11 Burst results for "Sara Birnbaum"

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | Last month

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Obviously grew up in Austria. So it's something like homegrown terrorism. Do we know what possibly motivated this gunman? It's not clear yet. But Schmidinger did have a couple of ideas. There is a strong Anti Muslim resentment in the Austrian right and extreme right and many young Muslims who grew up to feel discriminated and this alienation He's not the only reason but one of the reasons why These people become vulnerable for jihadi propaganda. So is a concern in Austria. Now that Islamophobia couldjust get worse. Yeah, that's what some people are afraid of. I interviewed for Reed Hafetz, who's a professor at the University of Salzburg. He works on issues of race and racism, he said. So far, he's been somewhat reassured by Chancellor Kurtz's response. I have to admit that I was positively astonished that he was very clear. They're giving one message. This is not a battle between Muslims and Christians. There's another belt between foreigners and Austrians, and I think that is important because he is actually the leader ofthe a conservative mainstream political party. That within the last five years has completely co opted the far right anti Muslim agenda. So Hafez says it could have been worse. But on the other hand, he also Spoke about so called Islamist extremism right. So it was also in a way reproducing this whole narrative that there is extremism related to the religion of Islam. So that is the rhetoric and we have to pay attention to words. But Sarah what is the long term practical concern here that the country is resting with? The fear is that we could see an increase in far right extremism in response to this terrorist attack. And then, of course, that just means more terrorist attacks, which feeds more extremism. So that's the cycle of violence. People are and especially people in the intelligence community are very concerned with But, like a set of Austria's never grappled with this before, so it could go in a totally different direction. The world. Sara Birnbaum with an update on the terrorist attack last night in Vienna, Austria. Thank you very much. You're listening to the world. It's 2 20. This is San Francisco. I'm Michelle Hannigan. The latest on the ongoing violence in Afghanistan is after your local traffic.

Reed Hafetz Austria Hafez University of Salzburg Schmidinger Michelle Hannigan Chancellor Kurtz Sara Birnbaum Afghanistan San Francisco professor Sarah Vienna
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | Last month

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Attack last night. It happened in central Vienna near restaurants and bars hours before a Corona virus lock down was to take effect. A gunman armed with an assault rifle, machete and fake suicide belt opened fire, killing four people and injuring many others. The suspect was shot and killed by police Soon afterwards. Austria's Chancellor Sebastian Kurt's spoke to the nation today. Sanders does candles and understood from Kurt said. This is not a struggle between Christians and Muslims. Instead, it's a battle between civilization. And barbarism. The world Sara Birnbaum has been following the story. First of all, Sarah What do we know about the gunman? He was 20 years old. He was born in Austria. But he's a jewel citizen with northern Macedonia, his parents or ethnic Albanians from northern Macedonia. Authorities say he was an Isis sympathizer, and he actually served some prison time He was arrested for trying to join Isis in Syria in 2019. He got sent to prison. He had a sentence of 22 months. But then he was released early because hey was so young interior minister said during a press conference that he Fooled the Deradicalization program. No one's clear exactly what that means. Have the Deradicalization program failed, but they will be looking at it going forward. The gunman, as he said, was young, ethnically Albanian. So child of immigrants does that scan with the extremist profile that police and officials are aware of in Austria. So that's an interesting question, because in one way, there isn't a profile of your typical Austrian terrorists cause this really hasn't happened before. But then Austria does have an issue with people leaving to join Isis in Syria and Iraq and Marco back to the question. You asked me. Is this a typical profile? I asked that question to Thomas Schmidinger. He's a professor at the University of Vienna, and he studies how young Austrians become radicalized. And he told me that Isis sympathizers in Austria are actually very hetero Genius group. But there are some continuity ease. And in that way the gunman does fit the profile. He is relatively young. He.

Austria Thomas Schmidinger Chancellor Sebastian Kurt Syria Vienna Macedonia assault Sara Birnbaum Sarah What University of Vienna Sanders Iraq Marco
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:24 min | Last month

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Minutes. PBS NewsHour starts at three Optimism, bias or thinking that bad things are gonna happen to you is pretty natural, but it can have some consequences. Optimism bias in the Corona economy next time Marketplace coming up at four o'clock this afternoon. Hi Marco Woman. This is the world in the race to develop vaccines and treatments for covert 19. There have been some recent hiccups. On Monday, Johnson and Johnson announced it had halted Ah, large scale trial of its covert vaccine candidate. US. Testing of vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca is still on hold. After that trial was paused last month for more on what all these pauses mean. Let me turn to Polly Roy. She's a professor and chair of virology at the London School of Hygiene. And tropical medicine. She joins us from London. Ah, Professor Roy, let's take the announcement this week from Johnson and Johnson, which concerned a vaccine trial. What's your reading of what happened there Any vaccines for any vaccine? Large scale, Some people will react. It is actually normal and it should show the vaccine is working, and it is good that they pause there trying to find out exactly what is the reason and it could be for any reason, so it's not necessarily direct fault with the vaccine itself. What about AstraZeneca's cause issue is the same issue because they did a large scale also very carefully step by step and very transparent. And exactly same thing happened. So I don't find that Israel issue really? So there is still a lot of vaccine scepticism out there. How do you get over that while all these hiccups air happening along the way, which you say are totally normal. Is totally normal. If you did not have any hiccup that Miss Texas may not be really that good is not very walking. It will have a different reaction to different people. Men thing is the Probably the majority people will not have any reaction. Professor Roy as a scientist. What do you want the public to better understand When it comes to these vaccine trials, you have to convince them that how we got the vaccine so good in small part, for example, or yellow fever off course. Initially, there was a problem to convince people They have to understand this fundamental issues. Vaccine is the key for stop any infectious disease and this is the time we can make it save axe indefinitely because the science is so advance and that's the key message. Every 100 should understand. But it is better to go step by step. We transparent knowledge for everybody understand what's going on to educate people why we did vaccine properly. And if you can explain each vaccine, what type there was danger they could be people who will understand. Not everybody have to be. Scientists were side he's had to make others understood each vaccines are working and whether they do any harm in their body or not. Whether they have any feature affected, not but the main goal is all these vaccines are trying to make a strong anti bodies. We got making too much side of that is the idea that we have, but you kind of rush this sort of thing. You have to test with many people. As far as a time line for a vaccine. Do you see? Perhaps a strong candidate is release and then maybe gets adjusted along the way, perhaps leading to. Ah, better vaccine or maybe a booster. Yes, because that's the case. For most of the vaccine. They started either Think about pulling the same way Polio vaccine because you started the what is the best available that time? And then you improve with a different design because they're learning every day. Once they do that all this triumph will know that what is happening Side effect. And what should we avoid? Polly Roy's a professor and chair of virology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She's been speaking with us from London. Professor Roy Thank you very much. You're very welcome. Way we've seen how the pandemic has been especially cruel on older people that includes a group that's already lived through extraordinary suffering Holocaust survivors. Germany says it will now pay more than $600 million to them. AIDS specifically for Holocaust survivors on the poverty line, who are now trying to cope with a deadly disease. The world Sara Birnbaum has our story. Germany has been paying reparations to Holocaust survivors for nearly 70 years. It's paid out more than $80 billion, and that amount is about to get higher. Gideon Taylor of The Claims Conference, which negotiates with Germany on behalf of survivors says the Corona virus poses unique challenges to Holocaust survivors. Suddenly, this global pandemic came on DH brought back difficult, complicated, hard memories of hard times. The German government has agreed to give survivors an extra half billion dollars over the next two years. The funds will go to survivors who aren't already getting pensions from the German government people who have mostly been left out of reparations agreements, people who fled and escaped from the Nazis. Often just before the Nazis game. Many of them went to the east of the former Soviet Union. Many of them are what we call double victims, victims of the Nazis and then after the war victims of communism And some of them live still in the Soviet Union, many of them but also in the United States here. Most people don't know this, but the German government and the claims conference meet every year even when there's not a pandemic. To increase reparations and expand the circle of survivors who qualify for them. Gideon Taylor says both sides come to the negotiating table with pretty much the same goal to help as many survivors as they can while they're still alive, even despite a ll the distance in time from the Holocaust, even despite the political changes in Europe, generally politically Still that core understanding that this is a responsibility. It's not a sentiment that's lost on Holocaust survivors. The German government doesn't voluntarily this survivor is close to my heart. It's my grandfather, Jack Rosenthal. They're doing that with an independent country enjoyment it's called Leader Would Mom Tryingto do the right thing, Sorrow and Jack appreciates it, but it's complicated. He gets two payments from the German government reparation for his time in outfits and book involved concentration camps. And a social security pension for work he did in the ghetto, where his family was forced to live. But he sees it's sort of like blood money I put in for a charity. I don't wantto touch their money. I asked him about the new payments if he thinks the German government should be helping survivors affected by Cove it I don't think the Corona virus has anything to do with the Holocaust. What of the other hand? On the other hand, I think the German people are responsible for all the survivors for their wellbeing, Gideon Taylor says It's not just about the money. It's about honoring the people who help us find.

Professor Roy German government Gideon Taylor Polio vaccine professor and chair Johnson AstraZeneca Germany London US London School of Hygiene and T Jack Rosenthal scientist Soviet Union PBS Marco Woman Israel London School of Hygiene Texas
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:44 min | 2 months ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Announced this morning. It went to two scientists Jennifer Donna at UC Berkeley and Emmanuelle Charpentier at the Max Planck Institute in Germany for their work on the technology known as crisper. That's the word you're probably hearing a lot today. For an explanation of what it does. Here's the world. Sara Birnbaum crisper Sounds like the stuff of science fiction, but it's really it's a gene editing technology crisper allows scientists to search for a particular location on a gene then cut into that point and make precise changes to it. In theory, you can use crisper to change the genome of anything from silk worms to celery to people. Nobel winner Jennifer Tao DNA was on a box podcast last year, and she talked about where she thinks this technology will be in 30 years. I suspect by that point in time, the technologies for gene editing will be refined to a point where That can be delivered safely into tissues. They can be employed Tio correct everything from a single letter change in DNA of a cell that causes a disease like Sickle cell anemia or Duchenne muscular dystrophy all the way, tio things that require inserting new genetic information into cells efficiently. Scientists are also looking at using CRISPR to create drought resistant wheat and make better bio fuel. Doubt now met her fellow laureate Emmanuelle Charpentier. At a conference in Puerto Rico. They took a walk together in old sand one and talked about sharpened his research. At the time, Charpentier was studying flesh eating bacteria, and she was interested in a gene known as crisper that helped flesh eating bacteria fight off viruses. The women decided to work together, but darkness says never in her wildest dreams. Did she imagine that decision would lead to this? This is the amazing thing by understanding that process and the enzymes and mechanisms that allow that kind of Adaptive defense to viruses in bacteria. It was possible to harness that system for a very different purpose. Namely, Gene editing. I'd be remiss if I didn't mention that Donna and sharpened today are the first woman on Ly team in history. To win a Nobel in science trivia question. The first woman to win a Nobel in chemistry was Marie Curie. Emmanuelle Charpentier reflected on her Nobel win today on a phone call with Nobel officials, very pretty miss it for the girls and the young woman who wished to Stop science continue in science and to really provide the candy said that it is possible to achieve the highest honor in your field. For the world. I'm Sarah Bernbaum. The field of Gene editing is complicated and controversial. Sheila Johnson off is a founder of the Science Technology and Society Program at the Harvard Kennedy School. Let's start with a basic Sheila Gene editing is not new. But this idea of so called germline gene editing where You're changing genes before they're passed down. That's newer. Can you explain what that is? And how it differs from what's known as somatic editing? Yes, that's for asking. That's trivia question that is swerving around in the Ethical debates around this new technology. So germline gene editing is a technique for going in and altering the genetic composition of reproductive cells that will multiply in an organism before they have become specialized to particular purposes. Normal gene editing happens when the organism is older. And then you change the genetic composition through gene therapy in ways that will affect the person who you're changing, but not the reproductive potential of that person to pass on. These genetic changes into a new generation of genetic engineering has Already being caught up in an ongoing set of debates about particularly the line between therapy where we're trying to put something back to the condition that it was in or that a normal person would expect to be in On enhancement where you've tried to build in characteristics that people do not have now and yet might wish to be happy and so was crisper. That makes this blurry line between when are we bringing something back to a normal condition? And when we actually taking the normal and changing it to this currently popular term, the new normal that we hear another context, So I know you've said that Gene editing should not be thought of just for its impact on individuals but on society. Give us an example of the societal benefit of gene editing. You're asking aboutthe societal benefit, but I think I prefer to talk about the societal impact. So one of the areas in which Jean editing is being thought about most centrally is in reproduction. Now, particularly in America. We consider reproductive freedom to be a fundamental right. Guaranteed constitutionally and by decades of constitutional law, and people have come to believe that they have a right to procreate and tow have biological Children off their own bodies. And then that has slid into a belief that some people hold that if you have a right to have a biological child, you also have a right to have a biological child off the sort you want. And therein lies the complexities. So what is the sort you want, then? People They want their Children to be born, not death, for instance, and if there's a congenital history of deafness and the family and you can detect it and cure, maybe people will try that because they do not want their Children to be born with a handicap. But there is a social movement of deaf people who believe that they constitute a different culture and society to say sorry you should not be looking at us is dis able to it differently abled. So in that sense an individual decision to say I want to quote correct unfold my child before it's born and make sure that my child is born without thus and such defect bumps up against a more collectively held societal view. That may be the thing that you were considering. To be a defect is not in the wider eyes of society a defect Maybe it's even good for society's tohave differently abled people in them and there is a hazard that by having everybody individually tried to pick you know what is best for themselves. The collective the cysts, Aysel distributed patterns would be altered in ways that may not be good for us biologically socially ethically. Professor just enough. You've called for a global observatory. When it comes to the gene Editing is their agreement right now, for example, on how to deal with rogue scientists who have crossed a line I mean, what is that Global observatory? Have in mind. The premise of this institutional forum that we're trying to create is that certain kinds of debates that ought to be happening or not happening you ask about is their agreement about road scientist. There's not even an agreement as to what constitutes a rogue scientist. So typically for gotten fact about Mr her. John Cui Hu has become The world's poster child of rogue scientist. This is the man who confessed in 2018. I think it was that 18..

Emmanuelle Charpentier Sheila Gene scientist Jennifer Donna Sara Birnbaum Global observatory Max Planck Institute Germany Science Technology and Society Marie Curie Tio Nobel Sheila Johnson CRISPR Puerto Rico Berkeley John Cui Hu Sarah Bernbaum
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 2 months ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stop selling the favorite shirt of a hate group. That story is next in the final segment of Marketplace presidential debate this week was chaotic, which is fitting given this year. What a chaotic election, though, could mean for already chaotic economy. Next time on marketplace. The story about the shirt is coming up Next on the world market Place comes on it for Marco Woman You're with the world. Hours before President Trump announced he had the Corona virus. He went on Fox News. I condemn the K K. K. I condemn all white supremacists. I condemned the proud boys. A lot of us are now thinking about the proud boys as the world. Sara Birnbaum reports a British clothing brand has been thinking about them for a while. The British brand, Fred Perry announced last week they would stop selling their black and yellow polo shirts in the U. S in Canada because they had become the shirts of choice for the proud boys. The company won't respond to interview requests, though they posted a statement on their website saying Fred Perry is frustrated to see their shirt co opted and subverted. The writer Zoe Beery told me how the problem started wearing this polo to begin with, so the proud boys were founded by Gavin McInnis. Hey, what's up? My name's Gavin Gavin McInnes is also kind of a sartorialist himself, and he started wearing the black and yellow Fred Perry polos on air for his radio show, Fred Perry shirts are needed. And when you have terrible with wimp, Grover Shoulders like mine picked black and yellow Because of the Wiz Khalifa's on There.

Fred Perry Gavin Gavin McInnes President Trump Gavin McInnis Grover Shoulders Zoe Beery Sara Birnbaum Fox News Marco writer K. K. Canada
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:11 min | 2 months ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Woman. You're with the world. Tis the season of political dog whistles, coded words and phrases build the wall. For example, in the U. S Law and Order in France, there's a word that's been plucked from colonialism and revived by the far right. As the world, Sara Birnbaum reports. The word is also vaginal, and it's also now entering the mainstream in French politics in July, France's interior minister who's the head of the police guy named Domina Even interview to Frances, right leaning newspaper Le Figaro and in the interview, he said, if Oh, stupid, long, silvery moon to impact In English. We have to stop a certain part of society from descending into savagery. It's no mystery. What part of society he met youngsters from suburbs that are from immigrant Descents. Cecile All dewy teaches French political language at Stanford University. This word also of asthma is mostly used in general by the far right. And anti immigration movements. So when it was used by dark Mana, who was hand picked by President Emmanuel Macron, it caused a firestorm in his own party. One lawmaker declared. There are no savages in France only citizens. Other ministers accused Domina of fearmongering sit there, move he developed for pitting one group against another. Ah, different cities and countries. Still others in Macron's party defended Dharma Naz use of the term while dark, Mana refused to back down all the while insisting that he's not talking about immigrants or people of color. This's But that's pretty hard to believe, considering the history of the word on salvageable. The term comes straight out of writings about colonialism, says Jennifer Sessions, a historian of French colonialism at the University of Virginia, colonial polemicists and ideologues and people in the colonies. They worried about what would happen to French people who went overseas, particularly to Africa, that they would be Also Vijay that they would be and savaged by contact with supposedly savage people, Sessions says the French colonialists divided the world into us and them. Civilized and the savages the French on one side and the black and Arab world on the other. These days, though, you'll mostly hear the word on Silva Jamal coming from the far right. The white nationalist local back tone used it in a book and 2013. His theory is that violent crime in France is really three times higher than the official figures would suggest, And that's the result of immigrants in savaging French society. The book was promoted by Marine Le Pen, the leader of France's far right anti immigrant party and Macron's main opposition. Le Pen, has used the term on Silva Jamal and almost every speech and TV appearance since 2018 also rational and also so to hear the word from Montana, who's in charge of the police. It was disconcerting, says Pop. India, a professor of history at CNN's Po in Paris. If minister like Domina uses these word, also of asthma. Then you will soon find that the police forces used also the word of a German. It tends to legitimated the use of violent means. And raise Provine ing to control these young people. So far, President Emmanuel Macron has avoided using the term on silver, but he hasn't disavowed it either..

President Emmanuel Macron France Le Figaro Silva Jamal Mana Marine Le Pen Sara Birnbaum Jennifer Sessions Cecile All U. S Law Stanford University Africa Dharma Naz CNN Frances University of Virginia Paris Montana India
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 2 months ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Several people who did not like their given names, so they change them. One small town in Quebec That's trying to change its name is finding that's not so easy the world, Sara Birnbaum explains. You might not be shocked to learn that the town of specificity is having a hard time luring investors. That's why the mayor Hyuk Lima says the town simply must change its name. Post Way for the mayor told the CBC that potential foreign investors treat folks from asbestos like they're contagious. At one point, a delegation from this pestis went to Ohio to try to drum up business, and the Americans refused to take their business cards. At a town meeting Earlier this week, officials presented the residents of this pestis with four options for a new name. More on that in a bit, But the entire process has been controversial, controversial because some people are attached to the historic name of the town. And because this whole thing is also caught up in the French English divide. The English word Asbestos doesn't have the negative connotations in French. That's because asbestos is just a place name on the French word for us, bestest. You know, the cancer causing stuff is a man. So some town residents are accusing their government of cow towering to the English. Still, the town council move forward with a proposal to change the name and come late October. The town ofhis pestis might be known as Jeffrey. For the world. I'm Sarah Birnbaum from Japan to Ethiopia to Canada. Today's show is a perfect example of how the world stories connect you to the wider world Continue that connection on social media. Follow us on Twitter. We're at the world and join the conversation about the stories that keep you thinking and take a moment.

Sara Birnbaum Hyuk Lima Sarah Birnbaum Twitter Quebec CBC Ohio Jeffrey Ethiopia Japan Canada
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:05 min | 3 months ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Offering a glimpse into how protected people might remain after being infected. Marion Pepper is a researcher at the University of Washington specializing in immunology. Marrying a lot of people might have heard a misleading news story over the weekend that people who've had Cove it 19 are immune from getting reinfected for a certain period of time. Clarify this. What do we actually know about immunity right now? Right now. We have done studies that have looked at how the body responds to infection and whether people have the right pieces in place to be protected from a re infection. There isn't really any information yet about how long that immunity will last. Some of this came from some guidelines from the CDC that came out that were later clarified. We have loved so far to see that there will be some type of immunity, but we can't say for sure. So I know you've got a new study that's going through the peer review process. Now, what did you find out about immunity? I think the good news that we have to share is that the immune response in people who have experienced what we consider to be mild Cove in 19 meaning they weren't hospitalized looks very normal. It looks like what we would expect from a good immune response to a virus. All the components. All the pieces that you need to be protected from reinfection looked to be there doesn't prove it, but it suggests that these people will be protected from a re infection. So help us understand what that is all about, Because I know your study looked at blood from people who had mild cases of covered, not the individuals themselves. What are the limitations of studies like yours that look at immunity in a lab? As opposed to out in the real world there two ways to really test immunity. Of course, the most obvious a way to do. It would be to know that people have been reinfected who have had it before and to show that they're not getting reinfected, but that's really hard to do. So what we did, instead is looked in the blood of people who had had Cove in 19 and looked at their cells specifically that can respond to the virus to see how many are there what they looked like and how they function to our best ability in the lab. And they show that these cells not only are there but they look like they should be a functional population of cells that could fight this infection. So what did the hardest parts of studying immunity and in the corona virus like? Where does the new ones come in? It's hard because it takes time for immunity. Tio develop So you need to wait until an infection has been cleared s. Oh, it takes time to be able to say for sure that the cells are still there that we would like to see that would be protective. I'm guessing a lot of people hearing this ultimately want to know When can I start walking around without a mask? No one should be walking around without a mask. It's critically important that people still wear masks and social distance and take the right precautions not to get this. Yes. So just explain that a little more people who may be immune I mean, they should be wearing a mask to write because we just don't know who really is immune. Yes, All we can say is that the right cells that look like they're going to be protective and to help you be immune are there. We can't say for sure that people are going to be immune. So do we know of people who have had the Corona virus? Have gotten it again. I don't know of any evidence showing that a person has been reinfected, but those cases may be out there. I just don't know them. So what is your advice to people who are confused about all the messaging coming out about immunity because there does seem to be a lot of messaging and a lot of almost contradictory advice. I think the message is that this study that we did is hopeful And I think we're optimistic that the vast majority of people who have had Cove in 19 who have mild symptoms should have some sort of immunity. That should last for some time. We can't say how long But this is actually very encouraging news for the vast majority of people who have had it. And yet you're telling people to keep the masks on. So there's a lot we don't know There's still a lot we don't know. And there is no way to predict who is going to be immune versus who isn't going to be immune at this point. If everyone wears a mask, then we can reduce transmission and get beyond this pandemic. Marion Pepper is an immunologist at the University of Washington. Thanks very much for being with us today. Thank you very much for having me. New Zealand has been a model for how to deal with the Corona virus. 1600 cases total, but now it's fighting a cluster around 80 active cases. So New Zealand has extended its locked down and the prime minister just Cinda are. Durn has announced another protective measure. Delaying elections. The world Sara Birnbaum reports. The new date for the election will be October 17th. A delay of one month prime minister just sent a Durn said that will give political parties enough time to campaign for the Electoral Commission to prepare. And devotions to feel assured of a safe, accessible, incredible election. The delay in New Zealand might remind you of something closer to home. I don't want to delay I wanna have the election. But I also don't want to have to wait for three months and then find out that the ballots are all missing. And the election doesn't mean anything. On July 30th President Trump suggested on Twitter that we delay the election here in the U. S. The reason, he said, was that with all the mail in voting because of Cove, it The election would be quote the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history. He's offered no proof to substantiate that claim, though there are lots of differences between what's happening in New Zealand and what happened here, says Tufts University political scientist Jeff Berry. For starters, two very different systems. New Zealand is a parliamentary system that means elections. Khun be called at any time and the prime minister has the sole authority to call the election, so she's well with In what sort of normal New Zealand politics Where is in the United States? Constitution tells us when presidential elections are first Tuesday after the first Monday in November, another difference between here and New Zealand one word consensus. Before a Durn made the announcement. She consulted all the political parties. I did came this widely. I canvassed everyone. Naughty room was of the same view. But I gave equal white in equal measure to everyone's for you. But in the US, Jeff Berry says the situation was very different. President Trump just suddenly wanted to say I didn't consult the Republican leadership, the Congress much less the Democrats, and then there are the approval ratings. Just send a adorns approval ratings last month were hovering around 65%. She's New Zealand's most popular prime minister in a century. Trump's approval ratings, on the other hand, are 42% according to the latest Gallup poll. The president is way behind in the polls, and this was very transparent as a move to try to shake things up. In the presidential race. It didn't work, and he had to back off the suggestion to move the election. But it's still stoked fears that Trump would do anything to hold on to power. So the moral delaying the election, Khun be seen either as an appropriate measure to protect the public health or as a power grab to circumvent a democratic system. Depends on your vantage point. For the world. I'm Sarah Birnbaum. Getting exam results this year was never going to be straightforward. How do you grade students who have not been to school for months and haven't even sat for exams? Teenagers in Britain and across Europe are discovering that it's complicated and they're not happy..

New Zealand prime minister Trump Cove Marion Pepper president Khun University of Washington Jeff Berry Durn United States CDC researcher Sarah Birnbaum Sara Birnbaum Europe Twitter Britain
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 4 months ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Very much for having me on With everything going on with the pandemic, you might have missed the major news story of the summer. What I'll call the great gloomy controversy of 2020 the world, Sara Birnbaum explains. The situation. I'm about to describe my sounds strange, but I promise you, it happens all the time, especially with Europeans. So you and Canada are on the verge of finalizing a huge trade deal. It would cover like 30% of the world's economy. But the tiny island of Cyprus, Vito A treaty and the sticking point is cheese. Cyprus wants to prevent Canadian cheese makers from calling their halloumi cheese Helou, me and the island is willing to cause a huge headache for the rest of the U and Canada to do it. But like I said, this happens all the time. In 2017 the same trade deal came to a halt over you guessed it Cheese. The failure to protect feather in Canada now haunts the ruling Syriza party. It's M P's say they won't ratify the agreement. When it comes to Parliament. Cheese was the culprit again in 2019. This time in a deal between the U and the Australians, cheese makers could soon be forced to stop using several names, including Fitter grew year and Gorgonzola is free trade talks with your paying union into final stages. This big train deal with Europe and Canada isn't scuttled. Yet. D'you still has a few tricks up its sleeve. And ironically, the U has also used to loony as a cheese cudgel to get Cyprus to do what it wants. Cyprus is divided between the Greek side of the island and the Turkish side. They can't stand each other and the you wants them to unify. So, Brussels said. Look, if you guys get together, we'll give salumi a special protected status. But if not No dice. So really, what's going on now is she's karma for the world. I'm Sarah Birnbaum. Coming up in a bit. Thailand could soon become the first country in Southeast Asia.

Canada Cheese Cyprus Sara Birnbaum Europe Sarah Birnbaum salumi Southeast Asia Thailand Syriza party Fitter Brussels M P U
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Frankly slightly better than blacks from the south does that accurately lay out what was going on destiny a white immigrant italian immigrants definitely were not as discriminated as immigrants of caller for example or african americans and the south but what's interesting in this case is how they were trying to regulate restrict italian immigration echoed allotted the same measures so for example the leaders see test that was barred from the south were debris using the literacy test to disenfranchise african americans from voting eventually said there is a lot of overlap but it once they were in the us they think did it fare better denton uh added minorities so you're historian you spent a lot of time looking back at all these policies today what lessons are you taking away what occurs to well historically allotted this provision or laws but what worries me about the ban is that these are executive orders and so in a way there are a lot more unpredictable annan and unstable because every administration could keep changing their provisions essentially maddalena monari teaches history acccused davis a dolphin college she's written about all this for us you can find it at our website p r i dot o r g i go to say this is strange stuff this next story at least twenty people associated with the us diplomatic corps in cuba have been suffering from hearing loss dizziness nausea and even concussions and brain swelling it's been going on since november last year and it's affected some in canada's diplomatic community they're two on friday the trump administration cut the us diplomatic presence in havana in half and warned americans not to go there there's talk that it some kind of secrets sonic weapon that's been making people sick cuba vehemently denies doing anything like that and there is no evidence of it at this point so what is going on a reporter sara birnbaum tries to find out more okay full disclosure to me this sounds absolutely razi but it doesn't sound weird to vince houten the curator of the international space museum in washington dc it's a long past time of intelligence agencies with diplomats.

african americans us annan cuba nausea canada havana reporter sara birnbaum international space museum executive maddalena monari vince houten washington
"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sara birnbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And warned americans not to go there there's talk that it some kind of secrets sonic weapon that's been making people sick cuba vehemently denies doing anything like that and there is no ever dense of it at this point so what is going on a reporter sara birnbaum tries to find out more okay full disclosure to me this sounds absolutely crazy but it doesn't sound weird to vince hatton the curator of the international spy museum in washington d c insane long past time and i'm telling abc's tom mess with diplomats of other countries particularly adversary conference let's go back to the cold war robert long programme it was created after the failure of bay of pigs let's was let's see i even have to try to cash throughout various methods castro was added scuba diver so one of the ideas was created an exploding shell that would be put on a reef near where cash for like two scubadiving it'd be so beautiful that castro would feel compelled to go pick it up and look at it and then it would blow up in though their ideas about he hit a radio address every week and the idea was literally be radio studio with lsd so in castro gave his radio address you would be tripping on acid and give wacky radio address on the one wanna follow him anymore and this one is my personal favorite one of the ideas was due to sprinkle his shoes with valium salts which houses your hair to haul out so the idea would be that castro's beer would fall out and then because the cuban people were so much she smile they would no longer want to follow him because he didn't abbas beard that one would have totally worked but if we're talking about sonic weapons that cause lasting damage may be a closer corollary is the spy dust from the cold war the styles see the east german secret police would use radioactive chemicals to track suspected dissidents anna funder is the.

reporter sara birnbaum abc castro lsd cold war anna funder cuba vince hatton abbas beard