entrance exam. The family was incredibly worried about the daughter grace so it was a male twin and then grace race. The male twin had passed his exam and was headed into secondary school. They were so worried about grace and what i observed was that it young male at night could go study in the home under the one lightbulb they had but grace was out doing dishes with us in the dark at ten at night and when my gen came out out of our little hut with a headlamp grace who was a pretty shy adolescent which is pretty typical at that age she came right up to my gen and the one thing she asked us for while we were there is may i have your headlamp. When you go home so i can study at night after being up so late working all day doing unpaid labor that unpaid labor is a really important point they these women <hes> that she lived with were expected to do work doc was not paid for but that while doing it at work kept them for improving their their own personal lives and these were cultural standards that everybody took for granted yeah and this is a theme she picks up on a lot in her book which is called the moment of left <hes> and it's sort of something that resonates throughout and i'm glad that she brought this up as a really good example and she's such a good storyteller. He tells the story with the economy. She gives you the details as it make you see it as lovely story. She tells about her own own household in about her private off to dinner. The family gathers starts to do the dishes and then one by one they peel off and then is left alone in the kitchen finishing off the dishes so she issued an order from now on nobody melts away until everything's done in nobody leaves the kitchen until mom leaves the kitchen and and i love that not only does she help people in other countries in our own country but she helps us through or the story she told she helps us understand the plight of our fellow humans and just knowing about that makes it better for all of us yeah and part of what she talked about in the in the episode with you too is that they that she and bill would go into situations where they they had expectations of what was supposed is to be or what was supposed to happen and then the reality on the ground was so much more different than what they had expected <hes> a lot of the stories that are in the book are that sort of reconciliation conciliation between what what the what the jada projected what the science said was going to happen and then what they actually found on the ground and how they were able to bridge the gap between the those sort of two extremes so she said it was very important to be able to tack to tax time analogy they. You don't necessarily get where they're going head on. Who's got the next show. I think it's me <hes> and i want to set the stage for the audience on the next episode so <hes> and this is what was with pat metheny who is one of the great jazz improvisers of all time and it was wonderful setting because has he was in your apartment and we all kind of gathered around and youtube talked about music and improvisation in the it it builds on themes that we've talked about before with renee fleming and we will also cover again in in season five with your mom when you you're gonna talk about that a little bit later on this this <hes> really where you unpowered both talking about improv in respective fields you know for me. The there are interesting aspects of living the life as an improviser. I mean in many ways. Being an improvising musician has a kind of exalted status. Somehow you know i mean it's like you know if you're well known as an improviser. There's things that are acknowledgement of like your skills but the truth is we're all improvising all the time. We're improvising right now. You know you knew why was coming. I kind of knew i was going to be here. We don't know what was going to happen. Darin done the switch exactly but we have a sense of the context of it. It's going to be an interview. We're gonna talk roughly about things that maybe we share in terms of our experiences. You have this great podcast and i'm a musician vision so we kind of have a little bit of frame for it. What is also interesting and i bet there's a parallel in your world activities with this is the idea the improvising over the long term like for instance. I'll go out on a tour and i'll do two hundred fifty concerts and yes. It's improvised vise but we have a set of tunes that were you and you know not john. Coltrane charlie parker not art tatum. There is not a musician in history who stood up their set after set after set and completely reinvented their entire language every time there's this misconception conception among some of us. I think that improvising means total freedom with no boundaries no discipline you just make stuff up somehow willfully and at the same time i think there are probably many many levels of subtlety involved in say for instance you you doing a show where you're going to do it one hundred nights in a row you have to make it knew each time you have to make it real each time with with the materials that you have available and it's kind of the same <hes> you know for me. What i need are musicians. Who can tell a story because it's all about that for me. It's all narrative exposition all type improvising is what i want to hear more about that in the mid would finish musicians but i need people who can tell a story about particular subjects. Stay on the subject but tell a different story about it each night in other words. This song is about brussels sprouts. You can say anything you want. You can make up story about brussel sprouts. Your mom used to make or brussels sprouts from mars but you gotta talk about breasts on that. If you start talking about green beans i might have to get another bass player might might have to get another bass player. He brings up the whole idea for me of living life like an improvisation because every moment is different but it's possible to make every moment so regimented that it doesn't seem fresh and if we let the moments be fresh and take directions that we didn't expect and yet say within the limits of discipline to keep it to brussels sprouts when that's the subject object that sounds to me like a a pleasant way to live he touches on something to that <hes> you've you've never sort of come out and expressed breasts this but the the observation i've always had is that improv takes a lot of practice to and that it is something that <hes> you know it is spontaneous lena's but to get to that point where you're comfortable in the spontaneity you have to be practiced <hes> and then you can sort of let the creativity and that storytelling that he talks sobat music come out both yoyo ma and ishak perlman's at the same things to me that you develop and most of the musicians. I know say this issue. I have to be so sure of your technique that in the performance you can forget the technique but it's there yeah and you're now now free to be expressive in subtle ways and that's what makes an interesting conversation than life interesting. If you're if you're talking to somebody who only wants to tell you how they have everything figured out. It's not as much fun as if they toss the ball back and forth well speaking of tossing the ball back and forth. I'm telling it to you right now and i'm going to toss it to brian greene. Oh yes <hes> who you know for many years <hes> he and his wife tracy day founded the world science festival doesn't yes oh back and you've been associated with one way or another of a sense right yeah i. I've been in helping them on the board. <hes> i often gone interviewed scientists on the stage at the fed the festival word the festival takes place once a year for five days and they're about fifty events all over new york city and we also have an affiliation with the world science festival in brisbane. We did my play about albert einstein there and it was we did it in new york and in brisbane and it was done in moscow and it's so interesting to see different cultures interpret interpret the the letters of einstein in different ways well einstein came up right at the beginning of your chat with brian only forget that we were sitting at a table much like this one might be in the studio and the tables covered in sharpy messages at people who were interviewed leave their messages on the desk on sharpy brian sat down and saw something completely incomprehensible to most people but it turned out to be the einstein hilbert action the very complex looking equation that apparently is the basis of general relativity so you spent the first ten minutes also tossing around around general relativity an einstein and looking for it on the table in there it is there it is that's right that is complicated and <hes> you got fascinated by the idea of the curve..

melinda gates brussels bill gates producer albert einstein tanzania alan alda sarah chase brian greene brisbane pat metheny africa new york youtube renee fleming brussel tracy day Darin moscow ishak perlman
"sarah chase" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman and you're with the world. We're a co production of the BBC World Service PRI and w h here in Boston with all the political drama here, and there may be easy to forget that US troops are still in Afghanistan. The top American commander there general Austin Miller himself had a very narrow escape yesterday. Shooting broke out during a high level meeting in the southern city of Kandahar. Others in the meeting were not so lucky. The provincial governor was wounded. His intelligence chief was killed. So with Kandahar's police, chief obdurate Rosic, Sarah chase, new Razek wealth from the decade. She spent living in Kandahar Jay's ran nonprofit groups and then became an advisor to the US military actually got to know before the fall of the Taliban sack. He was hard of gang that the US had designated as one of its proxies on the ground. And so when I crossed the border from Pakistan into Afghantistan, you know, we're talking December ninth or something like that. Two thousand and one. I stopped off at his barracks to say hi and he and his crowd. He wasn't my closest friend in that group, but he and his crowd gave me a bodyguard and couple of guns with which I then drove into Kandahar. So what kind of man was, what did you see in the time that you spent with Abdul Raziq? Well, as I say, he wasn't my best friend and I stayed a bit away from him. I liked a colleague of his tribesmen and colleague of his who told me in those very early days. Basically what are warlords like me doing in the police. We wanted a government after the fall of the Taliban. That would be a government of rule of law. I shouldn't even be in the police, whereas Razek was exactly the type of warlord who exploited his relationship with the United States to carry out some pretty abusive practices. There. There was a significant tribal rivalry on the border there. There's a ton of commerce of all kinds that crosses that border. And he set to work consolidating his position because of his America backing quite brutally, quite of use of Lii and consolidating personal wealth. And as I say, his sort of political and military position on the border, not a popular guy. I mean, you're touching on actions that sound like abuses of human rights. No kidding. And even that is pretty sanitized language, you're talking about a guy who would take people out into the desert and have them shot when he was first brought in from the border to Kandahar to take command of a big surge, Geno portraying had him play this role in two thousand and nine. I mean, it was massive sweeps of the countryside, indiscriminate rounding up of people shooting of people. And then when he became chief of police, I mean, it was a reign of terror in Kandahar, and so this. Was a guy who was detested by much of the city. And in fact, I communicated with general patrol us that there are some legal issues with the United States partnering with this guy. There's a law called the lady act which prevents the United States military in particular, from partnering with military units that are known to have committed significant abuses of human rights. And it was just it was open secret. Everybody knew it was this when you were a vising the US military and back. So we're talking now two thousand and nine. So some eight years after I first met Resnick. I mean, the US commander, general Austin Miller had real praise for Resic. He said he was a patriot. He said, the good he did for Afghanstan will never fade away. So I mean, how big a compromise was the US making in partnering with Resic gigantic compromise? And what's so. I mean, I get it when someone's been killed. You can't exactly you know shame on him, but. It's very distressing to me that in all of the years of this conflict US officials and officers have not understood the basic question that when somebody is brutal and detested by by the population that you're trying to wage the war on behalf of. You know, he might kill a couple of insurgents or even many insurgents, but he's behavior is creating. I don't know how many more for everyone kills. This is why we're still in a conflict nap ghanistan seventeen years later because we haven't quite understood the basic concept that Afghans don't like to be treated brutally and abused by government officials that are enjoying American backing Sarraj's lived and worked in Kandahar for ten years..

Kandahar US Austin Miller Taliban Marco werman Sarah chase commander Abdul Raziq intelligence chief BBC Afghanistan Boston Afghanstan Pakistan Geno America Afghantistan Razek Sarraj
"sarah chase" Discussed on I Do Podcast

I Do Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on I Do Podcast

"To ID podcasts. Thank you. We hope you enjoy today's episode and if you are a longtime listener. Welcome back. Welcome back. Thank you so much and chase here. We never really introduce ourselves. Now we don't often. I'm Sarah chase, and we've been together for ten years, and we've had the podcast for about four years. We started it to improve our relationship, get free relationship advice and share with you guys. And here we are. Now we got an online course we are. We have a three year old daughter, so we're starting a parenting pocket. That's what we do when we want to learn about something, but just like, let's start a podcast and learn about interview people about finding exactly what we want to know from the experts. Awesome. Well, today's episode we interviewed Dr Aaron, Leonard, and Dr Aaron is a practicing psychotherapist and author of three books about relationships and parenting. I think we need to have her back on the parenting podcasts on in today. We focus in talk about some key tools to navigate toward a healthy relationship. So whether you're single or dating, trying to find a good relationship or you've been in a ten year relationship in, you're married the. Are married. Today's episode has some great specific tools to use such as how to be accountable in, say, you're sorry, seem so simple. Right? But is it so hard tires ten times? Yeah, to say you're sorry or if you have a partner that just can't seem to do it how to communicate with them and because it's really going to be critical to your relationship, how to be more mindful, create emotional closeness how to make each other laugh. Why that's so important in understanding the perspective of your partner to create compromise and so much more. So today is a nother great episode. Sarah night took lots of notes again, you know, that's why we started this. Our relationship in hopefully it is helping you guys to. We hope you guys enjoy today's episode..

Sarah chase Dr Aaron partner Sarah night Leonard four years three year ten years ten year
"sarah chase" Discussed on I Do Podcast

I Do Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on I Do Podcast

"Hey guys welcome to i do podcasts thank you for joining us if this is your first time listening thank you i'm sarah chase and where the host of id podcast and if this is your hundred fiftieth episode or whatever number on welcome back thank you for being such a loyal listener we have a really important and and valuable episode today in wanna just tell you about dr rhoda lips come in give you her bio because it's quite impressive she is an alternative sexuality specialists certified sex therapists in clinical sexologists with their phd in clinical sexology to know that was a phd she is an author teacher public speaker and has been counseling and consulting with individuals and couples in the area of human sexuality for over twenty five years and today we talk about designing the best relationship style by understanding your sexual personality type and we get into a lot of things but mainly just the conversation around sexuality in how it shaped by our culture a lot of you guys listening in the west and shaped in a certain way that can put a lot of negativity in shame around it and dr rhoda talks about how we can have discussions with our partner and talk about our desires our fantasies not feel like we're judged in into opened two different things in in how to have communication around that and one of the things just give you a little preview is the s m checklist so.

sarah chase dr rhoda lips partner dr rhoda twenty five years
"sarah chase" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"Nfl once again forced to navigate some dangerous waters will tell you about it next on spain and fitz on espn radio and the espn app spain and fitz nicole briscoe in for sarah chased him fits it's time for straight talk brought to you by straight talk wireless best phones best networks no contracts and the straight talk year is that yet again the nfl is wishing there were games to distract us from what's happening off the field and i said this loudly in the past especially during these iki elliott stuff that the with the nfl really needed were games take everybody mind everybody's minds off the things and then we got games going and not only that but once you added protests on top of it there was never relief right the nfl needs relief at some point they need to to find a way to get the news positive and to get us everybody just enjoying football again that becomes very difficult when things happen like has happened today as you may have heard in the news the new lion's head coach matt patricia a report has come out to in detroit that he was accused of aggravated sexual assaults in texas twenty two earner looks like nineteen ninetysix so back in nineteen ninety six he was accused of sexual assault it went through injury they did not end up going to trial so the charges eventually were dropped they did not they did not press charges so i is some point in this process it never came up in the hiring it's not something the lines were aware about when they hired him but it is now come to come to the front of everybody's attention and it forces a reaction from everybody and i it's it's important to know and we'll get to some some what to coach patricia had to say about it and some of our thoughts it's important to know that this happened in one thousand nine hundred six again it's important to know that as of this point he has not been convicted of anything but he is definitely he was definitely used a grand jury definitely decided there was enough there to move forward and then they weren't able to prosecute so nicole when you see this what your initial reaction i mean i'm stunned.

Nfl nicole briscoe sarah matt patricia detroit assault spain fitz espn football texas
"sarah chase" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"sarah chase" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

"'cause like twenty minutes away from each other but i don't get to see everyone else has often so not sick of them yet but that will be okay not a lot has changed but i mean do yeah like i mean i love having like you know like people that i can talk to that are like minded and you know went to the same stuff as me i mean this is something i've always wondered you made it pretty far on our susan correct i mean you were there for how many weeks i think it was like five or six weeks okay so now if you're there five or six weeks do people stop you and recognize you on the street yeah yeah and i love that i love like like meeting new people and kind of like that's kind of what i was meaning like when i can reach people i just yeah it's also have a restaurant with your mom right yeah and you still do that i really close mom yeah i mean he was on my like intro video on does i'm having a tip mom right now just wanted to let i get my mom constantly working together is like an her all my god i can only imagine i moved across the country from my mom and i'm still sick of her sarah chasing i love you wish you tracy waters in this podcast marie for you and your life today what are your hopes now you're not doing paradise will you ever do a bachelor franchise show again and if not then then what is next and why not why not i mean yeah i never say never so i i'm open to it your that like i don't know i'm kind of you know on the show like i kind of just like guys to like tell me that they like me i just wanna know like i don't want there to be like straightfoward maybe she moved to jersey they tell you how it is.

marie six weeks twenty minutes