17 Burst results for "Sarah Bosley"

"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

04:50 min | Last month

"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"World and vaccines on the horizon getting public health and its messaging right could be more important than ever one of the first principles of good public health message and use lame public when we have seen some points in this pandemic when the finger is being pointed at individual behavior i'm the audience health editor sarah bosley and this is science weekly To find out more about what constitutes a successful campaign against disease and what we might learn from countries that have done it well or not so well. I spoke to linda. Bold the bruce and john asher chair and professor in public health at edinburgh university linda many people object to governments intervening in their lives. What can public health offer in the situation. Where very normal behavior like michigan cafe with friends become dangerous and has to be discouraged. What sort of tools to governments have at their disposal. The kind of fundamental basis for public health as you're thinking about the population so s- about health of everyone in society or the hell of a large group of people who might effected by for example in infectious disease so governments need to communicate that. It's not all about making things better for the individual which has particularly hard in countries economies where individual liberties are highly valued but is channeling messages. Which are to do with solidarity care for others at about protecting hours so these are things which is very important for governments to convey the. Don't always you that successfully. But it's it's about taking the public with them to understand what public health is about. The population is not just about the individual. If we look at the way we've handled things here in the uk. The seems to have been very different responses across nations and even regions. Is it possible to make a judgment about the effectiveness of the public health behavior messaging across the uk as a whole if you looked at objectively in terms of song the metrics we use in this pandemic case numbers hospital admissions and deaths the differences between the developed. Nations are not actually that significant compared for example how would contrast internationally countries. But you do seem important differences. Which i think are actually done to solve the public health message including -cation so the first one is confidence in government a my colleagues at university college london being conducted code social study and since march in fact and you can see that confidence in government has been significantly higher scotland in particular that in england to a lesser extending wales. So i think there has been a perception that the way that governments handle the crisis is different across the parts of the part of the reason for that might be that the devolved governments have responsibility for health and public house but now some of the other tricky things and like for example taxes under the treasury that the uk government have and. I also think it'd be more frequent communication. In wales and scotland between government center populations that may have played a role and looking at that public health response across the uk at its least effective. How could it have been done better. I think the major errors that occurred across the uk are less to do with communication more to do with the system working so the key things which we can now look back at points. You are not increasing testing recognizing the need to do that early on and not building a functionally tested trade system contact tracing system which was paused in mid march not started again properly until may as a fault with problems throughout and not being able to protect care homes in the way we should have done where we can see that happening in other countries and then i think just giving people enough information to allow them to understand what the guidance means for them and to give them confidence that they should follow one of the first principles of good public health. Message lame public and we have seen some points in this pandemic when the finger is being pointed at individual behavior or the behavior of groups in a negative way to use two examples. One of them was around testing when souls went back. Lots of families requesting tests on the government came out and said away should all be requested tasks even though big told people advise people to get attached tested. They have symptoms for months beforehand. Then secondly there's been some unhelpful narrative around responsible young people not following guidance disenfranchises young people and gives them even more reason to think that it doesn't apply.

sarah bosley john asher linda uk edinburgh university infectious disease bruce wales scotland michigan university college treasury london england
"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:01 min | Last month

"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

"The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK? What is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow. Monday on they are saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, indeed. This is Thief Eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger RNA. So this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind on that. We have another one in process as well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at, because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials. So there's something like five doses to each file on beach boxes, 975 doses. Now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives. And then it goes down in descending age order except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw detail. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say. From those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is they're not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate. So they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review the technologies because he's a new technologies. So I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific, but you really don't need all of that. It's very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities air wrapping up of fall semester Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked five students how it went. Hey, my name is trace Williams..

UK United States Sarah Bo editor London Thief Eyes Joint Committee Oxford University Sarah Bosley AstraZeneca Williams Lee FDA
"sarah bosley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:16 min | Last month

"sarah bosley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"UK Ah Covad 19 vaccine has been approved for emergency use their and many will receive it as early as this week. The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK what is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow Monday. On. They're saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, Indeed. This is Thief Eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger RNA. A. So this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind. And that we have another one in process as well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at. Because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials, so there's something like five. Doses to each file on beach boxes. 975 doses now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives, and then it goes down in descending age order. Except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw details. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say. From those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is they're not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate. So they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review the technologies because he's a new technologies. So I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific, but you really don't need all of that is very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities air wrapping up a fall semester. Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked four students how it went by. My name is trace Williams. I'm a senior at the University of Kentucky before covert 19 was everything. I told myself like I would never taken online class because I feel like I can lose like focus easily. But I'm actually kind of enjoyed online classes. But I know some students don't you know Some students don't have the best WiFi connection. Some students really can't focus. Other students are very depressed or have a lot of anxiety because they're in isolation, and it is missing people and they just like they need that kind of connection that they're not getting online. My name's Quinn, a heart I'm, a sophomore at Colorado College. As an R A It has been a little challenging something I tell my residents one day could be different The next They started the semester with bringing all freshmen on the campus, so I had About 14 people in my hall, and now I'm down to three. More than half left after We had a couple of quarantines of like, are bigger holes. I'm telling my residents toe keep their contacts like small like, try and hang out with the same people. You don't want to be The kid that starts the next Dorm wide quarantine. Yeah. My name is Eva Swell. I am a senior at the University of Iowa. I was actually like a teaching intern. So I wasn't in the class. I was teaching a class so each little section would have, like six people so they could sit far apart. We would have them clean everything with ethanol before they sat down and before they left would have them wear lab coats, gloves, face shields and masks. It wasn't pleasant. You know the rooms like 85 degrees. The students were not engaged at all. It felt like a farce like Obviously like as a person who's going into education that's like not like a great feeling. When you're the one teaching that class. My name is Thomas Assad. I'm at the University of.

UK editor London Sarah Bo United States University of University of Kentucky Oxford University Thief Eyes Joint Committee University of Iowa Sarah Bosley Thomas Assad AstraZeneca FDA Lee Eva Swell Colorado College Williams
"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:15 min | Last month

"sarah bosley" Discussed on KCRW

"Ah Covad 19 vaccine has been approved for emergency use their and many will receive it as early as this week. The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK what is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow Monday. On. They're saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, Indeed. This is Thief Eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger RNA. A. So this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind. And that we have another one in process as well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at. Because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials, so there's something like five. Doses to each file on beach boxes. 975 doses now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives, and then it goes down in descending age order. Except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw detail. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say. From those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is they're not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate. So they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review the technologies because he's a new technologies. So I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific, but you really don't need all of that. It's very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities are wrapping up a fall semester. Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked four students how it went by. My name is trace Williams. I'm a senior at the University of Kentucky before.

UK United States Sarah Bo editor London Thief Eyes Joint Committee University of Kentucky Oxford University Sarah Bosley AstraZeneca Williams Lee FDA
"sarah bosley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:11 min | Last month

"sarah bosley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"19 vaccine has been approved for emergency use their and many will receive it as early as this week. The UK is the first Western country to license the vaccine, but lots of questions both moral and logistical remain about the distribution. Sarah Bo's Lee is the health editor for the Guardian. We've reached her in London. Welcome. Very pleased to be with you. So what is the latest on plans for the rollout in the UK what is really exciting because the deliveries to hospitals around the UK are going to happen tomorrow. Monday on they are saying that the very first vaccinations will take place on Tuesday. So we're really almost there. Remind us if you would, which vaccine we're talking about here because there are several in the works at the moment. Yes, indeed. This is Thief eyes. The biotech vaccine, which is made with a novel technology called Messenger or in a so this is very much brand new is the same as the Moderna technology that's coming along behind on that. We have another one in processes well from Oxford University and AstraZeneca. Are there any challenges that come with the visor vaccine? Yes, This is actually logistically the most difficult of the three that we're looking at, because it has to be kept at minus 70 C. Now that is deep, deep frozen at it also comes in boxes off multi vials. So there's something like five doses to each file on beach boxes, 975 doses. Now because they're kept in this deep frozen state. They then have to be very, very carefully split up on that is the bit actually, that hasn't yet been properly figured out. So just like in the U. S. The tough question is about distribution. Who is getting this? First You say care homes are in line that's like the nursing homes here in the U. S. How has the UK tackled the matter of who comes first? Well, we have an expert committee that's decided this. They're known as the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization. They are very independent, but they're an advisory body to the government. So their advice is being taken everywhere on the number one priority is care home nursing home residents also those staff who work in them for obvious reasons. On the number two is everybody over the age of 80 plus health care workers. After that, it's the over 70 fives. And then it goes down in descending age order except quite high up. There are people who have underlying serious health conditions. How is it that the UK was able to get approval for the vaccine so quickly ahead of countries like the U. S. The main difference actually with the United States is that the FDA in the United States actually demands all the raw details. So that's all the data that there are the raw data I should say from those trials on then they do their own statistical analysis, so they do not depend on the company's summer is I'm not taking water companies say as necessarily accurate so they will do their own data analysis on dope Feli come up with exactly the same results on Also, you have an independent committee that's going to review Technologies because he's a new technologies, so I think you're going to get a result fairly soon, but it's just that bit behind us now, our regulators saying Terrific. But you did really don't need all of that. It's very hard for us to know whether that's so or not. But actually, if you think about it, the regulatory approval probably is going to take maybe a week longer in the states. It may not be much more than that. Sarah Bosley is the health editor for the Guardian. Thank you so much for being with us. That's great pleasure. Thank you. Colleges and universities are wrapping up a fall semester. Unlike any other, the pandemic left campuses around the country scrambling to figure out how to effectively teach while keeping everyone safe. So we asked four students how it went by. My name is trace Williams. I'm a senior at the University of Kentucky.

UK United States Sarah Bo editor London Joint Committee University of Kentucky Oxford University Sarah Bosley AstraZeneca Williams Lee FDA review Technologies
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Today the science behind the three ground breaking vaccines but could be about to lead us out of the covid. Nineteen pandemic twenty twenty has banned a pretty intense year for all of us but particularly for health journalists. Like the guardian sarah bosley. We've relied on her throughout this crisis from conversations back in january when it all began through rising deaths and lockdown and now into the second wave so it must be a relief that she can now focus on some good news. It's a sarah by the of the garden. Sarah thank you minister asking. Boris johnson on monday about the massive and almost unbelievable breakthroughs achieved this month in the development of covid. Nineteen vaccines will.

sarah bosley covid Sarah Boris johnson
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

06:59 min | 6 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"We'll give this vaccine tool. The older people all the vulnerable people so that at least if they get covid nineteen they. Probably weren't end up in hospital on a ventilator, but it probably won't stop the infection spreading, and then you start to think about okay. Is another vaccine going to do that? We going to be using multiple vaccines. At once the same infection! Or do we then just rely on on other types of medicines, if you like treatments and therapies coming along which do different job? Essentially what you're saying is. A vaccine. Could be here by the end of the year and that it might have some positive results, perhaps not the kind of miracle cure all with thinking about you will say mention treatment that at the other side of the coin. Is there a way that you can make the immune response. More effective want someone is infected, so there are a number of things people looking at one of them is called Interferon Beta and there's a company spent from Southampton University that produces an inhalable form of this interfere on beater. It's a protein that the immune system produces it actually coming back to the orchestra and algae. It actually helps sort of all straight the immune response the Amine reaction. This company. Release some results suggesting that. It could be helping to reduce the. Severity of disease that people experience, but also done on a very small number of people so. It's promising, but it's. It's early doors for interferometer. Are there any other options in terms of building immunity? Yes, so in one of them dates back to before the one thousand nine hundred thousand flu pandemic. Which is you get? Blood Plasma from recovered patients, and preferably you get blood plasma from the patients who was sickest and That plasma. If you get it early enough is actually pretty rich antibodies, because it's helped that person survive the infection, you can actually translate. into new patients and the idea being that those antibodies then help basically boost the person's own immune system to fight off the infection. Trials going on many countries that are showing that that is a promising approach. There's a second option where you actually take this idea kind of turbo charge it so get a bunch of. People who've recovered from coronavirus again preferably after a pretty bad infection, you sift through all of their antibodies test, which ones are most potent. You say okay. Which of the antibodies in this mix a best at taking out corona virus you then, which is really neat, is you then just mass produce those antibodies in manufacturing facility, and this is already done for other other conditions, so you just use vats and fermenters, and you make antibody, and then you can actually mixed together cocktails of kind of lab, grown antibodies and transfused those into people through a drip when when people turn up a hospital when people get ill. So that again is a way of just really boosting someone's. Normal Immune response, very frankenstein-like. I'm not sure that as science editor. You realized that you'd be taking a soul. Emotional Roller coasters in the way that you just have with me. Moments moments have depression moments of hope moments of excitement I feel like the end of this I'm not quite as sad as I was at the beginning, but I'm not quite in the happy place I wanted to get to. It sounds as if there is some hype around vaccines and therapies, but realistically they aren't going to be a silver bullet that will give us that ultimate goal of herd immunity which kind of leads us to a conclusion than I guess. Of this that we should be preparing ourselves to live with covid nineteen, and if that's right, what does that look like society? I think this is probably the most interesting question around right now outside of the immediate sort of scientific questions. A spectrum scientists yesterday. Who told me? The handshake is gone forever. And okay. It's a small thing now. You think okay. Does that then mean hugs gone forever. Does that mean you know the sort of media? Lovey kiss on the cheek is gone forever. And I. I really don't know, but I think. I'm an optimist. Appears and I think all of these things we've been talking about and something's. We haven't about the vaccines. Your. Immunity once you've had the virus, but also treatments. We've already seen things like DEXSA medicine Rendez Aveer look as if they make some difference and help some patients, and I think all of these will chip away at the virus from different angles. And get it into a place, which is at least better than where we were in February and March. How much we return to normal I think. Is really interesting. I mean it may will be that. We've become a nation of face mask. wearer's which seems odd to us, but. I don't know if you'll see more than six months time. And I think they're just. GonNa be all these strange ways that we changed behaviorally. There are parallels with HIV to some extent is that there are some viruses that are around? For decades that you adopt around. And you do your best with medically and I think we will probably actually adapt better than we might think. Because I, think we are actually incredibly adoptable people. In sample, thank you very much. You're welcome. Thanks very much. That was an sample. The Guardian Science editor. You can read his excellent reporting at the Guardian Dot Com including that worrying story about antibodies being lost within months, but also lots of others about potential breakthroughs I would strongly recommend our science weekly podcast where you can hit in along with our other science writers. Hand up Len Nichole. Davis and our health editor Sarah Bosley explore. All of these issues are many more. That's it for today. My thanks to an sample. This episode was produced by Josh Kelley Sound Design was by Nicholas. Cox Executive producers are not Nicole Jackson. We'll be back tomorrow..

editor Guardian Dot Com Southampton University Josh Kelley Interferon Len Nichole Guardian Science depression Rendez Aveer Sarah Bosley Executive Davis Nicole Jackson Nicholas
"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

07:57 min | 8 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"The Guardian. Welcome to science. Weekly look our regular noncovic episode. We're continuing to explore the science behind. The outbreak. Delving into some of the issues raised as always do keep sending in your questions. Head over to the GUARDIAN DOT COM forward slash covid nineteen questions on one word in today's episode. We're looking at something that hopefully those of us living in northern attitudes will be guessing more of as we head into some a months vitamin D. We're asking what role it might play in Covid. Nineteen infections to find out more about vitamin D. I spoke to Susan than new professor of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Surrey. It's a very unusual nutrients and it is the only nutrient where your main source is from you. The expulsion. I'm Sarah Bosley Health Guardian. And this is science weekly. Hi Sue how are you good afternoon? Sarah my son has allowed me to use. He super-duper microphones. I'm a hug leaks coming across clearly. Are you socialize -lating and you're working from home. I am indeed. I'm working from home with a family of two teenage boy and a girl and under wonderful husband so we're trying to make it work on the Internet and helping you know La Labors and doing our NHL volunteering at the weekend. So we're doing all. We can with very very lucky to be after teaching. Do I. Research from hung great so soup before we get into the links between there's been d deficiency in the severity of covid nineteen infections. Can we start with how we actually get vitmain? D into our bodies is usually from exposure to sunlight. Isn't it so what happens from there? It's a very unusual nutrients and date if we begin at the beginning. Vitamin D is not what we would call a vital aiming. We used to have the E. on the end so vitamins were always known as vitamins. Chilly and vitamin D is very unusual. It is the only nutrient in the broad spectrum of all the macro macho nutrients that we have way. Your main source is exactly as you say from you. The expunging do get him food. But the main source is from sunlight exposure. Now that sunlight exposure has to be at between two ninety three ten nanometers. What means is that we are only of of that right wavelength in Arizona attitude including of course the UK between March to the end of September. So we make no vitamin D in UINTA during those spring and some amounts we have. What's called Seventy Hydra Clusters? So that is a steroid. That sits just undressing. That is exactly the same in humans as it is in animals. And you've be rice hit onto that skin. And then we start to make vitamin D and looking at science of that. We have what we would call a pre vitamin D than a temperature. Dependent is mariah citation to might full vitamin D. Which has been high what we would call a hydraulic selected in the Litho. The then gives us our mark for clinical status which is twenty five. Oh Hd twenty five Hydroxy Vitamin D. So what that means is you can take that sample from someone a measure. How much vitamin D? They have in their blood and the reason that vitamin D is so special. Is What happens. Is You also then have further? Enzymes that convert twenty five Hydroxy Vitamin D. To one twenty five dollars hydroxy the mandate and that is the active hormone of Vitamin D. So not only is it a nutrient but it's also a hormone right so it's absolutely nothing like vitamin C. or vitamin B. Which we get usually through our food. Don't we? This is not really a veteran at all. Is that right that is right? So what are what is US vitamin D four? Why in fact do we make it? Well the main reason of the main aspect of vitamin D Where most of the evidence sits with respect to the importance of vitamin D? To health is our musculoskeletal health. So we know that children who don't have enough vitamin D. They will develop rickets or knock kneed bandy legs as it's known where the the the bone is very soft because it hasn't been mineralized properly because there isn't enough vitamin D. The don't equivalent of that is osteomyelitis so when the growth plates are fused and we're no longer growing you can still have a tremendous effect of vitamin D deficiency on your bones but not where your legs become soft and Bandy as they do in childhood rickets but where you develop a tremendous muscle bone pain less achieve fatigue and there are many people. I'm sorry to say that particular during the winter who actually have mauled Austin. Malaysia and dunk is that they have it so that is a one side. It is also very important in preventing the brittle bone disease osteoporosis. Which we can get when we younger through stress fractures. People don't realize that they often think. Osteoporosis is just a an older person's condition but not the case but where victim dis also imported in diabetes. So our Rita cells so those of the cells in the Christoph responsible for Producing Insulin. Pray action need to work. And then finally Mindy of course has a link to immune function Because we have what are known as vitamin D sceptres. And you find those in immune cells as well as vitamin D metabolic enzymes. That of course then provides a strong scientific rationale for the potential role of vitamin D in in immune homicides. This is there any evidence that vitamin D actually helps immune system in infectious diseases. Eight spin hypothesize for a very long time that there is an association between seasonal upper respiratory track infections and low vitamin D status because of poor both of those occur in the UINTA. But the problem that we have is. We just don't have enough randomized controlled trials to really be able to pull that together with you know with very strong concrete evidence but certainly we know that. Vitamin D inhibits pulmonary inflammation responses. So that is there and an interestingly in populations that have rickets a there is also an association with upper respiratory tract infections but the jury is still really undecided in terms of science face. How critical vitamin D is to preventing upper? Switch.

vitamin D deficiency Sarah Bosley Covid UINTA upper respiratory tract NHL bone disease Osteoporosis Arizona Sue professor of Nutritional Scien bone pain UK Susan
"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

03:19 min | 9 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Welcome to science weekly as the pandemic continues to unfold have been so many questions about covert nineteen and its impact around the globe. Some of which were exploring here today. We're asking what does the vaccine got to do? With covert nineteen. Many of you may have seen recent reports linking the tuberculosis vaccine otherwise known as G to lower rates of mortality from covert nineteen. So why would one hundred year old vaccine have any effect on a new disease? There is no evidence at all at the moment that Basiji protects against Corona virus infection. I'm Sarah Bosley and this is science. Weekly Hello Helen. How are you how are you doing? Are you able to do any work at the moment? A High Sara yes actually. I'm busier than ever as a suspect. Many people are trying to coordinate The clinical research activities as happening Oxford. And does that mean going into the labs or can lots of stuff be done from home? No it needs doing almost all of this from home. I do go occasionally. I Tell Them. Mcshane Professor Effects Analogy at the University of Oxford who researches new vaccines for Tuburculosis so Helen. Some of our listeners may have seen news stories reporting on a study which found the death rate from Ovid nineteen with six times lower in countries that had a program to give children the G. Two closest vaccine. So I WANNA before we go to get into the evidence for this. Perhaps you could just talk to us about. Why would even be interest in the role that a hundred year old vaccine could possibly play in fighting a new disease and this is a vaccine of course that we know doesn't work that well for tuberculosis itself. Which is why we don't actually use it very much anymore in the UK except in particularly at risk areas of the country. The reason why people are interested in whether BCG might protect against corona virus is. There has been a long standing scientific interest in what we call the non specific effects of. Bcg nonspecific we mean protection from diseases. Although than mycobacterium tuberculosis and related micro bacteria the very best evidence we have four nonspecific effect for. Bcg is that it works very well when given locally into the bladder in very large doses to treat early stage bladder cancer. However I think it's really important to remember that giving very large doses of Basiji repeatedly into the bladder where it has. A local effect is very different from saying that injecting. Bcg into the arm might protect against other spiritually pathogens such as corona.

BCG tuberculosis bladder cancer science weekly corona Sarah Bosley Oxford University of Oxford Basiji Ovid UK Professor Tuburculosis
"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

06:25 min | 10 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"We'll be looking at something that quite a few listeners have sent in questions about including izzy. Hamilton who asked how have African countries responded to the covert one thousand nine crisis to help us get a better understanding of the emerging picture of what's happening we're joined today by two D. Lang who runs a program called the global health network. Trudy is a professor of global health research at the University of Oxford at a senior research scientist in tropical medicine such diverse continent. We've got populations living in krems cities. We've got quite wealthy populations in some of the capture cities and of course villages often finishes after which is very well spread out populations living in very different contexts and huge variations. In happy. Move around as well. I'm the Guardians Health editor. Sarah Bosley. And this is science weekly. We first met in two thousand fourteen during the huge outbreak of a ballroom west Africa. The quickly became clear that some African countries were very vulnerable indeed to a rapidly spreading infectious disease that they'd never encountered therefore early data on the covet. Nineteen situation in Africa. Seem to suggest the numbers were lower than feared but the cases are now increasing. Some countries in Africa are acting quite quickly on which you're not to give some examples of what they're doing. Yeah I think one of the most impressive things is to see the national coordination. That's happening already Compared to other wealthy places in the world the coordination between the African nations just fantastic and as countries have accidentally and and of course they need to because the situation in most African nations isn't like we were going to put in place in in countries. Like k where we could do the early attack to contain because we do testing in those early days when we wanted to spot the cases in Africa. It's just not possible to do that. Level of testing and so very quickly that is to be the move to delay and so that's why Canadians offer move much faster between those steps. We've seen elsewhere is the Boehner experience relevant now to any attempt to fight covert nineteen twenty twenty very much. So Zeke rap break. We'll say learn from the outbreaks. Mezin sauce so what we're saying here is how the world has changed in terms of coordination and preparedness. That's been put in place ready for not right like this actually read and heard about the disease. X. Scenario lots of group work towards. Would you like to explain disease x? This is a program in case of an epidemic is so the. Who have an RND blueprint scheme and many other organizations and follow the idea that the theoretical disease x? Which is a new pathogen. Referred to infection can spread very rapidly the difference between disease X. and what we have with heavy nineteen is actually disease extra much higher mortality rates. This isn't disease ex. But we're seeing how this could possibly play out with this what we're now. This huge pandemic and so countries had put systems in place to plan some of the transmission block elements and down situations Rapid Paxi in drug development processes. And so. That's how we really taken. We've learned from outbreaks such as Binary Zeka so the Africa Centers for Disease Control and prevention which is generally known as the Africa. Cdc was also set up as a result of a Bolo. Is that right? Exactly that being really organized in strong in that information supplying and the guidance that they're giving in the nation managing to achieve also lots about the pan. African organizations have been around for many years and have been working closely with them and and again built on the lessons. Another good example is African Society of Nebraska Tree Medicine and all of these Sepe without doubt strengthened as a result of what we learned from a Boehner about this need to have a really joined up thinking and things in place. They're the nation's drawn on quite quickly other needs specific factors that might help African countries in this crisis because it has been suggested for example that is possible. Virus might behave differently in different climate. Do you think that's possible? Yeah that's been moving around for quite a few weeks. This outbreak. Hasn't it and I think the officers the same. Actually that still remains to be seen this a lot of questions around why the case numbers are either behind to perhaps they will remain low. Which would be really good news. It could be that they're just behind the rest of the world and that producer differences in volume of travel will help the population of around. Luckily we know that for some time so it could be several factors that impact this and we still don't too much around the impact of seasons in climate. All those two teams are. Obviously there'll be a lot of concern that the healthcare systems are not as well resourced and well setup as they might be in other parts of the world so given the few intensive care beds in many African countries already inevitably looking at a high death toll or can they actually do better than us in preventing the epidemic taking off by keeping the virus. Obey where I think. That question nothing. Let's let's start with Can better than us at keeping it at bay. I think it's going to be very challenging. Lots of countries to do that that move very quickly as they have to butts tried to enforce extra distance saying end communities where you have most flock season. Smo- houses really close buying other. Perhaps that people even sharing the same long drop toilets you haven't got ability to refrigerate store food off the financed by volumes foodstuffs had said that people can stay at home is almost impossible. Ask and they'll be some really hard decisions for families to make about putting themselves at risk versus literally being up to get food.

Africa Africa Centers for Disease Con Boehner African Society of Nebraska Tr krems University of Oxford Hamilton Guardians Health Trudy Sarah Bosley D. Lang senior research scientist Cdc professor editor producer Sepe
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

07:19 min | 10 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Stay with US coming up. I'll speak to Jonathan Freedland about who is now running the country. But I I WANNA thank you for all your support. In Times of global crisis. Trusted news is more important than ever and the Guardian is committed to accurate reliable news. You can help us to provide the quality information. The world needs by supporting the Guardian. Just go to W. W. DOT The Guardian Dot Com forward slash. Podcast thank you very much. Jonathan Freedland Right. Now as we record. Barry still a huge amount of uncertainty. We've just head from our health editor. Sarah Bosley that people who come out of ICU can take a long time to recover. We are in the middle of an international crisis. What happens now who is running the country. Well there is a formal on so that people are giving to that. And they're saying that Dominic Robb is the designated First Secretary of State and therefore he deputises and if the prime minister is in intensive care for any length of time it is just not possible for him to remain in realistic charge. And I don't think it's really sustainable for long to see Dominic Robb as this sort of action. Prime Minister either. I mean we're talking about people feeling rattled by the news dominic Robb. I looked frankly terrified when he appeared on the ten o'clock news. He did a very short into Greensburg. People be about his health and about. Who's entirely business will continue Ah The prime minister is in safe. Hands with brilliant team at some Thomas's hospital and using the most sort of senior experienced figure around that cabinet table. Who naturally his colleagues would turn to. There will be some other kind of settlement will have to be reached by the cabinet together and somehow through that process. I think somebody who is even if they don't actually get the title somebody who is defacto making those decisions who has the cabinets backing to do so will emerge before we had this news about. Michael gave himself moving into self-isolation. That was a kind of logic the pointed to him. It is just not sustainable to keep on repeating this line that the prime minister remains in charge if he is not fully able to converse we leagues will make decisions which. I don't think anyone would pretend you could in intensive care and I also think as I said that the the formal chain of command even if it remains in place is not the one that counts. Apparently we have heard in reports that that was a caveat Structure where anyone minister could go down and he would be filled but the structure. They came up with. Didn't look at the possibility of the prime minister. Being the person who was struck by the disease. And as you say he can say Dominic Robb is in charge the problem as would others like Michael Gable Matt Hancock accept that and would they take instruction as easily also none of them? Have that big majority that Boris Johnson has just one when you have such a messy chain of command. What does that mean for serious national security questions and for those urgent questions linked to this particular crisis. Well I think all of the day to day decisions will be handled by that. As you rightly term it that covy proof structure they constructed so for example about resources at between these new nightingale hospitals. Say which would be taken a health secretary level and Matt. Hancock can still take those decisions. But what if there was a big decision to take about the titanic the lockdown? You know there was this talk about for example restricting people's right to excise now that feels up to be a prime ministerial decision Very difficult to take that just Without that person there and there is this additional factor which you referred to which I think is right which is more in terms of the longer term a few weeks. While the days which is about the mandate Boris Johnson won a very clear personal mandate. The campaign was about him so I think that's wonderful. Two Months Ahead Rothen an today tomorrow and the day after but there are some big strategic cools to make in fighting ours for the moment for the next twenty four forty eight seventy two hours. I think they can carry on just as they were telling everyone stare home but if any point there is a serious pressure to change the lockdown regime. That is going to be a hard decision for anybody. Who didn't themselves win? That big personal mandate new doesn't themselves legitimately occupied the charity. Prime Minister Jonathan. How does this all look from the outside? What's the international reaction? Well I thought every one of those statements that came very quickly from around the world could have been distilled into a single message. Rich was there but for the grace of God. Go on and then of course. You've got the eccentric outlaw example of of Donald Trump. I also want to send best wishes to a very good friend of mine and a friend to our nation. Prime Minister Boris Johnson. But he you know he's suggesting these going to send the cavalry in with American doctors coming in with their own. You know therapy but when you're in intensive care it's a big deal so They're they're and they're ready. I think we have all around the world. People will be watching this case because in some ways he is Boris Johnson. Now the most high profile person to be ill with this virus. Finally governments obviously have to be ready for all sorts of things as he'd made very clear. This is unprecedented. Jonathan. You've been covering politics for thirty years and looking back on it for decades before that. How does this moment fail to you now? This not ready. You felt like the most traumatic experience for the country collectively since the Second World War. Two locked down the entire population to close the schools to have closed the football grounds at the pubs. Nothing has changed British life so dramatically ever before to add onto that. The prospect of the prime minister incapacitated by the very illness which imperils the rest of nation. I think this is the greatest peace time challenge to Britain and to its system of government. We've ever know Jonathan. Thank you very much. Thanks very much. That was Jonathan Freedland and Sarah. Bosley do go to the website to follow bear reporting and that of all our teams across the Guardian this unsettling time. That's it for today. My thanks to both of them and to you for listening this episode was produced by. Rachel Humphries mightily row. And Courtney usurped sound design was by Nicholas Cox. The executive producers are still may not and Jackson. We wish Boris Johnson. And anyone else suffering with this virus. Well we'll be back tomorrow..

Prime Minister Boris Johnson prime minister Jonathan Freedland Dominic Robb Prime Minister Jonathan Sarah Bosley Boris Johnson Michael Gable Matt Hancock Greensburg Donald Trump Barry editor Rachel Humphries First Secretary of State Thomas secretary Courtney
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:35 min | 11 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Sarah Bosley health editor at the Guardian. Come I start by asking if you're sitting in the headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva Right. Now you're looking around the world and you're urgently trying to figure out what can possibly stem this deadly disease. What they saying what different choices have country's been making so what you have in the Far East countries like China South Korea Japan Taiwan this a really cracking down massively. So you've got whole city's in lockdown and this is the example that China's set everybody else charitable y'all poodle. They told everybody to stay home. Cancel Public Transport They took every possible control measures. They could she would mutually one in some other. Asian countries in South Korea. I know that they're monitoring people's movements by satellite if if test positive so that they can show people on a website where people have been and therefore other people will know if they were at risk of being infected in those places pass amazing and they're testing everyone they can. They're testing everybody. They can they then tracking their contacts and quarantining those people so it means that they're hunting down the virus in every way possible. Okay so all that was happening in Asia and then the center of the pandemic move to Europe. What did we start to see in terms of.

China South Korea Japan Taiwan Sarah Bosley World Health Organization South Korea Geneva China editor Asia Europe
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:09 min | 11 months ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Because it's being you know infecting more people than are currently infected a reproduction number of less than one usually indicates that an infection is dying out. I was reading a piece by Ed. Yong in the Atlantic however that pointed out some difficulties with interpreting reproduction numbers for emerging diseases for example the reproduction number is an average right so a disease that has a reproduction number of two could mean that every single person who gets infected spreads the pathogen to to New People or it could mean that one person out of fifty spreads disease to one hundred people and this. This actually has been known to happen. These cases can become known as super spreaders cases where certain diseases are spread disproportionately by select individuals And perhaps intuitively diseases that propagate via super spreaders can be easier to contain than diseases spread steadily from person to person across all cases. I guess the the the easy go to example this it's typhoid Mary. Mary Mallon Yeah. Who has she wasn't the only super spreader of typhoid typhoid fever? I guess But she was somebody who worked in food service and food preparation and and while not showing strong symptoms of infection herself kept spreading the the typhoid to other people. If memory serves. There's an episode of the Nick that deals with her Now are there cases of super spreaders of Corona virus? It's still early but it seems so. I was finding several examples in news reports For example one report in The Guardian from yesterday but in an article by Sarah Bosley and Martin Bellum Alleging quote the third British case of current virus was a man in his fifties who contracted the corona virus infection at a conference in Singapore. He then travelled to France where he stayed with his family in a ski chalet at the Alpine Resort Konta mean amongst joy. Five people who were in the shelley including a boy of nine if tested positive for corona virus since the man came back to the UK on an easy jet flight and was diagnosed in Brighton. Another Briton who is on holiday in the chalet flew back to his home in Malacca and was admitted to hospital in Palma the chief medical officer said four more people had tested positive England. All of whom were also on the skiing holiday in France so it seems like there was a there was massive transmission from this one person who contracted it. I was also reading a report of a woman in South Korea. Who is at this point believed to have so far? Spread the corona virus to at least thirty seven people at her church. Yes I think it was reading about this part part of this deals with this particular church. You know the Their congregation how they gather and then how they go out and Attempt to spread the word right but it could also have to do with just specifics of individual variation in you know How your immune system works like there appears to be something called a twenty eighty rule for the spread of many infectious diseases To quote from a two thousand eleven paper by Richard Stein in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases quote in what became known as the twenty eighty rule a concept documented by observational and modeling studies and having profound implications for infection. Twenty percent of the individuals within any given population are thought to contribute at least eighty percent to the transmission. Potential of a pathogen and many host. Pathogen interactions were found to follow this empirical rule. Now this isn't true of every disease but what they're saying is it's it's been discovered that four many diseases that are infectious and spread from person to person. Twenty percent of the people infected do eighty percent of the spreading. Now I think it's important of course not to demonize people who happened to be super spreaders. They're almost never spreading disease on purpose. the factors that make somebody a super spreader is still not fully understood but it may just have something to do with how their immune system works Sometimes it happens because a disease that makes other people very obviously outwardly. Sick creates almost no symptoms in the super spreader. So they don't even know they're spreading to people right and this was the case with with typhoid Mary. For example right so yeah again. It's important not to demonize twenty percent in any way. Well actually I think with typhoid Mary. I'm not saying we should demonize her. Either I think at some point. She was made aware but then had after that at least for a while continued work in food service. So obviously if you're aware that you are you know that that you may have an infection that could spread to other people you should do whatever possible not to spread it to people and we can talk about the practical methods for that in a bit here but also coming back to the reproduction number of an infection the reproduction number at young points out and actually several authors. I was looking at have have made. This point is a very good one. It is not a fully fixed biological feature intrinsic to the pathogen. The reproduction number of a pathogen can be influenced by human interventions. Yong points out that SARS originally had very different reproduction numbers in China and Canada. So you'd get or not's ranging from like two five or six and this was just because of different levels of success in diagnosing. In containing the cases that appeared corona viruses no different. It's are not is influenced by biological facts about the virus itself but also about how well people respond to what kinds of measures we can put in place to contain it and stop transmission and we'll get to those numbers in a second but also. I I mentioned There's there's the interaction between the reproduction number. In the case fatality rate of emerging pathogens meanwhile The hemorragic fever a bola does not spread super easily. Between people it usually has an R. naught between one and two it's not highly highly infectious but it bowl is very scary because it has such a high case fatality rate some somewhere around fifty percent of the people who get below end up dying from it and there are diseases with even higher. Cfr's Avian Influenza A or H five in one has to see a far somewhere around. Sixty percent corona viruses. Nowhere near that high. In in fact depending on how you measure it there are greater. Dangers represented by much more familiar. Diseases like seasonal flu like seasonal flu has a lower case fatality rate then Corona virus appears to seasonal flu. Has something like an average rate of point zero one percent in the United States? At least over it's still very dangerous just because of the number of people who get infected this season alone. The flu has already caused more than twenty. Five million infections In fourteen thousand deaths in the United States alone the flu usually has a reproduction number of something like one point three and it comes in fairly predictable seasonal cycles so we've kind of gotten used to it even though it is still a great I mean it kills thousands every year but I guess it seems less scary to us. Just because it's been around. We know what to look for now so as for the specific reproduction number in case fatality rate of the new corona virus at one point the World Health Organization estimated that its reproduction number was between about one point. Four and two point five I was reading a recent study from the Journal Travel Medicine which reviewed studies from between January. First of this year and the seventh of February this year and for this time period the authors write quote. We identified twelve studies which estimated the basic reproductive number for the cove in nineteen from China and overseas The estimates range from one point four to six point four nine the mean of three point two eight a median of two point seven nine and Intercoure tile range of one point one six so maybe the range is a buyer best estimates now currently averaging between like two point five and three point five also seen estimates between two and three though again to drive home. Those numbers could change a lot depending on. What kinds of new New Diagnostic methods and containment methods come online reproduction. Numbers for new emergent virus. I think are going to tend to be higher than they are for something that we're better at looking for because it takes us longer to recognize it and stop it spread As the case fatality rate overall it appears to be somewhere around two percent on average but it also varies greatly based on factors like the age of the infected person and perhaps other factors that haven't come into focus yet One relieving thing about it is the disease at least so far appears to be pretty mild. Rain bordering on non existent in children. Children rarely seem to get it and when they do it's usually not severe and they don't die from it. Elderly populations on the other hand where people with compromised immune systems or other pre existing diseases or at much higher risk with the case fatality rate could reach in some cases up to about fifteen percent which is a lot so this should get into the symptoms. A bit You know what are the symptoms as we understand them so far for corona fires right so there are a lot of complications because the disease is so new and we also don't have a good sense of how many people can become infected without showing major symptoms appears that at least some people are getting this virus without major symptoms Which is actually you might think. Oh that sounds good. But that's actually very bad can help it. Spread some of these others of these other Pathogens that we discussed here like one of the reasons we were able to control them is because it became abundantly obvious. When you had them you know you would have a debilitating fever or something and you knew something was wrong and and you win and sought help and then it could be There was a red flag there for medical professionals right. You're less likely to spread to more people that way and then there's another complication along the same lines. Which is that. It appears there might be a long incubation period before some people end up showing symptoms Estimates have been anywhere from two to fourteen days. We just don't really know for sure. Yeah but again. That's not good you'll you don't want people to be In a stage where they could potentially be contagious while they're not showing symptoms but when symptoms do manifest. The basic outlook seems to be familiar. You know it's like a lot of other respiratory infections. It's going to be fever cough shortness of breath. Those are the main ones And then there have been other smaller. Instances of things like a digestive trouble. Diarrhea Sneezing But but the main ones are fever cough and shortness of breath now at an early stage of an outbreak like this. There's a lot of danger. That's not just the disease itself but danger from Misinformation Hanoch from pseudoscience plowing into people's brains We were both reading a good article by Kate. Kellyn Reuters That was just about bad. Science that had been published on preprinted servers without peer review and then spread around on the Internet and only to later be retracted like there..

typhoid fever Yong Mary Mallon flu China France International Journal of Infec United States Ed Atlantic Reuters South Korea World Health Organization Alpine Resort Konta Brighton Nick
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"It was one of our favorite episodes where India Rakkason and the Guardians Health editor. Sarah Bosley. You met Carley pleasant. An amazing young woman with cystic fibrosis campaigning. For access to a life changing drug. Stick around to the end of the episode where we've got an update for you. I've covered a lot of stories about drug prices and the campaigns of patients to get access to drugs in the past but this one really he did astound me. Four years ago news broke of a new drug for. CYSTIC fibrosis. A drug that for the first time treats the cause not just the symptoms uh-huh and has the potential to lengthen and improve lives to thousands of people the drug is called or can be and is made by VERTEX. Thanks a small biotech company in Boston. America but there is a program. They came to London determined to be heard. Aw the drug is so expensive. The many health services across the world say they can't afford it. Yeah but you just holding knowing that there's GonNa be something that helped me but something I just can't touch ten percent of all. CYSTIC fibrosis sufferers. I live in the UK where is currently a deadlock between the NHS and vertex meaning. Many patients still cannot access a pill but could transform their lives from the Guardian. I'm India rakkason today. In focus who decides the price of life..

CYSTIC fibrosis India Rakkason Sarah Bosley Guardians Health Carley editor NHS Boston London America UK
"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Decide that if our if our people if patients need a drugged badly then we will allow a generic version to be made and his legal within the World Trade Organization rules on intellectual sure property right because Labor is arguing that there are safeguards that allow governments to override patents if the needs of the people outweigh the interests of the company. Anthony now the Tory say this could massively discourage research and development. Is that a risk. That is always the argument but there there are various things in in this one is that we're not actually getting always the drugs that we need. We're getting the drugs that were offered by the pharmaceutical industry. So there's lots of arguments around access to medicines ooh Dennis given the DNA. Chess is so central to this election. tell me what. The ideological divide is between Labour and the Conservatives. When it comes to the Health Service the energy ask ask in this election is proving to be a very very clear illustration of the vast ideological divide between the two parties the Conservatives led by I leader who back in one thousand nine hundred? I wrote a leader in the spectator saying that patients should be charged access and she has care people forget that and he's not often asked about it. Multiple people around him including members of the cabinet historically been involved in right wing think tanks that want to shrink the rule of the NFL on expand the role of the private sector. AH bringing a insurance for healthcare. Just keep it quiet at the moment because it's politically toxic and then you've got to Jeremy Corbyn on Joe McDonnell saying that you know under future liberal government everything that the NFL stalls will be provided by the chess only the classic ultra statist view of healthcare which seems to play well not just liberal rallies but but on the doorstep Dennis thank you very much. You're very welcome. That was Sarah Bosley and Dennis Campbell. They along with other specialists across the Guardian will be providing coverage of key policy areas throughout this election campaign. Nine do keep up on the website and do keep listening to us as we look at each of those areas in turn coming up Dan Collins on the the protests that toppled Eva Morales Bolivia's first indigenous president.

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on Today in Focus

"In nineteen ninety I guess throw Terrell adjusts called Andrew Wakefield claim that the measles mumps rubella vaccine was linked to autism. It was one of the most controversial health stories of generation causing alarm amongst parents as the immunization rate collapsed over the years, the original research was widely discredited trust was slowly rebuilt and the doctor at the heart of the scandal seemed to disappear, but. Autism has become an epidemic. Your take this little beautiful baby, and you pump. I mean, it looks just like it's mid for a horse. Not for child vaccine skepticism is back health experts say social media, I'm populace fueling a growing movement that seem worrying trends in vaccination rates, including for HP, which can lead to cervical cancer. Flu and measles. We'll Health Organization has a goal to radically Musil's in Europe by twenty twenty. So should be almost gone. The last year there were the highest number of measles cases in Europe for twenty years sixty thousand and seventy two deaths and that's mostly children and vulnerable adults from the guardian. I'm initiative Astana today in focus is a growing anti vaccine movement putting lives at risk. Actually have been vaccine skeptics ever since vaccines were invented. But when it comes to measles mumps rubella, it does date back to nine hundred ninety eight very specifically and a press conference that I actually went to in February of that year the Royal free hospital. Sarah Bosley is the guardians help editor. So I went to this building and went in was held in a in a big lecture theatre. So I remember we all have these individual seats. It was a bit like sitting in exam in school with those little desks that sort of you can pull over push away. And they're at the front was a lineup of very serious scientists with very long faces and looking very slightly pompous and amongst the Moore's Andrew Wakefield who was young charismatic. Plus the dean of the ROY free medical school. Who was the? Most Sopa faced of the lot. And he was so worried about what Wakefield was saying really really anxious about it reasons. Mumps rubella given together maybe too much immune system of some day. Reckon day. There was a link between gut disease in children and autism. And that in some way, the measles mumps rubella vaccine might be the thing that triggered this off for the most part of the conference was about the paper about the scientific work that the team had done. But the really difficult moment the moment that really turned the whole issue around and launch the thousand and vaccines groups was when Wakefield actually said case for the socio. Vaccines into their component parts separate thought that those that the measles mumps rubella vaccine should not be given us one shot that it should be given a separate vaccines for safety. And it was that thing which was not part of the paper, which really allowed people massively and caused all the anxiety that followed did you think at the time. This doesn't sound right. What I did think was that's one heck of a claim when you're journalist, and particularly perhaps if you have a specialization, you have an antenna, and I think it was very obvious to those of us who covered health that he was saying something that was really front page news. Certainly I had that moment when studies actually stomach turning over. But it's something of that sort. You think oh there is something that's being set. Here. That's going to be a big story. How big I could not possibly have imagined at that time. Could be a link between a common childhood vaccine and autism questions were raised today about the safety of the combined mumps, measles and rubella vaccine news urge showing a possible link with a bowel disease, which could lead to autism. According to Dr Wakefield's theory, the MR vaccine ten damage the intestines of some children, allowing toxins delete..

Andrew Wakefield mumps Europe Flu Royal free hospital Astana Terrell cervical cancer Musil twenty twenty Sarah Bosley ROY free medical school editor HP Moore twenty years
"sarah bosley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"sarah bosley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Behavior bbc news hello claudia hammond's welcome to health check from the bbc now we all know just what disgust feels like but could this powerful emotion bihan est to stop the spread of disease they've gone to villages and they've said look here is fecal matter on the ground here's pooh on the ground do you realize that you're actually drinking that if you're not using a toilet so the hair into some poo and then dip it into the glass and then offer the glasses somebody to drink and the immediate response is all that so disgusting is a very powerful visceral response we promise the interviews not too disgusting and could a new idea help india reach its ambitious target to rid the country of tuberculosis by twenty twenty five and it's welcome back to sarah bosley the health editor of the guardian what you have for us today well i've been looking at a bit of a political struggle over support for sugary drinks taxes at the world health organization and the growing number of women transplants great we'll have that later now if you have cancer the earlier it's discovered the more likely it is that it can be treated before it spreads and the more curable it is so early detection is key for most cancer tests involves scans or biopsies where tiny bits of tissue or extracted from the body so that the cells can be tested to see how advanced the disease is but what if you could have a test which could detect cancer long before any lumps or symptoms have been spotted simply by having a blood test there are several groups of scientists trying to develop such a test and we've discussed before on health check a test for eight different types of cancer now results of a test for ten kinds have been announced at the.

claudia hammond bbc cancer india sarah bosley editor