17 Burst results for "Sarah Allen"

"sarah allen" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"According to the National Park Service, big bend national park in West Texas along a big bend in the Rio Grande is seeing record tourism more than 500,000 visitors last year. With all those people though, have been coming some frustrations over something called a hotel occupancy tax. They're not unique to Texas those taxes, lots of states and cities have them. But it's how they can be used in Texas that's got people hung up. From Marfa public radio Travis Bubonic Scott the story. Off a rocky road in the borderlands tourist town of terlingua, Daryl EB shows off his big bin stargazer Airbnb. This, I would classify as glamping. Yeah, this is nice. Small TV. It's a vintage but renovated airstream trailer perched on a hillside with sweeping views of the surrounding chihuahua desert. From here on the deck, we've got a view of Big Ben national park, the chiefs of mountains, castellan peak, EB manages more than 30 short term rentals here, making him one of the biggest local lodging business owners. Lately, he's also been raising concerns about lodging related taxes. In Texas state law limits how these special taxes can be used. The money mostly has to go back into promoting tourism, with some wiggle room. The taxes can be used for arts programs and historic preservation, but they can't pay for things like roads or public housing. And because the big bends already seeing record high towards numbers, EB argues the tax rate should be lower. They're basically just throwing away money now on extra advertising, much of which is probably not seeing any significant or necessary return on investment. Brewster county has a 7% lodging tax rate that gets tacked on to a guest short term rental Bill. The county then funnels that money into a local tourism council that runs towards a marketing campaigns. This fiscal year county records show the tax has already brought in more than a $1 million. It does beg the question, you know, when can we say that's enough to spend? Sarah Allen galland is a local county commissioner. If you spend a $1 million advertising Brewster county, is that enough? Or do you have to spend 1.2 next year? Do you have to spend 1.4 next year? Can you just say like, okay, a $1 million a year is enough. Gwanda says she'd like to see the county's tourism marketing budget, quote, plateau, and then officials could find something else to do with the rest of the money. Robert Alvarez, who heads up the county tourism council, is on board with that. He says the council is already planning to use some of the tax money for things that the law does allow, like new visitor centers with amenities like public restrooms. My organization doesn't have to keep bringing more and more people were at a sustainable level right now. Still, what's sustainable here is up for debate. Skyrocketing tourist numbers have come with the same challenges that other communities face, like a housing shortage as Airbnb numbers grow and strained water supplies as people build new properties. The state's hotel industry has largely opposed any broad expansion of lodging tax laws that could allow the money to be used to address those kinds of infrastructure problems, though lawmakers have passed some specific expansions in certain towns. The compromise has always been that that's something that the industry will tolerate provided that the money is used to promote the areas of tours and destination. Justin bregel is with the trade group Texas hotel and lodging association. And I understand there's some communities that would say we don't want any more visitors or tourists, but that ship of sale, so to speak, right? Still, Daryl EB says, if lawmakers would allow some changes to the tax uses here, there are plenty of things the community could use the money for. Grants to help a restaurant owner open up or to incentivize someone to open a new gas station, or to provide a housing assistance for locals. There's a lot of need out here. Meanwhile, there's been a related problem lately of some Big Ben rental owners not paying these special taxes. Officials are gearing up to go after those unpaid taxes, so it's likely this rural area will have even more tourism driven cash on hand in the future. But at least for now, it's also

Brewster county Daryl EB Travis Bubonic Scott terlingua bin stargazer Airbnb chihuahua desert Big Ben national park Texas big bend national park Marfa Sarah Allen galland West Texas National Park Service Rio Grande Gwanda Robert Alvarez Justin bregel Airbnb
"sarah allen" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

04:01 min | 11 months ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

"No less a pop eminence than miss Diana Ross asked to work with Daryl hall on her 84 album swept away. Daryl and his companion Sarah Allen wrote the album's title track, a number 18 pop. Number three R&B hit for Ross and hall co produced the song,.

Diana Ross Daryl hall Sarah Allen Daryl hall co Ross
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"About this episode or any episode of keys to the shop. Please reach out, you can just email me, Chris at keys to the shop dot com. That's also how you can contact me to inquire about keys to the shop consulting. Chris at keys to the shop dot com. Now coming up here pretty soon in the next few weeks is the Portland Oregon coffee fest. The 5th and 6th of November Marx, the final coffee fast event for 2021, coffee passed has been the best event to attend if you're looking to resource yourself and your team with what it takes to build a thriving coffee business for over 25 years. They've been doing it that long, and it just keeps getting better, providing seminars, workshops, trainings, of course, there's the trade show floor, all the networking you get to do the competitions, the throwdowns, exploring cool cities. There's a lot.

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"You can follow us at Instagram at barista magazine. I also, that's where any of these avenues you can let us know about events that you have coming up and we would be happy to send you swag and magazines to give away for no charge at all and promote your events on our on our socials. And when we are back up and running with in person events, we are usually at them and we love having people walk up to us and tell us about them and introduce themselves and being in with and among the people who make up this extraordinary community is really that's our number one priority. Thank you so much, both of you for serving the community the way you have all these years. And for speaking with us today, it really was fantastic. Thank you, Chris. It was such a great time talking to you. Well, I hope that you really enjoyed that episode, getting a peek behind the curtain of this incredible publication and the work that Sarah and Ken have done throughout 16 years at barista magazine, and as much as things have changed, the thing that remains the same as Sarah and Ken's continued dedication to serving people serving coffee. I think the best of us in the industry, the best we can hope for is to make a mark that is so impactful on the industry that it's a part of the fabric and it's always been there. And there's no doubt in my mind that what Sarah and Ken have created and essentially co created with the industry over these years is something that is a cultural institution for coffee globally. So of course, a huge thank you to Sarah and Ken for being guests on keys to the shop. Of course, I recommend that you subscribe to barista magazine. This is something that I think every shop should be subscribed to and get in the hands of their baristas. Be sure to visit them over at barista magazine dot com. You've got event calendars. You.

barista magazine Ken Sarah Chris
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"It seems where the response is to the pandemic, very greatly depending on where you're physically located. And the rules and regulations for it can also vary greatly. And so you get a lot of situations where the barista is being asked to enforce health and safety policies that may get them pushback from the customers. That sounds crazy. But unfortunately, that is a reality right now. And so at the very least, I think all the braces out there need. One, I respect for coming to work every day and working in this and through this entire pandemic. But two support from managers or ownership to either be providing them with deescalation training or having set procedures and practices in place if customers are giving them grief or push back on whatever the stores, health and safety protocols are. Hopefully, these are things that we can work through and get through with this pandemic and get over. But certainly right now, I think that is a huge, huge thing. It bogs my mind to be honest. They were in this situation because there's just one thing we needed to do to get through this pandemic. And that was to care for each other. You know, if we just show a little compassion and caring for everybody around us, this pandemic would be over already. And right now, the society at large apparently that is too much of an ask, but I don't think it's too much of an ask for us to give to each other on an individual basis. And I think to be successful moving through this as a business, you really have to be aware of that and hopefully companies are supporting their baristas with that. It's always been a very emotionally heavy position to be a barista in day to day, not knowing what to expect and now almost mixing with that knowing what to expect and not really wanting to deal with it. So yeah, I think that's well said that we definitely have the responsibility to care for them our staff and give them the resources that are necessary for what we are going to predict they're going to need and not just kind of let them flounder and figure it out for themselves. Because yeah, you're right. They need all the help they can get. Well, and with the sort of hiring crisis right now, when you look at the shops that aren't having trouble keeping staff, it's the ones that maybe they can't even pay as well as they'd like to, but they're caring for their staff, their respecting them, they're listening to them. They have their they have their baristas backs. So, I mean, it's not just the right thing to do from an ethical standpoint. It's a good business decision. And it always has been, right? If there's one thing that the pandemic has shown us is that the things that are suddenly in focus are things that may have needed to be in focus for a while. And so hopefully, as if we exit this thing soon we end up with some of these renewed focus points and it's just back to the idea of serving people serving coffee, right? Yeah. That's right. Sarah Ken, this has been fantastic to talk to you. I always enjoy talking and talking coffee with you guys. Why can people learn more about barista magazine? I feel silly asking this, but how can people stay in touch and what can.

Sarah Ken barista magazine
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"Clean coffee is the only way that you can be truly faithful and respectful to the coffee variety. And the terroir. So to talk to Emmy and Matthew about this was super interesting because they were saying, well, the producer deserves to have a role in the presentation of the coffee, which is why they champion experimental processing techniques, fermentation. And so to see that, they're right. And so it's the person who says clean coffee is the way to do it because coffee does offer us the options to interpret it in so many different ways. As long as you're paying a lot of money for it. So that's the thing is we're just constantly listening and watching what's happening in asking a lot of questions. Luckily, since we've been doing this so long, we have a direct line to a lot of people, so we can reach out and get interest and get opinions and try and just try and present the content in as clear way as possible with the caveat that we are never saying this is the answer. I like that approach a lot. The idea that there's going to be some things that are contrary, you know, issue to issue somebody might say something that is their opinion and like you say it's a big world. And honestly, you know, a lot of the focus, the buzzwords, beyond sustainability is accessibility and everybody who is roasting a little bit darker these days, more blends, more trying to buy coffees that aren't just over 90 points and all that. A wider scope of consumer is being catered to and I imagine you're a bigger spectrum of ideologies has to make its way in there, so getting a lot of different people's opinions and experiences in the mix is really cool. And again, back to the idea that a magazine could be like this model of a business like a coffee bar, if you're an owner or if you're a manager, getting the kind of good feedback from your team is essential to being able to make good decisions, right?.

Emmy Matthew
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"Background or interest level or age group or ethnicity to feel welcome and to feel encouraged to be a participant to be an active participant. You know, the guy said, I can teach anyone to use a genome machine in ten minutes. But I honestly do think this is a line of work that yes, the passion should be instinct. But you can learn it. And so if someone's engaged and wants to do it, you know, sky's the limit. It's interesting that you mentioned clicks because over 21 years in coffee now, I remember people might feel like it's the same today. But back then, I feel like it was almost a lot more clicky. It was focused on if you're part of this group of people that work at this business, like a business based or brand based identity, like if you work for these people, then you are it. And just because of how expansive, especially coffee is, like, New York City had like four good coffee shops in the early 2000 and now they have hundreds. It's hard to really hang your hat on that hole like I work at this company and therefore I am the bee's knees or whatever. So it feels like now it's almost like what barista magazine started doing, which is focusing on the individual, so we kind of look at people a little bit more like this is a person that serves coffee, not a person that works at this coffee shop and therefore they're validated. But they're validated more so because they're awesome person and they make coffee, just like me. That's a really interesting point, Chris, because back in the day, yeah, there were teams from different coffee companies who had come in and they're, you know, and it was intimidating. But that is something that we've tried to do since the start just sort of anticipating that people very often don't stay with the same company forever. And so we want the people who are on our covers to exist or we want to celebrate them as individuals. And as role models, as people who are, you know, hustling and striving to make themselves better and make the industry better. I think that there's more humility today in specialty coffee. So I don't, I mean, you know, it's just like what Ken said things are cyclical. And ego is has a different form today than it did back then. Still exists, but I do think there are more doors for people to open to cross into specialty coffee where before it did feel a bit isolating. I would say that there's definitely a plethora of educational opportunities available now for specialty coffee people. And I think that's great. For all the nice things you've said to us about barista magazine and I appreciate it. We are still just a tiny magazine. And we reach a tiny number of the people who actually work in coffee. We would like to reach everybody, but that's not realistic. You know, there are millions of people that work in this industry. And I can understand just like with school, not everybody learns the same way, not all techniques are effective for everybody. Some people are more visual learners. Some people are more audio learners. So I think the proliferation of educational opportunities.

barista magazine New York City Chris Ken
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"They were certainly the first producing country participating. And when you go to Mexico City and Guadalajara and other sort of bigger cities in Mexico, you would not believe how vibrant those breeze to communities are and how connected they are and the level of quality. And I think that it can be traced back to someone offering a platform place where they can be empowered. So those are just the kinds of rewards I feel like we've been able to observe throughout the time that we've done the magazine is watching these communities develop and grow the scene and the culture in their native areas by leaps and bounds. You know, it seems to me a happy barista or a well cared for a barista who has joy in their role. Is the best marketing that you could possibly have? I think that's very correct. I mean the idea that these communities, especially at origin, are creating more value in their own countries is obviously needing to have community of people who are enthused about that. And I'm curious, you know, too, because I have this assumption that being a barista now, like if you start off being a barista, there's a wealth of resources out there that can help you find your way a little bit quicker, do you find that that's true as you kind of look over the scene today over the years and interact with baristas or is it that there are so many options for people to get resources from that it's more intimidating than helpful? I mean, what's your take on that? Baristas are their first community is the one in their shop. And, you know, they're this is a social job. You're talking all day every day. And so someone's going to say, I watched this really cool video on YouTube about pouring latte art where I read this really cool article about a producer in Honduras or I mean they're sharing information and then and then that grows, but I think that it can be intimidating just like in any community when it feels clicky, but I also do feel like there are more and more spaces for people.

Guadalajara Mexico City Mexico Baristas YouTube Honduras
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"Great service for their community and being proven and indispensable part of that community over this year, whereas whether they needed to change the bar flow, change their workflows, our hours, or whatever, just to keep the coffee flowing because their customers were still coming depending on them to provide some sense of normalcy or if nothing else a cup of really good coffee. I love that point about the global community and how you talked about the forums and then barista magazine as like the original platforms for bonding and community. And then the exponential growth of it, I think barista magazine is obviously one of the catalysts for that. And you know, it's not just that people are just wanting to glom on to something in that they see other people doing. It's also just how they want to express that in their own culture as well. And one of the things that I see a lot of today I've read about also in barista magazine and elsewhere is the idea of barista cultures springing up in more so in producing countries. And that seems to be almost like the zenith of this thing where it comes full circle and I know that this is something that you all have featured many times in the magazine and I would wonder what your thoughts are on that and how you've perceived that the growth of the at origin barista community and what it means to coffee in general. I would say for coffee in general, it's a great thing because I think the way to make coffee sustainable and to get coffee farmers paid better is to make sure that their product is also consumed and enjoyed in the country that they produce it in. Want to keep more of money from coffee that's generated from the actual crop of coffee in the country of origin. It creates a better connection for urban dwellers to the rural countryside. And what I was thinking of specifically there is an experience I had in Colombia and antiochia, which is the region where Medellín is located. And it's one of the largest copy producing areas. In Colombia, however, the average age of a coffee farmer there, I believe at the time was 64. And if you've spent any time on a coffee farm, you'll know that.

barista magazine antiochia Medellín Colombia
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"New pieces of equipment was the clover brewer oh yeah. Yeah, and that was a big deal. Just the idea of having a buy the cup brewer like that. And now we have different machines that can do similar things from the poor study that can do a number of cups at a time or the cyclops. And then the clover of course being bought by Starbucks. But that also I think is another trend that you see is a lot of the stuff that takes off in the, what I consider are, especially coffee industry, which tends to be smaller shops, very focused on doing high quality coffee and high quality work. Pushing the broader industry forward where you see bigger companies start mimicking what they're saying in the smaller shops and eventually the other trend you've definitely seen is a consolidation. Of what were the sort of big players at the time of our launch, especially coffee, like intelligentsia, stumptown, to come to mind immediately, they're both owned now by the same company. There's those kinds of trends. The other one that I seen in is frankly more rewarding for me individually or as a person is seeing the spread of the barista culture go global and Sarah talked earlier about how when we started, we looked to places like Australia and Scandinavia that seemed to be somewhat ahead of where the U.S. especially coffee scene was. And now you sort of see excellent high quality cafes springing up literally around the world. To me, I find that to be just awesome because that is a true global community and it's a terrific thing to be a part of. And often reminds me of musicians. And the idea that it doesn't matter where your geographically from, if you're a musician, you play music, you can play music with anybody else in the world playing music too. You know what I mean? It's a global community that you have a shared language, which is music. Here, there's a global community where the shared language is coffee. And it's really, I think in this time particularly where we've had we're in the midst of a global pandemic. It's a very scary time in a lot of ways. It's a very difficult time for small businesses, but it's still, I find an inspirational time when I'm interacting with people who can be located anywhere in the world, but we all share these same values and we're still all trying to do the same thing, which is create great work to do a great job at providing service to our communities. And certainly over the last year and a half, the baristas have been frontline workers in this pandemic, often dealing with huge stress levels, but still needing to provide.

Starbucks Scandinavia Sarah Australia U.S.
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"And that's just because we want this information and content to be out there and available to as many people as possible. I feel like owners that, you know, so many owners provide barista magazine as one of those things like we get this in the store and you can read it on your prank or whatever. But a magazine and what you do is almost kind of a hint like as an owner or an operator, you can kind of do the same thing with how you resource your staff. You can also be the kind of leader as you all are through the magazine to open up and expand the possibilities for your staff. That's a great way of putting it. I hope that's the case. I mean, Ken and I have always been very transparent about the fact that we are a tiny company. We work out of the second floor of our House, we really identify very closely with the majority of our readership who are small business owners who are always trying to keep up with what the latest trends are or, you know, there's so much news constantly coming out, so I think that it's helpful that we can share that experience with our readers. So speaking of trends and themes, I wanted to ask you about how things have progressed over 16 years in terms of how the community has decided to use its energy and spend its focus, you know, like, in the early days, what would you say were the main themes that the barista community or even just specialty coffee was really focused on as compared to today? Specifically with coffee, what we saw was a huge movement to single origin when we started. And that was a big deal in that, you know, and it sort of started at that time. It was single origin just meant the country of origin. And then it was started drill down into a region and then maybe to a farm level, then and then suing years, you've seen blends sort of make a comeback. And you have companies like Floyd's that does nothing but blends. There are these cyclical things. You get excitement from 2015 when Sasha says take one that WBC and in scatter with his carbonic maceration. Fermented coffee, right? And so now there's a lot of new processing techniques and you see a lot of different coffees using different somewhat experimental processing techniques or adding yeast or doing different things to affect the flavor at the producing portion of it, not just in the brewing or grinding or roasting aspect of it. You know, back to the startup recent magazine that.

barista magazine Ken Floyd Sasha
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"Well, I just saw the runway when I saw you last at coffee fest Anaheim she's still awesome as she ever was and she's still working on coffee and has no sign or quitting or slowing down. And she's held, I don't know how in position since that first cover feature on her, but she would be a person that we originally covered as a barista who would totally be suitable for a one on one conversation at this point. Here it is 16 years later and she's held a number of physicians. So I guess my point is just that, again, when we started the magazine, we got a lot of questions about how can you have enough stuff to write about? Why would you want to write about these kids? They're not going to be doing this for very long and saying that all of that is incorrect. You know, you can write about coffee every day. You can write about the people who make coffee every day. And you never run out of material. And just to add to that, if you were asking about the way that we've structured the magazine and there are regular features, so really as it's become evident, the people are the heart and soul of the magazine and also kenzan my heart, but it's in terms of other content that we offer. We always include field reports, which are reports from consuming countries and also from producing countries. Those are usually first person sort of travelogues. From different places all over the world. We also have Tracy Allen from brewed behavior is our business columnist. He writes a column called cash box, which tackles really like nuts and bolts, business advice. We have a column written by Alex and double J of black rabbit service co called high maintenance, which is an we call it car talk meets dear Abbey. People write in with questions about their equipment. We've got a tech column. So we try and provide that culture and that inspiring background on what it means to be a coffee professional through all these different lenses. But then we also really want to provide a lot of tools and education that people can use to be better and more successful business owners. Really reminds me of how you're talking about that guy who was dismissive and said he can teach somebody to use a cappuccino machine in ten minutes. The mentality of pigeonholing somebody into just use the machine and shut up basically. To saying, no, the baristas in the barista roll has all these other interests that are not just like novelty interests, but are integral to being a good barista. So the fact that you have all of those different channels available to learn more about mechanics to learn about, you know what's going on in other countries and producing countries and these are all the things that baristas wonder about, but I think historically, and unfortunately, still, you know, it might be the case today. And I know it is a lot of baristas are like I want to learn more. I want to expand my view, and I think that's a lot of what barista magazine does so well. Well, thank you. We really also very much believe in making it as available to people as possible because I think that some of the education that's available now is costly, especially when.

Tracy Allen black rabbit service co Anaheim Alex barista magazine
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"And that was a way to highlight people who weren't necessarily baristas, but had been working in the specialty industry for a while and had their lifetime of experience to share. And to get some of their experiences and coffee and general in business and life, you know, I'm thinking of like George Howell was featured doing a pretty early one of those. People had been involved, and especially coffee, but maybe not necessarily as barista. And that was to provide sort of a wider spectrum of input and experience for our readers to see that people have been working in this industry for decades, whether or not it was called specialty coffee at that time. And that they probably had some interesting information and experiences to share as well. One of the things that always sticks out to me here in our office, we have the hallway that's has all the covers that we've done for all the issues. So that when we're walking into our office, we pass by all the faces of all the people that we've featured on the cover of priest magazine over these 16 years. And what is probably not would have been predicted when we started, but it is really evident is the longevity of people's careers and coffee and how many of those people that we featured back in 2005 to the president are still working in coffee. Maybe they're not still a barista or maybe they're at a different company or more likely it seems they've started their own company. But it really shows to me that we read the situation correctly when we started the magazine that people were not becoming braces necessarily just for part time temporary job. There is something about the service, the craft and the coffee that they're serving that creates a long-term bond or a community that they want to be a part of for a long time. So that is also part of the validation that we get from continuing our work and doing what we do every day is saying that, man, you remember when we put bronwyn CERN on our first cover?.

George Howell bronwyn CERN
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"Ability to bring exceptional coffee to their customers and hopefully in doing so, they help improve the coffee economy for everyone from pickers growers, producers on down. That's sort of our original idea and what the community brought to it and really pushed us forward with. Traditionally, every industry has at least one trade magazine, whether it's, you know, hammers, monthly or hot tub journal or whatever. And traditionally, those trade magazines are just vehicles for ads. So I think that was the point that we wanted for our readership to present something that really did look and feel like a consumer magazine in its quality of writing and photography and illustration and the depth of its content. But in essence, it is what the definition of a trade magazine is, which is for professionals. Taking into consideration that you tapped into this desire that baristas had to be taken seriously. When people write a note, like if you write a note to your significant other and they don't expect it, it's like, that's really cool. Hey, thanks for thinking of me. But when you start a magazine for them, you know what I mean? It's like, wow, okay, there's now this is us. And there are people who are working day baristas featured in the magazine, their opinions are being asked and you know, as one of those baristas that was reading barista magazine from issue one, you know, until now, it's like that's been the through line of just seeing these are baristas that you can find working on the bar and it does, like you said it adds that it doesn't add the legitimacy to it, but affirms that the legitimacy is there. And it creates this huge movement for people to say, you know what? This is my community and that I wonder as you started to experience that kind of response. I mean, how did that initially help guide you from what you had created, I don't want to say totally in a vacuum, but with your own good intentions now, how are you starting to collaborate and co create the magazine with the input of the community?.

barista magazine baristas
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"Serving people serving coffee. So even though you haven't been baristas, you've been working for baristas essentially this whole time for 16 years and that niche of the barista community through the competitions, especially in the barista gild was such a great time to build a platform because that whole time in coffee was so punctuated by people getting onto a platform through the competitions and there is of course the coffee forums and there's just this opportunity to get resources concentrated in one area and I imagine that must have been I don't want to say difficult, but kind of a heavy task because there's so much when you first decide what you're going to do this. I mean, what goes into deciding what the first issue is going to have in it when there's all of these different facets of this specialty coffee community that you want to represent. I mean, how did you go about deciding how you're going to format this? And what the goal was of the magazine. I would say our goal was to create a trade magazine that was unlike any other trade magazine at the time. Part of the way we did that was by focusing on people. At the time we started barista magazine, most of the trade magazines were more general and focused and focused on wider spectrum of anything you might need for your coffee shop. And we saw an opportunity to do it differently. One was in the actual physical product of the magazine. We wanted to present a magazine that had as much care and thought and craftsmen work that went into it as our readers put into their work. So we wanted to have really high quality materials as far as the paper goes. We wanted the paper. As soon as you touched the magazine that you felt it was something different that was unlike the glossy, everything at that time had a glossy cover and we went with a matte cover and it was a really interesting texture so that a person immediately forms a bond with the physical property of that paper when they pick it up because it's different..

baristas barista magazine
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"Okay everybody, well, today we have an amazing episode for you truly a special one, especially for me personally. I think so many of us have grown up with barista magazine as just a foundational resource for our careers in coffee and certainly I am one of those people I have on my shelf both the first edition of barista magazine and the last one. So to be able to interview Sarah and Ken on the show feels truly special, considering the impact that they've had on the community and the amazing work that they've done, it is something that anyone in my position who has a platform for distributing resource and information aspires to. So a little bit about Sarah and Ken Sarah Allen is the editor in chief and cofounder of barista magazine and has been a driving force in the international barista movement from its outset. Her writing is thoughtful and compelling as it covers the barista craft, as well as contributing to numerous stories on the culture of baristas to multiple magazines and newspapers, Sarah has worked in a variety of editorial positions in her 20 years of professional publishing experience as a staff writer for the Oakland tribune in the Bay Area as a staff writer for the oregonian in Portland as a freelance writer for publications like WebMD, Los Angeles Times Magazine, Hollywood reporter, and as the editor of fresh cup magazine, Sarah holds a master's degree in journalism from the university of Oregon and a bachelor's degree in English from the University of California Davis. Now Ken Olsen is the publisher of barista magazine and is more than two decades of experience working as a writer and an editor for both mainstream and specialty coffee publications. His work has appeared in numerous publications, including academic journals, Oregon, humanities, and The New York Times, Ken holds a master's degree in communications from the university of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, and a bachelor's degree in history and communications from the University of Washington in Seattle Washington. The third wave coffee culture was really in its infancy around 2004 and 2005. There was only a few places you could go to enrich yourself as a barista back then, light scatterings of events, online forums and the like. What you didn't have was this cohesive connection to community that tapped into the heart of what it was to be a barista until barista magazine entered the scene. You know, their tagline serving people serving coffee has been undeniably true throughout the now 16 years of publishing barista magazine, and because of the power of community words, ideas and connection and the channel that was opened up in the platform that barista magazine provides, it has been one of the great catalysts that has brought about progress in the industry. So today I wanted to highlight their work and get the story of their founding, their evolution, philosophy and curating content and collaboration with the community. Their thoughts on the future of coffee and much, much more. So I'm really excited again to bring this conversation to you such an honor to welcome Sarah Allen and Ken Olsen of barista, magazine. Well, Sarah can it is an absolute honor to have you on the show, how in the world are you? Doing well..

barista magazine Sarah Ken Sarah Allen Oakland tribune Los Angeles Times Magazine fresh cup magazine Ken Olsen Ken university of Amsterdam WebMD university of Oregon Bay Area University of California Portland Hollywood Davis University of Washington The New York Times the Netherlands Oregon
"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"sarah allen" Discussed on Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals

"This is keys to the shop, episode three O 9, a conversation with Sarah Allen, and Ken Olsen.