9 Burst results for "Sarah Bosley"

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

08:01 min | 5 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Sarah bosley got in health editor. We've just heard from two women. Who because cases arising again and restrictions have been extended have had to cancel by music festival last minute. It's a huge blow to their livelihoods and all the other businesses involved in that event and thousands others like them across the country. This is happened. Despite britain having one of the world's longest lockdowns and fastest vaccination programs and boris johnson until now was really positive about the idea of normality returning. We can really look at that. June twenty first date with some optimism. What has gone wrong basically the delta variant has gone wrong so that's the mutation of the virus that's come from india in the first place is now called delta and it has taken over so it was the dominant strain in this country. So this rampaging it's more transmissible. We think between forty and eighty percent more transmissible so a lot more people getting infected now. The data veterans of corona virus doubles the risk of hospitalization compared to the alpha variant which has been dominated of pretty much doubled since last week. Tango that increased. Transmissibility was making the decision on whether to lift all remaining restrictions in england on the twenty first of june more difficult. And and that's worrying worrying mostly not because the people who are being infected going to hospital and certain because of deaths because that's not rising very fast is mostly worrying because we've got a great deal of virus around at that rate of transmission which means it's possible that some of the people who are vulnerable. We'll get ill and under so that we could actually felt variants of our own again. There is some concern about imitations evading. Vaccines is there any evidence to back so far. Yes we have seen that and we've seen it with some the previous variants that we've we've had concerns about not so much with kent variant the uk. Very which is now called alpha. That one was certainly spreading much faster than we before. But it didn't have the nasi mutations however the beater and gamma variants as we. Now call them which came out of south africa and brazil respectively did have mutations that made the vaccines less effective and these mutations in the spike protein itself which the vaccine actually targets all vaccines do at the moment there's a particular mutation called e. Four eight four k which seemed to be causing much of the problem however eek eek. That's right however we have seen that the vaccines are not completely knocked out by that tool. They do work. They just work slightly less well than they did before. And beyond that back to the nation programs are being hailed as the savior. Not least because in the early days we caught one after another suddenly being approved and they each seem to out. Do each other with these crazy. High efficacy writes. This is great. Seventy percent seventy five percent. Keep you out of the hospital. Keeps you from dying. So so we We are very excited about what this could mean ovation's integral working very closely through abortion whilst vaccine efficacy of ninety five percent. And yet here. We are in the summer of twenty twenty one facing some more weeks if restrictions where we wrong to be so optimistic to feel like we'd be bulletproof. I think those massive relief when these two hugely successful vaccines came along so people did assume that it's just a case of let's give everybody a shot and we're out of this and maybe that was a wrong perception. Only because let's you've got one hundred percent vaccine. There are going to be some people who are still vulnerable. And and actually there are a lot of people in the country to vaccinate of course so certainly with two shots so yes i guess we probably were little bit over-optimistic or at least we thought the job beaten sooner than it will and of course also. We hadn't really anticipated the the problem with variance. And i'm talking about we. The public as opposed to like chris witty patrick valance who probably knew perfectly well. These problems would come along but this virus has taken us by surprise time and time again and we just don't know so pass we have been a little over enthusiastic about it on the other hand. It are fantastic vaccines and they certainly are the roots out. We've already seen that. The link between cases and hospitalizations and deaths has been at least partly severed. I think it's been completely separate myself. But the big issue for me and actually for all of us is that the world is not being vaccinated. The uk is way ahead of the curve. And the us as well what we have to worry about. Is that the rest of the world has had getting tiny share of these vaccines and a very tiny proportion of people are being protected against the disease which means that the virus is just going to spread and spread in those countries and variants will develop. That's that's how they develop because where you have virus. They are able to evolve more easily. So knowing that knowing that we need to vaccinate the world protect all of us from this pandemic. What were the plans to make that happen. The big plan has always been kovacs and this initiative aims to buy vaccines to give to the poor countries largely who can't afford to get them for themselves. So that's the initiative they. It's obviously a great thing to do. It's really important thing to do. But it's underfunded and it's got nowhere like the number of doses of vaccine that it needs at the moment when you say it's got nowhere near enough. What do you mean. How far behind is it. So kovacs has delivered eighty seven million doses so far but their target is for two billion by the end of this year. So they're running pretty short and that means that some countries of any tiny amounts that sounds like an absolute mountain to climb. Let's talk about what has gone wrong so far. Obviously we've discussed before the fact that india was going to be a big provided k. Backs then had its own really terrible crisis that it had to deal with bodies lining up in criminal rooms graveyards running artis patients of being done the way there is a severe shortage of oxygen and even drugs used to treat covid infections and the situation in india is beyond heartbreaking but beyond that what is going on can ask you first about the companies themselves. Is there a problem. Where the production. They have actually all had production problems you know biological compounds. They are things have to be grown in that sindh. It's a complicated process. So for the astra zeneca vaccine in particular have been lots of supply problems Simply because the vaccine hasn't grown in addict quantities expected in some of the factories the netherlands for instance had a particular issue and the astrazeneca vaccine is the big one that we were expecting was going to be the workhorse of kovacs and really go out to a lot of developing countries. But actually the rene vaccines have also had production problems so it's not unique to astrazeneca by any means. It's just.

Sarah bosley Seventy percent two billion brazil india ninety five percent south africa patrick valance england two women last week uk forty two shots June twenty eighty percent seventy five percent astrazeneca kovacs one hundred percent
"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

"The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK? What is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow. Monday on they are saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, indeed. This is Thief Eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger RNA. So this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind on that. We have another one in process as well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at, because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials. So there's something like five doses to each file on beach boxes, 975 doses. Now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives. And then it goes down in descending age order except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw detail. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say. From those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is they're not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate. So they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review the technologies because he's a new technologies. So I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific, but you really don't need all of that. It's very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities air wrapping up of fall semester Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked five students how it went. Hey, my name is trace Williams..

UK United States Sarah Bo editor London Thief Eyes Joint Committee Oxford University Sarah Bosley AstraZeneca Williams Lee FDA
"sarah bosley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Medicare. And the listeners of KQED. 61 expected to be the high Today in San Francisco. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Debbie Elliott. It feels like a light at the end of the tunnel in the UK Ah Covad 19 vaccine has been approved for emergency use their and many will receive it as early as this week. The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK what is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow. Monday on they are saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, indeed. This is Thief eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger RNA A. So this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind on that. We have another one in processes well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at, because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials, so there's something like five. Doses to each file on beach boxes. 975 doses now because they're kept in this deep frozen states. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. And the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives, and then it goes down in descending age order. Except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw detail. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say. From those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is they're not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate, so they will do their own data analysis on hopefully come up with exactly the same results. And also you have an independent committee. That's going to review the technologies because he's a new technologies, so I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific, but you really don't need all of that. It's very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities air wrapping up of fall semester Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked five students how it went. Hi. My name is trace Williams. I'm a senior at the University of Kentucky before covert. 19 was everything I told myself like I would never taken online class because I feel like I can lose like focus easily, but I'm actually kind of enjoyed online classes. But I know some students don't you know Some students don't have the best WiFi connection. Some students really can't focus. Other students are very depressed or have a lot of anxiety because they're in isolation and they just missing people. That is. Like they need that kind of connection that they're not getting online. My name's Quinn, a heart I'm a sophomore at Colorado College as an R A It has been a little challenging something I tell my residents one day could be different The next they started the semester with bringing all freshmen on the campus, so I had About 14 people in my hall, and now I'm down to three. More than half left after way. Had a couple of quarantines of like, are bigger hauls. I'm telling my residents toe keep their contacts like small like, try and hang out with the same people. You don't want to be The kid that starts the next Dorm wide quarantine. My name is Eva slow. I am a senior at the University of Iowa. I was actually like a teaching intern. So I wasn't in the class. I was teaching a class so each little section would have, like six people so they could sit far apart. We would have them clean everything with ethanol before they sat down and before they left would have them wear lab coats, gloves, face shields and masks. It wasn't pleasant. You know the rooms like 85 degrees. The students were not engaged at all. It felt like a farce. Obviously like as a person who's going into education that's like not like a great feeling. When you're the one teaching my class..

UK Sarah Bosley editor Debbie Elliott NPR News London San Francisco United States Medicare. Joint Committee Oxford University KQED. University of Kentucky University of Iowa AstraZeneca FDA Eva slow Colorado College Williams
"sarah bosley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"UK Ah Covad 19 vaccine has been approved for emergency use their and many will receive it as early as this week. The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK what is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow Monday. On. They're saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, Indeed. This is Thief Eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger RNA. A. So this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind. And that we have another one in process as well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at. Because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials, so there's something like five. Doses to each file on beach boxes. 975 doses now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives, and then it goes down in descending age order. Except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw details. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say. From those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is they're not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate. So they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review the technologies because he's a new technologies. So I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific, but you really don't need all of that is very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities air wrapping up a fall semester. Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked four students how it went by. My name is trace Williams. I'm a senior at the University of Kentucky before covert 19 was everything. I told myself like I would never taken online class because I feel like I can lose like focus easily. But I'm actually kind of enjoyed online classes. But I know some students don't you know Some students don't have the best WiFi connection. Some students really can't focus. Other students are very depressed or have a lot of anxiety because they're in isolation, and it is missing people and they just like they need that kind of connection that they're not getting online. My name's Quinn, a heart I'm, a sophomore at Colorado College. As an R A It has been a little challenging something I tell my residents one day could be different The next They started the semester with bringing all freshmen on the campus, so I had About 14 people in my hall, and now I'm down to three. More than half left after We had a couple of quarantines of like, are bigger holes. I'm telling my residents toe keep their contacts like small like, try and hang out with the same people. You don't want to be The kid that starts the next Dorm wide quarantine. Yeah. My name is Eva Swell. I am a senior at the University of Iowa. I was actually like a teaching intern. So I wasn't in the class. I was teaching a class so each little section would have, like six people so they could sit far apart. We would have them clean everything with ethanol before they sat down and before they left would have them wear lab coats, gloves, face shields and masks. It wasn't pleasant. You know the rooms like 85 degrees. The students were not engaged at all. It felt like a farce like Obviously like as a person who's going into education that's like not like a great feeling. When you're the one teaching that class. My name is Thomas Assad. I'm at the University of.

UK editor London Sarah Bo United States University of University of Kentucky Oxford University Thief Eyes Joint Committee University of Iowa Sarah Bosley Thomas Assad AstraZeneca FDA Lee Eva Swell Colorado College Williams
"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

"Ah Covad 19 vaccine has been approved for emergency use their and many will receive it as early as this week. The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK what is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow Monday. On. They're saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, Indeed. This is Thief Eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger RNA. A. So this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind. And that we have another one in process as well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at. Because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials, so there's something like five. Doses to each file on beach boxes. 975 doses now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives, and then it goes down in descending age order. Except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw detail. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say. From those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is they're not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate. So they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review the technologies because he's a new technologies. So I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific, but you really don't need all of that. It's very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities are wrapping up a fall semester. Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked four students how it went by. My name is trace Williams. I'm a senior at the University of Kentucky before.

UK United States Sarah Bo editor London Thief Eyes Joint Committee University of Kentucky Oxford University Sarah Bosley AstraZeneca Williams Lee FDA
"sarah bosley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"19 vaccine has been approved for emergency use their and many will receive it as early as this week. The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK what is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow. Monday on they are saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, indeed. This is Thief eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger or in a so this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind on that. We have another one in processes well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at, because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials. So there's something like five doses to each file on beach boxes, 975 doses. Now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives. And then it goes down in descending age order except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw details. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say from those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is I'm not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate so they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review Technologies because he's a new technologies, so I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific. But you did really don't need all of that. It's very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities are wrapping up a fall semester. Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked four students how it went by. My name is trace Williams. I'm a senior at the University of Kentucky.

UK United States Sarah Bo editor London Joint Committee University of Kentucky Oxford University Sarah Bosley AstraZeneca Williams Lee FDA review Technologies
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:09 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Because it's being you know infecting more people than are currently infected a reproduction number of less than one usually indicates that an infection is dying out. I was reading a piece by Ed. Yong in the Atlantic however that pointed out some difficulties with interpreting reproduction numbers for emerging diseases for example the reproduction number is an average right so a disease that has a reproduction number of two could mean that every single person who gets infected spreads the pathogen to to New People or it could mean that one person out of fifty spreads disease to one hundred people and this. This actually has been known to happen. These cases can become known as super spreaders cases where certain diseases are spread disproportionately by select individuals And perhaps intuitively diseases that propagate via super spreaders can be easier to contain than diseases spread steadily from person to person across all cases. I guess the the the easy go to example this it's typhoid Mary. Mary Mallon Yeah. Who has she wasn't the only super spreader of typhoid typhoid fever? I guess But she was somebody who worked in food service and food preparation and and while not showing strong symptoms of infection herself kept spreading the the typhoid to other people. If memory serves. There's an episode of the Nick that deals with her Now are there cases of super spreaders of Corona virus? It's still early but it seems so. I was finding several examples in news reports For example one report in The Guardian from yesterday but in an article by Sarah Bosley and Martin Bellum Alleging quote the third British case of current virus was a man in his fifties who contracted the corona virus infection at a conference in Singapore. He then travelled to France where he stayed with his family in a ski chalet at the Alpine Resort Konta mean amongst joy. Five people who were in the shelley including a boy of nine if tested positive for corona virus since the man came back to the UK on an easy jet flight and was diagnosed in Brighton. Another Briton who is on holiday in the chalet flew back to his home in Malacca and was admitted to hospital in Palma the chief medical officer said four more people had tested positive England. All of whom were also on the skiing holiday in France so it seems like there was a there was massive transmission from this one person who contracted it. I was also reading a report of a woman in South Korea. Who is at this point believed to have so far? Spread the corona virus to at least thirty seven people at her church. Yes I think it was reading about this part part of this deals with this particular church. You know the Their congregation how they gather and then how they go out and Attempt to spread the word right but it could also have to do with just specifics of individual variation in you know How your immune system works like there appears to be something called a twenty eighty rule for the spread of many infectious diseases To quote from a two thousand eleven paper by Richard Stein in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases quote in what became known as the twenty eighty rule a concept documented by observational and modeling studies and having profound implications for infection. Twenty percent of the individuals within any given population are thought to contribute at least eighty percent to the transmission. Potential of a pathogen and many host. Pathogen interactions were found to follow this empirical rule. Now this isn't true of every disease but what they're saying is it's it's been discovered that four many diseases that are infectious and spread from person to person. Twenty percent of the people infected do eighty percent of the spreading. Now I think it's important of course not to demonize people who happened to be super spreaders. They're almost never spreading disease on purpose. the factors that make somebody a super spreader is still not fully understood but it may just have something to do with how their immune system works Sometimes it happens because a disease that makes other people very obviously outwardly. Sick creates almost no symptoms in the super spreader. So they don't even know they're spreading to people right and this was the case with with typhoid Mary. For example right so yeah again. It's important not to demonize twenty percent in any way. Well actually I think with typhoid Mary. I'm not saying we should demonize her. Either I think at some point. She was made aware but then had after that at least for a while continued work in food service. So obviously if you're aware that you are you know that that you may have an infection that could spread to other people you should do whatever possible not to spread it to people and we can talk about the practical methods for that in a bit here but also coming back to the reproduction number of an infection the reproduction number at young points out and actually several authors. I was looking at have have made. This point is a very good one. It is not a fully fixed biological feature intrinsic to the pathogen. The reproduction number of a pathogen can be influenced by human interventions. Yong points out that SARS originally had very different reproduction numbers in China and Canada. So you'd get or not's ranging from like two five or six and this was just because of different levels of success in diagnosing. In containing the cases that appeared corona viruses no different. It's are not is influenced by biological facts about the virus itself but also about how well people respond to what kinds of measures we can put in place to contain it and stop transmission and we'll get to those numbers in a second but also. I I mentioned There's there's the interaction between the reproduction number. In the case fatality rate of emerging pathogens meanwhile The hemorragic fever a bola does not spread super easily. Between people it usually has an R. naught between one and two it's not highly highly infectious but it bowl is very scary because it has such a high case fatality rate some somewhere around fifty percent of the people who get below end up dying from it and there are diseases with even higher. Cfr's Avian Influenza A or H five in one has to see a far somewhere around. Sixty percent corona viruses. Nowhere near that high. In in fact depending on how you measure it there are greater. Dangers represented by much more familiar. Diseases like seasonal flu like seasonal flu has a lower case fatality rate then Corona virus appears to seasonal flu. Has something like an average rate of point zero one percent in the United States? At least over it's still very dangerous just because of the number of people who get infected this season alone. The flu has already caused more than twenty. Five million infections In fourteen thousand deaths in the United States alone the flu usually has a reproduction number of something like one point three and it comes in fairly predictable seasonal cycles so we've kind of gotten used to it even though it is still a great I mean it kills thousands every year but I guess it seems less scary to us. Just because it's been around. We know what to look for now so as for the specific reproduction number in case fatality rate of the new corona virus at one point the World Health Organization estimated that its reproduction number was between about one point. Four and two point five I was reading a recent study from the Journal Travel Medicine which reviewed studies from between January. First of this year and the seventh of February this year and for this time period the authors write quote. We identified twelve studies which estimated the basic reproductive number for the cove in nineteen from China and overseas The estimates range from one point four to six point four nine the mean of three point two eight a median of two point seven nine and Intercoure tile range of one point one six so maybe the range is a buyer best estimates now currently averaging between like two point five and three point five also seen estimates between two and three though again to drive home. Those numbers could change a lot depending on. What kinds of new New Diagnostic methods and containment methods come online reproduction. Numbers for new emergent virus. I think are going to tend to be higher than they are for something that we're better at looking for because it takes us longer to recognize it and stop it spread As the case fatality rate overall it appears to be somewhere around two percent on average but it also varies greatly based on factors like the age of the infected person and perhaps other factors that haven't come into focus yet One relieving thing about it is the disease at least so far appears to be pretty mild. Rain bordering on non existent in children. Children rarely seem to get it and when they do it's usually not severe and they don't die from it. Elderly populations on the other hand where people with compromised immune systems or other pre existing diseases or at much higher risk with the case fatality rate could reach in some cases up to about fifteen percent which is a lot so this should get into the symptoms. A bit You know what are the symptoms as we understand them so far for corona fires right so there are a lot of complications because the disease is so new and we also don't have a good sense of how many people can become infected without showing major symptoms appears that at least some people are getting this virus without major symptoms Which is actually you might think. Oh that sounds good. But that's actually very bad can help it. Spread some of these others of these other Pathogens that we discussed here like one of the reasons we were able to control them is because it became abundantly obvious. When you had them you know you would have a debilitating fever or something and you knew something was wrong and and you win and sought help and then it could be There was a red flag there for medical professionals right. You're less likely to spread to more people that way and then there's another complication along the same lines. Which is that. It appears there might be a long incubation period before some people end up showing symptoms Estimates have been anywhere from two to fourteen days. We just don't really know for sure. Yeah but again. That's not good you'll you don't want people to be In a stage where they could potentially be contagious while they're not showing symptoms but when symptoms do manifest. The basic outlook seems to be familiar. You know it's like a lot of other respiratory infections. It's going to be fever cough shortness of breath. Those are the main ones And then there have been other smaller. Instances of things like a digestive trouble. Diarrhea Sneezing But but the main ones are fever cough and shortness of breath now at an early stage of an outbreak like this. There's a lot of danger. That's not just the disease itself but danger from Misinformation Hanoch from pseudoscience plowing into people's brains We were both reading a good article by Kate. Kellyn Reuters That was just about bad. Science that had been published on preprinted servers without peer review and then spread around on the Internet and only to later be retracted like there..

typhoid fever Yong Mary Mallon flu China France International Journal of Infec United States Ed Atlantic Reuters South Korea World Health Organization Alpine Resort Konta Brighton Nick
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"I guess the the the easy go to example this. It's typhoid Mary. Mary Mallon yeah who has she wasn't the only super spreader of typhoid typhoid fever I, guess but she was somebody who worked in food, service and food preparation, and and while not showing strong symptoms of infection, herself kept spreading the the typhoid to other people. If memory serves, there's an episode of the Nick that deals with her. now are there cases of super spreaders of Corona virus? It's still early, but it seems so I was finding several examples in news reports for example one report in The Guardian from yesterday, but in an article by Sarah Bosley. Martin Bellum alleging quote. The third British case of coronavirus was a man in his fifties who contracted the corona virus infection at a conference in Singapore. He then travelled to France where he stayed with his family in a ski chalet at the Alpine, resort Konta mean amongst joy, five people who were in the shelley, including a boy of nine, if tested positive for corona virus, since the man came back to the UK on an easy jet flight and was diagnosed in Brighton another Briton. Who is on holiday in the chalet flew back to his home in Malacca and was admitted to hospital in Palma the chief medical officer, said four more people had tested positive England, all of whom were also on the skiing holiday in France, so it seems like there was a there was massive transmission from this one person who contracted it I was also reading a report of a woman in South Korea. Who is at this point believed to have so far spread the corona virus to at least thirty seven people at her church. Yes, I think it was reading about this part part of this deals with this particular church. You know the Their congregation how they gather, and then how they go out and Attempt to spread the word right, but it could also have to do with just specifics of individual variation in you know how your immune system works like there appears to be something called a twenty eighty rule for the spread of many infectious diseases to quote from a two thousand eleven paper by Richard Stein in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases quote in what became known as the twenty eighty rule, a concept documented by observational and modeling studies and having profound implications for infection. Twenty percent of the individuals within any given population are thought to contribute at least eighty percent to the transmission potential of a pathogen and many host pathogen interactions were found to follow this empirical rule now. This isn't true of every disease, but what they're saying is it's it's been discovered that four many diseases that are infectious and spread from person to person twenty percent of the people infected do. Do Eighty percent of the spreading now I think it's important of course not to demonize people who happened to be super spreaders. They're almost never spreading disease on purpose. the factors that make somebody a super spreader is still not fully understood, but it may just have something to do with how their immune system works sometimes it happens because a disease that makes other people very obviously outwardly. Outwardly sick creates almost no symptoms in the super spreader, so they don't even know they're spreading to people right? And this was the case with with typhoid. Mary for example right so yeah again. It's important not to demonize twenty percent in anyway. Well, actually I think with typhoid Mary. I'm not saying we should demonize her either I think at some point. She was made aware, but then had after. After that at least for a while, continued work in food service so obviously. If you're aware that you are, you know that that you may have an infection that could spread to other people. You should do whatever possible not to spread it to people, and we can talk about the practical methods for that in a bit here but also coming back to the reproduction number of an infection. The reproduction number at young points out and actually several authors I was looking at have have made. This point is a very good one. It is not fully fixed biological feature intrinsic to the pathogen. The reproduction number of pathogen can be influenced by Human Interventions Yong points out that SARS originally had very different reproduction numbers in China and Canada so you'd get or knots ranging from like two five or six, and this was just because of different levels of success in diagnosing in containing the cases that appeared. Corona viruses no different. It's are not is influenced by biological facts about the virus itself, but also about how well people respond to what kinds of measures we can put in place to contain it and stop transmission, and we'll get to those numbers in a second, but also I. There's there's the interaction between the reproduction number in the case fatality rate of emerging pathogens meanwhile the hemorragic fever. Ebola does not spread super easily between people. It usually has an R. naught between one and two. It's not highly highly infectious, but it bowl is very scary because it has such a high case, fatality rate some somewhere around fifty percent of the people who get below end up dying from it and there. There are diseases with even higher, CFR's avian influenza, A or H. Five in one has to see a far somewhere around sixty percent corona viruses nowhere near that high in in fact, depending on how you measure it, there are greater dangers represented by much more familiar diseases like seasonal flu like seasonal flu has a lower case. Fatality rate then coronavirus appears to seasonal flu has something like an average rate of? One percent in the United States at least over. It's still very dangerous just because of the number of people who get infected this season alone. The flu has already caused more than twenty five million infections in fourteen thousand deaths in the United States alone. The flu usually has a reproduction number of something like one point three, and it comes in fairly predictable seasonal cycles, so we've kind of gotten used to it. It even though it is still a great, I mean it kills thousands every year but I guess it seems less scary to us just because it's been around, we know what to look for now. So as for the specific reproduction number in case, fatality rate of the new corona virus at one point, the World Health Organization estimated that its reproduction number was between about one point, four and two point five I was reading a recent study from the Journal Travel Medicine which reviewed studies from between January first of this year, and the seventh of February this year, and for this time period the authors write quote. We identified twelve studies, which estimated the basic reproductive number for the covid nineteen from China and overseas The estimates range from one point four to six point four nine, the mean of three point two. Two eight a median of two point, seven nine and Intercoure tile range of one point one six, so maybe the range is a buyer best estimates now currently averaging between like two point five and three point five also seen estimates between two and three,.

typhoid Mary Mallon flu France China International Journal of Infec United States Nick Sarah Bosley Singapore Martin Bellum World Health Organization Ebola Brighton UK South Korea Malacca medical officer Richard Stein
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"In nineteen ninety I guess throw Terrell adjusts called Andrew Wakefield claim that the measles mumps rubella vaccine was linked to autism. It was one of the most controversial health stories of generation causing alarm amongst parents as the immunization rate collapsed over the years, the original research was widely discredited trust was slowly rebuilt and the doctor at the heart of the scandal seemed to disappear, but. Autism has become an epidemic. Your take this little beautiful baby, and you pump. I mean, it looks just like it's mid for a horse. Not for child vaccine skepticism is back health experts say social media, I'm populace fueling a growing movement that seem worrying trends in vaccination rates, including for HP, which can lead to cervical cancer. Flu and measles. We'll Health Organization has a goal to radically Musil's in Europe by twenty twenty. So should be almost gone. The last year there were the highest number of measles cases in Europe for twenty years sixty thousand and seventy two deaths and that's mostly children and vulnerable adults from the guardian. I'm initiative Astana today in focus is a growing anti vaccine movement putting lives at risk. Actually have been vaccine skeptics ever since vaccines were invented. But when it comes to measles mumps rubella, it does date back to nine hundred ninety eight very specifically and a press conference that I actually went to in February of that year the Royal free hospital. Sarah Bosley is the guardians help editor. So I went to this building and went in was held in a in a big lecture theatre. So I remember we all have these individual seats. It was a bit like sitting in exam in school with those little desks that sort of you can pull over push away. And they're at the front was a lineup of very serious scientists with very long faces and looking very slightly pompous and amongst the Moore's Andrew Wakefield who was young charismatic. Plus the dean of the ROY free medical school. Who was the? Most Sopa faced of the lot. And he was so worried about what Wakefield was saying really really anxious about it reasons. Mumps rubella given together maybe too much immune system of some day. Reckon day. There was a link between gut disease in children and autism. And that in some way, the measles mumps rubella vaccine might be the thing that triggered this off for the most part of the conference was about the paper about the scientific work that the team had done. But the really difficult moment the moment that really turned the whole issue around and launch the thousand and vaccines groups was when Wakefield actually said case for the socio. Vaccines into their component parts separate thought that those that the measles mumps rubella vaccine should not be given us one shot that it should be given a separate vaccines for safety. And it was that thing which was not part of the paper, which really allowed people massively and caused all the anxiety that followed did you think at the time. This doesn't sound right. What I did think was that's one heck of a claim when you're journalist, and particularly perhaps if you have a specialization, you have an antenna, and I think it was very obvious to those of us who covered health that he was saying something that was really front page news. Certainly I had that moment when studies actually stomach turning over. But it's something of that sort. You think oh there is something that's being set. Here. That's going to be a big story. How big I could not possibly have imagined at that time. Could be a link between a common childhood vaccine and autism questions were raised today about the safety of the combined mumps, measles and rubella vaccine news urge showing a possible link with a bowel disease, which could lead to autism. According to Dr Wakefield's theory, the MR vaccine ten damage the intestines of some children, allowing toxins delete..

Andrew Wakefield mumps Europe Flu Royal free hospital Astana Terrell cervical cancer Musil twenty twenty Sarah Bosley ROY free medical school editor HP Moore twenty years