19 Burst results for "Sapient"

Mike Zagorsek of SoundHound

The Voicebot Podcast

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Mike Zagorsek of SoundHound

"And maybe just pin little bit of a picture for the audience who haven't known you for twenty years like I have about some of the things you've done, so you would sapient you're you're you're working and user experience and some of those things and then? A Couple you went to the agency world, you worked at apple you worked at square. Thank at one point. Before coming down so if you think about some of the things that you did before sound down. What were some of the formative pieces? Thought were really interesting that you sort when you came to sound and you're like. Oh, here's something I can apply here. Perspective skill something like that. Yeah I reflect on that a lot and. UNRELATED TO APPLE IF YOU'VE listened to Steve. Jobs is I know the jobs get of quote, but. The fact that he said it is secondary to the idea which was you can to better understand where you are today, you can only connect the dots in reverse, and you can say well. How did one decision to another lead to another in how this connecting those dots help me understand it in so doing that in the benefit of this conversation I've always been. been fascinated about how humans interact with technology, what does that relationship between tools and technology and the reciprocal nature of the world that we live it as which is the result of tools and technology so I? I Love sci-fi was always watching Star Trek Star Wars you name it good bad Sifi! Always just take it all in, and because really interested in how? A world that had technology was itself a reflection on society, and I think Especially now with something like voice, that's playing itself out so. In the early days I didn't understand that as well and I don't think the the world of of technology was was. Quite at the sci-fi level yet, just getting a website you know going back twenty years. Getting a website was cool, but it. It wasn't the most exciting thing and. But I was always interested in digital after leaving Sapien I went on the agency side, but it was always very comfortable. Helping clients build websites. And digital advertising. I made the move to Apple. In two thousand seven have the day I joined with the day the iphone launched. And that was a pretty chaotic time. A very different company than it is now, and I spent five years building APPLE DOT COM and A lot of digital communication email worldwide. And but this idea of people in technology it I mean obviously being apple. You learn a lot about that. In Steve himself talks about you know liberal, liberal arts and technology merging so it's not a new concept. After apple I wanted to get a little bit closer. How companies were built so I left to go motion. Recruited by former apple colleague. And for those sites leap motion a real following. It was It was touch lists, but it was gesture based. It was actually hand and finger tracking to really high fidelity. and I learned what it needs to be. An interesting involved will start up. That's its own. PODCAST in and of itself. square for me was an opportunity to really build. A marketing practice within a more established company from scratch although that moving away from the leap motion environment where it was human computer warrant to Fintech. Realize I distance myself. From what I was passionate about so southbound with how to fight the voice platform. Is the culmination of my experience in large companies small companies. Immersed in. A world of Scifi or being more distant from it, and so it really is a combination of a lot of things. I think that's why for me. Personally I feel like we have a lot of momentum. So you Reverend Scifi. SCIFI fancy listed the voice about bad gas, not surprising being the industry, and so, what sei fide did you like to follow? Well I describe myself as a trekkie. I mean I'll. All of it and so that's. Most people. Who are inside I will have an affinity for. It's always a very safe. Safe Choice but but then as things started to diversify, really got into battle star. GALACTICA reboot and I really loved. The expanse is fan, although not everybody follows that in but when it comes to to star Trek I'm very agnostic. I love the old stuff and the new stuff than I know some of that's been poor polarizing, but it's always really just been. How does it does it help? Facilitate A world that allows us to to be more human I mean. That's always been been what Star Trek. Spin about so you can't ignore that and and be in the

Apple Steve Scifi Leap Motion Fintech
"sapient" Discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

Riders Lounge Podcast

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"sapient" Discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

"To do the job and you gotTa Jump Monkey and you'd lane on the same spot or whatever it was and it blew they. Moen's yes I they just there. Was this bit a film Greg. Who's a a can naughty little due to be fair. He's doing this fight scene. So allie whitten comes flying in flat out skids into him high solids into this and it's just like a layer of soft sand. So then he said Greg. Conaco wheels And then the buggy comes in and stuff but to jump over him but they built this round like Sushi is the highest fucking bed like it wasn't even waist height but to jump over his head so we just got the bucket of the Italian Blah and put the wedge ramp up on that and his wedge round was like thirty centimeters like a foot wide nor these hidden at five. But when you turn a corner like thought is fucking narrow. Yeah like all. There's not much room for those toys. And like yeah like we need you to land. He so like okay. No worries and they're making a bit of a fuss about it on online. Just just tell me when to go. Yeah like it's not a problem of got my helmet and boots on like Mubarak's running. Just tell me when to go and then not use to it. It's just it's just two different worlds like overseeing freestyle motocross. Probably the most important part of your job is to land on the same fucking spot. Yeah like the sweet spot and it's to me is really on any standard estimates. Landon you about to me is of sweet spot in ten percent and you jump in seventy five seventy four. Whatever so jumped. It landed in Saint Place. Can you do that again? I'm not yet. Tell me when though worries off yeah. I never caught a like really surprised in just gone. Well it just this. This is not a problem. Would you do it again? I'll tell you that video or movie work. Obviously that video with Morgan. Because it's like a mate and he's into free they were a good crew like Morgan Damian. Like it was fun and we went out for a few days and everyone was appropriate. Laugh and walk in and she said to me like in the movie world. He was like these Gaza Fun. This is a mellow day off. Who's messaging you know one yet? Not right no just chicken to see if these things work and only just got this stuff on. I'm just looking at sapient equipment. Morgan these discuss this is like super mellow and easy. Go in and like yeah and someone else. It's all year lot riding today and I'm armed there in disbelief it while I'm here in light but what I do again I think both would you do other movies for other people. Probably if they spoke to me like a piece of shell began yeah. That's the problem. That's the problem. Odd have is because I've been my own boss from what the age of twenty one twenty two you know and I'd like to think I take the Piss a lot an all fucking rip into people and have a laugh but I would like to think. I've never spoken to anyone disrespectfully route. Yeah and there's a big difference. Even when the sense of humor gets a bit harsh an old probably should wander like in the chain revalue. We've obviously he's GonNa Laugh at this one but it's all in jest always Delvin so yeah when I hear stories about how people are getting screamed and shouted at Lufkin. Sworn in the ridiculous odd. Yeah that's not for me for me. Never do that to anybody. And are certainly. Don't want that in my direction. Say Nine exactly. It doesn't give maybe stuff but if you want to speak to me like a piece of shit that's fine I'll just fucking goto catering stuff my face and Fuck Afon. Nice and easy. As many as other fridges like that live in the fray stall law hip well speaking things doing things you like doing. We had red bull dirt diggers and that was a whole lot drive in diggers for fourteen hours a day and having a nervous breakdown while probably it probably was not law. If to be doing that one was good test. It was a good test it will exactly in onshore. You've learned a few of the character but the to protect the jumps I build. Oh no she didn't. Oh eight went. They rebelled dig is was sick. It was an event that speak even.

Greg Morgan Damian allie whitten Moen Mubarak Delvin Fuck Afon sapient equipment Landon Saint Place Lufkin
"sapient" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"sapient" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Yes that's exciting to have that person on your team and to bring their expertise to it. I want to touch on something else. You said. In a video you did a while back which really resonated with me. Were you said having your assistance. Say Your name was really important to you. You know now we interact a lot with assistance where you're saying. Hey Alexa Hey Google assistant always have to talk to it. But it's not talking to you. An greeting of saying your name would be amazing and I'm curious why is customization so necessary versus having AAs creepy assistant every time from your perspective. It turns out that this customization is a basic human need. The studies of human faces showed that once again. Our Caveman brain is highly wired to identifying people that are part of our tribe. We feel most comfortable with people that are like us in the studies that have been done on. Ethnicity people prefer people from their own ethnic groups when they're looking at avatars. This is just how we're wired. It's not racist or sexist. Oh by the way. Also the studies have shown a slight preference for female avatars rather than male avatars by twenty two percent but the really telling part of the study was there was a seventy percent preference for choice. I'll tell you myself My wife is an artist and an organic farmer. She's kind of the last person To adopt technology when I gave her an an IPAD was She said when I use this but then her one of her girlfriends showed her how to change the boys to a British male voice and all of a sudden she loves Siri and now she uses voice interfaces even more than me so I think it's a telling indicator that we all watch me able to adapt interface to sound like who we want and who we want. I couldn't agree more. I actually have my google maps with an Australian male boys. So we all. It's funny as you're like. Oh something different is unique and exciting but also sometimes something. That's very similar is helpful to you. I think it's something that's so small yet so significant to talk about you. Know they always say like a person hearing their name as one of the sweetest sounds in the world and so having someone say your name in the the voice or tone that you want is larger and more important than I think most people are realizing there's social aspect to this. The studies are finding that when there's an Avatar people are more polite to the voice system. That's not a big deal but they are more polite and more forgiving of mistakes Wednesday. Start seeing the voice persona as an entity like a friend. Then they use it more. They have better feelings towards it and And get more utility out of that voice interface I just find this really fascinating One of my friends was the CTO of the robot company. They're now out of business but while they were still up and running. They looked at the user logs and found that sixty percent of all the conversation with their little home. Robot was purely conversational. People saying hi. How's it going? It's a little bit like me talking to my cat but Unlike by cabinet talks back. Yeah you know. It's interesting to me because I have been hearing studies. That are showing people feel more comfortable to talk to an AI and divulge information than they do to a human being because they feel less judged and in some ways. I think that's incredible. That's amazing that helps people feel less lonely and then in other ways. I'm curious because how does that affect us from a social humanitarian perspective? You know does that affect us as human beings at all? Do you think that that's helping hurting or not really making a difference if we're spending a lot of time talking to an ai or an avatar guess it's better than talking to yourself? I think it's I think it's a basic human need to converse and I know when I'm on a long drive by myself. Having somebody to talk to could be fun but it also could help me keep from dozing off. It could increase spikes safety so I think these are good things. Some of our customers were in the early stages with are making systems for seniors. I think we all know that People that are in seniors homes. It can be a lonely experienced. My wife worked for many years in senior care and she found people that had kind of drawn inside themselves and withdrawn from the world. My wife was in their teaching art seniors when they started engaging in something artistically they would come back alive. That's a wonderful thing. If we can make companions for seniors that they can talk to but also are feeling other functions like monitoring their health and telling. Dr Of things going wrong. I think that's a really useful function. Yeah I think it's definitely helpful. I don't think it replaces the human interaction but I think it supplements the areas where it's needed and where it's missing we're in conversations with some big medical care providers like Kaiser Cleveland Clinic there looking ahead on these topics and I think one of the things that's emerging in the early conversations. They were saying. How can we replace the doctor? But those conversations are evolving to really the doctors strongest part of the healthcare system. What we need to do is take the mundane tasks away from the doctor. Such as an initial patient interview or checking on them to make sure they're taking their medicine and supplementing the doctors skill with an AI system. That can do the more. Menial tasks to make the doctor more effective were able to service more patients. Now you have done a lot personally in your life within this space and now as part of this company do you have any advice for other voice companies out there in terms of standing out and leading the way innovation but also doing it in a useful and usable way with their use cases. What I see in our industry is a lot of healthy work going on. There's also a lot of hyper ball a lot of trends a lot of people following fads that come out and I would just say to people that before choosing a voice system and the technology to build your voice system on really put your scientists to head on and take a look at the hard research that's been done to give you an indication of which way to go as you're designing your systems. Don't just go with the crowd. Go with what makes sense from a scientific standpoint and the last question we like to ask on this show. David to help promote voice as a whole is there a current flash briefing or voice killer? Experience that you're using and really enjoying right now I am. We did something that to me was intensely fun this past year. We had customer conversation after customer conversation where they said David. We really like what you're doing but you need to speak our language. Sometimes language was mandarin or Japanese or German and we took that seriously and worked on extending our system to not just speak English but to speak thirty five new languages and I found that I just love working on language standing the commonalities between languages and how people communicate and they're a little bit different in each country so now our system is able to potentially serve five point three billion people because we speak thirty six languages. I hope to speak even more in the in the near future but I feel like we're off to a good start. We want everybody to have a good experience with a Boyce interface. That's great if people want to connect with you or learn more about what you're doing. Where can they do that? So I'm just David at sapient dot com the website www sapien next dot com and. I'd love to talk with you. And If you've got a challenging idea for US WE LOVE TO SOLVE PROBLEMS. I love it. Well thank you so much for being here sharing your insight. You've done so much within this space and really pushing the boundaries in terms of innovation. So thank you and I look forward to hearing more of what. Sepia next dozen the future. Thank you so much carry was great talking with you today and up to talk to you again soon. Thank you for listening to the inside voice. Podcast we greatly appreciate you being a part of our community. And if you enjoyed this episode or you like the Podcast we would love it if you would subscribe a follow like share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people. You WanNa see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot Com that's K. E. R. At M. O. D. E. V. DOT COM and. Be SURE TO CHECK. Us OUT ONLINE AT BOY SUMMIT DOT A. I thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

David Google CTO AI Siri Kaiser Cleveland Clinic Carey K. E. R. At M. O. D. E.
"sapient" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"sapient" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Of things. The second systems were would we in the industry typically call chat bots systems. They were very simple systems. That if you happen to say a keyword it would trigger response Those persistence came out in one thousand. Nine hundred sixty five and the chat pop. Boom that began about four years ago was based on these older technologies. The problem with these systems they can be very effective but most of them were not well built to understand what people were saying. A statistic that I saw yesterday was that there was only a twenty two percent user satisfaction rating of those voices systems. That use those primitive chat bots so a lot of people that have built companies in the past few years on. Those technologies are finding a lot of consumer pushback because they're just operating all that while and satisfying people and achieving the missions that they were set out to the third generation were systems like Siri and Alexa and Google Assistant. They began to improve the chat. Bot Technologies by adding machine learning. Now let's go up a level if you're in a scientist you have a lot of different tools available to machine. Learning is just one of them and for those of you who don't know much about machine learning it's using statistical analysis to take good gas at what someone is saying. It's a little bit like pattern matching if they hear a pattern of voice pattern of people saying something they can trigger a response the problem with these systems as good as a they are is. They're not very accurate. There was an interesting study that seating at did they release his past August. Doing an eight hundred question. Benchmark on all the primary systems things like Alexa scored seventy two and a half percent accuracy rating in this evening that test so it means that one out of four questions that you ask of. Alexa give a wrong answer and really I that syncs with my own experience. I use Alexa every day and when I request music very often it gets it wrong. So it's good for what it is and it's primarily good for non mission critical tasks like Music Selection. Or tell you what the weather is even the best system in the study Zd net found a google to only be eight percent accurate. That's pretty good but it's not good enough for most of our customers for instance when we're making a system for car and you want your window to go up and down your lights to turn on your seats go back and forth you need to have that. Work reliably every single time so We're building a system that is by the definitions in the presentation. I saw yesterday. A level for system level for system focuses not just on understanding commands but understanding people as they speak naturally conversation. Like you're talking to your best friend so that you can ask for your music in any way you might ask conversationally. An assist understands you. You can ask two questions at a time and a wander. Stand both of them separately and give you separate answers. It will understand the context of what you said and also it will be doing sentiment analysis to measure your motion as you're speaking because it turns out that emotion is also important in understanding what people are asking for or trying to achieve by working with voice assistant. So that's where we are today building level for system. Yeah and I love that you kind of broke that down because I have not thought about it that way before but it makes so much more sense and again really customizing it to you and I know your company has supplied conversational systems two cars motorcycles robots and a variety of consumer products. And you've built systems for companies like Bobo. Lg Mitsubishi and future robot. Can you talk about your process in developing conversational assistance for the automotive and transportation industry? Meaning what have you found works? Well and what are people liking most? What does the experience like so touching on something? I said a moment ago when we built our first assistant indycar about ten years ago there was a largely held belief in the auto industry. That voice interfaces didn't make any sense but that position has changed we have the Tesla factor going on in the auto industry and that is forcing all of the auto companies to think out of the box and to kind of reinvent how people use cars in interact with their cars their lot more receptive to new ideas. And there's two key things that we're trying to achieve in a car. I one is to make your diving experience more safe and I see a lot of interesting. Things will look at your existing car. You have to take your hand off the steering wheel to press a button to get something to work in your car or twist a map or push a lever. I would submit that anything that would cause you to take your hand off of the wheel and be distracted by that. Makes you less safe when you're driving so I do see new technologies like gestures in cars that make no sense at all to me? Why would you be even more distracted trying to make a gestures in the air with one of your driving hands once again? That's distracting you. Taking your hands off the wheel it makes great sense to me to use your voice to control your car. Yes I agree and I had seen a video that you did. I guess in the last year or so where you showcase kind of how it works. And you're asking voice assistant to move the seat up or to turn the D. fog or on and like you said it's something that can be done it's safe. It's easy it's effective. And it's customized to your vehicle in yourself. There's some important things that I think that we're doing. And maybe it's because my early start was doing three d interfaces and it was natural for us to put three talking. Characters with voice systems intuitively. We knew that people. If you made a good character they would bond with it and have a more satisfying experience with that voice system. If there was a character that went along with it but today were we've found there's been a lot of research done in the last ten years the confirms some of our hunches that is that people have higher user satisfaction higher trust scores higher engagement ratings and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration even found that it increase safety by having a good visual interface that complements the voice interface. I think a lot of us have also heard an old statistic that seventy percent of all human communication is nonverbal. Why I don't exactly seventy percent but it strikes me that we in the voice industry are very focused on delivering a good experience for the thirty percent of human conversation. Let's face it. We're in the communication business. We want to effectively communicate with our users to understand what they want in order to better serve them and if we're only focused on the thirty percent solution were leaving. Seventy percent at risk so our view is if an Avatar can effectively reinforce the voice communication with appropriate facial gestures and interactions. That will work with what I call our caveman brain to have a complete communication and to more effectively communicate with the the driver or the user of the robot or person watching their TV interacting with a talking character on their TV. It's just hard wired into us to do this and what we're seeing in. The research is Improvements in the range of fifteen to twenty five percent in trust and user satisfaction scores by using good avatar. Yeah and that's interesting to note because I do see more of a push towards the multi modal where you're having the images with the voice but I know that there's also been a recent yell study where they found that voice. Only communication enhances empathetic accuracy relative to communication across various senses. Do you have any response to that particular study or do you still stand by. We're you saying voice and visual is equally as important together. I'm a person of science. I look at the research and in any topic of research. There are GonNa be contrarian views that come out if you look at the Avatar studies that were done ten to twenty years ago they all said the avatars are a bad idea. Well if you take a close look at the studies. They were doing cartoon. Stick figures as avatars. It's no wonder that their test subjects were reacting negatively to avatars. It's only really been in the past ten years where the study started using characters that were at the level of a good computer game or a a Pixar Disney movie that people started reacting positively to avatars and we took seriously ourselves The person on our team heading up avatars Alex Hessler. He came out to fix our he worked on the hesitate movie. It's important to us top talent whether it's the top. Ai Engineers or the top artistic talent to make the best possible things for our customers..

Alexa google scientist Bobo Siri Zd Lg Mitsubishi Alex Hessler Pixar Disney
"sapient" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"sapient" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"This is your host to carry Roberts and today my guest is David Colleen the CEO at sapient acts. Welcome David. Thank you for being here. I carry thank you so much for having me. It's an honor to be on your show. Thank you so we were just talking right before this interview that both you and I came from pretty diverse backgrounds getting into this space and I know you started your career journey in architecture and then you got into a in about two thousand and three and now you're into voice. Can you tell us a little bit about that? Career journey and how you went from designing buildings to designing voice experiences of not sure Add or just naturally curious. But I have gone through a lot of things I I I studied architecture and got out of school and started designing high-rise buildings in San Francisco but one of my professors turns out. He was one of the founding fathers of computer graphics and infected me with the notion that you can use computers to design buildings so I started doing that. And then sold friends. So I was backpacking with them. And they said we're GONNA leave our day jobs and started a company to three on the Internet. How would you like to put the first three D online and that sounded pretty cool? So we did that. And that was the beginning of a Mile Dublin at nine Studios Team. We built our first talking characters using those three d technologies and one thing led to another and in two thousand and three. We were building computer games for the intelligence community to create synthetic human. That could look for bad guys and that was early. Start DOING AI. Talking characters it was very primitive back then but it put a the notion in our minds that we could effectively communicate with our technology by voice a few years later in two thousand seven we were building navigation systems for the hand held and automotive markets. And that's when we brought all friend of a programmer Bruce Wilcox onto our team and he built what possibly was the first digital assistant for a car. It worked beautifully. It was exciting all except for one thing speech recognition. Ten years ago was in a terrible state. It only understood may be one word out of ten that we would say so. As much as we love the concept of talking to our technology we knew we would have to shelve it and wait until that technology matured then. Siri came out and I pulled a little bit of hair out. If you look at me I know you can't see my picture. I don't have any here left house but I've got a little bit out at that point because Siri beat us to the punch then An old friend of mine divulge that he had been working on Alexa and they brought a lex out to great acclaim and I pulled some more hair out at that point. But you know what looking back at it. I see now. That Syrian Alexa didn't important things. They established that technology was used way to communicate with your technology and they built a large consumer appetite for voice products. And we all benefited from that. So today we are running saving tax. We began at four years ago and were busy. Building Voice Systems that understand conversationally using some dramatically different technology from what everybody else is doing in the marketplace and were building new systems for people make cars and robots and motorcycles and consumer electronics of all sorts. So that's where we are today and thank you for having me here. Yeah very exciting to kind of hear that journey and I know there was an article. Done your company back in two thousand eighteen. That wrote that. The current voice products force users to learn commands blocking the natural conversation that we desire. They can't handle complexity of speech multitasking. And they consume mountains of sensitive user. Data that is stored for marketing and development of user profiles or that gets used for targeted advertising. And you say that your company sapient acts is two times better fixing this than your competitors. Can you speak to this and talk about how and if these are still issues in your eyes today and you're a invoice? Technology is fixing. This won't so. Let me begin unpacking that by describing the presentation. I saw in a voice conference yesterday. They voice technologies in five levels. The first level were. Ivr systems phones. That could understand you when you said yes or no or three or five or very very simple sorts.

David Colleen sapient Siri Voice Systems Bruce Wilcox CEO Syrian Alexa San Francisco Alexa Roberts Studios Team Dublin programmer
"sapient" Discussed on This is Product Management

This is Product Management

11:24 min | 1 year ago

"sapient" Discussed on This is Product Management

"Alex Lead Citi ventures deep division. Which is focused on incubating early stage products and businesses that will drive growth? Alex has a storied career in Fintech and banking. Let's hear him talk about his entrepreneurial background and experience at startups and large organizations alike before I received at city with his car job which is under CITI ventures. I WAS GENERAL MANAGER FOR MOBILE. Ed J. P. Morgan Chase so I ran a cheese mobile banking as well as kind of overall APP mobile APP strategy for chase and prior to that. I was the founder one of the first fintech startups. A NEO bank called moving. So we were one of the first. Neil banks out there. I've had a long history in the Financial Services Consulting Strategy Space and basically a child of the digital era so I kinda started on my career in the nineties when the Internet was just new and focusing on helping banks and can I finish services institutions. Figure out what to do with this new technology and have written that from wave to wave which has led me to where I am. Today I grew up in the beginning of the DOT COM era. So I worked. I in investment banking at Prudential Securities. And that was literally when the first kind of Internet companies were coming up so we add an analyst kind of working on the analyst team guy by the name Henry budget that was of some fame these days but he started out covering some of these early companies like Yahoo Netscape and would come back to the office and have some these weird companies out west. What are they doing with this Internet thing so there was a group of us there that actually kind of got influenced by lot of the stuff that hair was finding and some of us car broke off and said look this. Internet things going to be a big deal for the financial services industry so me and a couple others broke off and we started a my first startup which was a small little consulting company and our charter was quite simply help. Big Banks figure out this Internet thing. We really help build the first kind of websites and Internet's out. There I worked at a company called Sapient Following that little star up and save it was one of the first companies to switch from sort of client server oriented technology kind of web based technology and I was part of the Group there that was their digital strategy team again. Kind of a pioneer. Sabin was a pioneer within the space and one of the first companies that are kind of really pivot almost the whole business away from kind of old technology. Do this new web stuff. So I was part of this team that worked on kind of the first armoured banks for Song my brokerages when it was really just about information like how do you build products that kind of unleash data that had previously just been only available to banks and now make them accessible for clients to be able to kind of deal with new information? Wills do self service that entire era of kind of nineties into the mid to late. Two thousand eight nine really was it for banking was kind of this era of digitization and I followed that through multiple phases on the consulting side as well as kind of creating a startup at city that was oriented around launching a business within the wealth management space then kind of social mobile and payments revolution. Hit some around two thousand seven two thousand eight and at this time. I was kind of leading financial services at sapient on my second. Go Round. They have said. Hey Alex social mobile facebook all this new stuff comes out and what's the future financial services? Now we're at this other technology inflection point and so at that time there was a guy in that. I got connected with in the early Twitter Environment Guy. With an MBA brick king who had written a book called Bank two Point Zero and we got sort of connected through this early twitter network and I was kind of at sapient and come up with a point of view on what banking was about. I said you know called this guy up and said hey what do you think about? The world is GONNA look like with mobile social and some stuff going on and payments. And you know kind of we had each other at. Alloa it was one of those moments and then we kind of got together and started to talk to big banks around the world selling Sapient Services. About what the view of banking wasn't future that collaboration ended up becoming the kind of idea of moving. Which is really about kind of reinventing a bank with this kind of these new tools mobile social and kind of what was going on in payments. And you know our premise was simply just that which is if you had to redesign a bank from kind of mobile backwards. What would it look like recognizing that I N G creed the first stage of evolution with web and this kind of high yield is direct play? What was the new play with mobile and social as the premise? So we started moving based upon working. That is this opportunity backwards. Raised a couple of rounds of capital in the early days of fantastic about twenty two million under eye tenure there and launched a consumer product in the market as well as Abebe enterprise product and SORTA partnered with some big banks on move ins core technology. Td Bank up in Canada and WESTPAC in New Zealand. Good examples we kind of build that business piloted it to enterprise business and then I was always passionate about consumers so around our Ciaran of capital we brought on new executive scale. The business and I went over to J. P. Morgan Chase with the opportunity to kind of lead mobile and visionary was basically. Hey you know we're J. P. Morgan Chase. We're the largest mobile user base in the United States. That seems like a great chassis that Kinda drive impact the world banking through that product and platform. So I spent a couple of years doing that. Then recognize that in some ways the things that I liked about new company creation and Kinda venture and the early stage of product development. I wasn't really getting at chase which was much more mature. Large-scale firm as you can imagine so then the opportunity comes at Citi ventures and what I do now which is working within the context of a very large global company but really focused on that early stage development and sort of that new concept of. How do you develop an entirely new and emerging spaces new products and services? That can really drive the needle of growth. That's the kind of stuff I'd like to do. Alex has been working on digital transformation of banks and financial institutions long before the concept of digital transformation entered the current sites. What lessons learned moving that? He's applying to early stage. Product Development Habitat Acts. The vision of what moveon started with right? Which is this idea of taking. You know social mobile and revolution that was happening within payments and saying. Hey these three things will kind of dramatically impact how customers behave and in many ways kind of transformed the nature of how money works and how it could interact with society recognizing that there was these enabling technologies that were had this attention to change behavior and in some ways where the product development angle comes in. Is that behavior change? Unless it's a whole bunch of new ways to approach jobs all sorts of consumer jobs to be done that gets transformed by these enabling technologies. So that idea that very notion that spurred all the practice element of moving from like the first kind of widgets that we had to the ultimate platform that it is today centered around kind of mobile social and payments as enablers to these new use cases. That's commonality right. That's the same within Movin as it is at city as it is at J. P. Morgan Chase. And if kind of the heart approximate element is essentially about identifying these jobs to be done for consumers and sort of arranging solutions around them. I'd say that that's been common. Strain ended inspiration. Abide is really kind of paint that vision getting people to recognize that those three technologies when combined really do have a huge on kind of the way money and banking works. It's a guiding light principle that we use within city and I think I found it useful the product development overall guiding light of kind of thinking about every single product as a job to be done for a consumer keeps you honed in laser focused on on that task. Then he used a really needs to accomplish and it's kind of a starting right there to me is the essence of good product. Bellman moving was in you. Bank that Al Expounded. We should only mobile and digital operations no physical presence. He subscribes to the same philosophy at city that he did it move. Every product is a job to be done. Ver- Consumer Alex's worked at startups large companies and agencies. But does he see as the strengths and weaknesses. Beach business type as it pertains to innovation to me. Pratt development is kinda perfected by experimentation and that idea of identify the job to be done in the consumer need but then very quickly get something out there. Get a solution out there that you think might be that deed do a little testing and then erased very rapidly too. G PRODUCT MARKET FIT PRETTY STANDARD FORMULA. To me is one of those things. Were applying that kind of scientific method to product. Development is the recipe for success. So with that as kind of if you do that you're going to be able to get successes at Prague Development. Who is best able to accomplish that cycle in the purest way? And that's where I think you see. The bifurcation between startups versus agencies versus is very large companies startups. Of course have that. Ability to in many ways do really approach new emerge especially in early stage product development and early markets. They really have the ability to kind of approach product. In from that pure scientific method fueled by venture capital fueled by with the permission to be able to explore and less constraints is really a great way to really develop products and very rapid ways. We can get to the essence of the job to be done by consumers and that's to me there because of that the structure of a startup is probably the best chassis to explore early stage markets. And that kind of product development that being said with large companies. You're always dealing with products on that kind of mature end of the Cycle. So it isn't about early stage growth exploration. It's often about creating an infection plane. Further adoption of an existing business model then becomes about pricing ways to kind of drive loyalty and wards and create more habitual. Hit Behaviors in new segments. I think that's very very different than kind of product development and looking at early stage concepts and solutions so I think both of them have their pros and cons. But in the very early stage cycle.

product development Alex CITI ventures J. P. Morgan Chase Ed J. P. Morgan Chase Neil banks Citi Twitter Fintech sapient Sapient Services NEO GENERAL MANAGER founder moveon Prudential Securities analyst
"sapient" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"sapient" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Like six five star. I named birds. Kubo says bought reservation from Microsoft. Six hundred million dollars. I left before we sold Jasper is about three acquisitions before that. But what's really interesting about. That story is reservation Soviet. Were mortal enemies like we got the morning early days razors to destroy I'm pretty sure they got up at the same mission and so when they merge the brands like Ford went out. Very Ara Ara one eighty year anniversary a razor fish so all of the founders with one exception all food in New York last summer to get on the same boat. We had our launch party on twenty years ago. Thank the on a reservation now the CEO of the company rents the boat tours in Arbor and we went around blower we went around the Arbor drank talk little tops and so while it's such a great story and and just seeing how you know. The space has evolved. I've actually had many conversations with with Sheldon Sheldon Monteiro. I'm sort of you know. Sort of a Marketing Technology background. I've been in that space. So they've done some really cool stuff at sapient now where they're actually teaching beating people marketing technology and actually training the marketing technologist over there sheldon shows a great dude. So you know. I think you know in a parallel. It's like like I've spent all this time in Johnston all the time in in marketing and digital. And we've found our way into the blockchain space Joel and I. We started back crypto about two and and a half years ago just because we were seeing the emerging technologies we were seeing how blockchain can impact the world and so with that hat. What is your impression of blockchain? And how do you see from your perspective of running. Just a huge agency. How is blockchain? Maybe going the impact first of all the advertising advertising world because it seems like it's going to impact that space tremendously. We'll ginger zee so I I think the blockchain blockchain is an interesting idea Because it is one of the really the most interesting uses of encryption and also decentralized database and I think there's a whole under principles around that that are really exciting one of the first things the industry did I think because they're having trouble. Raising money is began innovating around the third financial services fundraising piece of things. And that's how we got. Servings is IOS excess but the platform itself I think quietly Zilz rating just like the Internet did most industry so I always tell the story is. I Went Pacific financial.

blockchain blockchain Sheldon Sheldon Monteiro Ara Ara Arbor Kubo sapient Microsoft Ford Jasper Johnston Joel New York
"sapient" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

12:59 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Today on the show got a your Gupta. He's the chief marketing officer freshly prior to freshly Ashley. He was the global V._p. For growth in marketing spotify whereas responsible for growing the free and subscribed user base for the company prior to that has spent stints at Kimberly Clark as well as sapient. He's an engineer and a master's in computer science so it's a fresh perspective that we haven't necessarily heard from on the show and today we get into what he thinks about marketing where it's going a little bit more about freshly and their mission to deliver food and wellness to people over one hundred million and people is their target and I hope you really enjoyed this conversation with mayor or would you mind introducing yourself sure some Gupta. I'm the chief marketing officer at freshly which is a wellness platform with a clear mission to make eating healthy. A lot easier for people will welcome to the show Mayor Mayor. Thanks thanks for having me. We've Kinda. Lot to talk about today but let's start with the U. growing up and going to school in India. What do you what do you remember most fondly about that? Yes of course well a lot of <hes> foreign fund. <hes> lifelong memories of my family's family stood back there in a lot of my childhood friends are there and doing fantastic and I honestly remember everything from my elementary school to my Undergrad Undergrad to Grad Days in college definitely a lot of cricket and tennis and <hes> you know I feel India's of course grown as an economic dominic power house and at times. I feel I was born at this time. The kids kids coming out of school in college today off fearless ambitious and they have a purpose in in many ways. I find they are born. Entrepreneurs in some incredible companies like flip caught in oil that have become global phenomena come on there with very young people and at the same time also sometimes. I feel <hes> countries like India where we obviously have a very high population. Sometimes a number of people exceed the kind of professional opportunities. You get so from a very young age get into this competitive environment for you. You know it's a race for survival and see kind of train yourself like that but sometimes good and bad but being an immigrant here in the U._S. I I obviously London have a lot of appreciation gratitude but you know one of the topics that often come open. I'm talking to other my friends. Who've moved are others is <music>. How in countries in you have too. Many people visits sense of corruption and political environment even though that's not the core of this conversation that <unk> America used to instill is a dreamland for many people and when I grew up it was the same what I realized was countries like India. I the corruption is visible right. It's in your day to day life and <hes> it impacts people in what you do every single day but it's localized you know it is in that country. I feel that in in more developed countries like the U._S. U._K. And others not having been here and I'm part of the system by I am not talking as an outsider rather than insider. I feel that corruption is more systematic. You know it's invisible than it is more organized than we we talk about that often here in healthcare and I feel that the impact of some of the decisions we make is not just localize as a matter of fact is more global than what happens in some of the other countries so not the answer. You're looking for but no but it's it's so true in that. We were talking earlier. <unk> never thought about the connection between the visible and invisible corruption because most people. I grew up in the United States so you know it's one point of view but you think of this place <hes> as a land of opportunity rate we were taught from an early age that you can achieve even the American dream <hes> all of that's changing but there's so many people nowadays that are disenfranchised here and to your point. It's likely because the system system is rigged in some ways against them <hes> but it's invisible you know it's not it's not just making sure that you pay off your teacher to get a grade aid even now yeah exactly or get into a institution right <hes> but you know it's yours. You're so true. It's so true way just said so. <hes> thank you for sharing that and I can imagine you know <hes> growing up in another country area developing country <hes> leaves you with Dr Like you described that <hes> it's probably propelled you through your career so let's let's Kinda start there ear. Where did you start your career in. What's been the path become C._M._o. Freshly yes so the path of course now looking back seems like a you know of course fantastic journey full of mistakes and a lot of lessons. Lond and in many ways I I often call my journey as quite accidental oh <hes> simply because I was never meant to be marketeer never studied marketing. I I grew up as an engineer. I did computer science. I did my masters in computer redesigns at home. In India and <hes> writing code in for the first many years did exactly that quite should quote sometimes but <hes> the interestingly I was. I used to work at a company called Sapien which is not part of publicis in back. Danny was one of the largest digital <hes> <unk> agencies gosh partners and so on so the interesting part in my journey was when I gradually got into product development from pill technology allergy <hes> sometimes in the two thousands when saving acquired a company called T._G._i. That really got me into this role of Aztec and marketing tech and more from pure attack to building products the world of in a marketing and advertising and since then have gradually taken baby steps to get into the center of marketing and and coincidentally <hes> the world of marketing itself has been evolving from the pure days of Madman where marketing was all about pure instinct intern irrationality and creative and funny to today. We're marketing is accountable measurable addressable it has way more meaning and porpoise so I feel that those two things just organically connected for me and it wasn't a conscious choice and <hes> yeah so. It's very exciting to be here in in <hes>. I lost and I would say his two of my career. I've grown up with tech can date Einstein's. The Wall has been binary for me but the last five or six years of my experience has really taught me that the will is in binary and the wool marketing is in binary <hes> it just not just not about what works and what doesn't work. There is the irrationality serenity. Pity of marketing should never go away so while we often talk about data. There's a there's a ten line between being data driven. Worse is being delayed inspired and I'm on that journey now just as an individual as a marketer details of how do you balance that. How do you balance that underlying cultural inhumane impact with the tangible impact on business astonishment impact on growth and people's lives. That's very true very true and something we should keep at the forefront what we do as marketers <hes>. I know you know I'd be remiss if I didn't ask you about a couple of stops that you've made along the way on your way to freshly so you. I think it was moved moved from sapient to have this out of order but sapient to Kimberly Clark so I'd love to know about that transition and then <hes> and then <hes> how you found yourself at spotify and then you know what brought you to freshly if you don't mind show show now just a few months back had this opportunity to share a little bit of this journey which <hes> which is quite embarrassing <hes> not because it's anything special because it was nothing special as so. It took me a wide. I had to put together so the way I was thinking about that when I shared it on three months back was Safin was almost like a gym for me. I was learning how to learning the after everything and <hes> in many ways besides that one pivotal point where I got from Geotech to develop an ad in advertising and marketing auditing are feeling the key pivotal point for me was this trump's transition from save into Kimberly Clark Corporate America Fortune One hundred and the investing in disruptive role as chief marketing technologist sitting at the center of Assia Moina C._I._O. alone tremendous law but in many ways the big transition that happened in myself as a professional was I felt for the first time I had a point of view <hes> mm or the situation forced me to create a point of view N._S. perspective which I never had earlier and at the same time it also gave me a lot of courage that <hes> what was more important always have a perspective and there was no perspective which was right or wrong because it was just mine as long as I believed in it and I feel that that I can if I'm plugging my career on a graph if you'll have a pre perspective or pre point of view stage Anna Anna pulls point of view stage and dust means such loaning you know just a tremendous thing for me <hes> not just in a professional life now but as an individual as well and then I think the last stop was <hes> and I would love to talk a lot more about freshly by was yeah they will so much that I learned at spotty fine in which is now together addressed with the leadership team with older experiences renowned bringing at a fantastic place called freshly but my big takeaways from a wonderful place spotify was one in this was the transition from imagine fortune one hundred Kimberly Clark a hundred and fifty dollar company and and and one of the most brands called spotty fine so what I took away. was that the only moat that you have in the world today as an organization a speed is your ability to move and tests faster than the competition and when you do that there is meant to be chaos you know there is there is meant to be <unk> chopping and changing ideas of strategy and what I learned was the the the coal is not to kill that chaos the goal is is not to bring calm but how you haunt us that fails and the only reason the only way you can actually do that is ran. You focus on the internal. Culture is the power of the people inside the organization. How do you build that trust the transparency you know where there's no anxiety and so that was my my biggest takeaways in is how do you how do you harness chaos to drive scale quote and how do you not worry about the two problem and just focus on day one on so all of that led me to freshly reach which I deeply connected with with purpose and mission which is to change human life life because there's so much happening in a live it just crazy in chaotic and be believed that nutrition is the single largest influence answer off your well being and it's one area which has been most under penetrated and desperate via playing and <hes> it's a blank canvas fast fast growing company. We've been here for the last four years with the founders. Mike and Condo and I feel super excited about the mission on one hand of what you're trying to accomplish with impacting opting hundred million lives at the same time. It gives me a blank canvas to draw the blueprint for marketing in the way. I envisioned over the years. Nice <unk> will tell listeners that <hes> we have listeners all around the world so tell listeners freshly is and and where they can find find it today yes so in a nutshell in we are Valez platform that is centered around efficient and <hes> our mission is to remove all in any kind of barriers from hell eating so it's in his fundamentally to democratize hell eating because we believe that's that's cold to our well-being so we online subscription platform. You can download the APP freshly. It's available.

India chief marketing officer Kimberly Clark spotify engineer sapient publicis tennis chief marketing technologist United States America London Valez Lond Mike intern Kimberly Clark Corporate Ameri Einstein Danny
US companies hunt for loopholes to beat China tariffs

Marketplace

02:24 min | 2 years ago

US companies hunt for loopholes to beat China tariffs

"We begin today where we often have lately the trade war the escalating tariffs between the u._s. and china perhaps you've heard that mentioned here before now yes for sure those tariffs have had an impact on trade between the two nations and during the g twenty summit that starts on friday and japan president trump and president xi jinping will meet to talk about their relationship issues but meanwhile business finds a way to go on as usual and many businesses have resorted to work arounds loopholes shall we say that helped them avoid paying these tariffs marketplace's eric embarrassed has that story work arounds on tariffs sometimes called transshipments have been around as long as terrorists have existed says emily blanchard professor at dartmouth but right now they're having a moment when tariffs were lower before this trade war it wasn't a profitable strategy now that tariffs are going up we would definitely expect to see transshipment becoming more popular and not all transshipments are created equal practices like shipping furniture made in china to a third country with lower tariffs like vietnam and then removing the made in china sticker that's a legal but doing most of the production in china and the finishing touches elsewhere that's arguably legal says michael moore who teaches economics and international affairs at george washington university if you bring the product in and you use a screwdriver to screw in the last screw that doesn't mean it's made in vietnam it has to be a substantive change in the product like assembly new kind of paint or a crucial part since the beginning of the trade war a lot of goods made in china have been shipped from sapient nam or other southeast asian countries entering the u._s. via transshipments mary lovely and a communist and fellow at the peterson institute says industries like footwear toys and steal can use transshipment but others can't like industries that have to be certified so called life and death industries artificial knees any kind of medical products that are made in china those that whole supply chain is certified by u._s. regulators you can't all of a sudden just say oh i happen to get any from someplace else that leaves those industries with no option but to pay those terrorists or move their production elsewhere altogether america bears from

President Trump Professor Dartmouth China Vietnam U._S. Peterson Institute Japan Jinping Emily Blanchard Michael Moore George Washington University America
"sapient" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"On what you know what he needs. He can target people. You know not tamper but he can target people who he wants. Yeah. I you know, I got your point and I think it's, it's very well taken and I, I would imagine he's doing just what you're talking about now. You got guys who are under contract and it stuff as you say, you can't start tampering with people now but you can certainly make your list up of people. Now he walked into a really tough situation and. That's why I'm not. I'm not blaming him. You know, we know that. I mean you know what's he gonna do with Crawford? What's he gonna do with longoria, you know, belt, you know, the whole group of them, you know, guys who are free agents or, you know, when they get near the trade deadline, then this is where he's gotta use his expertise. So who does it rely on even if he had a GM now I think he's the GM type other words, he's not a guy who just came in sort of to, to run the organization. He's a hands on evaluator. And so what does he do now? He's got Zack Minassian as director pro scouting. He's got a farm director, and he's got the j p Ricciardi as an adviser and he still has if he needs the expertise, Brian sapient and other people are still around. But the thing for me is I think he should be doing just what you're saying, and that is fine tuning who he wants for GM fine tuning who he wants for a manager. But more importantly. Scouting everybody in baseball because you cannot miss you cannot miss with these deals that are going to come up in July. They have to hit. And I think that's what he's got to do in your point about Larry is well, taken. I think the whole organization misses him to tell you the truth, in, in his leadership in the organization, and he'll be back to lie second and hopefully everything will be, you know, okay in his life, and PAM's life, and he can come back and give the guidance. I think you bring up a good point. I think the whole organization has missed him, especially in a year where you're twenty one and thirty two or whatever twenty one thirty one. Yeah, I understand. Mardi one more thing is not about baseball in my backyard thirteen. I I wine tours.

Crawford Zack Minassian GM longoria baseball director PAM Ricciardi Brian sapient Larry
"sapient" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Audie who can understand like being a passionate fan, and you're passionate fans? We're all we're all that way. But I don't know anybody like just for the sake of defending like an idea where you would open a Mike or whatever you workplaces the gas station, the office, whatever talk to your co workers veal again, I'm psyched about this. China's had two hits yesterday. I feel good like nobody feels good about a team that gets to its they Saturday. We should say that Iraq is nice to see that little outburst. Yeah. Those little run we forgot to mention they did win. And and it was a wonderful. I it was a one to one game in the sixth inning on. I mean, this is what losing teams do. They start looking at like we had a chance, right? No. You're totally true. That's losing baseball. Yeah. I know. So they can't hit and who's psyched about two hits like who who's going to celebrate that because you're going to try to defend far hon-. I mean, I think you gotta make a distinction like, and I still do I'm still trying to figure this out like, and you were saying this last week to what what exactly is the plan here. Are they trying to win right now? Are they looking towards the future? They're not gonna use the R word rebuild. But when you're putting read in and Joe out there sometimes and then sometimes not like even those young players need a chance to get into a rhythm and get into like a daily routine where they know like, I'm the leftfielder. I'm gonna play today. Like, I question guy shown up to the yard having no clue where they're playing or if they're playing at all buddy might texted me and said, hey, hey, ho, ho. Re reading show have got to go good. Yeah. I know those guys are easy scapegoats in kind of not their fault. But you got you got bocce Preston. You've got you know, guys. We haven't even talked about the Connor Joe arm. Right. Have we? I mean, let's not let's not talk about in left field. I dunno. Polly. We got into it last week mount. Saint Murph blue after the first series in the books like what are you see out there? We. Are we trying to do? Yeah. You're trying to win with with pitching and kind of the same model. They've tried to win with when things were good which is pitching and defense, and they were able to. Bit dude. You've gotta hit a little Brian sapient four-run rule. Brian savings says our our data shows when we score for he's right generally win that data's rock-solid. It's been proven, right. You give those those pictures, and it would be a shame copes for Hannity you to watch. If this great pitching continues. Maybe not great. But very good starting pitching. And very good bullpen work. It'd be a shame to just throw that on the side of the road. Because we can't score runs. I'm just laughing because it took them three games and scored four runs off at five in the weekends. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So I mean, yeah, I don't want more than I was hoping for sun with the dodgers. Did right? I doubt. If you wanna talk about it, dude. I don't even wanna talk about it. They they went scored forty two runs to the giants five you got that Cope's forty two the Ronnie Locher. That's a franchise record for the dot one hundred years old. They hit fourteen home runs to the giants won. And they also by the way rally last night with three in the bottom of the eighth to to win. Actually, the diaper bags were were six hours away from splitting that. Series. Sorry excited at this giants dodgers theory. Well, let's see what happens Pomeranz against rias Palmer Anderson. And again, they other part, and we talked about this on Friday, and we're gonna continue talking about this all you to lefties left. He's left. He's left. He's left. He's crushing these guys. They they are they cannot combat the lefty thing a Murph. I wish that just because we've seen it so many times, and it's always fun is a Bumgarner Kershaw, and I'm trying to remember how long has Kirsch shut like when's Kershaw going to be ready? It's a good question. I don't know the answer to that. Because what better matchup is there? When those two guys are working against each other getting bummy review and the other party to of this team in this roster. This thirteen pitcher roster was you run out of bench players and you had Madison Bumgarner on deck on Saturday night for a Friday night Friday night. I'm confusing. My nights they won on Saturday. They lost on Friday Friday night. Bumgarner was on deck because they have no bench because they only have four bench players. And again that you don't need thirteen pitchers, man. Sorry. You just don't go down to twelve and give me another bench guy handle your business. Bullpen. Handle it with you. Okay. In by the Nick Vincent getting some work out there and Sam Dyson to yesterday. So all right after the cache creek text line a lot of people right now. Right. And there's all sorts of topics have gotten into eight three one TIMMY never had run support. Either frowny face a six five always written in several texts, and you guys are slagging analytics and yet the Tampa Bay rays just three or four from the Astros with their innovative style ball. Well, they have young talent the giants don't have young talent. So there you go. Yeah. Yeah. Eight three one. It's really too bad that Bobby Evans single handedly obliterated the positive glow of three World Series. Ninety five says, would you rather have Gorkhas then Connor Joe? Yes. Yes. Yes. I would. That's a no brainer. Rates says they said Connor joke and play third. How no way that arm can throw all the way across. Pablo yesterday? Unfortunately that was a damn shame too. Because Pablo had just given the giants a lead. They literally threw it away. Two nights is I love watching Maranta bump, of course, and derived. Yeah. Even the shark was solid pitching was good. It's derived to get a win, by the way. Yeah. Yeah. Seven seven five writes in all caps rebuild we though and they're not going about it as a rebuilt a rebuild. His you. Just you eat contracts. You dump guys? There you go. For eight asks legitimately. If opening day gets rained out are the Friday ticket holders out of luck. I paid a lot of money for opening day. This is an omen. I know we're while with less weather can change everybody. Six five O says the rebuild will eventually go through the demolition phase. And then fans will really drop off. Yeah. There will be a time when you get eighteen thousand sixteen hack, you might have seen the last dates, I it's most likely this year to you're probably going to see smaller crowds like second half of this year. If this continues, this kind of play very seventy seven rights to Topeka, I feel like a small bright light in my life is winking out me man care to nica me. Two seven. Oh seven. Yeah. She's not she's not passing away. She's still around. She's flying. The coop though. She's flying away. Forays is Bobby Evans called the brewers says we like yelich bursts said who you got Evans said, blah, blah. Blah, brewers said click is what happened pretty much on that a six five. Oh, says can we talk about how the giants should've tried to get Christian yelich instead of Giancarlo Stanton? Somebody else seven or seven writes in RIP nips. Z hustle. Yeah. A lot of stuff going be a really came out. I confess that the young man. I I was not a practitioner of his music. I was aware of his celebrity and his fame. Good name. Also phenomenal name for those Lakers fan volume the old match game. Comedian nipsy Russell shout out who used to do his jokes in poem. I think he was in the Bill. Cosby, I think he was a top of my head. I'd have to check. But wouldn't you know, Bill Cosby movie uptown Saturday night in the seventy right? Yeah. So great name. And then sadly, I guess, you know, I read that he was involved in in the crypts and down there in LA get shot in front of a clothing store. Steph curry. Star Steph curry with a long. Eulogy really the young man. Yeah. So that's a big deal obviously had an appearance during the summer at a store in the hip hop community. Eight three one's a great listener. He says yelich colon. He banks. Hey, you got to bang seven seven says, I just remembered today's April one no chance, you guys are just fooling around with this. Giants roster. Right. Ooh. Says you guys talk in Lubbock, Texas. How do you not mention Bobby, buddy? Holly, Bobby keys, the sax player on Brown sugar. Let me give those and shout out to make Jagger get-well-soon kid, by the.

giants Bobby Evans Connor Joe baseball Madison Bumgarner China Bumgarner Kershaw Connor Joe arm Steph curry Audie dodgers Iraq Mike Bill Cosby Saint Murph Tampa Bay Pablo Brian sapient LA Bobby
"sapient" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"And you're next up. Hey morgan. They ham the radio st- good to have you. I just as Alabama fan. We got our hours handed to us that I mean there it is. There you go don't like talk about it and feeling like I'm part of the finebaum family for my family, and my kids always call him sing happy birthday. So here we go. Happy birthday, Mr. sapient, happy birthday, Mr. sapient Yellen, saying long, happy birthday, Mr. say being and happy birthday. You you. Okay. Well, we've got that settled. It's okay to sing happy birthday. Now. Isn't it isn't that surpr- that court ruling it used to be if you sang happy birthday would cost you, but some court ruled that you can do it now for free public domain? We got that settled how about Jerry next in the Commonwealth of Virginia been reading a lot of beverage lately. Seventy grease seventy degrees today, and you still got it. And you still got a governor to hell. That's crazy. Well, you got remember that we are the heart of the confederacy. Yeah. No. I'm never lost track. Wherever Jinyu is. And where they stood. Who are you taking any more of these though chick your person comb never done with that topic? Okay. Well, it's a lot of fun. I've been looking at the two careers, not just peak value with career value, the two coaches, and I don't see how saving could be compared to develop check as far as degree at difficulty of chievements and for four simple reasons. May I say states, you may please don't hesitate. Another second. Reason number one you simp- at that level of football NFL, you simply cannot schedule wins. You cannot custom schedule ins to you're saying you cannot play the citadel or Mercer. Yes. Or some? Yeah. Baked potato school like that. I that's exactly right, Paul. Yeah. Western carolina. You have sixteen games that every right, by the way that that is maybe the most sapient point. I've heard in this debate. Well, it's it's just so obvious. You just can't custom schedule wins at that. That's not a knock on Satan. Because they all do that. We're talking about the best. We're not nobody's getting knocked here. Right. Well, savings at great great great seal of powerhouse program that nobody can deny that. But. Comparison, here's based on degree of difficulty of TV. Okay. Number one is no customs, schedule number two at billet checks levels football. You can't play sixty five and seventy percent games at home like saving does your point..

Mr. sapient Yellen football morgan Alabama Jinyu NFL surpr Mercer Virginia Jerry Western carolina Paul seventy degrees seventy percent
"sapient" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Young girl who discovers talent for stand up comedy pay by lift hill. That is definitely wanted to be recommended. It's on February on wild rose while rose is a very sweet story of a young girl. He wants to be a country and western singer and Julia Roberts shit. Sorry. Julie Walters in it. And Jessie Buckley is the starter. Watch a lot. Julie Walters and Julia Roberts gaming stuff generalize at that. But yeah. Film, wouldn't it. Maybe they should do that. That was the film critic and us may think sation with rubber bound for this week's edition of Monaco culture show, you the curator Monaco's weekly highlight show here and monocle twenty four with me Margot sapient tomat- words on last week and edition of meet the writers Georgina Goto joins by Douglas Kennedy, the best selling author of the big picture the pursuit of happiness leaving the world. And the moment they discussed his career today and his jump from theater to literature. And in this highlight what it was like writing from the perspective of a woman. It's the eighth or ninth time, I've written in the voice of women, and it's not like I have a little pouch of estrogen that, I place under my arm when I do this or I think how women react in this. It's interesting I've been married twice. And the second one was a quickie, and she was a psychoanalyst and one of the few things that I remember which was positive experience was in. But she made a very interesting observation while she said. You right. So well about women because you're still trying to understand your mother. And I actually thought that was very interesting. I never thought about that. My mother was a very unhappy woman raised by what is known in Yiddish is he enter and father who is slightly distant. And she was essentially a Jewish American Princess could have the kind of lower economic stronger and had teamed up with this big Irish American, and it was a mess. And she was someone who is like the mother in the book omnipresent. All the time. Could never leave for children alone was always invading their privacy. And was just this myth assists, Vall of unhappiness and frustration, but you also made me in all of us as well. I'm sure of that. I think one of the things I started to do at the age of eight was look at my parents. It's as they were fighting, and it was very distressing for an eight year old see this going on. But I see this now, and I've done enough of the talking cure, the get the basically, this was point where a worldview began to form. And the the fact that actually making a life with somebody is probably the hardest thing we ever tried to do that search for love, which is in all of us for found -ly. It's the one thing we want more than anything in life is to make that connection. It's the most lucid thing and it haunts on us. That's was the best selling author Douglas Kennedy and conversation with monocle Jewish we in four laws two weekends at Chenoweth. Meet the writers, and that's pretty much all we have time phone. This week's issue of curator. The show is produced by Sam M P M presented by Maitum Edwards and Marquis AP. Do join us again next week to him all of the very best to the low seventies. Head on. The station. Let's end though, Marcus is not quite the rap of the show just yet with some music, and what a treat we've gone exactly what. Threes highlights from this week's dishes of the session at Matori house. The phoning member owns guitarist store, the keillor's Dave cuning is launching a solo career and he stops by Midori house to play trucks from his new record Brigham assume. Here he is with the night. Thanks for listening. In two nine leave your baggage five. Hi. Hi. Close your eyes and fine. Navigate through the strays amaze cod up fray of wise trip banning on your own. These is this fight is over and I can see. Carry on. Spied as. Can see. Harry night. You been ready since you? Conquering down riding the stone. Joe THAAD, send food stretching exit strategy of play action. Raisins bar at why shoots shore. Rose side. There is cry. Give yourself funds to good night. This fight is over and I can see the light. Gary. Night soon. I. Spider solar, and I can see the light. Carry on nine. And

Julie Walters Julia Roberts Douglas Kennedy Joe THAAD Jessie Buckley rose Monaco Maitum Edwards Marcus Dave cuning Matori house Georgina Goto Gary Margot sapient Chenoweth Harry Midori Sam M P M keillor Brigham
"sapient" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

"West Ken am big thanks to express VPN for sponsoring this week show. It happens now. And again, a celebrity tweets about how great their Samsung, whatever is from their iphone apple music tweets about it service from an Android device. Sometimes it seen as hypocritical often it seen as amusing. But ours Technica says the company wronged by the latest Bo PA is showing zero sense of humor over the issue. The stories prelude came at the end of last year. According to report in the final minutes of twenty eighteen the official at while way account wish everyone a happy new year. It was a nice enough sentiment that people quickly notice that it was posted using an iphone which is awkward when the whole purpose of the account is promote wall weighs phones. Was this absent mindedness on the part of wall weighs PR firm. Quite the contrary while way employed a company called sapient to handle the Twitter message among. One assumes other messaging, apparently based in China, the company had to use a VPN to be able to access and post to Twitter's and Twitter is blocked in China, but sapient experience VPN troubles close to time to tweet the tweet wanting to get word out on time a piece from Reuters says they used an iphone with a roaming sim card to get the happy new year message out apparently forgetting that some Twitter clients show from what sort of device a given message is posted one assumes that say be bien has been fired. But that's not enough for while way are says while way has reportedly docked the pay of two employees by five thousand U N that's about seven hundred twenty eight dollars US and reduced each employee is ranked by one level in wall. Weighs corporate hierarchy. Worst new year ever. And finally today while apple is not at this week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and got. It says the company has sent attendees a message in the form of a huge sign riffing on sin cities old what happens in Vegas. Stays.

Twitter Las Vegas apple sapient West Ken Samsung US China Reuters official seven hundred twenty eight dol
"sapient" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"They give you a little bites, and then it becomes an elephant, and sort of this this idea that you just shared read of these details that went on notice and eventually became something bigger. But then the idea that I kinda wanna touch on here and get your your perspective on for the listeners is you mentioned a sanctuary for failure or or an area for failure. How do you create that environment? I feel like that's something that we all work on and try to get better at but if you had to boil it down to one or two things how. Do you create that failure friendly environment? Yeah. That's a great question. I think personal you gotta prove it. And so I think those that we serve those that we lead when they see across our society across a maybe their own previous experiences when they see instances of kind of instant retribution, and this idea that people are gonna be generalized or discriminated or labeled quickly for an error for mistake that they make it really creates since intimidating exiled. So as news when we start to talk about that. It's always not always. But it is oftentimes can be met with scepticism. Right. Right. And so we have to prove it as an organization we have to I communicate and inspire it. So there's a there's a narrative that you have to speak and deliver to help. Folks, authentically understand that the environment that we're creating as relates to being accepting of failure. Without judge. Without persecution. Without retribution is important. It's critical importance to our organization, and as you commit to that narrative, then stay steady with it in constant with it. Then you get the opportunity to prove it. And so when those moments happen it's met with in embrace. It's met with a process that is designed to encourage their heart. So that they believe and understand in our fully convicted in the idea that what they've done something. Good. And what they have helped to do is something good that will improve the organization now that doesn't dismiss negligence or gross outliers things of that nature, but has an organization as a community in relationship with partners across the country, these safe, havens and sanctuaries as you described them, I think they're important differentiator for us particularly with this small, but he volving niche of. Of the industry and segment of the industry. I appreciate you diving into that mitt consistently communicate and then approve it by showing that you're not just talking the talk, but you're walking the walk and then putting a process around. That's great. And so, you know, we dove into one of the setbacks that you've had, but let's take the other side of that coin and walk us through your most recent or even proudest doesn't have to be recent medical leadership experience that you've had to date. It's a recent scoot, and this probably because it's recent it's the freshest and the it was just a great experience. But the expense had with leaders said Oklahoma state University Medical Center and Oklahoma state University College of health sciences, the hospital in Tulsa sapient hospital for the community in its beacon for the bender insured and uninsured to go and receive care it had been mismanaged neglected in almost treated as a castaway for a number of years. And when I was with mercy we had the opportunity to come in and provide some support the organization leadership support. And and it was just an incredible. Moment, we rallied the co workers of the institution around a shared vision. That was more about the future of medicine that they would deliver in the community, and how critical the their placement in their role in that was to the services and the care available to the most vulnerable, and then we had to stabilize the organization from a financial perspective. And so we executed a financial turnaround plan that was very significant. And we were fortunate to be very successful in that regard..

Oklahoma state University Coll Oklahoma state University Medi Tulsa sapient hospital
"sapient" Discussed on Dreamland

Dreamland

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on Dreamland

"Answer. Anything you ask to help you in any way. I can always now. This isn't very interesting question as to what they wanted and may have wanted an I look at it in terms of history. Because if you look at history what you see is it's hit human history is a history of violence marked by gradual increases in the in in in the quality of life. But with. These extraordinary explosions of violence, which have been getting bigger, and there there's no difference in the human being the differences that the more potent the weapons we develop the more terrible the violence. We we prefer patriot on each other. What does this about do you think they want? This is is it suggests we might be some kind of a game almost. Yeah. And that issue between neanderthalensis and cro-magnon home, safety and sapient the more that scientists have studied the enter to lenses. They have found that they from pollen on the ground in certain rectangular kind of patches it was very clear that Neander tolls. Bury their dead and put flowers on those great. We know that in terms of cubic volume the Neanderthal brain was bigger than current chrome onion, home safe. Sapien. And it is also very interesting that that beautiful art in caves that you mentioned it was always attributed until just the last four or five years to the emergence of cro-magnon, homo sapiens, sapient in the caves lescaut in certain areas on the French and Spanish border in that area. But now there have been papers that have written this suggests that Neander to Lynch was also doing some of the will say less realistic, art work and some, but nevertheless, art work in these caves, if Nandor two lenses was peaceful had some sense of soul bury their dead put flowers on the grave had larger brain capacity than this particular model of us. Why was it? Replaced and when you look at as you just said, the singular characteristic of the homo sapiens. Sapien chrome onion of the last forty thousand years has been its evolution through war, and then Lucien of its technology through through Kerr war. And so if you say as they remote viewers, do and the military was blowers, we are dealing with a lot of life in this universe. And that some of it is friendly to us some of it is very neutral as as if they only monitor and then something or some things that are truly hostile would like humanity eradicated from earth without any explanation for why that would be the case either. Then what does friendly mean if you look at the Bill? Shape curve of friendly neutral hostile. What is our gauge for friendliness, if it isn't helping us with tools of war, helping us neutralize nuclear missiles, they definitely have done that. And then you step back and say, well, if we have some of the friendly's that in the nineteen sixties were considered hostile because they were interfering with our minute men missiles, then what is the definition of friendly neutral in hostile from a human point of view. It is seen mostly in largely through the lens of military priorities and nuclear missiles are not going to help anything on earth. That is for sure. And so it appears that if there is if you read out of what happened in the sixties the interference with our minute, ma'am, missiles, what is the priority of the non human? It appears to keep be to keep us alive or to keep some version of live on earth. So what is it that we provide for them that they would even put up with us evolving in developing nuclear missiles until a point..

Neander Nandor Lynch forty thousand years five years
"sapient" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Cried passion and pack injury of college. Football leaves here. This is the Paul finebaum show our four podcast, welcome back to the program. I will give credit to the next caller though. Jim and Tuscaloosa. I think I think much sapient ads in mind and eight years through Petra. And I think he's you to thank all you know that you you probably brought that guy up and that's what he wants. I believe he's like a sensationalist like Geraldo doing stupid more Reich stuff like what he said to get a kitchen to get on there and get many bomber haters startup and Alabama stirred up. Don't you think that's probably what will occur. And and and the reason I believe that Jim is you could you could tell in his attitude most people, certain one or engage and be friendly? I mean, he came on mad at the world like these guys are going to rip me, so I'm gonna come in and start swinging before they can. I wish I mutual sapient friend Shane from Senegal could've come in and saying, killed that guy. That's I physically he'd probably would physically to, which like really though, I mean, that guy wouldn't have stopped. Well, I may have stopped it up for a while. Well, somebody might let you stop after about five rand finding, I wouldn't have been in a hurry to stop it. That's what I'm talking about. But anyway. Yeah, that just a clown. That's what Shane. I just come clown looking for kitchen down there. Hey, should chain it. You put him on, hey, but you know what? Jackie men, the brand block a couple of months from now we'll listen the good news. The good news is that were that we talked to him. The bad news is he he's still stuck in, can I'll. I disagree the the bad news is I hear that. Got, yeah, I feel the same way Jim. I, I mean, you news. I mean, you're, you're Sapien guy. You could tell ten seconds in that. He had an attitude and he was not. He was not gonna listen to anything. We said. Minute raising was he had no reasoning is reasoning. And by the way, you know, I usually just let guys like that talk. I don't even gauge because he's the guest. I'm the host. I, I want people to understand, but you got some flack v n interrupted. I knew you were about the co in the blast means say, I'm no longer. I'm over the hill and then you bring Vickers back, shows you coming back, keep getting guys like in a layer. Well, that's where you lose it. You gotta. I'd like having. Guys like that or what made the show Jim. No, no, Paul, no dishes, the guy you're talking to you, the made this show. You're right. I mean, other than you guy guests like that. Yeah. Well, anyway, we got. We got a mutual understanding. He's nothing, but I, I can't you a kitchen artist. Yes. Fly moron around. Oh. The by the way I, I haven't seen much of the news. Wh- what is what is Geraldo so still an ally, Capone's vault. What's he done lately? Nobody knows get going. Nobody wants to check on him. Okay. I'm I'm I didn't. I don't even think I didn't even know what job most profound thing that bothers me about Trump has hasn't been to the last year and a half. Now. What's that moron? He calls him on Twitter. John Trump follows Geraldo quit hours ago on quitter. Well. That is disturbing. The second pair. Will you following me? Well, I do follow you, but I know I would take a little bit a high rated than watch. I try to. I try to get a good variety of opinion on Twitter. Collar. Tiger follow. That's you need to keep your own. Well, I'm I agree by the way Saran petro, whatever his name he would have probably said, I'm not impressed by tiger. I'm still not he. He didn't win in my book because he only beat thirty. He beat a small field. Yeah. Well, I, you know what? A better mind. That's all that we agree on, Jim. Hey, thanks where we are facially out of time what a show this has been with so many incredible guests and then Saran petro, whatever's last name was podcast is available. I assume petro will be on the podcast, although I personally wouldn't.

Jim Geraldo John Trump Shane Saran petro Capone Twitter Football Alabama Tuscaloosa Senegal Jackie men Vickers Paul Trump Wh Reich eight years ten seconds
"sapient" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"George Steinbrenner and he seems to have kind of consolidated his power. So between that and I mean, you know, Billy bean with as could Billy beedon. He's not the GM technically, but could he get fired? Could Brian sapient get fired? I mean, these guys have been in their roles for decades and I think it might take not even a scandal because Cashman's had a kindle to read. He's been in the tabloids for various stories and hasn't seem to affect his job security. I think it might just take an ownership change for these guys to. To get displaced at this point. I agree with that. I don't know. Brank Catherine will not be the Antes GM more operate in that role for the rest of his life probably, but he could also do it for literally the rest of his life. Yeah, if he wanted to, it seems like he could, and I think that the realized that even if they were to somehow miss the playoffs this year, have it be a disappointing season in the end? Clearly they have built a foundation here that really hasn't been seen in this Orgainzation since the the one that set up the dynasty a couple decades ago. So I think that he has done good work, and regardless of the outcome of the season, that work is recognized speaking of which I recommend, and we'll link to the article that Mark career wrote for the athletic this week about how the Yankees have changed. Their club has culture. They've made it much more rookie friendly. They've done away with the hazing and the hierarchy. Some veterans like c. spat thea have made a point of putting the young players on equal footing with. Them some credit goes to Cashman to and Aaron Boone and other older players really good story and something that in this youth-oriented era, baseball other teams should emulate and that Mike Mathie would hate. All right. Questioned from patriot supporters. Sean cusak. It's no secret. Rental players have been bringing back less value in recent years due to how most teams view them. What if teams traded a rental player but was sent back in return was decided based on how the team performed the rest of the season, the Abass package that the selling team gets no matter what, but the package gets a little better as the team progresses in the season. You could have base package plus one. If the buying team makes the playoffs base package plus two, if they win the pennant and base package plus three, if they.

Billy bean George Steinbrenner Yankees Cashman Billy beedon Brian sapient Abass GM Mike Mathie Sean cusak thea Catherine Aaron Boone patriot Mark
"sapient" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"sapient" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Word is a really loaded word conscious there are all sorts of levels of consciousness and maybe that'll be another what's the word soon but sapient comes from the the words that the root words that mean to be wise or to perceive or to remark and you can even look at sapienze which is a little bit older is that older let me see yeah it's older than sapient so that the noun form actually is older and it actually the latins sup means intelligence wisdom and even good taste so that's where things get a little bit confusing too because sometimes people will literally utilize translate things like taste the way that it's used here it doesn't mean taste on your tongue it means discernment one that is capable of discerning one that is capable of having wisdom having selfawareness is a sapient being but one that simply experiences life through its senses one that has an envelope is is a sentient being all beings are sentient in some way or another all animals at least and many plants and a lot of fungus and even some 'bacterial they have ways that they can sense their surroundings whether it's chemo ception or even something super simple like that so keep those things and it's almost like since everything is sent into a certain degree it's almost like you're it's it's almost meaningless then to say something sentient what actually isn't sentient rock a rock what's a that's hard right his i do think that in the moore poor poetic term or the way that probably a lot of science fiction authors will use the word is like are they actively perceiving or they passively perceiving there's nothing in the definition that defines that but i do think that there's kind of a line that a lot of people on the end like a sponge might not they might not consider a sponge or a leaf to be a sentient being but an organism that experiences some sort of sensation reacts to it yeah it's also we run into trouble with the term artificial intelligence yeah right because people use that term to colloquially to mean a.

sapient chemo moore