18 Burst results for "Sarah Alexander"

The Case Of The Murdered Jewess

Judaism Unbound

06:15 min | 1 year ago

The Case Of The Murdered Jewess

"We now lay before the reader. A full account of a shocking murder that of miss sarah alexander the beautiful polish jewess. Who was foully murdered in an east new york cornfield. The crime was one of the most shocking that has ever occurred in the metropolis or its vicinity. Cousin of the dead girl to whom she was very much attached was arrested and the discovered fact of her near maternity coupled with the expected arrival of the prisoner's wife from germany furnished. The only clue there was to the horrible deed. Eddie thank you so much for joining me today. Thanks for having their happy to be here. So we're talking about some murder. Pamphlets there were four that were published about the case of pesach. Rubinstein were featuring two of them. These pamphlets were type of pulp literature. They've been around for a long time and were especially popular in the nineteenth century. Tell us more about them. These were mostly eight to sixteen page pamphlets that were often illustrated and described typically in lurid detail well-known murders that took place in the united states. Obviously the time. There's no radio. Tv internet print media is the only thing available and some of them are. I guess you could say enhanced. Sometimes the writers make things up both were pale with lips compressed and is haggard and as they halted and looked at each other their hearts appeared to be like open books every feeling every emotion could be read. She had a knife with which her own life blood was to be. Shed thrust into her bosom and drawing it fourth. She held it toward her companion. He trembled violently. His knees smote together and he was altogether like a man intoxicated. It's obvious these pamphlets were not written by people who knew about jewish beliefs and practices. They contain some false information. They show a lack of knowledge of how jews live and worship. What's an example of this. One of them shows him preying on his hands and knees with his hands clasped before him. So this is obviously how a christian praise and not at all. How a jew praise our artist has graphically sketched him while at prayer and from the illustration a better idea can be gained than any description can give. Now that we've heard about the pamphlets can you give us a detailed overview of the story contained within the particular ones were exploring in eighteen. Seventy five a body was found in a field in east new york. East new yorkers in brooklyn and at the time and eighteen seventy five. It was a far. Now it's not on december fourteen. He found the body of a woman in a cornfield on the ground behind a stack of corn. These stacks were at the lower end of the field near the fence. The farthest off from the plank road. There was a shawl lying by the side of the body. The corpse was about two feet from the base of the corn stack. The body lay on the back and was all cut about the neck win. This went and informed. Mr wessel who in company two other men went and viewed it farmhand had her and he went to the police and told them they came investigated. Took the body away to the morgue. They know who was there had been no reports of anyone missing in brooklyn and so they chose to do so. This person must from manhattan. The police were puzzled. No report had been received of any late disappearance from the neighborhood. Nevertheless the region was scoured. All during tuesday afternoon and evening. The police station was thronged and officers. Say that not less than two thousand persons saw the body no one could identify it and the conclusion was arrived at that. She was a stranger in the village. So what they did was. They put an advertisement in a newspaper which was actually very common at the time claiming that a body had been found and they wrote a description of it now at the same time a woman who worked for a particular family on the lower side had gone missing. Her name was. Sarah alexander at her brother went to the rubinstein family where she worked and he said you know. Have you seen sarah. She didn't come home from work yesterday and they said no she was here until such a time and then she left. We haven't seen her since so her brother. Put an ad in the newspaper looking for missing person and describing her the new york sun december fourteenth eighteen. Seventy five a girl missing since the afternoon of the twelfth age. Seventeen years stout middle height face dark dressed in a light colored dress with the black over skirt striped shawl small gold earrings with red stones. Any information will be received by. J p alexander number thirty essex street coincidentally. The two advertisements appeared on the same page in the same paper and they describe the same person. The father of the rubinstein family happened to get that paper. He saw the advertisements and he went to the police station. Ad said that girl is sarah alexander of number thirty essex street. She was a good religious girl. She did not stay away from home and if she was murdered away out there. Some ruffians must have dragged her away so the police came to the home and began to interview everyone to find out where she had last been seen and while they were entering everyone. One of the sons came in. His name was pace off rubinstein on monday. The sun with great perturbation of manner told them that he had had a dream the previous night. He dreamed that. Sarah alexander was lying murdered alongside of corn stalks ten miles outside of the city. She was murdered by an italian and the knife was close beside her. She wants me to bury her. He said

Sarah Alexander Rubinstein Pesach Mr Wessel New York Haggard Brooklyn Eddie Germany Farmhand United States Manhattan New York Sun Sarah
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Common, including the ability to provide emotionally safe spaces for parents and Children. Remind immigrants and refugees of home or to create deep and meaningful connections between people and cultures, even when miles apart from Syrian refugees living in Turkey to front line health care workers estranged from their family during the pandemic here in the United States. Hannah told us she witnessed firsthand the power and impact lullaby eyes can have and her own interests in this research emerged after the first time she sang a lullaby to her stepson. Us sleeping over in our new place in the city, which was a bit far from where he lived with his mom, and he was sleeping over for the first time in that space. And it was the middle of the night. It was like about two or 3 A.m., and he started crying and I started panicking. And I I was started getting worried. And then you know, in the midst of sort of like my panic about what to do about a crying child. I started to hold him and I and I started to sing. And then eventually, you know, he fell asleep. And then I guess in that moment I started to ask myself. You know who's who Spears had. I really been s waging in that time, Or was it just about as much as my own fears? Had Dennis waging, and so I started just casually asking people about their experiences of bedtime. Their experiences. So what were the things that frightened and also reassured them growing up? And I realized how how There were just so many different stories in that space that you know it's one of our most intimate of spaces, and that's when I really started delving into the sort of this kid and world of alibis. So, Hannah, I confess to you before this interview that I have a 10 month old son and I don't sing him a lullaby eyes, But I do have Ah bedtime ritual that is very sort of rhythmic and You know, And and almost I guess somewhat melodic, even though it's not a traditional lullaby. So what is a lullaby? Could it be anything that we say or saying to a child when we put them to bed? Also, at least the way we approach this story was I was more interested in sort of the more General view of nighttime rituals. And so our working definition of a lullaby was very, very broad. When I think about Lola buys my even think about the nighttime sounds we hear and how different that is for everybody around the world, and that's sort of part of the fabric from Treek Start going off to sleep. One of the researchers I spoke to Laura Surreally who, you know, studies the science behind maternal song. When I was interviewing her, she explained something to me that I thought was really powerful. She looked at the lullaby, not just as really the song. But she explained to me that in her research, she was looking at the lullaby as sort of the small time Auteuil experience. It's really about feeling Mother's gentle rocking, You know, having her face very close to the baby. And and sort of feeling the warmth of the hold. So for me, that's sort of how I see the little abayas. Well, what's the history of LA alibis? And I suspect that they're not just happening in the United States? I mean, this is a global phenomenon, isn't it? Yeah, it's a global phenomenon. It's not just something that happens, you know across borders. It has also happened through the course of history and through the course of time. The oldest recorded lullaby that we have or the oldest record of a complete lullaby that we know about. Is this Babylonian lullaby? That's about 4000 years old. So we're looking at little by singing. We've been doing this for millennia. One of the really cool things about it is that it's been passed on for generations. And you know mostly by women. When I think of little advice, I guess I think of my own mother. And I think about what she passed on to me through Lullaby singing. And I guess you know one of the things that as a woman I always thought about was when I read history, books and Likely looking at history books through the lens of men. And then when I think about Lola buys as thinking about how much history there is likely composed by women Why are they so soothing to Children? In particular? I mean, there have been studies from the Harvard Music lab that found that infants who listened to lullabies that weren't even in their own language. Not even from their caregivers were still soothed. By them. I find that fascinating. Another thing that Laura Sara Lee, the researcher, had mentioned earlier, too. You had explained to me was shoot. She had this term called infant directed, singing and often you know, infants will know when adult or a caregiver, it's specifically directing, sound or music to them. One of the things that Samuel Mayor who's part of the Harvard musical APP that you mentioned told me that the interesting thing about Lola vices Well, it's while you know music is so diverse across cultures across different backgrounds that the interesting thing about love advice is that we asked Asuman beings when we're singing a lullaby. We're looking at the same set of constraints. You know, you have to put a child to sleep. So in that way, my guess is that we're instinctively may be slowing down the temple, you know, singing in the more intention at least soothing way we'll be right back with more on the significance of lullaby eyes and your calls when we return, Okay. My name is Sarah Alexander Living Kirkland, Washington When my Son who's now almost nine was a baby. I used to sing lock moments, You'll take the high road. I'll take the low and I'll be in Scotch, Linda On me. And my true love will never meet again on the Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch. No woman. Hi. This is Anna from Stanford, Connecticut. And my mom is lens and she's nothing to me in Spanish. A rooming me are only are more. I can't remember the rest. But that was how it went. Support for KQED today comes from the Sierra Nevada brewing company, family owned.

Hannah United States researcher Turkey Laura Sara Lee Auteuil Bonnie Bonnie Banks Sierra Nevada brewing company Harvard Music Spears Dennis Laura Surreally Connecticut KQED Sarah Alexander Stanford Samuel Mayor Anna Kirkland Asuman
"sarah alexander" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know, these little guys all have different sounds, but they have many things in common, including the ability to provide emotionally safe spaces for parents and Children. Remind immigrants and refugees of home or to create deep and meaningful connections between people and cultures, even when miles apart from Syrian refugees living in Turkey to front line health care workers estranged from their family during the pandemic here in the United States. Hannah told us she witnessed firsthand the power and impact lullaby eyes can have and her own interests in this research emerged after the first time she sang a lullaby to her stepson. He was sleeping over in our new place in the city, which was a bit far from where he lived with his mom, and he was sleeping over for the first time in that space. And it was the middle of the night. It was like about two or 3 A.m., and he started crying and I started panicking and I I was started getting worried. And then you know, in the midst of sort of like my panic about what to do about a crying child. I started to hold him and I and I started to sing. And then eventually, you know, he fell asleep. And then I guess In that moment I started to ask myself whose whose fierce had I really been assuaging at that time or Is it just about as much as my own fears that I had been assuaging, and so I started just casually asking people about their experiences of bedtime. Their experiences. So what were the things that frightened and also reassured them growing up? And I realized how how would there were just so many different stories in that space that you know it's one of our most intimate of spaces, and that's when I really started delving into the sort of like this pit and world of Lola buys. So, Hannah, I confess to you before this interview that I have a 10 month old son and I don't sing him Lalla buys, But I do have Ah bedtime ritual that is very sort of rhythmic and You know, And and almost I guess somewhat melodic, even though it's not a traditional lullaby. So what is a lullaby? Could it be anything that we say or saying to a child when we put them to bed? Also, at least the way we approach this story was I was more interested in sort of the more General view of nighttime rituals. And so our working definition of a lullaby was very, very broad. When I think about Lola buys my even think about the nighttime sounds we hear and how different that is for everybody around the world, and that's sort of part of the fabric from tweak. Start going off to sleep. One of the researchers I spoke to Laura Cirelli. Who, you know, studies the science behind maternal song. When I was interviewing her, she explained something to me that I thought was really powerful, where she looked at the lullaby, not just as really the song, But she explained to me that in her research, she was looking at the lullaby as sort of the small time Auteuil experience. It's really about feeling Mother's gentle rocking, You know, having her face very close to the baby. And and sort of feeling the warmth of the hold. So for me, that's sort of how I see the lullaby as well. What's the history of LA alibis and I suspect that they're not just happening in the United States. I mean, this is a global phenomenon, isn't it? Yeah, it's a global phenomenon. It's not just something that happens, you know across borders. It has also happened through the course of history and through the course of time the oldest Recorded lullaby that we have or the oldest record of a complete lullaby that we know about. Is this Babylonian lullaby? That's about 4000 years old. So we're looking at little by singing. We've been doing this for millennia. One of the really cool things about it is that it's been passed on for generations and you know mostly by women. When I think of little advice, I guess I think of my own mother. And I think about what she passed on to me through Lullaby singing. And I guess you know one of the things that as a woman I always thought about was when I read history books. I am Likely looking at history books through the lens of men. And then when I think about Lola buys as thinking about how much history there is likely composed by women Why are they so soothing to Children? In particular? I mean, there have been studies from the Harvard Music lab that found that infants who listened to lullabies that weren't even in their own language. Not even from their caregivers were still soothed. By them. I find that fascinating. Another thing that Laura Sara Lee, the researcher, had mentioned earlier, too You had explained to me was she had the storm called infant directed, singing and often you know, infants will know when an adult or a caregiver is specifically directing, sound or music to them. One of the things that Samuel Mayor who's part of the Harvard musical APP that you mentioned told me that the interesting thing about Lola vices well, it's while you know music is so diverse across cultures across different Backgrounds that the interesting thing about love advice is that we asked Asuman beings when we're singing a lullaby. We're looking at the same set of constraints. You know, you have to put a child to sleep. So in that way, my guess is that we're instinctively may be slowing down the temple, you know, singing in the more intention at least soothing way we'll be right back with more on the significance of lullaby eyes and your calls when we return. Hey, my name is Sarah Alexander I living Kirkland, Washington When my son who's now almost nine was a baby. I used to sing Lakme Loman's Well, I'll take the high road now. I'll take the low And I'll be in Scott's Linda already. And me and my true form. Never meet again on the Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch. No woman. Hi. This is Anna from Stanford, Connecticut. And my mom is Len and she's nothing to me in Spanish. A roomie. Roomie are more I can't remember the rest but how it went..

Lola Hannah United States researcher Turkey Bonnie Bonnie Banks Laura Sara Lee Auteuil Harvard Music LA Laura Cirelli Connecticut Len Lakme Loman Sarah Alexander Stanford Anna Samuel Mayor Kirkland Asuman
"sarah alexander" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Be <Speech_Telephony_Female> creator <Speech_Telephony_Female> lin. <SpeakerChange> Oh <Speech_Telephony_Female> hi. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I'm fe <Speech_Telephony_Female> visconti from <Speech_Telephony_Female> alpha <Speech_Telephony_Female> loma california <Speech_Telephony_Female> and <Speech_Telephony_Female> my favorite <Speech_Telephony_Male> little by goes like <Speech_Telephony_Female> this <Speech_Telephony_Female> j nifong <Speech_Telephony_Male> of their <Speech_Telephony_Female> Pocketful <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> foreign twenty. black <Speech_Telephony_Female> bird. Baked <Speech_Telephony_Male> he <Speech_Telephony_Male> the when <Speech_Telephony_Female> gooch was open. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Birds <Speech_Telephony_Female> began to stay. And <Speech_Telephony_Female> now was <Speech_Telephony_Female> that. A danny <Speech_Telephony_Female> thing that before <Speech_Telephony_Female> the king <Speech_Telephony_Female> the king within <Speech_Telephony_Male> the parlor <Speech_Telephony_Male> rolling ravioli <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Female> the queen within <Speech_Telephony_Female> the pantry <Speech_Telephony_Male> boiling <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> the made within <Speech_Telephony_Male> garden <Speech_Telephony_Female> picking nicole <Speech_Telephony_Female> along <Speech_Telephony_Female> the black <Speech_Telephony_Female> bird and <Silence> the offer. Your no <Speech_Telephony_Female> and the <Speech_Telephony_Female> reason why we love that <Speech_Telephony_Female> is because it's a symbol <Speech_Telephony_Female> for bologne <Speech_Telephony_Female> family <Speech_Telephony_Female> Hybrid <Speech_Telephony_Female> of <SpeakerChange> the cillian <Speech_Telephony_Male> in american culture. <Speech_Telephony_Male> My name is <Speech_Telephony_Male> michael goldstein. I'm calling <Speech_Telephony_Male> from boston massachusetts. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> My mom sang <Speech_Telephony_Male> me. Almost every <Speech_Telephony_Male> night. <hes> <Speech_Telephony_Male> a song <Speech_Telephony_Male> with <Speech_Telephony_Male> words is the ability <Speech_Telephony_Male> was green sleeves <Speech_Telephony_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> here was her words. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I <Speech_Telephony_Male> love i <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Speech_Telephony_Male> easy. Sacha <Speech_Telephony_Male> good little <Speech_Telephony_Male> darling <Speech_Telephony_Male> on. I <Speech_Telephony_Male> love my <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Speech_Telephony_Male> good. It's <Speech_Telephony_Male> he's such a sweet <Speech_Telephony_Male> little boy <Speech_Telephony_Male> niagara <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> god the <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> research <Speech_Telephony_Male> that it'll die <Speech_Telephony_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> i go. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I <Speech_Telephony_Male> love <Speech_Telephony_Male> you jurisic. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Little boring <Speech_Telephony_Male> just <Speech_Telephony_Male> saying that to <SpeakerChange> be almost <Speech_Telephony_Male> every night when i went to bed. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Hey my name. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Is sarah alexander. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I live in kirkland <Speech_Telephony_Female> washington <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> When my <Speech_Telephony_Female> son who's <Speech_Telephony_Female> now almost nine <Speech_Telephony_Female> was a baby. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I used to sing. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Lock moment <Speech_Telephony_Female> to him. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <SpeakerChange> Which goes <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> he'll take <Speech_Telephony_Female> the high <Speech_Telephony_Female> road. And <Speech_Telephony_Female> i'll take the little <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> and i'll be <Speech_Telephony_Female> in scott linda <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> and me and my <Speech_Telephony_Female> true love <Speech_Telephony_Female> never <Speech_Telephony_Female> be again. <Speech_Telephony_Female> On <Speech_Telephony_Female> von yvonne <Speech_Telephony_Female> he thanks <Speech_Telephony_Female> Locked <Speech_Telephony_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> lullabies <Speech_Female> can also <Speech_Female> serve to bring <Speech_Female> comfort in incredibly <Speech_Female> difficult moments <Speech_Female> like the one <Speech_Female> that our producer lydia <Speech_Female> sister cintas <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> just a warning that <Speech_Female> this call deals with <Speech_Female> the loss of a child <Speech_Female> and we'll hit a <Speech_Female> lot of us hard <Speech_Female> but we felt it was really <Speech_Female> important <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> to hear. I had <Speech_Female> my first son in <Speech_Female> june last year and <Speech_Female> he was unexpectedly <Speech_Female> stillborn. <Speech_Female> My <Speech_Female> husband asked me <Speech_Female> to sing a lullaby at <Speech_Female> his burial so <Speech_Female> after saying <Speech_Female> all of our goodbyes <Speech_Female> and lowering him into <Speech_Female> the ground <Speech_Female> i sang. The song <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> is called lakota lullaby <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and one of the lines <Speech_Female> means my kind <Speech_Female> hearted. Boy <Speech_Female> go to sleep <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> chundin <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> hush <Speech_Music_Female> day. Oh <Speech_Female> she la <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> la <Music> <Music> <hes> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <hes> <Speech_Music_Female> hun. Hey <Speech_Female> piggy <Speech_Female> washed. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Were <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> he <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> he <Music> we. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> We named <Speech_Female> our son sky <Speech_Female> and now sky <Speech_Female> has a little brother who's <Speech_Female> almost four months <Speech_Female> old. <Speech_Female> I sing the <Speech_Female> song to my son. Rio <Speech_Female> too and i hope <Speech_Female> that skies listening <Speech_Female> when i do <Speech_Female> sky in rio <Speech_Female> may not get to grow <Speech_Female> up together <Speech_Female> but i feel some <Speech_Female> comfort knowing <Speech_Female> that at least they have <Speech_Female> this in common <Speech_Female> that their mother <Speech_Female> saying this lullaby <Silence> to <SpeakerChange> both of them. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> There's really nothing to <Speech_Female> say. That can follow <Speech_Female> that moment. <Speech_Female> So i just want to <Speech_Female> thank you for being with us. <Speech_Female> I'm tansy <Speech_Female> nevada this <Speech_Female> is the takeaway <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and we'll see you tomorrow. <Speech_Music_Female> Love <Speech_Music_Female> you in the morning <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> then the afternoon <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> viewing <Speech_Music_Female> evening <Speech_Music_Female> on dirty the <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> rain <Speech_Female> hitting hitting <Speech_Female> scanner moving. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> You <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> know <Music> <Music> school. <Music> <hes> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Music_Female> just.

michael goldstein sarah alexander scott linda lydia <Speech kirkland massachusetts boston washington
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Shaffer, Politics editor here. Now that people are voting in California, it's worth thinking about what comes next. First. We probably won't know the full results on election night this year, especially in those really close races. Remember, That's not an indication of fraud or voting problems. So be prepared for not knowing final results right away and let your friends and family know that it's to be expected will make sure you have the final vote totals as soon as we do. It's time now. For a perspective, that's our daily listener Commentary. Siri's Sarah Alexander is one of the many for whom the reality of wildfire is no longer someone else's problem. Here's her perspective. I live at the edges of the fires, which have been getting closer every year. In 2015. They were just on the evening news. Two years later, ashes from the tub's fire covered my deck. I developed a nervous attachment to my cell phone packed to go kit. And other new habits and 95 masks anxious calls to neighbors the adrenaline rush of Nick's alerts. Heart sickness when I met people who had lost their homes and eventually disaster tourism. I developed an appreciation of wind of first responders and a walk in fresh air. But this is the first year that a friend's house burned down. Brian is a gifted carpenter and artists and old wood and vintage hardware. Totally By chance. I went to his yard sale on a Sunday on highway 12 between Los Alamos and pithy and roads. I fell in love with a beautiful heart transformed from an old Cabinet, Pebble Grey, tin and window glass turned lavender with age. I arranged for delivery on Tuesday It was hot in the sky was smoky and when a helicopter flew by with a bucket of water, we both admitted toe wildfire PTSD. The first mix alert came at 10 P.m., Brian's neighborhood. By 1 30. He texted back that he had just driven out past neighbors houses burning on both sides. In a few days. He confirmed that his house, his workshop and my cabinet were gone. I found myself walking around the house thinking I'd be glad if this thing burned up in that same too. Those thoughts scared me. I don't want my house to burn. I remove every overhanging tree. I create defensible space. I don't ever want my house to burn. But I found myself feeling box after box with unwanted possessions, blankets, books, gifts, clothes, shoes, and when the smoke finally subsided, and goodwill opened its donation door, I joined a crowd of like minded people. We all wanted to lighten up. We all wanted to control it ourselves. The perspective. I'm Sarah Alexander. Sarah Alexander is a therapist in filmmaker living in the North Bay.

Brian Sarah Alexander California Scott Shaffer editor PTSD fraud Los Alamos Siri Nick North Bay
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You get the sky was moving better. The stall clear, But a ripple effect is it backed up before the tunnel toll plazas still backed up to the overpasses, Joe McConnell fork and Traffic support this morning comes from San Matteo Credit Union. Good morning. I'm Dave Freeman with a perspective now on at 8 43. Sarah Alexander is one of the many for whom the reality of wildfire is no longer someone else's problem. I live at the edges of the fires, which have been getting closer every year. In 2015. They were just on the evening news. Two years later, ashes from the tub's fire covered my deck. I developed a nervous attachment to my cell phone packed to go kit. And other new habits and 95 masks anxious calls to neighbors. The adrenaline rush of nickel alerts. Heart sickness when I met people who had lost their homes and eventually disaster tourism. I developed an appreciation of wind of first responders and a walk in fresh air. But this is the first year that a friend's house burned down. Brian is a gifted carpenter and artists and old wood and vintage hardware. Totally By chance. I went to his yard sale on a Sunday on highway 12 between Los Alamos empathy and roads. I fell in love with a beautiful heart transformed from an old Cabinet, Pebble Grey, tin and window glass turned lavender with age. I arranged for delivery on Tuesday It was hot in the sky was smoky and when a helicopter flew by with a bucket of water, we both admitted toe wildfire PTSD. The first Knicks alert came at 10 P.m., Brian's neighborhood. By 1 30. He texted back that he had just driven out past neighbors houses burning on both sides. In a few days. He confirmed that his house, his workshop and my cabinet were gone. I found myself walking around the house thinking I'd be glad if this thing burned up in that same to those that scared me. I don't want my house to burn. I remove every overhanging tree. I create defensible space. I don't ever want my house to burn. But I found myself feeling box after box with unwanted possessions, blankets, books, gifts, clothes, shoes, and when the smoke finally subsided, and goodwill opened its donation door. I joined the crowd of like minded people. We all wanted to lighten up. We all wanted.

Brian Joe McConnell San Matteo Credit Union Dave Freeman Sarah Alexander PTSD Los Alamos Knicks
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fence Bay Bridge. Barely backed up out to the overpass is the metering lights that were on but no problems on the span except fog this morning, Joe McConnell fork and Traffic support with the fog comes from San Matteo Credit Union. I'm Dave Freeman with a perspective now on DVD at 6 43. Good morning. Sarah Alexander is one of the many for whom the reality of wildfire is no longer someone else's problem. I live at the edges of the fires, which have been getting closer every year. In 2015. They were just on the evening news. Two years later, ashes from the tub's fire covered my deck. I developed a nervous attachment to my cell phone packed to go kit. And other new habits and 95 masks anxious calls to neighbors. The adrenaline rush of nickel alerts. Heart sickness when I met people who had lost their homes and eventually disaster tourism. I developed an appreciation of wind of first responders and a walk in fresh air. But this is the first year that a friend's house burned down. Brian is a gifted carpenter and artists and old wood and vintage hardware. Totally By chance. I went to his yard sale on a Sunday on highway 12 between Los Alamos and pithy and roads. I fell in love with a beautiful heart transformed from an old Cabinet, Pebble Grey, tin and window glass turned lavender with age. I arranged for delivery on Tuesday It was hot in the sky was smoky and when a helicopter flew by with a bucket of water, we both admitted toe wildfire PTSD. The first Knicks alert came at 10 P.m., Brian's neighborhood. By 1 30. He texted back that he had just driven out past neighbors houses burning on both sides. In a few days. He confirmed that his house, his workshop and my cabinet were gone. I found myself walking around the house thinking I'd be glad if this thing burned up that staying too. Those that scared me. I don't want my house to burn. I remove every overhanging tree. I create defensible space. I don't ever want my house to burn. But I found myself feeling box after box with unwanted possessions, blankets, books, gifts, clothes, shoes, and when the smoke finally subsided, and goodwill opened its donation door, I joined a crowd of like minded people. We all wanted to lighten up. We all wanted to control it ourselves. The perspective. I'm Sarah Alexander. Sarah Alexander is a therapist and.

Brian Sarah Alexander Joe McConnell Fence Bay Bridge San Matteo Credit Union Dave Freeman PTSD Los Alamos Knicks
"sarah alexander" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:23 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Watch the new Hulu series normal people you might even watch it one day like Sarah Alexander wrote on Twitter she said I have spent my day watching all twelve episodes of normal people just gorgeous the ceiling at Mick Adams on Twitter said she spent ten hours watching the series saying quote my heart is absolutely full and broken at the same time so what's all this about normal people is based on a literary sensation of the same name by acclaimed Irish author Sally Rooney unlike the original novel the show became a pretty much an overnight critical and commercial hit the series tells the story of a couple Connell Marion they come together in high school when Connell is a quiet but popular football star working class kid and Marianne is a reed thin book is sometimes a bit salty and not that social person both are brilliant and they began a relationship in secret you know I'm USA and other data do you like me but but the photocopier is out of yeah yeah did you mean like as a friend or was just as a friend I thought that might be in play just wasn't sure C. I. N. it's just a confused about what I feel I think if you of course in school if something happens with us I have to know as you can imagine that is necessarily work out well but they're both Merion Connell head off to Trinity College in Dublin and the script was flipped she's a confident one with a pack of friends and he's the one struggling to fit in if the two managed to keep finding their way back to one another has gotten widespread acclaim for its intermittent serous portrayal of young love Saxa mental health The New York Times calls it a gorgeous melancholy series that presents an empathetic study of two people coming together of H. we're joined now by executive producer and Oscar nominee director Lenny Abrahamson you know his work in the film room he directed the first six episodes of normal people he joins us from Ireland so there's a slight delay many thanks for being with us after the pleasure thanks for having me then you knew you wanted to adapt the book before it was even published you had a galley copy when you're reading the novel what inspired you as a director I mean it's just so many factors I think primary societies rising is so great I mean deceptively simple it's quite direct she tell you what happened with what people think and what they say but somehow she manages to give you the kind of the infamous encounter with the characters related the story of intimacy and intimacy between them but also it's told in this very intimate way and I was excited by the fact that it's a story which takes young people and and first love and that transition from teens to adults to take that really seriously it doesn't kind of like a glossy nor does it like a solid guys that it's a it's a really truthful we recently observed story of an incredibly important part of I think everybody's life so yeah an exoneration learners from later on there's a whole lot of reasons why I felt like passion I was gonna ask you your Irish the writers Irish story set in Ireland for the non Irish what's particularly Irish about the story well I think aftereffects of everything and nothing it yeah you're right I mean it's cast and crew it's it's an entirely serious even though United with the BBC and native the creative and they kind of DNA evidence and I'm with the people around it all from here over here being where I am but actually because it you know islands now is such a you know it's it's retention and you look at the generation of Mariana Connell they have often more in common does teenagers aren't as young adults and I don't have more in common crops with their American peers or the European pairs and they might live that an older generation of Irish person for the globalized culture that all of them and hi Katie participated and so on the one hundred three hours the landscaping here that the actions you can hear not classed I'm there are lots of cultural details that people will hopefully be intrigued by but ultimately it's a pretty universal story advised this with the people that I think young American years as well as other American losers well we'll be able to identify and identify pretty easily one of the biggest challenges I imagine for you as a as someone the visual medium is that so much of the story relies on the interior dialogue from Connell and Marianne so as a filmmaker when you think about that when you think about that interior dialogue what kind of decisions do you have to make in terms of camera angles in terms of lighting to help us understand it I mean that's the challenge always you know it's it's it's it's more focused on because when you're adopting it the feature literature because you you know it's very apparent looking set on the page but it's always true if you're looking any drama how do you how do you reflect the interior of characters in this kind of very external and medium and like you know you you turn the camera on everything towards a device or can kind of like a scalpel the filmmakers a different sort of instrument I think it's a combination of things you know clarification on your lucky very lucky to work with valley near south on the what wonderful but it's kind of like a lot of courage and and it's the clever sentence calling or grabbing were cheering as pieces of interior and speech or thought on on making them fly into dialogue but actually it's it's just about the presence of great actors as well and I'm closely and carefully observing women with texture and color and I love you know it people are amazing ask them to standing other vehicle and great actors have the capacity to digest in fact they're they're kind of body language and they're they're kind of expressions in the towns of voice with so much color and I think it's just all of that all of that machinery or filmmaking cat harness to do exactly what you told them that which is to get a sense of the interior on screen my guest is Lenny Abramson executive producer director the first six episodes of normal people and we got a unsolicited tweet about normal people we'd we'd advertise you're gonna be on the show today and the tweet says so happy to see Mr Abrams and on the show today the Hulu series normal people so beautifully done please commend him for being true to the story without being pedantic it's moving to watch as it was to read Bravo no the script really huge club not nice to the Brooklyn to the book correct yes it's this incident is that says say that again sorry awesome debate pretty close to the book yes right yes it does I mean there are lots of subtle changes and there are some different emphases and we do think the way the the very end works and how that set up a little bit different because it's in in the novel it's one massive interior kind of and a look at that at the cabin interiors and we have to kind of break that out there a little bit but I think in terms of faithfulness it's a very faithful adaptation and and you know we were it was good to be able to do that because you can't not every vocalize bottoms when you take any find tractors and things that you need to deal with the book really how and I think that's because the compelling how compelling that relationship you know it's such a beautiful love story and such a kind of complex love story in a way as well as being and as I said about the novel Freddie direct and it's telling that once you've just concentrated on what was happening between those two characters you know we we thought we were on the front lines and not allowed us to see you know expose walk through the store in a fairly straight way so we need a little bit about intimacy and sex because the sex scenes in the series inspired a lot of praise but the way they're shot in the way that this particular sexual relationship is depicted what kind of conversations you have with your actors and and should use an intimacy coach and I would love to know how what impact do you think that hat on the end result I think it was really important M. I mean I would think that the first time that I've ever worked with a machine and a coach and I it was like skeptical when I heard about this well I thought I could send you got both between the actors and also discouraging for director or you know and it gets all sorts of of anxiety around it but I actually work for the wonderful woman if you shop online worked on shows like sex education and other things that people are not on Netflix for example and you get to the left a way of framing the discussion thank you for incredibly inclusive which isn't very and collaborative which allows for kind of creative collaboration but keeps everybody safe and hard and so we we we took a very early on in the night before he even involved I spoke to the actors before we cast them about the way I was thinking about usually about intimacy we talked I think like strolling on unusually in our son took that nine golden tiger fee is beautiful because of her shots at work that you know shot news but in a way which is very tender and we also talked about having the actors very much believe like I did that this is essential to the story it's not an item to the story it's the three part of understanding their relationship with any she came in and she just hardens very you know good ways of working from the very practical like how do you make something look real with that in any way sort of and you know in light of the actors feel safe and comfortable as little so and how we would talk about everything in advance talk about it dramatically separate the character from the actor said that email set up push to have any actors bringing their own internet life into this into the space you know it's really about how to work it's not displaying in creating images that carry the meeting that we all agree on and then very simple things like you know a green touch what what sort of touch each both of the actors feel comfortable and having ways of of land discussing that with don't you said the call you from the news or whatever just end up being a very grown up and ultimately very I think wholesaling experience you know because I think the scenes are very peaceful and things they wouldn't have been if people have felt awkward or uncomfortable in the making office let's talk about those two actors by the way my guess is many Abramson we're talking about normal people now on Hulu daisy after Jones and Paul the scout unit I think it's Paul's first onscreen role for it for you as a director what is the benefit of having an unknown what we didn't set out to you to have a note or notes we just went and tried to find the best people and when you I think people in their early twenties these two characters are instructors are did a good chance that they will be and and I I think then if that is the thing that happened in the three actors are so great and so right the ravens and excitement and I thought I suppose when you can come to bring the show to the audience because it's just they're struggling into more aware of how good a while longer shooting I was always exciting hi this would land with an audience and and maybe the other advantage I suppose it's just that there are no baggage from other shows or other sound and and it adds to that sense of realism for an audience that they know your chances of creation not saying that I was wondering which of the feeding that you're encountering real people helped by by that kind of lack of familiarity but and what does that but that's it you know that they're not but if you like it now I think their dangers of anonymity a kind of over you know when the first clip that we played you know there's after that point where we cut it there's ten seconds of silence before anything happens again and there are lots of moments of silence for you as a director how silence a good tool well I guess that's a really good question I really like it because if you create an intense atmosphere and if there is so there's if there's a palpable transaction between people happily then you need to give it space said to resonate colonel in the scary.

Sarah Alexander Twitter Mick Adams Sally Rooney
"sarah alexander" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"When I was still yet. Oh September seventeenth. That is those gusty coach. Joseph C but Korean mentors. Some macy inaudible. He's been yes. Yeah Awesome Vendettas. `scuse benefit by some more on recess a film and they're gonNA super reds set up simply template daily fiercer. You go on fat more throws think Lebron Dido Solo gone those ingredient address Trish bookie Tony Whiskey. Must not overdoses bedroom London. A seen them better known as the phillies. I thought. God galleon deleon but as a federal Futch Day Megan thus far Phil Deborah yet amass owner if they are do do but our worst in Davos episode Lebron Dido but after nine years in mementos soot umbrella Halloween oil memento kick it is not sort. There are more stress from is near the locally fat or no single. There's days that he'll go. We know last in for mom what him blow the Aero's so but then what Abo- all Gelinas fantasma soul seemingly as the notion Russian defeat fillets. The committee has always sort of Halloween costume. Postal Beta Halloween. A bull. They seem Conrad Domino last days. That formats in multi mode super McCarthy discussed these various Going no less shaun king remedy to radical. Let that the Golden Sava nauseous Kasich. Whatever the internals it amenable to other whisky he Whiskey in Worcester but they also pose seniors seniors token allies. Yoda Bama's collaborated go moose. For they have only Nia a pusher madam. Indeed honesty intimidators polling capelle donate from very multiple alochol. Okay I'm oceanography. Painted did them in. But I'm a grown thus upon Golden Sarah Alexander Mosul Miranda's golden city. That has Kellyanne. That's a one loss most demented as that issue. But they're getting combat and in no way. Is there a mobile. Oh mentors but abby got a case to a quarter is there it was it must be in charge them data as aesthetic warwick in a memento. CK's but these are not only go to that. Seniors in Istanbul told necessitates. Wrap it easy moment. This is Colorado in there but but others defeat and L. But are what are the most being bonus but la CAPAC rubber uniform either sports superstore mclemore oriented. Mo's Laszlo Manolas. Mondays Camera Soho stabers mass in a toilet and local going Colo Muslim and they'll watch elevator but I think durant Domino's sooners squad Lola's Oh really in Lunde told you never Doodo Golden Imos entrust your and it is the took Lati- Ganga me. No less is better than this yet. Today's own delivers post. It was begging..

phillies Lebron Dido Golden Sarah Alexander Mosul M Doodo Golden Imos Joseph C CAPAC Yoda Bama Conrad Domino durant Domino shaun king Kasich Lati- Ganga Tony Whiskey Istanbul Colorado London McCarthy Worcester Laszlo Manolas
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Father Sir you know as the supply officer two of the army is that was mad Anthony Wayne brought to the battle of fallen timbers his father was killed by the Indians in trying to supply Wayne's army and so he uses his father's the gift to the country of his life in in order to help protect it a two I can secure or a commission a efforts to secure a midshipman's berth in the navy and he's slowly but surely rises in the navy always being sort of a cantankerous and obstreperous guy that gets in trouble with his contemporaries and had no place to the ever get in more trouble with the contemporary than he did with his superior at the battle of Lake Erie Oliver hazard Perry and what he's trying to do an eighteen forty three is to justify what he did at the battle of Lake Erie which was so controversial yeah by many people who felt that he did not adequately support him is commander in this particular battle and so this controversy is going to run on for at this particular point thirty years and that will continue in that way for at least about another decade before it finally withers and Elliott is sort of forgotten and become the same I am a major hero in the your early maybe but to follow your story David you have done the work of putting together all the two sides and noted that major naval historians before you teddy Roosevelt's one of them and may hung himself offered may Han is another have taken this same incident and argued it from either on all over Paris side or Jesse L. inside and no less than James Fennimore Cooper Wade into this in contemporary to Jesse Elliott so there they were major American voices arguing this tale is that correct that is correct in and Elliott has no better champion in James reading more Cooper wrote a history of the U. S. navy any in the US history he defends Elliott or at least does not attack him for what happened at the battle of Lake Erie and thus gives himself drawn into a controversy which means that his naval history which he hoped would be his most popular book is virtually condemned in the general public and even though it is still in print today the the the description of the battle of Lake Erie that is in it is the center of a whole controversy that arose between Elliott and the his champions on the one hand and the Perry household and champions on the other where was he died of disease of of yellow fever I believe in a right nineteen any died young and so he was forever the hero that America needed to celebrate this as I've learned from David was the Trafalgar for little of put she ends of the American west this was the largest sailing action naval ship to ship line the line that America ever participated in this in the the Napoleonic era the era culpa crown by great of rock roll navy heroes Horatio Nelson being chief among them so let's go back to the beginning because we're going to start we start in eighteen forty three when the arguments going on and by the way what what the dry remark that I love about Elliott David is that he's the latter day Iago Iago always complaining about how he didn't get credit so let's go back to the beginning of all over Oliver hazard Perry his family to to understand come to America and take root as Quakers spot with and going through quickly between marriages and meeting the hazards he is born in the late eighteenth century and his father is a sea captain who is his father and how does this father fair in the U. early U. S. navy is father was Christopher Raymond berry who had been captured in you the war of American independence and had escaped and in one of these is a curse since he's got the scape in Ireland he meets a young lady who he meets again on another issue commercial ship years later and eventually marry and so and she is a wall because of the very famous family of the Wallaces in Scotland and so that she is brings into the family a law I long tradition of warrior of fighter of fighters of various sorts and but Perry is a commercial captain in the period after the American revolution who is given a commission as a captain in the U. S. navy and command of a new ship called the general green he brings his eldest son Oliver hazard Perry with him as a midshipman on this ship and slowly but surely curry following the usual careers of naval officers the day rises to be a lieutenant and then a master commandant which is a rank in the navy at that time roughly come in a commanding are commensurate with we what we would today call a Commodore seventy commander all right this is Oliver hazard Perry the son of captain Christopher Raymond Perry called Raymond I want to spend just a moment about with mom Sarah Alexander as you say she's of the William Wallace family Braveheart was William Wallace these are these are Scottish independence strong minded and fiercely anti English but in any event and that suits well the early American colonies are you have a moment in your book in which everybody says it was madam Perry won the battle of the array and not Oliver hazard her son why did they say that David well she I thank you is introduced into this Quaker land each a fighting tradition they admittedly her husband over there his Quaker lineage to by becoming a a combatant in the American revolution but she I think brings in a a much more traditional sort of approach to workfare being part of a family tradition and she and her son takes it now just a moment before we go to see on the general green he grows up largely in Newport Rhode Island where a lot of very prominent names from the south spend their summers to escape the malaria and the disease is one of them I believe is John Calhoun what does Oliver hazard Perry make of Newport what is new port at in the seventeen nineties well Newport in the seventeen nineties is a decaying city in large part because of the commercial activity of New England is of Rhode Island in particular is B. as for shifting to Providence rather than to the island of Newport which doesn't have any real connections to the back country and so as the consequences of these people are there are looking for a an occupation that will give them some a chance to have economic success and the the Perrys are involved in commercial activities and then when the opportunity comes with the expansion of the navy in seventeen ninety eight the really the creation of the navy in seventeen ninety eight the that Kerry is political support gets him this captaincy of the general green right these are the early captains the early lieutenants of the United States Navy putting together and putting to sea into politics Adams and Jefferson and will meet all that when we come back Oliver hazard Perry born a seventeen eighty six he goes to see on his father's ship is a mid ship and in seventeen ninety nine the general green will sail with the race and will also a plunge into what comes the early navy the.

officer Anthony thirty years one hand
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KGO 810

"As the supply officer two of the army is that was mad Anthony Wayne brought to the battle of fallen timbers his father was killed by the Indians in trying to supply Wayne's army and so he uses his father's the gift to the country of his life in in order to help protect it to secure or a commission a efforts should her midshipman's berth in the navy and he's slowly but surely rises in the navy always being sort of a cantankerous and obstreperous guy that gets in trouble with his contemporaries and had no place to the ever get in more trouble with the contemporary than he did with his superior at the battle of Lake Erie Oliver hazard Perry and what he's trying to do an eighteen forty three is to justify what he did at the battle of Lake Erie which was so controversial yeah by many people who felt that he did not adequately support him is commander in this particular battle and so this controversy is going to run on for at this particular point thirty years and that will continue in that way for at least about another decade before it finally withers and Elliott is sort of forgotten and become the same I am a major hero in the your early maybe but to follow your story David you have done the work of putting together all the two sides and noted that major naval historians before you teddy Roosevelt's one of them and may harm himself offered may Han is another have taken this same incident and argued it from either Oliver Parry side or Jesse L. A. inside and no less than James Fennimore Cooper Wade into this in contemporary to Jesse Elliott so there there were major American voices arguing this tale is that correct that is correct in and Elliott has no better champion in James Fenimore Cooper wrote a history of the US navy in the in the US history he defends Elliott or at least does not attack him for what happened at the battle of Lake Erie and thus gives himself drawn into a controversy which means that his naval history which he hoped would be his most popular book is virtually condemned in the general public and even though it is still in print today the the the description of the battle of Lake Erie that is in it is the center of a whole controversy that arose between Elliott and the his champions on the one hand and the Perry household and champions on the other where was he died of disease of of yellow fever I believe in a white nineteen any died young and so he was forever the hero that America needed to celebrate this as I've learned from David was the Trafalgar for little of put she ends of the American west this was the largest sailing action naval ship to ship line the line that America ever participated in this in the the Napoleonic era the era culpa crown by great of rock roll navy heroes Horatio Nelson being chief among them so let's go back to the beginning because we're going to start we start in eighteen forty three when the arguments going on and by the way what what the dry remarked that I love about Elliott David is that he's the latter day Iago Iago always complaining about how he didn't get credit so let's go back to the beginning of all over Oliver hazard Perry his family to to understand come to America and take root as Quakers spot with and going through quickly between marriages and meeting the hazards he is born in the late eighteenth century and his father is a sea captain who is his father and how does this father fair in the U. early U. S. navy is father was Christopher Raymond berry who had been captured in you the war of American independence and had escaped and in one of these issues occur since he's got the scape in Ireland he meets a young lady who he meets again on another dish commercial ship years later and eventually marry and so and she is a wall some of the very famous family of the Wallaces in Scotland and so that she is brings into the family a law I long tradition of warrior of fighter of fighters of various sorts and but Perry is a commercial captain in the period after the American revolution who is given a commission as a captain in the U. S. navy and command of a new ship called the general green he brings his eldest son Oliver hazard Perry with him as a midshipman on this ship and slowly but surely Terry following the usual careers of naval officers with a rises to be a lieutenant and then a master commandant which is a rank in the navy at that time roughly come in come in leading are commensurate with we what we would today call a Commodore seventy commander all right this is Oliver hazard Perry the son of captain Christopher Raymond Perry called rain and I want to spend just a moment about with mom Sarah Alexander as you say she's of the William Wallace family Braveheart was William Wallace these are these are Scottish independence strong minded and fiercely anti English but in any event and that suits well the early American colonies you have a moment in your book in which everybody says it was madam Perry won the battle of the array and not Oliver hazard her son why did they say that David well she are you saying is introduced into this Quaker land each a fighting tradition they admittedly her husband over there his Quaker lineage through by becoming a a combatant in the American revolution but she I think brings in a a much more traditional sort of approach to warfare being part of a family tradition and she and her son takes it now just a moment before we go to see on the general green he grows up largely in Newport Rhode Island where a lot of very prominent names from the south spend their summers to escape from malaria and the disease is one of them I believe is John Calhoun what does Oliver hazard Perry make of Newport what is new port at in the seventeen nineties well Newport in the seventeen nineties is a decaying city in large part because of the commercial activity of New England is of Rhode Island in particular is B. as for shifting to Providence rather than to the island of Newport which doesn't have any real connections to the back country and so as the consequences of these people live there are looking for a an occupation that will give them some a chance to have economic success and the the Perrys are involved in commercial activities and then when the opportunity comes with the expansion of the navy in seventeen ninety eight the really the creation of the navy in seventeen ninety eight that very is political support gets him miss captaincy of the general green right these are the early captains the early lieutenants of the United States Navy putting together and putting to sea into politics Adams and Jefferson and will meet all that when we come back Oliver hazard Perry born seventeen eighty six he goes to see on his father's ship is a mid ship and in seventeen ninety nine the general green will sail with the race and will also a plunge into what comes the early navy the heroism.

officer Anthony Wayne thirty years one hand
"sarah alexander" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Officer two of the army is that was mad Anthony Wayne brought to the battle of fallen timbers his father was killed by the Indians and crying to supply Wayne's army and so he uses his father's the gift to the country of his life and in order to help protect it to secure or a commission yeah for sugar midshipman's berth in the navy and he's slowly but surely rises in the navy always being sort of a cantankerous and obstreperous guy that gets in trouble with his contemporaries and had no place to the ever get in more trouble with the contemporary than he did with his superior at the battle of Lake Erie Oliver hazard Perry and what he's trying to do an eighteen forty three is to justify what he did at the battle of Lake Erie which was so controversial yeah by many people who felt that he did not adequately support him is commander in this particular battle and so this controversy is going to run on for at this particular point thirty years and that will continue in that way for at least about another decade before it finally withers and belly abuse sort of forgotten them Perry become the same time a major hero in the your early maybe but to follow your story David you have done the work of putting together on the two sides and noted that major naval historians before you teddy Roosevelt's one of them and may harm himself offered may Han is another have taken this same incident and argued it from either on Oliver parricide or Jesse L. inside and no less than James Fennimore Cooper Wade into this in contemporary to Jesse L. and so they are they were major American voices arguing this tale is that correct that is correct in and Elliott has no better champion the James Fenimore Cooper wrote a history of the U. S. navy in in the US history he defends Elliott or at least does not attack him for what happened at the battle of Lake Erie and thus gets himself drawn into a controversy which means that his naval history which he hoped would be his most popular book is virtually condemn in the general public and even though it is still in print today the the U. description of the battle of Lake Erie that is in it is the center of a whole controversy that arose between Elliott and the his champions on the one hand and the Perry household and champions on the other where was Terry he died of disease of of yellow fever I believe in a nineteen any died young and so he was forever the hero that America needed to celebrate this as I've learned from David was the Trafalgar for little of put she ends the American west this was the largest sailing action naval ship to ship line the line that America ever participated in this in the the Napoleonic era the era culpa crowned by a great rock roll navy heroes Horatio Nelson being chief among them so let's go back to the beginning because we're going to start we start in eighteen forty three when the arguments going on and by the way what what the dry remarked that I love about Elliott David is that he's the latter day Iago Iago always complaining about how he didn't get credit so let's go back to the beginning of our work Oliver hazard Perry his family to to understand come to America and take root as Quakers spot with and going through quickly between marriages and meeting the hazards he is born in the late eighteenth century and his father is a sea captain who is his father and how does this father fair in the U. early U. S. navy is father was Christopher Raymond berry who had been captured in you the war of American independence and had escaped and in one of these is a curse since he's got the scape in Ireland he meets a young lady who he meets again on another dish commercial ship years later and eventually marry and so and she is a wall some of the very famous family of the Wallaces in Scotland and so that she is brings in through the family a law I long tradition of warrior of writer of fighters of various sorts and but Perry is a commercial captain in the period after the American revolution who is given them a commission as a captain in the U. S. navy and command of a new ship called the general green he brings his eldest son Oliver hazard Perry with him as a midshipman on this ship and slowly but surely curry following the usual careers of naval officers with a rises to be a lieutenant and then a master commandant which is a rank in the navy at that time roughly come in a commanding are commensurate with we what we would today call a Commodore seventy commander hi this is Oliver hazard Perry the son of captain Christopher Raymond Perry called Raymond I want to spend just a moment about with mom Sarah Alexander as you say she's out of the William Wallace family Braveheart with William Wallace these are these are Scottish independence strong minded and fiercely anti English but in any event and that suits well the early American colonies you have a moment in your book in which everybody says it was madam Pareh won the battle of the array and not Oliver hazard her son why did they say that David well she are you saying is introduced into this Quaker land each a fighting tradition that admittedly her husband over there his Quaker lineage to by becoming a a combatant in the American revolution but she I think brings in a a much more traditional sort of approach to warfare being part of a family tradition and she and her son takes it now just a moment before we go to see on the general green he grows up largely in Newport Rhode Island where a lot of very prominent names from the south spend their summers to escape the malaria and the disease is one of them I believe is John Calhoun what does Oliver hazard Perry make of Newport what is new port at in the seventeen nineties well Newport in the seventeen nineties is a decaying city in large part because of the commercial activity of New England is of Rhode Island in particular is to be issue shifting to Providence rather than to the island of Newport which doesn't have any real connections to the back country and so as the consequences of these people live there are looking for a an occupation and that will give them some chance to have economic success and the the Perrys are involved in commercial activities and then when the opportunity comes with the expansion of the navy in seventeen ninety eight the really the creation of the navy in seventeen ninety eight that Perry is political support gets him miss captaincy of the general green right these are the early captains the early lieutenants of the United States Navy putting together and putting to sea into politics Adams and Jefferson and will meet all that when we come back Oliver hazard Perry born seventeen eighty six he goes to see on his father's ship is a mid ship and in seventeen ninety nine the general green will sail with the rays and will also a plunge into what comes the early navy the heroism of.

Officer Anthony Wayne thirty years one hand
"sarah alexander" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Father served you as the supply officer two of the army that was mad Anthony Wayne brought to the battle of fallen timbers his father was killed by the Indians in trying to supply Wayne's army and so he uses his father's the gift to the country of his life in in order to help protect it a to secure a commission the efforts secure a bit shipments birth in the navy and he's slowly but surely rises in the navy always being sort of a cantankerous and obstreperous guy that gets in trouble with his contemporaries and had no place to the ever get in more trouble with the contemporary than he did with his superior at the battle of Lake Erie Oliver hazard Perry and what he's trying to do in eighteen forty three is to justify what he did at the battle of Lake Erie which was so controversial yeah by many people who felt that he did not adequately support him yes commander in this particular battle and so this controversy is going to run on for at this particular point thirty years and that will continue in that way for at least about another decade before it finally withers and Elliott is sort of forgotten and become the same as a major hero in the your early maybe but to follow your story David you have done the work of putting together all the two sides and noted that major naval historians before you teddy Roosevelt's one of them and may hung himself offered may Han is another have taken this same incident and argued it from either on Oliver Perry side or Jesse L. inside and no less than James Fennimore Cooper Wade into this in contemporary to Jesse Elliott so there there were major American voices arguing this tale is that correct that is correct in and the elite has no better champion in James Whitmore Cooper wrote a history of the U. S. navy in the in the US history he defends Elliott or at least does not attack him for what happened at the battle of Lake Yuri and that's gets himself drawn into a controversy which means that his naval history which he hoped would be his most popular book is virtually condemned in the general public and even though it is still in print today the the the description of the battle of Lake Erie that is in it is the center of a whole controversy that arose between Elliott and the his champions on the one hand and the Perry household and champions on the other where was he died of disease of of yellow fever I believe in a right nineteen any died young and so he was forever the hero that America needed to celebrate this as I've learned from David was the Trafalgar for little of put she ends of the American west this was the largest sailing action naval a ship to ship line the line that America ever participated in this and the the Napoleonic era the era culpa crowned by a great of rock roll navy heroes Horatio Nelson being chief among them so let's go back to the beginning because we're going to start we start in eighteen forty three when the arguments going on and by the way what what the dry remarked that I love about Elliott David is that he's the latter day Iago Iago always complaining about how he didn't get credit so let's go back to the beginning of all over Oliver hazard Perry his family to to understand come to America and take root as Quakers but with and going through quickly between marriages and meeting the hazards he is born in the late eighteenth century and his father is a sea captain who is his father and how does this bother fair in the U. early U. S. name is father was Christopher Raymond berry who had been captured in you the war of American independence and had escaped and in one of these is excursions he's got the skate in Ireland he meets a young lady who he meets again on another commercial ship years later and eventually marry and so and she is a wall some of the very famous family of the Wallaces in Scotland and so that she is brings into the family a law I long tradition of warrior of fighter of fighters of various sorts and but Perry is a commercial captain in the period after the American revolution who is given a commission as a captain in the U. S. navy and command of a new ship called the general green he brings his eldest son Oliver hazard Perry with him as a midshipman on this ship and slowly but surely curry following the usual careers of naval officers the day rises to be a lieutenant and then a master commandant which is a rank in the navy at that time roughly come in come into being commensurate with we what we would today call a Commodore seventy commander all right this is Oliver hazard Perry the son of captain Christopher Raymond Perry called Raymond I want to spend just a moment about with mom Sarah Alexander as you say she's of the William Wallace family of Braveheart was William Wallace these are these are Scottish independence strong minded and fiercely anti English but in any event and that suits well the early American colonies you have a moment in your book in which everybody says it was madam Perry won the battle of the array and not Oliver hazard her son why did they say that David well she I thank you is introduced into this Quaker lineage a fighting tradition they admittedly her husband over there his Quaker lineage to by becoming a a combatant in the American revolution but she I think brings in a a much more traditional sort of approach to workfare being part of a family tradition and she and her son takes it now just a moment before we go to see on the general green he grows up largely in Newport Rhode Island where a lot of very prominent names from the south spend their summers to escape the malaria and the disease is one of them I believe is John Calhoun what does Oliver hazard Perry make of Newport what is new port at in the seventeen nineties well Newport in the seventeen nineties is a decaying city in large part because of the commercial activity of New England is of Rhode Island in particular is because for shifting to Providence rather than to the island of Newport which doesn't have any real connections to the back country and so as the consequences of the people there are looking for a an occupation that will give them some a chance to have economic success and the prairies are involved in commercial activities and then when the opportunity comes with the expansion of the navy in seventeen ninety eight really the creation of the navy in seventeen ninety eight that Terry is political support gets him this captaincy of the general green right these are the early captains the early lieutenants of the United States Navy putting together and putting to sea into politics Adams and Jefferson and will meet all that when we come back Oliver hazard Perry born a seventeen eighty six he goes to see on his father's ship is a mid ship and in seventeen ninety nine the general green will sail with the IRA's and will also a plunge into what comes the early navy the.

officer Anthony Wayne thirty years one hand
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Holiday perspective when my mother died eighteen years ago my thanksgiving died with her at first I did not think much of it and was glad that I might never again have to fly during the most god awful travel days of the year besides all things thanksgiving had already been developing for awhile first he didn't want all of us kids to come home at the same time next she began buying her pies at Costco but it was still the one holiday of the year we could all enjoy there was none of the how Christian are how Jewish do we celebrate ambiguity that came with Christmas and none of IT psychotic consumerism and hyperactivity there was none of the very who will kiss me at midnight angst the contract the forced merriment of new year's eve and we all loved food possibly more than each other but we loved each other enough to get ourselves to Detroit to perform some new re enactment of childhood thanksgiving rituals after mom died I went looking for a comfortable spot at a thanksgiving table I tried being the guest at homes of friends and homes of friends of friends I tried inviting equally was full sibling to town and cooking and or eating out I even learned to host to survive frenzy in the grocery stores and slavery in the kitchen to bake the sacrificial bird and answer that great unanswerable question how big of a Turkey do we need but more often than not my choices have surprisingly uncomfortable trade offs now I am grateful to notice that aging is obliging more friends to come up with a holiday redesign as their children grow up and move away as usual hosts age or die they find themselves asking where will I go this year I am glad for their company in this changing world were limitations for some of us to find a spot and a new table or just at a table where others might happily sit with the perspective I'm Sarah Alexander Serra Alexander is a marriage and.

Costco Detroit Turkey Sarah Alexander Serra Alexande eighteen years
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Our family shrink it often becomes necessary to find a new spot at the thanksgiving table or a new table entirely Serra Alexander has our holiday perspective when my mother died eighteen years ago my thanksgiving died with her at first I did not think much of it and was glad that I might never again have to fly during the most god awful travel days of the year besides all things thanksgiving had already been developing for awhile first you didn't want all of us kids to come home at the same time next he began buying her pies at cosco but it was still the one holiday of the year we could all enjoy there was none of the how Christian are how Jewish do we celebrate ambiguity that came with Christmas and none of IT psychotic consumerism and hyperactivity there was none of the very who will kiss me at midnight angst the contract the forced merriment of new year's eve and we all loved food possibly more than each other but we loved each other enough to get ourselves to Detroit to perform some new re enactment of childhood thanksgiving rituals after mom died I went looking for a comfortable spot at a thanksgiving table I tried being the guest at homes of friends and homes of friends of friends I tried inviting equally wistful sibling to town and cooking and or eating out I even learned to host to survive frenzy in the grocery stores and slavery in the kitchen to bake the sacrificial bird and answer that great unanswerable question how big of a Turkey do we need but more often than not my choices have surprisingly uncomfortable trade offs now I am grateful to notice that aging is obliging more friends to come up with a holiday redesign as their children grow up and move away as usual hosts Ader die they find themselves asking where will I go this year I am glad for their company in this changing world where limitations for some of us to find a spot at a new table or to set a table where others might happily sit with the perspective I'm Sarah Alexander Sir Alexander is a marriage and.

Serra Alexander cosco Detroit Turkey Sarah Alexander Sir Alexander eighteen years
"sarah alexander" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

08:21 min | 3 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"To the army. That was mad. Anthony, Wayne brought to the battle of fallen timbers. His father was killed by the Indians in trying to supply Wayne's army. And so he uses his father's gift to the country of his life in order to help protect it to secure a commission a first secure amid birth in the navy and he slowly. But surely rises in the navy always being sort of a Kantan, Chris and obstreperous guy that gets in trouble. With his contemporaries, and at no place that he ever get in more trouble with a contemporary than he did with his superior at the battle of Lake Erie, Oliver hazard Perry in what he's trying to do in eighteen forty three is to justify what he did at the battle of Lake Erie. Which was so controversial by many people who felt that he did not adequately support him his commander in this particular battle. And so this controversy is going to run on for at this particular point thirty years and will continue in that way for at least about another decade before it finally withers and Elliott is sort of forgotten Perry becomes a a major hero in the early navy. Not to follow your story. David you have done the work of putting together, the two sides and noted that major naval historians before you teddy Roosevelt's one of them. And may hunt himself. Alfred may Han is another have taken this same incident and argued it from either on Oliver Perry side or Jesse Elliott side and no less than James damore Cooper Wade into this in contemporary to Jesse Elliott. So there there were major American voices arguing this tale is that correct? That is correct. And and Elliott has no better champion James damore Cooper who wrote a history of the US navy in this history. He defends Elliott, or at least as not attack him for what happened at the battle of Lake Erie, and thus gets himself drawn into a controversy, which means that his naval history, which he hoped would be his most popular book is virtually condemned in the general public, and even though it is still in print today, the the description of the battle of Lake Erie that is. In. It is a center of a whole controversy that arose between Elliot and the his champions on the one hand and the Perry household and champions on the other. Where was Perry? He died of of of the Ella. Fever. I believe in nineteen and he died young. And so he was forever. The hero that America needed to celebrate this as I've learned from David was the Trafalgar for Lilla put chins of the American west. This was the largest sailing action naval ship to ship line. The line that America ever participated in this in the the Napoleonic era. The Eric crown by great of Royal Navy heroes of Horatio Nelson being chief among them. So let's go back to the beginning. Because we're going to start we start in eighteen forty three when the arguments going on. And by the way, what what the dry remarked that. I love about Elliott David is that he's the ladder. Day Yago Yago always complaining about how he didn't get credit. So let's go back to the beginning of Oliver hazard Perry. His family to to understand come to America and take root as Quakers, but with end going through quickly between marriages and meeting the hazards. He is born in the late eighteenth century and his father is a sea-captain whose father and how does this father fair in the early US navy? His father was Christopher Raymond Perry who had been captured in of the war of American independence and had escaped. And in one of these is occurs. He's got escaped in Ireland. He meets a young lady who he meets again on another commercial ship years later, and eventually marries, and so and she is a Wallis of the very famous family of the Wallis's in Scotland. And so that she is brings into the family, a long tradition of warrior of fighter fighters of various sorts. And but Perry is a commercial captain in the period after the American revolution. Who is given a commission as a captain in the US navy and command of a new ship called the general Greene. He brings his. Eldest son, Oliver hazard Perry with him as a midshipman on this ship and slowly. But surely Perry following the usual careers of naval officers today rises to be a Lieutenant, and then a master commandant, which is a rank in the navy at that time, roughly come in commending commensurate with we what we would today. Call a Commodore commander, Oliver hazard Perry. The son of captain Christopher Raymond Perry called, Raymond. I want to spend just a moment about with mom Sarah Alexander as you say, she's of the William Wallace family Braveheart was William Wallace. These are. These are Scottish independent strong-minded and fiercely anti English, but in any event and that suits, well the early American colonies. You have a moment in your book in which everybody says it was Madame Perry won the battle of Erie and not Oliver hazard her son. Why did they say that David? Well, she I think is introduced into this Quaker lineage a tradition. Admittedly, her husband over his Quaker Lenny to by becoming a combatant in the American revolution. But she I think brings in a much more traditional sort of approach to were fair being part of a family tradition. And she and her son takes it. Now just a moment before we go to see on the general Greene. He grows up largely Newport Rhode Island where a lot of very prominent names from the south's spend their summers to escape the malaria and the disease is one of them. I believe is John Calhoun what does Oliver hazard Perry. Make of Newport. What is Newport at in the seventeen ninety s well Newport in the seventeen ninety s a decaying sitting in large part because of the commercial activity of New England is of Rhode Island in particular is shifting to providence rather than to the island of Newport, which doesn't have any real connections to the back country. And so as a consequence of people, they are looking for a a an occupation. That will give them some chance to have economic success and the Perez. Are involved in commercial activities. And then when the opportunity comes with the expansion of the navy in seventeen ninety eight really the creation of the navy in seventeen ninety eight that Perry's political support gets him this captain captaincy of the general green. These are the early captains the early lieutenants of the United States navy putting together and putting to see into politics, Adams and Jefferson, and we'll meet all that when we come back. Oliver hazard Perry. Born seventeen eighty six he goes to see on his father ship as a midshipman in seventeen ninety nine. The general green will sail with the Perez, and we'll also a plunge into what comes.

Oliver hazard Perry Christopher Raymond Perry navy Elliott David US Jesse Elliott Lake Erie Perry Royal Navy America commander Newport Greene Yago Yago Wayne Newport Rhode Island Perez teddy Roosevelt Anthony Erie
"sarah alexander" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:24 min | 3 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"As a supply officer to the army. That was mad. Anthony, Wayne brought to the battle of fallen timbers. His father was killed by the Indians in trying to supply Wayne's army. And so he uses his father's gift to the country of his life in order to help. Protect it to secure a commission a first secure midshipmen Spurs in the navy and he's slowly. But surely rises in the navy always being sort of a Kantan, Chris and obstreperous guy that gets in trouble. With his contemporaries, and at no place to the ever get in more trouble with a contemporary than he did with his superior at the battle of Lake Erie, Oliver hazard Perry and what he's trying to do in eighteen forty three is to justify what he did at the battle of Lake Erie. Which was so controversial by many people who felt that he did not adequately support him his commander in this particular battle. And so this controversy is going to run on for at this particular point thirty years and will continue in that way for at least about another decade before it, finally withers and. Elliot is sort of forgotten and Perry become same. A major hero in your early navy. Not to follow your story. David you have done the work of putting together, the two sides and noted that major naval historians before you teddy Roosevelt's one of them. And may hunt himself Alford may Han is another have taken this same incident and argued it from either on Oliver Perry side or Jesse Elliott side and no less than James damore Cooper Wade into this in contemporary to Jesse Elliott. So there they were major American voices arguing this tale is that correct? That is correct. And and Elliott has no better champion than James damore Cooper who wrote a history of the US navy in this history. He defends Elliott, or at least as not attack him for what happened at the battle of Lake Erie, and that's gets himself drawn into a controversy, which means that his naval history, which he hoped would be his most popular book is virtually condemned in the general public, and even though it is still in print today, the the description of the battle of Lake Erie that is in. It is a center of a whole controversy that arose between Elliot and the his champions on the one hand and the Perry. Household and tampons on the other where was Perry. He died of of of yellow fever. I believe in nineteen and he died young. And so he was forever. The hero that American needed to. Celebrate this as I've learned from David was the Trafalgar for Lilla put chiens out the American west. This was the largest sailing action naval ship to ship line. The line that America ever participated in this in the the Napoleonic era the era crown by great of Royal Navy heroes of Horatio Nelson being chief among them. So let's go back to the beginning. Because we're going to start we start in eighteen forty three when the arguments going on. And by the way, what what the dry remarked that. I love about Elliott David is that he's the latter day Yago Yago always complaining about how he didn't get credit. So let's go back to the beginning of Oliver, Oliver hazard Perry his family to to understand come to America and take root as Quakers, but with and going through quickly between marriages and meeting the hazards. He is born in the late eighteenth century and his father is a seat. Captain whose father and how does this father fair in the early US navy? Father was Christopher Raymond Perry who had been captured in of the war of American independence and had escaped. And in one of these is occurs. He's got escaped in Ireland. He meets a young lady who he meets again on another commercial ship years later, and eventually marries, and so and she is a Wallis of the very famous family of the Wallace's in Scotland. And so that she is brings into the family law, a long tradition of warrior of fighters of various sorts, and but Perry is a commercial captain in the period after the American revolution. Who is given a commission as a captain in the US navy and command of a new ship called the general Greene. He brings his. Eldest son, Oliver hazard Perry with him as a midshipman on this ship and slowly. But surely Perry following the usual careers of naval officers today rises to be a Lieutenant, and then a master commandant, which is a rank in the navy at that time, roughly come in commending commensurate with we what we would today. Call a Commodore. I've only commander. All right. This is Oliver hazard Perry. The son of captain Christopher Raymond Perry called, Raymond. I want to spend just a moment about with mom Sarah Alexander as you say, she's of the William Wallace family Braveheart was William Wallace. These are. These are Scottish independent strong-minded and fiercely anti English, but in any event and that suits, well the early American colonies. You have a moment in your book in which everybody says it was Madame Perry won the battle of Erie and not Oliver hazard her son. Why did they say that David? Well, she I think is introduced into this Quaker lineage eight fighting tradition now, admittedly, her husband over his Quaker lineage to by becoming a combatant in the American revolution. But she I think brings in a much more traditional sort of approach to warfare being part of a family tradition. And she and her son takes it. Now just a moment before we go to see on the general Greene. He grows up largely Newport Rhode Island where a lot of very prominent names from the south's spend their summers to escape the malaria and the disease is one of them. I believe is John Calhoun what does Oliver hazard Perry. Make of Newport. What is Newport in the seventeen ninety s well Newport in the Seventy-nine, he says a decaying sitting in large part because of the commercial activity of New England is of Rhode Island in particular is shifting to providence rather than to the island of Newport, which doesn't have any real connection to the backcountry. And so as a consequence of people that they are looking for a a an occupation. That will give them some chance to have economic success and the Perez. Are involved in commercial activities. And then when the opportunity comes with the expansion of the navy in seventeen ninety eight really the creation of navy in seventeen ninety eight that Perry's political support gets him this captain c of the general green, right? These are the early captains the erlin lieutenants of the United States navy putting together and putting to see into politics, Adams and Jefferson, and we'll meet all that when we come back. Oliver hazard Perry. Born seventeen eighty six he goes to see on his father ship as a midshipman in seventeen ninety nine. The general green will sail with the Perez, and we'll also a plunge into what comes the early navy.

Christopher Raymond Perry Oliver hazard Perry navy Elliott David US Lake Erie Jesse Elliott Oliver Royal Navy William Wallace Elliot commander Newport America Greene Wayne officer Yago Yago Perez
"sarah alexander" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:04 min | 3 years ago

"sarah alexander" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"We're looking at the political careers of the four congressional leaders using resources from the C span archives and analysis by congressional reporters tonight. We'll look at the career of house minority leader Kevin McCarthy tomorrow night Thursday, we wrap up the week with a look at Senate, minority leader Chuck Schumer. But right now, we bring you our profile of Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell. Someone once stole President, George W Bush that you were excited over a certain vote. And he said really, how can you tell? So why? So few words, well, I'm not afraid of talking, but I've found learn a lot more about listening and so frequently I started out listening. Think about what I want to say before do it. Yeah. Yeah. So I think it's fair to say that. In Europe, Trump, probably very different in my approach to comment on public affairs. And that was Mitch McConnell 2016 sixteen talking about his memoir the long game. He's now the longest serving Republican congressional leader in history and our goal over the next hour. So is to look at his Senate career and his rise to leadership and power to help us do that. We're going to use the C span video archives were also going to talk with two longtime. Congressional watchers. Soccio Kapoor is with Bloomberg news and Paul Kane is with the Washington Post, Mr. Cain, you've been around this town almost as long as Mitch McConnell has what's his reputation in the political class. I think what he was just telling Sarah Alexander. There is some up his demeanor. And the way he is always thinking and sometimes people who interview with him if the old timers from McConnell staff, really like him. They will get the final word of advice. Will be. Meet the boss if he's just staring. Don't feel like you need to fill in the air. Don't feel like you need to keep talking. He's just processing and thinking what his next freeze will be. He is just constantly a strategic tactician. It's always what he'll he'll be known for. You look at any sort of profile of him strategy and tactics are always the first thing that come to mind an extreme discipline. We'll get into this probably at some point. But he grew up with polio and battled polio throughout his childhood, and sort of conquering that in later in life, physically and mentally McConnell, always sort of practice. What he called the long game? He was always thinking about the next step ahead and the step after that and the step after that because as a child he literally had to in order to get around the house to get around the school, and that sort of his hallmark now all these years later here in the capital. So he'll Kapoor what do you want to add to that McConnell is certainly the type of politician who thinks much more than he speaks. I think that's what Paul said, I do think he has a reputation as being a master of the Senate, and in my view, that's accurate, but he's really a master at using the intricacies of the Senate to shape, how people view politics, he understands the legislative tools and the levers people using my favorite example of this is his efforts in the Obama white during the Obama White House, essentially normalize the legislative filibuster on pieces of legislation. It was used before that he wasn't the first to do it. But he took it to a level not seen before. He's the reason we say things like it takes sixty votes to pass a Bill in the Senate before that remained the case, but not for every piece of legislation McConnell understood that by mounting that level of obstruction to the Obama agenda would convey to voters that something extraordinary was happening. And that it would split the democratic base because they wouldn't be able to pass as many pieces of legislation and unite his party against them. About an enormous impact on what Barack Obama was able to do. What's it like to cover him on Capitol Hill? It is complex in the sense that he never speaks in hallways quite as much as other other senators do he's extremely disciplined about that one of the rare exceptions to that. But I can think of was when the ROY Moore news broke on serious allegations of him being a child molester, Senator McConnell gave a speech on on the floor. He walked off. He spoke to some reporters and said, this is reprehensible, I cannot we cannot accept this. I cannot support this man. So it's a challenge because he like like we discussed he thinks much more than he speaks. And he doesn't always let on what he's thinking. Yeah. People like Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi. And before that going back to like Trent Lott, Tom Daschle, very expressive would like to try to tell you what they were thinking try to sort of work, the press to spin what what we would be reporting on McConnell that extreme discipline. I'm talking about at a breakfast with reporters in two thousand ten I believe he called himself, the master of the unexpressed thought he could people were trying to get him to weigh in on something asking at five different ways. And he has this way of old used to say at the risk of being redundant. I have nothing further to add. And he would he would never rarely steps in it. With his own words. So that makes it difficult. You don't get the sort of stream of consciousness that you get on Donald Trump's Twitter. Feed McConnell has probably never once. I'd be surprised if he ever even opened the Twitter app. He just, but you know, in the end. Is all about winning. And he is just trying to win. He wants to win Senate seats. He wants every vote is calculated at that at a pure partisan power play. And there are very few figures up there that are that partisan that powerful that will execute in fashion that he does and the rare moments I should add the rare moments where he slips where he speaks a little too much or when he's talking about that strategy that's going on in the mind famous example was again early in the Obama years where he told the reporter our single biggest priority is to make rock Obama when president right now, it doesn't surprise any of us that are Senate Republican leader would want to defeat the democratic incumbent. But the way he said it our number one priority. It just truck people's a little bit callous, really, it's not the economy is not the makes people's lives better. It's to defeat this, man. So sometimes he he says a little bit more than he thinks because he's such a strategic mind and in his mind and his private meetings. None of this will come as news to anybody. But sometimes it translates differently, and we will get into that a little bit later in this hour and turn to you at that point when we play a little video and have you have you? Look at that. But one of the things we wanna do is expose you to the span video library. Mitch McConnell has been on C span since nineteen eighty six when we started covering the Senate and even prior to that when we still had cameras out and about town. So we're going to show you the first time that Mitch McConnell appeared in the C span video archives? He was elected in nineteen Eighty-four. This is from nineteen eighty five. Actually, the people of Kentucky elected day for one simple reason. They wanted me to come to Washington and cut out wasteful spending. And I'm bringing lots of good Kentucky cost-saving ideas here to Washington, for example. Take education. I've introduced a Bill to teach grabber education and sex education in the same car..

Senator McConnell Senate Barack Obama Chuck Schumer reporter Soccio Kapoor Paul Kane Kevin McCarthy President Obama White House George W Bush Kentucky Europe Sarah Alexander polio Twitter Donald Trump Washington Post Washington