36 Burst results for "Santos"

Fresh update on "santos" discussed on Digital Marketing from the Trenches : Live at the Hive

Digital Marketing from the Trenches : Live at the Hive

00:42 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "santos" discussed on Digital Marketing from the Trenches : Live at the Hive

"Being. Barber. For Dr who. Put the full. Fool. Jazz. Jazz and we are live all I'd still use under their. Hi Everybody on Dana's welcome to episode one, Forty, eight of live at the hive digital marketing from the trenches. Message Producer Matt I'm Stacey Santos Content, marketing, manager here at the hive yeah you are. Right. Welcome everybody will just give it a couple of minutes for all the. Masses to flooding ooh room. See here, we're live at that on their food shrinking at my watch party. April high oven. And we go. So today, we are going to be talking about making your business stand out during uncertain times, and we're GONNA start with unfortunately a little bit of gloom little bit a doom and don't worry. We will give it on that very. Love it. So I think we have a couple of articles for what's new this week but we have a lot of examples in some good suffer what's working today so Let's dive right into what's new in I. Think we're going to be leading off with. TIKTOK. Dumped on. So before everybody that's Tiktok user flips out and loses their minds. My theory on this is that this is a whole lot of political grandstanding that will go right up to the eleventh hour and some kind of a deal will be sorted out and all will be good with the world That's just my guess I. Don't know what what you guys think about that. I'm thinking. Canadian aluminum. All tariff thing again. Oh. No, we're not going to do that. Yet impression I think I think Mark Zuckerberg is in his home. Office. Right now in the fetal position crossing his fingers like this hoping that it actually does happen. So instagram reels really gets out. That's what I think is. Going down right now it's entire. But but yeah, I, mean I I mean it definitely affects the content the United States. maybe not so much in Canada but it's GonNa be interesting to see definitely the next seventy two hours August is right so and the most unlikely of unlikeliest bedfellows in. And Walmart. Joining potentially be the I've not even quite sure to be honest with you what US overseer means. Partner it's really kind of vague fuzzy Again, this just feels like a whole lot of political grandstanding in advance of an election. So so trump can can look like a tough on. Tough on China. Has An influence though just think how important it is to diversify yourself because if he were just doing six I would be pulling my content right now trying to get as much stuff off my tiktok account is possible and just crossing my fingers hoping that they don't the ran it off..

Walmart Mark Zuckerberg Dana Instagram Stacey Santos Partner Producer China Matt Canada United States.
Los Angeles - California Battles Largest-Ever Fire As Tens Of Thousands Flee

Clark Howard

00:48 sec | Last week

Los Angeles - California Battles Largest-Ever Fire As Tens Of Thousands Flee

"Battle the state's largest ever inferno was, tens of thousands of people fled blazes up and down the West Coast, and officials warn that the death toll could shoot up in coming days. We get more from reporter Rene Santos homes burnt to the ground. Years of memories gone, the North complex West's own fire, leaving people trapped. Among the now missing Kelly Burke because I tried calling her House phone's turned off and 16 year old Messiah. His mom who's out of state now scrambling to book a flight to California. I love you. Please call me Let mom know where you're at and Michelle rank or Aldridge is praying her sister Kelly is safe after flames ripped through her Bury Creek home of 20 years. Neighbors. Tell her Kelly left with friends. She just wants to know she's okay.

Kelly Burke Rene Santos West Coast Reporter Michelle Rank Bury Creek California Aldridge
Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

Sean Hannity

00:25 sec | Last month

Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

"Covert 19. Meanwhile, a Yale University professor is warning college students today returning to campus to prepare for widespread infections and even deaths. Yale psychology professor Laurie Santos says students should be emotionally prepared for a residential college life that resembles quote a hospital unit. Several of Ohio's colleges, including Ohio State are conducting covert 19 testing on their students who live on campus at

Yale University Professor Laurie Santos Ohio State Ohio
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:21 min | Last month

Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

"A Smithsonian National Museum of the American Latino is one step closer to becoming a reality. The House approved a bill last week with bipartisan support in favor of it. And while the road to the museum opening is still long, the bill is sparking celebration and conversation within Latino communities. Here's NPR's Isabella Gomez. Salsa singer Celia Cruz. The traditions of the Dialogues, Martos Holiday alone is worth and the farm workers movement. The Smithsonian Museum of the American Latino can potentially explore Ah lot of the contributions of latte next people in the United States, but there are still logistics to work out. The bill now goes to the Senate. Then it gets signed by the White House, then the government to determine how much the museum will cost and where it will be. The location is going to be the biggest concern for me. That's a story the Rodriguez who's been lobbying for the creation of this museum for the past 15 years. And he knows where in Washington he wants it to be. You cannot Not be on the national Mall. There's also the cost, half of which will likely come from the federal government. The rest will be from donors. We all remember stories of how really stepped up for the American resume. We need to make sure that we have our donors like an overwintering. Bodegas estimates that building the museum from Scratch could take another 10 years, which gives lots of time to air some skepticism. Can one museum really encapsulate so many different cultures and experiences? Will it expand on what? Letting me that or let next identity looks like for Afro Latinos and indigenous people? My immediate reaction is I'm nervous simply because The branding of Latino lad, especially by stands. Broadcasting doesn't reflect the fact that Afro Latinos exists. That's got the knack Liston from Boston who studies the history of music in Latin ex culture. She says she thinks the museum is a good opportunity to finally have some tough conversations on race. Gender immigration. I think this is Ah, very exciting Start. If I'm gonna be honest, I do think that there's definitely a way for us to get it right. It just requires a level of honestly, I think some people are now becoming aware of that we didn't have before. And she's not the only one with some pause. Bala Santos is a museum educator in Chicago. She says she doesn't want the Smithsonian to brush over the struggles. Immigrants face when they come here. With an overly optimistic message. I would love to have Ah latte next museum where you could say they're actually structural inequities here. And it isn't about cease up. Whether it's about how are we setting up our society's? That's why museum champion is toward the Rodriguez says. Now is the time for people to raise their voices and explore those tensions. These are all historical moments they need to be laid out. It's not a story that's going to be very clean and print. That's not what we're trying to do, and it's not on the shoulders of one single Smithsonian Institution to tell that story. Well, a Santos says Now is the time for all museums across the US to reevaluate how they convey Latin ex

Smithsonian National Museum Bala Santos Rodriguez Smithsonian Institution Celia Cruz United States Liston NPR Isabella Gomez Martos Holiday Senate National Mall White House Washington Boston Chicago
Is This The NFL's #MeToo Moment?

The Lead

05:36 min | 2 months ago

Is This The NFL's #MeToo Moment?

"Can you give us a sense of the build up to the publication of this report? So there's been a lot of drama swirling around the Washington football team, but suddenly started to get all of these dots that you could start connecting. There's a lot going on within the front office. That really doesn't add up firings in retirement in July in the NFL. Rarely happening tonight. We're! And we're too high level personnel executives who were abruptly fired and Alex Santos in Richard. Man were fire. No reason was given as to why they were fired. Then today, longtime radio announcer for the Washington football club Larry Michael announcing his retirement, he spent sixteen years with the team, the man who had been there the radio voice, he abruptly retired without any sort of official comment from the team, and he started to hear this buzz rumors flying about a potential bombshell report on Washington's football team and owner Dan Snyder. This is absolutely taken over social media with speculation running rampant then by Thursday afternoon. The Washington Post dropped the story. There fifteen women who went on the record, alleging widespread sexual harassment within the Washington football organization that spanned just about Daniel Snyder entire time that he is owned the team, so these were women who works across the organization in marketing and ticketing and finance in there were also two female reporters, one who formerly covered the team for the Washington Times and Rianne and Walker our colleague from the athletic, who also went on the record to accuse one of the men who had? had been fired of sexual harassment as well. It was the sprawling account as you mentioned fifteen women accusing sexual harassment in Washington. Can you summarize some of those accusations? Yes, so it was a lot of the very classic cases of sexual harassment things from making lewd comments about women's bodies about their breasts about their rear ends about the the clothes they were wearing to very overt sexual comments, propositioning requests to go on dates, just a lot of overall inappropriate workplace behavior. Behavior from superiors directed at female employees, and it did not seem to be a secret. Some of these women who went on the record with the Washington, post talked about how the other people who worked in the organization knew about it. They talked about it amongst themselves. There were places in the building where women were advised not to go. Specifically, there was a stairwell that had basically transparent stairs and women were told. Do not go there because there were men who. Who would stand underneath that and look up? Their female colleagues skirts all of these things that are blatantly inappropriate and wrong and workplace environment, but had been persisting for more than a decade, all fifteen of these women went on the record, but one of the few who allowed her name to be published is a woman named Emily applegate. What was her experience like working inside the Washington Organization? It was miserable it really most people know times a comment on my appearin. Screaming at you for something that you, it's not your fault. And then somebody makes a comment to you about what you're wearing and it just snowballs from there. she cried at work regularly, she felt belittled, imagined us being called stupid on a daily basis, and then also almost in the same breath being hit on for your appearance. It's a miserable work experience. Experience to the point where she no longer wanted to work there anymore and no longer even wanted to work in sports, and we should note that Emily applegate's former boss Mitch Gershman who was the team CEO at the time both denied and said he didn't recall conversations referenced by Applegate, telling The Washington Post quote I can't comment on something I can't remember. But Lindsay what actions has the team taken in response to these accusations from emily applegate, and the many other women, well many of the men who were accused in this story, all ready been fired, and we're kind of fired in the process of the Washington Post. Reporting this story, the team can say that has taken measures to address this because some of these accusations date back to the early to mid two thousands, so some of these people no longer actually work with the team and then some of the people. People that had new allegations have immediately been fired or left the team. They've started their own investigation. They hired an attorney Beth Wilkinson. The name might sound familiar over the last several years. Wilkinson took part in notable cases involving Hillary. Clinton Brett Cavenaugh and Michael Flynn and she told us we can confirm that our firm was retained by the team to do an independent review of the team's culture policies and allegations of workplace, misconduct and Daniel. Snyder and his wife sent an internal email to everybody who works organization to. To apologize for the culture, the statement saying in part, the behavior described in yesterday's Washington Post. Article has no place in our franchise or society. The story has strengthened my commitment to setting a new culture and standard for our team, but without specific apologies to any of the employees into these women, and there have also not been any public apologies to the two female reporters who were not team employees. The team has not publicly addressed them as well

Washington Washington Post Emily Applegate Dan Snyder Harassment Washington Organization Washington Times Beth Wilkinson NFL Alex Santos Clinton Brett Cavenaugh Larry Michael Daniel Lindsay Walker Official Attorney Michael Flynn Hillary
At least 15 women are accusing Washington Redskins staffers of sexual harassment, report says

NFL Live

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

At least 15 women are accusing Washington Redskins staffers of sexual harassment, report says

"On Thursday, The Washington Post published thorough and. Story on toxic workplace, culture and sexual harassment allegations, The Washington football franchise related the incident stemming as far back as two thousand six. Here's some of the key takeaways from the Washington Post report, fifteen women who worked for the team have alleged sexual harassment and verbal abuse to front office members, Alex Santos and Richard Man along with longtime radio Voice Larry Michael had been accused of harassment. There have been no specific allegations against owner Daniel Snyder. The team has hired a DC attorney to review their culture and the allegations of workplace mixed misconduct

Harassment The Washington Post Washington Daniel Snyder Alex Santos Larry Michael Attorney Richard Man
At least 15 women are accusing Washington Football Organization staffers of sexual harassment, report says

Todd and Don

02:09 min | 2 months ago

At least 15 women are accusing Washington Football Organization staffers of sexual harassment, report says

"Got an update on the Washington Redskins. You know, they're they're They're changing the name. But something is something else is that they've got a bigger problem than just just a name thing. 15 women who previously worked for the Washington NFL organization, they have now alleged sexual harassment of verbal abuse by former scouts and members of the owner, Daniel Snyder's inner circle. This is this is this is this is blowing up the meat to movement bigtime. Now among those accused of misconduct. A former director of pro personnel Alex Santos, the former assistant director for personnel, Richard Man, the third as well as the long time play by play announcer and senior vice president Larry Michael. He's been doing play by play for the team for I don't know, maybe 30 years. He was fired this week and nobody knew it. Nobody knew what was going on. All of these people have been fired. Let go, and it's kind of bit hush hush and under the table. Several other names have been mentioned, including Dennis Screen, He runs the business operations for the team, former chief operating officer Michael Grisham. They're talking about in alleging sex parties involving a lot of athletes, team owners, some coaches from other teams as well. And this is all unfolding. There's there's a lot of other weird stuff involving this. That Is circulating on Reddit and on Twitter this morning. None of it's been confirmed, so I'm not going to go there. But it's a really weird allegations involving the Washington Redskins football team. Crazy man is not only is the name extraordinarily offensive t many people, apparently, but it goes deeper than that. Yeah. Allegations of a sexual harassment, toxic workplace and culture. Which span from 2006 to 2019 where raised by 15 women, all but one whom spoke to the Washington Post under conditions of anonymity. They didn't want to mention their name. So take that with a grain of salt. No. Yeah, right world is going crazy. Yeah, get just get rid of don't even not not even the name just get through the whole team. Just the whole team, not only in and it's Yeah, they're kind of crumbling around just cancelled the

Washington Redskins Harassment Washington Post Washington Nfl Daniel Snyder Senior Vice President Assistant Director Michael Grisham Alex Santos Director Larry Michael Richard Man Chief Operating Officer Dennis Screen Reddit Twitter
At least 15 women are accusing Washington Redskins staffers of sexual harassment, report says

SportsCenter AllNight

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

At least 15 women are accusing Washington Redskins staffers of sexual harassment, report says

"Several of the employees of the Washington NFL team have already resigned or been fired His results with story This is unacceptable behavior and corrected. In a wide ranging story detailed by the Washington Post 15 women who previously worked for the Washington Redskins, alleged sexual harassment and verbal abuse by former scouts and members of owner Daniel Snyder's inner circle. There are no allegations against Neider or former GM Bruce Allen, who was fired last December. Among those accused of misconduct or former director of pro personnel Alex Santos and Former assistant director of pro personnel Richard Man, the second as well as radio play by play announcer Larry Michael. All three departed the organization within the past week.

Washington Redskins Washington Nfl Washington Post Assistant Director Daniel Snyder Alex Santos Neider Bruce Allen Director Harassment Larry Michael Richard Man GM
Post reports misconduct allegations against DC NFL team

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

Post reports misconduct allegations against DC NFL team

"Today published an explosive report detailing more than a decade of inappropriate behavior of the NFL's Washington Redskins team. It's like 2 15 women who allege it least five former front office employees sexually harassed that made unwanted sexual advances. Details from CBS's nickel Kilian, One of the allegations centers around former play by play announcer Larry Michael, who was accused of routinely discussing the physical appearance of female colleagues in sexual and disparaging overtones. The club's director of player personnel, Alex Santos, was accused of making inappropriate remarks about their bodies and asking them if they were romantically interested in him. Michael retired Wednesday while Santos and assistant director of pro personnel were dismissed by the team this week. The team has retained the firm of Washington attorney about the well consent to do an independent review. Of the team's culture, its policies and allegations of workplace misconduct.

Alex Santos Larry Michael Washington Redskins Assistant Director Washington NFL Director CBS Attorney
15 women allege harassment, abuse by ex-employees at Redskins Park

Mut at Night

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

15 women allege harassment, abuse by ex-employees at Redskins Park

"Spent a month to forget. For the NFL franchise formerly known as the Washington Redskins. After decades of controversy, the team name was removed. The search for a new name continues and out comes a report in The Washington Post, which alleges Pervasive sexual harassment on the part of team employees. 15 women told the newspaper. They were harassed relentlessly and that the verbal abuse was ignored. One of the accused employees was the team's radio announcer Larry Michael. Retired yesterday, the team's director of pro personnel Alec Santos, who was fired this week, team owner Daniel Snyder refused comment, but the team has hired a law firm to conduct A review

Washington Redskins Alec Santos Daniel Snyder Larry Michael NFL The Washington Post Harassment Director
15 women accuse former Redskins employees of harassment

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:05 min | 2 months ago

15 women accuse former Redskins employees of harassment

"A bombshell report on Washington's NFL team. More than a dozen women who used to work there say they were sexually harassed and verbally abused. W T. Opie's Mike Murillo has the story. 15 former female employees tell The Washington Post that between 2006 and 2019 they were sexually harassed and verbally abused by team employees. And little was done about it, claiming some incidents were even Condoned by top executives. Some of the allegations were against Larry Michael, the voice of the Redskins, who was accused of making derogatory comments about women. He announced his retirement on Wednesday and didn't comment on the allegations. Alex Santos, the club's former director of pro personnel, was accused by six women and two reporters of making inappropriate comments about their bodies. Richard Man, the second former assistant director of pro personnel, was accused of sending inappropriate text to a staffer who says he told her to expect an inappropriate hug. Santos and man were fired this week. None of the employees filed formal complaints, according to the post. There are no accusations against team owner Dan Snyder. Former general manager Bruce Allen and the organisation says it takes issues of employee conduct seriously and has ordered an independent

Alex Santos The Washington Post Richard Man Larry Michael Mike Murillo Dan Snyder Washington Assistant Director Bruce Allen NFL Redskins Director General Manager
Steering The Ship. Building Business For Better Esports - With Bruno Santos - SVP at Ultimate Media Ventures

BIG Esports Podcast

04:31 min | 2 months ago

Steering The Ship. Building Business For Better Esports - With Bruno Santos - SVP at Ultimate Media Ventures

"Mean it's a super common thing. Right I talked to people at a KPMG I talk to people at other big accounting firms, all traditional businesses, and they say hey Christina game in my whole life. How do I get into the sports market? I mean for me. It's always hard for them. Because I say to them and I mean, we'll get into gaming receivables to cash later, but a lot of time I decided and look. These companies need someone with your expertise, but they don't have enough money to pay for someone with your expertise, so like what would be your if if someone from kpmg approach to the currently earning. Eighty to one hundred and thirty thousand dollars a year waking to co position and says hi. Burn I WANNA leave it on facebook. Like what would be your recommendation like? How could they get into the market? I? Mean I am more of. kind of like conservative investment personality so I, would say start small, you know you'll your legacy from a stark from from small perspective, and like let the company grow with the space I think there's a lot up growth to be gained route gaming, these sports and No one that's. Good enough to start heart and start from the top. Just you gotta you gotTa. You gotta pay. Dudes by you know understanding your community understanding your your base, and there are the ones who really help you kind of grow, and it takes sometimes time. It takes longer than people think I think there's a lot of. Misunderstanding on you know because of the boom of gaming and eastwards, General that anybody can come in and you know. Get Big really fast and I think that's the biggest misconception I. Think you just you know you start. Small and consistent you know slowly. You're going to grow verse. That's the same for any streamer any youtuber. Just you know it's consistent time put in a time over time. Put on on the business itself. Yeah. I agree I. Think it's a hard. It's a hard sell sometimes to be like. Hey, you know. Leave your corporate job high flying, and then guy and volunteers social media manager for a t three's team. That doesn't have a single financial sponsor. It's a bit of a hard pill to swallow a lot of time, but that's you know that's the suggestion and. If you if you're a true. Like for example if you're director and you have. All you skew saturated breach that seventy or mark of experience in your business you probably. Is Wise enough. In Organiz enough to manage your time to basically put two hours of your day into that visits that is probably equivalent of a ten hour of a new entry level person that's going to try to come up with new ideas so I think you know if the person is really passionate really wants to come in. Is it just a little bit about a time? And you know and maximize your. The into the business being open minded because it's a lot of different approach to the Gaming East sports business that you know that's rare different than the traditional, which sometimes core related, but also different. I think that's kind of what makes it the growth, even faster for someone. That's just brand new. Yeah Yeah that definitely makes sense and it's the same. It's the same way that anyone who comes to want to get to the industry. It's what I tell them you know. I started off as a player and a commentator and to start doing more start asking for more jobs. I was combining battlefield to them I said Hi. Be playing a lot of counterstrike souls can I go home and tight that too and I said well. If you want to do it, you can do it so I did that. And then they said you know. Marketing manages left. Who wants to do it? I said I'll do that as well as volunteer, but and I would to get that experience, and like you said on the ground like you really need a lot of that on the grand experience you know, get your hands dirty and really try it out and the like to to frame like a lot of conversation today. Before we started recording this, and before we went live on link Dan you and I were talking a lot about gaming versus a sports, and literally even in a meeting this morning. I was explaining exactly what this is, and I feel like I probably explain it at least three times a week, so for those people listening gaming, versus as bullets is like sport versa leisure activity, so if you'll just kicking a football with your friends down at the beach. That's not sport. That's just A. A leisure activity. That's having fun the same way that if you're just playing candy, crush my ball. Fine, your son, daughter or cousin is playing for not on the IPAD. You're just playing a little bit of data to solely Q.. That's not a sports. That's gaming. It becomes a sports when it's a structured competitive nature of play

Kpmg Facebook Organiz Director DAN Football
Knock and Announce

Criminal

05:20 min | 2 months ago

Knock and Announce

"In two thousand fourteen, a woman was pulled over by Myrtle beach police in Myrtle beach South Carolina. The woman was black and the police said they pulled over because of a tail light. They found a small amount of marijuana in her car and she was given the option to avoid charges if she told them where she got marijuana. As one officer later put it, she was asked quote who she knows. She, says she did know someone, but she didn't know his full name. She only knew him as Jules. My name is Julian bitten and right now. I'm in a Conway South Carolina. The police drove the woman to Julian Buttons apartment. They wired her with a hidden video camera and audio recorder, and then they gave her a hundred dollars and told her ass. Julian button to sell her marijuana. Julian is black and in two thousand fifteen. He was thirty years old. It was a friend of Mario de time girlfriend it was. She had some problems after father who died, so she had a medical discharge from the military. And she had asked me for some and I gave her some in first, and they told her to come back and buy from me, so that's what she did. The woman came out with what police recorded as approximately seven grams of marijuana. She'd done what the officers asked her to do, but something had gone wrong with the video recording. So they waited a few weeks, gave her hundred more dollars and drove her back to Julian Ben's house. What I didn't expect her to come back and buy. That was kind of strange that she came back and wanted to buy was like okay. We'll hear what that's not naming. are this ain't something is going become a habit? She would for her because I knew her situation I don't know I think I think she was pretty much more scared than anything when police stopped. If, they if she didn't give some if she didn't give a person gave. It's award that she was going to go to jail and Louis, her military benefits. On the second visit. The woman bought approximately eight grams. And there a video recording. This gave officers from the Fifteenth Circuit Drug Enforcement Unit probable cause to get a search warrant for Julian Ben's apartment. The Fifteenth Circuit Drug, enforcement. Unit pulls together. Officers for multiple police departments across Ori- and Georgetown counties in South Carolina. It stated intention is to create a multi jurisdictional multi-agency task force to address major drug enterprises. When you look at the operational plan, the Drug Enforcement Unit created for their search of Julian Buttons apartment. The first thing you see is their insignia. Large drawing of a skull and crossbones in front of a marijuana leaf. There's also a sword and a lightning bolt. Underneath that her a sort of motto. Serving Our community. One dealer at a time. I'm phoebe judge. This is criminal. Julian vet lived in a building with four apartments in Myrtle beach. On April sixteenth two thousand fifteen. Just before three o'clock in the afternoon, his next door neighbor Santos Garcia was outside working on his moped. Julie Ben was inside playing video games. Julian pause the game to go to the bathroom. And upon coming out of my bathroom, I hear, allow bone and I'm thinking my name upstairs. Neighborhood dropped something. That's all heard. Was it would okay? What are you doing? Upstairs was kind of a thought, but as I'm looking up getting ready to say that my aparicio's se objects coming at me in my living room. So, I'm trying to process de step back and reach for my gun because it was terrifying with the hell. Is this and I mean it was just a reflex. Be Reaching for my first first thing defense. Did you hear a knock debate. Announce themselves. No no, not at all. No. The next door neighbor cintos Garcia said that he'd been standing there and all of a sudden several cars appeared. He, said quote. A white car pulled up into my front yard. Right in front of me. One of the men who got out of it pointed a rifle directly at me. I was told to get down and I immediately did. I was five feet from Julian's front porch and door. Without stopping several of the men who had just arrived immediately went up into Julian's front porch and bastion his door. None of the men announced that they were police. no-one knocked on his door. No one waited any period of time for him to come to the door. And then Santos. Garcia said within two seconds of the men bashing Julian's door. I heard multiple gunshots that sounded like automatic weapons.

Julian Marijuana Julian Buttons Julian Ben Santos Garcia Myrtle Beach Fifteenth Circuit Drug Enforce Myrtle Beach South Carolina Conway South Carolina Fifteenth Circuit Drug Drug Enforcement Unit South Carolina Officer Jules Cintos Garcia Julie Ben Louis
Houston Astros sign all 2020 Draft picks, plus 6 others

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

Houston Astros sign all 2020 Draft picks, plus 6 others

"The Astros have signed all four of their draft picks from last week along with six undrafted free agents the list of signees includes their topic right handed pitcher Alex Santos a high school senior from New York who went with the seventy second overall pick the Astros did not have a first or second round pick because the penalties for the sign stealing scandal

Astros Alex Santos New York
Philippine journalist convicted of libel, given 6-year term

BBC World Service

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Philippine journalist convicted of libel, given 6-year term

"The head of the Philippines news organization and one of its former journalists have been found guilty of libel by a court in Manila the case is being seen as an attack on media freedom in the Philippines Maria ressa who founded the news outlet Rappler and writes that Reynaldo Santos face six years in jail for life being a businessman both of being given bail the judge said Rapla offered no proof to back up its allegations ms ressa said the legal action was politically motivated because of criticism leveled by how website against the president what we go to Tetteh Rappler night weren't the only ones on trial I think what you're seeing is death by a thousand cuts not just of press freedom but if democracy our justice system was on trial today and it just joining the kind of messaging that was pushed out on social media in twenty sixteen journalist equals criminal justice system just a little bit longer to catch up and

Manila Rappler Reynaldo Santos Rapla Ms Ressa President Trump Philippines Tetteh Rappler
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:38 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Fun and then what other Laurie do. I Know Laurie. Short for Lauren Lawrence Loren Loren. Oh thank but you know. Laurie Bell Laureus Short from which I love. Because of all Martingale Laura. Lie Tongue's strong feelings about Laurie but but I have very strong feelings about. Ezra an Justin Justin the other name. I have such profound feel about it. Well so the the coolest kid in my school was just into sure shoora and he had moved from California to elementary school. So He's from Kelley any. He was the first to have the Lee Pinstripe Denim jeans which became really popular like the next year. And I yes and I clocked. This motherfucker was one year ahead And then my cousin Justin. Lebow was like the coolest guy ever knew was sponsored as a BMX freestyler. He was sponsored as a snowboarder and he was in a band I loved. He was just the coolest and his name was Justin. And then a few don't Justin's and they're all cool. I guess many justice like Justin. Willman the magician. He's very cool. Nita's magic for humans legit for humans. Yeah he is a slick do he's there. Yeah it's a strong name is to e next to make a p baby if it's a boy we could name Justin. It's an interesting thought because I would be more inclined to name the baby like Ezra 'cause I think maybe the P. Baby will be capable of like genius yes highly intellectual pursuits but doesn't have the physical shape perform any kind of athletics or dancing or any of the things that would make you. Cool your idea of cool is so specific. It's like cool. It's like you can do shit. Really well physically. I think it's cool. To Be Smart. Yeah Yeah but but but just again. The Justice I knew are more like they were chill. They the Babes loved them. They were great at everything. They were like all the guys like them. Maybe our P. babies very likable. Our baby is gelatinous right. Or It's disgusting. It's it's in liquid form. It's not in solid fight. It's not gelatinous show Latin on how. Yeah Oh no one. It's sick like we have no experience with P. Children to know what their symptoms would be like. I guess if it got gelatinous. It's already jaundice looking. Well you could never determine if the kidneys were shot it. That's kind of part of its charm that in spite of looking so unhealthy thrives yeah. It'd be nice therapy baby to have a little brother sister. I could see a p. Baby being one of the X. men I don't know a ton about X. men but one guy's in a wheelchair right and he liked makes all the metal fly around like RPG be very powerful in a superhero world could even be the leader of the whole gang just sits in a toilet bowl come it they come to a toilet bowl that lives in a fancy toilet bowl probably like a crystal clear toilet bowl so that they can see him without having to lean over the toilet bowl to communicate with them renovate my house to make sure to make all the toilets translucent story Yeah Hey Laurie she talks about this psychologist Liz done. Who's doing all this research says if he for someone to spend money on other people are happier than when they spend money on themselves which was really interesting and so. I looked up. She is Ted. Talk is really worth listening to and yet says that but it also like they did this experiment with kids like starts even when you're too they bring these two year olds in and there's like a bowl of goldfish. They give them. The goldfish are very happy. Of course sure cute and then they have the stuffed monkey and they say like Oh. There's no none left for the Monkey. Can the monkey have one and they all like say sure and then give him one and then like mapped their response to after they received the goldfish and after they give the goldfish away and the kids are happier after they've given it away? Oh Jr is interesting. Yeah but okay. So this tedtalk was she'd already put out the research saying that and Tedtalk was basically like I put up this research and then I was like but this doesn't apply to me like I don't really give to charity and I don't really want and she's like maybe there's something wrong with my research of she went back in and basically the new conclusion is the benefits by when the people feel that they have a sense of connection to those that they're helping me and they can easily envision the difference that they're making So they did this experiment where they asked people to donate to either unison or this organization called spread the net and they picked those because they have the exact same goal. Okay but because UNICEF like this big well known charity and people don't really know exactly where things are going and spread the net like a very specific motivation which is for every ten dollars provide one bed net to a child with malaria for money. People's gave the spread the net the happier. They fell after but with UNICEF F. The emotional return on investment was flattened. So matters if you feel like you're connected personally it's also the kind of the Paul Bloom empathy thing it's like you feel one kid one net. I'm like in late to that. Yeah once you get into unison. So it's like a billion people just gets diluted you're feeling of impact. Yeah but even if you donate one thousand dollars you then no like. Oh I did this. You can like really connect you go. I got two hundred kids bednets so anyway. I thought that was interesting news. Okay so you said. The article in New York Times said five. Second bursts of exertion help break up lists rides Yeah four seconds of high intensity exertion repeated periodically throughout the day might counteract some of the unhealthy metabolic consequences of sitting for hours epidemiological studies indicate that most American adults set for at least ten hours a day. A total that is likely to reduce now that many of us are home. All Day. You in quarantine. I think I'm sitting like fourteen hours a day really. Oh sure I think you are to about are you..

Justin Justin Laurie Bell Laureus Ezra Lauren Lawrence Loren Loren New York Times jaundice Tedtalk Lebow California Nita Kelley malaria P. Children Paul Bloom Liz Ted
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

16:11 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Lori and now my favorite part of the show the fact check with my soul mate. Monica padme fact. Check take to all right. We're recording fact. Check number two. Let's start with some admissions by Dan. Sheppard there's two offers also with an admission. I I was late today. Oh I didn't care normally not late and I don't like it i. It just made me happy because I was like. Oh she knows what I'm feeling like when I'm way it was a rough literally just can't you can't get out of that Damn House. Yeah and then marches. Spills messes up your most beautiful. Blue Sweat. Tracksuit internet or Step on your macho with your stink. God it's almost too much to go on. It is okay so emission number one which I already made on Instagram. Which is in by the way. I didn't go back and listen but enough people voted that there was consensus. That fifty cent was doing exactly has as you interpreted is thing. Thank you for that admission. That's very big of you. And then secondly I didn't have corona. I got an antibody test and I didn't have it. Wow Yeah to my disappointment Abbott. No one in the house had it. Now Yeah which I mean. If one person had it likely the rest of us would have so it was really an all or nothing was y'alls tests came in really fast. Here's another frustrating things. I got a prescription than I went to. This quest place in a grocery store they took my blood had to go to the grocery store. Well that's where it was. Yes inside of a vons very weird to get your blood drawn volumes. Ed decide no and then I didn't get my results for like four days maybe five but then you guys took a task that you got the results in five minutes ten minutes Yep and all the you were negative for antibodies. Yes but I was still holding out like well. Maybe I got it when I was in Colorado or Texas and just you know pass through me by the time. I got back theory. Was we all have deer? Yeah we'll be going. Yeah it's just it's not the case not the case not the case. And I've never had it. I was pretty No no I was not excited but I was. I was saying apple time you were. You didn't think we had it and I fell validated. Sure of course feels nice. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah big time but I do. Of course wish I had it to to without knowing That's the best case scenario. Yeah you still had a inexplicably long stretch diarrhea that that is true. That is true. Everyone's in ancient it is. It is no God such a fun party. You January you. When you're at your mom's house you had like six days of I interrupted you think that I have no memory of no. It's so weird. I have total memory. I Have I keep pook journal though for you so anytime you say something. I market in there. I don't remember being with friends and then having to like I would remember that that would be um traumatic memorable. There's so many kinds of diarrhea right. There's like food poisoning diarrhea. Were you literally can't be away from a toy you can't be more than like three hundred feet from a toilet at any moment and then there's just like oh you went in the morning it was loosey-goosey and then you want to get in the afternoon. It was maybe straight water That's diarrhea. You could still carry about your business in that version of it that that's often what I'll experience for a little spell like it's unmanageable very manageable. And civil if it's only diarrhea in the morning okay. You don't count it sure. Yeah Okay Anyway. I know you gotTa keep it up because everyone talks about their poop with their friends they do. I don't know I don't talk about it with my other friends if I'm being honest or you don't know it's almost all I talk about with my friends. I don't think a lot of people do. Oh all right. Do you enjoy talking about your cycles. Fly No no no. You're you're brown cycles. I don't like talking about it with public. Okay see I think it's an extension of the vulnerable theme because it is so vulnerable? It's the grossest thing we do at the same time like sometimes I really think about it and I'm like it's not gross. You put food in and then it turns it into this thing. It's it's stained. Yes it's the exists so gross let's repellent so that you don't monkey around in other people's way. Sin Pickup Diseases. I think it's evolutionary but if if you trust that someone else's in disease carrier like your family members it's not as gross still pretty pretty gross so pretty Gross Murray time before this. Oh antibodies antibodies. Did it affect your position at all knowing you know for sure you didn't have it? Es why will say you know? This speaks to confirmation bias. I I'm holding it like a three percent chance I think the tests were flawed. But that's low was ninety seven percent accepting of the outcome. This is a bit hypocritical. Also because if I've said that you would not like you would say if he's at ninety seven no no no no sex if he said ninety seven percent. And you're only holding out three percent hope that the tests will be revealed. That's you make decisions a beyond fifty one percent. I think that would have elicited a reaction if I said that to you. You're also a fan of glimmers of hope if the tests were positive I need you to really step back. And think about the scenario in which the all the tests came back we had it And I said Okay but there's a there's a very small chance that this is wrong. You would not like it. I know it I want I want but if you said three percent at least go like. Oh you're the truth. Yeah I'm acknowledging the truth yeah I just have a fantasy that somehow still we could have all had it not worry about it. Don't you think most likely one of the test would have come back? Yes I do. Yeah I do use it. Is it change my position? I mean it does in that. I'm like before I was travelling through the city. Doing things simply for you guys like I had the. I have the gloves on in the mask. And it's really just for you guys. It's not for me. I don not worried about it but now like how I could catch it. Still so yes. There's another variable now that I think Oh should I could still catch this again. Which is tricky. Because I'm not afraid to have it but then the the hellfire I would if he could be figured out that it was. I who tainted the group thin. Yeah I would I would hate bat. I guess what it does do those. And I've learned this lesson before I knew who robbed our house. One time I was so convinced of it and then it turns out I was wrong. That was humiliated with the notion of how wrong I was similarly. I am not humiliated but reminded how wrong you can be in feel right for sure. You're trying your heart is not to gloat. Aren't you know you did a great job? Yeah I don't want you to feel bad knowing no you do. I actually forgot all about it. I wonder if he's going to tell everybody even totally didn't even think about it because I knew already knew in my heart that we didn't have it and I knew in my heart we did. That's what I'm saying. It could have gone either way. One of us was bound to be completely wrong and it was me which I'm owning show. I hope everyone's doing well me too. Laurie Santos Laurie assign. No in the episode. You start talking about names a little bit because you're talking about as being smart and then you said your name. Laurie like every Laurie. I know is so fun. Also what are you talking about? I was specifically thinking of like this Lori and my groundlings class. That was really.

diarrhea Laurie Santos Laurie Lori Damn House Monica padme corona Sheppard Dan pook journal apple Abbott Ed Murray Colorado don Texas
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:26 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Yeah stay tuned for more armchair if you dare. We are supported by square now. Monica do about hot see'ums in Detroit. Tell me they've been selling men's clothing for a hundred years and for the first time in its history. Hot Sam is selling online team and HOT SAM SET UP. Their page was square online store..

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

15:39 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Malcolm's company which I didn't even know he had until I listened yours which is exciting. A makes me want to explore all their stuff but you had one on grades and as a parent of two children in where we're like. Were just getting in the canoe and starting a paddle down the stream of this whole weird thing. There were so many fascinating things they even the history of it. Let's just start with the name. Ezra soon as I heard that the the guy who virtually invented the ABCD system albeit was written in Latin evolved that his name was Ezra. And I started thinking the only as resign. No were like hyper intelligent and I want the freakonomics guys to study that name. I don't know that that is so fascinating or not. But major major sidebar. Mr Ezra created grades. He didn't know what he was doing. This is as were styles president of Yale back in eighteen hundreds and he had just had his students having exam because before that there were no great. It's great aren't even that old. They're like only a couple of hundred years old you inherit this structure and you can't even comprehend what instruction and learning would be without those grades and I think it's just crazy. Yeah I mean basically they just like thought. You wanted to learn really. That's why he went to school right. So you're motivated to you this styles. At this moment. He was like I should probably just write down. Avi Did you know in what was interesting is two things one is. If you look at his grades he did Latin for Pajamas which was bad for different levels. But the highest level though was the what the most kids got like there was great inflation even from the moment which is kind of interesting but the only thing is that he didn't tell his learners about their grades. Kinda for his private like. How did I do as a teacher? You know who got it? Who didn't do so well right and I think all of that has changed a lot. Not only the kids know their grades. But they're obsessed with them. You know I'm not sure how old your kids are. You're just on the start but you already. They know that grades are thing that they're being evaluated and I mean they get evaluated preschools. They get their little. You know how well they shared and all this stuff and I think you know it matters for them right and it matters for parents right because we kind of soak up this culture where grades mean a lot will in that selfish way is we're really. It's a reflection of our own ego like we're doing a good job doing a bad job so it's like now we're inheriting these stupid grades exactly exactly and I think a lot of parents react incredibly strongly. We're seeing this now at Yale. Where in the midst of this pandemic you know. People don't have access to Wi fi there in these yucky situations. Many detentions said you know what no grades the semester. Just pass fail. Everything's just pass fail and we get parents who write to US fighting about this. That was like kid was on the verge of a minus this semester. And he can't get it now. Like what can I do like? I pay seventy five thousand dollars and I want my kid to like get a this semester. And you're like we're in a pandemic like dying. Your kids a minus. Is You know more. Your magna cum laude and I was magna cum laude and is a cornerstone of my self esteem. So I can relate strew Nova. What's crazy though is the I think he especially in the current time. The data suggesting that the grades are doing more harm than good. Like what they're doing is they're reducing. The students injuries motivation. So every time you stick an extra motivator on something now you're not doing it for the love of it anymore. You're doing it. 'cause you're getting some other award misstep tracker we were talking about right. You might just start because it's fun to walk around but as soon as you get like a fitbit grading you are giving you stars or giving you a ding. When you do a good job you know if you experience extras roads like I do. All of a sudden it's like is not about the steps anymore. It's about they'll beep at the end or something like that. And then they get obsessed. Stripe doesn't feel good anymore. You want to compete with other people you know. It's no longer about what it started. Which is it would just feel good to move my body now. It's like it's a thing. There's a wonderful David sedaris essay about this. And he calls it like the fitbit brain where he gets a fit and he started freaking out and waking up super early to get his steps in like not hang out with the people he cares about and is really obsessed and then it breaks and then he realizes all this craving that he had for number is that were like stupid but but functionally we in our society have turned learning into that kids like learning just for learning sake like it's fun to do puzzles. It's fun to learn. It's fun to get better when you slap grade on it. It's like saps the desire that kids would naturally bring to this otherwise fun activity and makes it Kinda Yucky. It makes the grade. And there's data the grades increase the desire to cheat so it makes kids cheat more because if it's all about the great if it's not about learning just do it the quickest way possible. Even if it's a little dastardly. There's evidence that grades make students take on less heart assignments because if you're just doing it for the grade pick easy book. Why would you pick the long one? Pick the super easy one to get the easy grade right. It was the gentleman you interview because he he was so mad. I enjoy listening to him speak. He has such a handle on this thing and he said you know we tend to blame. The students were like Oh they don't even want to learn they. Just want the and it's like well no the system is set up to get as that is the incentive. So what are you talking about your disappointed that they didn't read the Iliad instead of Catcher in the Rye of course they did because the is the incentive. It's the goal. Yeah this is this Guy Archie cone. He hates grades even more than I do. Strong a very strong statement but yeah I mean he's really suggests it's making kids not just that they hate learning like the best kids kids get the best grades hate learning the most which is just tragic and they also have the lowest levels of happiness as well as the lowest levels of self esteem optimism right and so this pursuit of grades like should be. I mean you didn't the nerdy kids who get the. A is are the kid who really love learning but these days it's not it's the opposite. They're the ones who are the most miserable this great job of pointing out that if you give people three letters and you ask them what would that is. What is that Anagram? And then if you give them you gave us a three letter one of five letter one and what's great is I was doing it real time and so is kristen because I was on the toilet listening to it loud and she was listening to and once you get to a nine letter word so there's a sweet spot in learning right which is if it's really easy. It's not that fun if it's kind of challenging but you can get it. It's really fun. And then if it's too hard it's just not and why pursue it? The grading system will actually steer people into wanting to do the three letter anagram because they will get an a for and that is now the outcome they want as opposed to the pleasure of being challenged and then in persevering that's so rewarding and fun but lop sides that system or that's not even why you would do it anymore exactly is both not fun and you end up engaging in practices that make you learn the least like imagine if we did this like for fitness. Like you're like I'm just GONNA like lift the lowest way over and over again because I can do ten reps right but you never challenge yourself. You just don't progress right and I think what we've done is create a system where it's not about progress. It's not about them. Loving learning is not even about their mental health. Because we're seeing like you know huge hits and happiness because of grades it's really about some arbitrary thing that we want to do and I do think it's a little bit about like parental kind of ego and that arbitrary thing that your kid is doing to which is even more dangerous. I think what is an a an a has no value only in its relativity. A B. exists right. There's no eight doesn't mean anything. I could define it any way. I'd like so long as it's above B. Yeah so implicit in that to me is comparison. It'd be great if an immense something that you would achieve some level that we all respect but in fact it's just that you beat the rest of the people or that you'd be right upstream. That's this huge bit of hardware. We have that were social. And we're all obsessed at all times with our status in our group where we have anxiety about. Where are we in this huge group? And this has been compounded by the fact that we used to live as a group of one hundred people. Now we're living in his group of seven billion people so our anxiety level is only win exponentially because we don't know where we fit in this so then we've come up with this arbitrary architecture to allow us to figure out where we're at think social hierarchy is so at the base of all this stuff. Oh yeah definitely and I think it's one of the reasons students are so much more anxious now. Right is that you know before back when I went to college like I was quote unquote competing with like other people. But you know I was doing my best now. I think a consequence of the fact that literally anybody can get into a school like Yale if they have certain grades. You know your income. Does it matter your prep? School doesn't matter means. These kids are competing with the other billions of kids out there and that is really exiled he provoking and there's this perception that the spoils of the war are really high and so kids are forgoing. They're asleep their mental health. All the stuff to get perfect grades to get into a place like yell and then they get there and they're kinda miserable you know it's kind of back to this. He Down Academy in that. We talked about that moment that they find out isn't really a great moment like students at Yale when they get in these days. They don't get a letter like I got back in the day. They click on this little link online and they get a little video is as you got into Yale. The class twenty twenty four and it's like places like bulldog bulldog bow plays this song and so there are videos online. If you watch this kind of some feel good. Wholesome mean CONTO. Students clicking on and finding out like screaming decided what students often report is the moment after that. Click when they're really excited? They have this like incredible emptiness. 'cause it was like that was working for like. I didn't really love chemistry or any of my stupid extracurriculars. I was just trying to get this moment to get in and now happened and now I'm like okay. There's the rest of my life like what's what's the next carrot like. Oh yes jake reward and you're probably now evaluating the effort versus reward like wow. That was four years of effort in it was for that forty second moment. Is that a good cost benefit analysis. And they're hopping right back on that treadmill. 'cause now they're like all right now. I gotta go to Yale. Where the spoils of the war even higher and they haven't figured out. Do you actually love chemistry? You know maybe photographer. Maybe you'd really love to be a janitor. We don't know you know knowing and graduate top of your class and then get the best job and then get promoted to the best position at the Joe ever what's driving. All of it is primate status thing. I am was so flattered to get to give this speech for the ANTHRO CLASS AT UCLA last year.

Yale Mr Ezra president Malcolm fitbit US David sedaris Wi Stripe jake Archie cone UCLA Joe kristen
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

06:39 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"We know we're safe but we get to experience enough of it that we can kind of comprehend it. I don't know an reason. I think people are still fight about that. It's actually a great mystery. My colleague L. Paul Bloom has a whole book on this about how pleasure is kind of weird right. But that's one of the theories it's like sort of practicing what those things feel and that's true for fear that's true for sadness right like why do people watch depressing movies you know. Why DO PEOPLE WATCH? You know terms of endearment something like really Super Super Sad. That's dumb like with that. Feel good right but we like to engage those things like year and sadness even discussed or pain sometimes people who eat the really hot hot chili peppers. So it's almost at the point of really hurting your mouth but not that bad. I'm going to go through so much. I told the story once on here but I have very distinct childhood memory of coming up on a pile of horse poop in the woods and I could not stop staring at it was making me sick and I hated it and yet I just and even walk away and then I had to go back and look again and get to the brink of throwing up and I have no clue why that was happening but it was a good fifteen minute exercise and just grossing myself out. Yeah looking to some bread. It's like like really dig this weird anyway yet. Another feature of the mind but yeah back to the breath I think regulating your breath. Controlling your sympathetic nervous system is a way that we can make. The threat is threatening right now and I use it I can watch myself. Kinda get really anxious of Panics Rolling on twitter and I've just been realizing like this is the time to do just like three D. belly breaths and afterward you just you feel so much better. Yeah okay number. Two was do acts of kindness and of course for in a that is like be of service. You have to be observers. It's so tell us the advantages of doing acts of kindness. Yeah I mean the advantages are huge and I think our culture just really doesn't realize this is another spot where I think our intuitions lead US astray. But also our culture like right now. It's all about treat yourself like self care like as soon as cova kicked in. It was like article after article about bathtubs self-care which is like again. It's not the bathrooms but the point is there's an opportunity cost to do stuff for other people right and so there's all these data suggesting happy. People do nice stuff for others acquainted for income or happy person. You tend to give more to charity. You tend to volunteer more. And there's some lovely work by folks like Liz done and others that show that if you force people to spend their money on other people they end up happier than if you force them to spend their money to do something to treat themselves. Yeah well okay. So an air explanation of that is my real. Problem is thinking about myself and all my needs and then craving but when I'm helping you it's nearly impossible to be thinking about my own desires and wants and so I'm just stepping out of that craving it forces me to stop thinking about myself and I find great relief in not thinking about myself. No totally think as we get inward focused. You know again this is what the Buddhists getting back to injure. Traditions realized about desire. Soon as you satisfy your GonNa come back right and so that the craving is just going to be a vicious cycle that you can never get over but the hit that you get from helping somebody. You can kind of do that again like you get the sort of warm glow as scientists. Call it from kind of helping other people. This is the sort of happiness that we get from doing. Nice things for others. It just kind of feels good so both gets you out of your head but it's also the you get kind of a double reward hit because like it feels good to help another person and then the research suggests it also helps your social connection right because often the people were helping. Our social relationship is going to give back to us. You know that service that you're doing in AA which is often with other addicts. Those people could help you when you're in a tough time so you're developing these meaningful important social relationships which is exactly. Yeah we we had this discussion the other day about being charitable and whether that's just ego or not and I was arguing no and you were saying everything stems from a selfish perspective of an an ran point of view that you can't do anything on planet earth that's not selfishly motivated now. You could have different selfish. Motivations that have outcomes that are beneficial to all but there's no way you can pretend that is this organism on planet earth. You're not I starting with your own desire. I guess yes like that is borne out by an evolutionary perspective. Natural selection would hopefully not believing stuff in that was actively bad for our own reproductive success. Just wouldn't do that right. That might not be the motivation in your head when you're doing it and so as onto polished you probably remember these. Biologists distinguish between what they call ultimate level. Which is like why is it selfish for your own survival and reproduction versus what's the proximate level. Which is like what does it feel like to you right now and your head right and so if you think about why you might want to have sex with somebody at the ultimate level that is always about getting your genes your next generation. That's why the instincts there but at the proximate level. You're not thinking about babies like you're probably thinking about like movies early didn't even they didn't even know that made a baby for years or when or why or yeah and so. My guess is like doing nice things for others. When people have this motivation works the same way right like selfishly natural selections like Oh help other people because reciprocity and you'll get all these goods leader and this is so great whereas the proximate level where like we just feel better if we do stuff for other people or we just really are motivated to do nice stuff rather people so sometimes it can be both and like. That's good yes. There's diminished returns when we satisfy ourselves so I can buy the perfect house and then I can buy the perfect couch and I can make the perfect meal and I can have the perfect wind and a certain point. I'm just going to Max out on things I can do for myself to amp up pleasure. It just keeps falling off whereas every person you help in the gratitude that you experience. That's not a diminished return. It doesn't kind of run out. Yeah and I think this is something that happiness researchers are just starting to figure out which is like so everything we do for ourselves. Has THIS APP teaching the researchers call it? He Donna Adaptation Right. Where it's like you buy yourself a new phone awesome for the first week but then you know over time you just get used to buy a new border bike and the first time you ride. It's great but then time number eighty seven. You ride it. You're just bored with it. But what's weird? Is that acts of kindness that we do to other people. Don't have that feature. I think is there like individual. There's a moment you do act of kindness and then you do another one it like you. Just don't get the adaptation to doing more of them. Each one is as good a hit. And so you you kinda end up helping yourself by investing and doing nice stuff for others because you just. It's not a subject to this attestation. Over time.

twitter L. Paul Bloom US sympathetic nervous system cova Liz
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

06:39 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"We know we're safe but we get to experience enough of it that we can kind of comprehend it. I don't know an reason. I think people are still fight about that. It's actually a great mystery. My colleague L. Paul Bloom has a whole book on this about how pleasure is kind of weird right. But that's one of the theories it's like sort of practicing what those things feel and that's true for fear that's true for sadness right like why do people watch depressing movies you know. Why DO PEOPLE WATCH? You know terms of endearment something like really Super Super Sad. That's dumb like with that. Feel good right but we like to engage those things like year and sadness even discussed or pain sometimes people who eat the really hot hot chili peppers. So it's almost at the point of really hurting your mouth but not that bad. I'm going to go through so much. I told the story once on here but I have very distinct childhood memory of coming up on a pile of horse poop in the woods and I could not stop staring at it was making me sick and I hated it and yet I just and even walk away and then I had to go back and look again and get to the brink of throwing up and I have no clue why that was happening but it was a good fifteen minute exercise and just grossing myself out. Yeah looking to some bread. It's like like really dig this weird anyway yet. Another feature of the mind but yeah back to the breath I think regulating your breath. Controlling your sympathetic nervous system is a way that we can make. The threat is threatening right now and I use it I can watch myself. Kinda get really anxious of Panics Rolling on twitter and I've just been realizing like okay. This is the time to do. Just like three D. belly breaths and afterward you just you feel so much better. Yeah okay number. Two was do acts of kindness and of course for in a that is like be of service. You have to be observers. It's ten so. Tell us the advantages of doing acts of kindness. Yeah I mean the advantages are huge and I think our culture just really doesn't realize this is another spot where I think our intuitions lead US astray. But also our culture like right now. It's all about treat yourself like self care like as soon as cova kicked in. It was like article after article about bathtubs self-care which is like again. It's not the bathrooms but the point is there's an opportunity cost to do stuff for other people right and so there's all these data suggesting happy. People do nice stuff for others acquainted for income or happy person. You tend to give more to charity. You tend to volunteer more. And there's some lovely work by folks like Liz done and others that show that if you force people to spend their money on other people they end up happier than if you force them to spend their money to do something to treat themselves. Yeah well okay. So an air explanation of that is my real. Problem is thinking about myself and all my needs and then craving but when I'm helping you it's nearly impossible to be thinking about my own desires and wants and so I'm just stepping out of that craving it forces me to stop thinking about myself and I find great relief in not thinking about myself. No totally think as we get inward focused. You know again this is what the Buddhists getting back to injure. Traditions realized about desire. Soon as you satisfy it's just gonNA come back right and so that the craving is just going to be a vicious cycle that you can never get over but the hit that you get from helping somebody. You can kind of do that again like you get the sort of warm glow as scientists call it from kind of helping other people. This is the sort of happiness that we get from doing. Nice things for others. It just kind of feels good so both gets you out of your head but it's also the you get kind of a double reward hit because like it feels good to help another person and then the research suggests it also helps your social connection right because often the people were helping. Our social relationship is going to give back to us. You know that service that you're doing in a which is often with other addicts. Those people could help you when you're in a tough time. So you're developing these meaningful important social relationships which is exactly. Yeah we we had this discussion the other day about being charitable and whether that's just ego or not and I was arguing no and you were saying everything stems from a selfish perspective of an an ran point of view that you can't do anything on planet earth that's not selfishly motivated now. You could have different selfish. Motivations that have outcomes that are beneficial to all. But there's no way you can pretend that this organism on planet earth. You're not I starting with your own desire. I guess yes like that is borne out by an evolutionary perspective. Natural selection would hopefully not believing stuff in that was actively bad for our own reproductive success. Just wouldn't do that right. That might not be the motivation in your head when you're doing it and so as polished you probably remember these. Biologists distinguish between what they call ultimate level. Which is like why is it selfish for your own survival and reproduction versus what's the proximate level. Which is like what does it feel like to you right now and your head right and so if you think about why you might want to have sex with somebody at the ultimate level that is always about getting your genes your next generation. That's why the instincts there but at the proximate level. You're not thinking about babies like you're probably thinking about like movies early didn't even they didn't even know that made a baby for years or when or why or yeah and so. My guess is like doing nice things for others. When people have this motivation works the same way right like selfishly natural selections like Oh help other people because reciprocity and you'll get all these goods leader and this is so great whereas the proximate level where like we just feel better if we do stuff for other people or we just really are motivated to do nice stuff rather people so sometimes it can be both and like. That's good yes. There's diminished returns when we satisfy ourselves so I can buy the perfect house and then I can buy the perfect couch and I can make the perfect meal and I can have the perfect wind and a certain point. I'm just going to Max out on things I can do for myself to amp up pleasure. It just keeps falling off whereas every person you help in the gratitude that you experience. That's not a diminished return. It doesn't kind of run out. Yeah and I think this is something that happiness researchers are just starting to figure out which is like so everything we do for ourselves. Has THIS APP teaching the researchers call it? He Donna Gadap teach-in right where it's like you buy yourself a new phone awesome for the first week but then you know over time you just get used to buy a new border bike and the first time you ride. It's great but then time number eighty seven. You ride it. You're just bored with it. But what's weird? Is that acts of kindness that we do to other people. Don't have that feature. I think is there like individual. There's a moment you do act of kindness and then you do another one it like you. Just don't get the adaptation to doing more of them. Each one is as good a hit. And so you you kinda end up helping yourself by investing and doing nice stuff for others because you just subject to this attestation over time.

twitter L. Paul Bloom US sympathetic nervous system cova Liz Donna Gadap
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

12:13 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I'm going to figure this out. And then what the discipline taught me is like? No what's built in is just all these biopsies. All these stupid strategies intuitions. That are just completely wrong and leading you astray the time. Thanks a lot natural selection. Like what did we you know? Wait around for this. This sucks. Yeah for me the tastiest thing I can learn and it's why I love Malcolm glad well it's almost entire. Work is in pursuit of debunking. A very commonly held intuition and that is a deeply fun thing about psychology but also a deeply frustrating thing about psychology. Because we get that. Our intuitions are wrong. But we actually don't have fantastic solutions for fixing those intuitions like the mere act actor realizing like hey. My intuition was wrong before it doesn't immediately update it which means you can be like an expert psychology and have like the years of training that. I do and still suck at life and still have really bad tuition. Still get wrong all the time. Do you think that humans? Actually I don't know if this is true but I think it is that humans have the highest emotional capacity than other animals. So we get blinded by those in a way that others don't yeah. I think we're part of the problem is like we're carrying around these sort of like old school emotions tendencies. Yeah some people call it our lizard brain but I don't know if that term's fantastic but basically like we were carrying around this old school architecture. Inner minds at the same time as we have these really smart frontal lobes that can and do all this stuff but the interaction between those just doesn't work. There's also all these ways that our brains are shaped. Just make no sense whatsoever. Now that I'm doing work in the happiness space one of the ones. I've been super interested in lease saintly as it turns out that the circuits that govern wanting in the brain. Like how much what you crave and what you go after are just completely different than the circuits that govern liking like we are actually going so. I know from your history doctor. You probably know this. You see this a lot in the context of addiction like you're craving in the wanting systems like go get this job or go get this thing then you get it and you're like I'm super habituated to this didn't even work right and system doesn't update. I mean it's just like not working in the way that we think and then the flip side is true right like there's all these things that feel really nice when I do them for me. It's like meditation or like a really hard exercise. But I don't have a craving like I do for you know like a sugary snack or like a drug user would have for how and I just have to like force myself to be like no no. No it's GonNa feel good like just force yourself to do it but then I like it and I'm like systems. Why can't you just frigging talk to each other? Everything would be so much easier. Yeah in is that. Because the chemistry that the frontal lobes and you have to imagine that the frontal lobes kind of in charge of the pleasure behind meditating or things that are you know are productive and positive for your future in a sense that though the chemical actually isn't as strong is that rewards center one that is like Faulk e. kill all those things. There's just no comparison in the strength of those right. Yeah part of it is that. There's just certain things that wig out the dopamine system. That's that reward. System like heroin was basically kind of almost like synthetic dopamine ways like drugs mimic these chemicals. Really well so part of it's that the chemicals are different for the good stuff that we really like part of. It's just like the systems are different so the liking system is registering information but it's not updating in the wanting system and that just means there's this disconnect there's actually cool kind of techniques you can use to try to get its update better. One actually is mindfulness and taking time to pay attention. You know if you are really mindful about what you like you know after eating your like. That feels really good. I feel really calm now. You can kind of get your wanting system to notice a little bit because it's like. Oh wait there was a reward. They're like Spitzer little dopamine like I should update things yet in my experience. Because I'm a very big proponent of exercise that actually mentally have to link the negative thing that's very very powerful for me so it's like I know what I feel like in the absence of exercise that has to be motivator versus the marginal uplifting mood after I exercise. Yeah I think both of those are super Yeah for me for me. It's the noticing the good parts afterwards which I tend not to do I. This wonderful yoga teacher wants to at the end of a practice would take a moment. When you're Shiva's it'd be like notice how you feel right now like really notice how you feel and if it's different from how you felt when you start in whatever and again my liking systems like wait a minute does feels nice like John this again. You know we should get together again. I totally agree with you. I've had that that that sensation post yoga where I'm like while. This is the sedative I always dreamt of when doing drug yeah. It's one of the many tools we don't employ when we're feeling bad. I mean there's evidence. Now that like a half hour of really strong cardio can be as effective as a prescription zoloft which is one of the leading anti depression medications. But you know psychiatrists don't prescribe exercise if people they prescribed pharmaceuticals so we forget that there are other things that can give us those hits especially if we're paying attention to the benefit in the end you're think the NHS right in England. They years ago stopped. Prescribing inhibitors for people with mild depression and instead prescribed access to a gym. Or some kind of you know trainer related. Exercise did yield on the long term. Better results which is fascinating is tricky. Because I almost feel like the liking system is attracted to things that take time that are slow processes and the wanting system is like a quick. Fix Yeah totally. If you can get a you know a heroin level banged your dopamine system. The wanting system notices that and it really likes it right but yeah the slow burns. You know. It doesn't as much but but again it's it's so frustrating when you think evolutionary because like I don't know if every quick hit evolutionary was like the thing that we really wanted like natural selection could have built in some slow Burns that had them you know but somehow it never did you get the in biology and psychology and then you get your masters in Psychology. Then you get a PhD psychology all from Harvard. Monica Harvard Harvard Harvard Harvard. We'd love and you have the distinction. We interviewed tall. Ben Shahar and I do think it's interesting writer. The Gates that he teaches the most popular class at Harvard. Which is unhappiness and you teach the most popular class in the history of yell which is also unhappiness. Yep So what I glean from that as we all we want won't be happy right. I mean I think that's exactly the right intuition also. Funniest the tall did this about a decade. Before I did you know. His glass was huge. Famous are heard and then he went off and became a popularizer and did other things and then many years later I did the same thing yell and get all this press for and what was funny was in every article I interviewed for like this is like my their other schools. That did this before me. But Eh somehow never makes it into the media but yeah I think people really want to figure out what they can do to be happy you know and I think in this day and age people really want evidence based strategies for what they can do to be happy. You know these days. I think students are as much drawn to the humanities or great literature to explore this question of how live a good life. I think they're like what does the science say about living a good life you know give. GimMe the neuroscience of the good life and I think that's part of what drew people to my in toss class which I think is a fall. I think my read is a lot of the stuff in science. Right now is just validating. What great literature and Philosophy told us before and good religions and things like that but you know bracketed. I think the way students want is they. Don't just want to hear what somebody did. They're like show me the graph that this makes my anxiety better and then I'm going to do it so to that exact point. I watched you on the news. Recently in reference to Covid you'd given five tips on how to feel good in quarantine and got say four of the five or like tenants of AA and like. Isn't this interesting that like some of these things are known but they do eventually take data to be recognize Israel. So you're I was deep belly. Breathing right yeah. This is important to explain because I think people can sometimes get pissed off when I give this tip because everyone's had the experience of like getting really mad at somebody's like just take a deep breath and like nephew But but scientifically. We know that this is one of the few ways. We can hack our automatic nervous system so quick biology lesson even though I didn't really take the right biology classes. But I got enough to do this. This podcast the sympathetic nervous system is your fight or flight system like it. Evolutionary is built. So that when there's like a lion about to jump out and attack you you can either freeze or flee like it's ready to like tighten. Your muscles gave heart beating fast and to do that. Has the shutdown all the other normal systems like your digestive system shuts down your immune function shutdown. Your Sexual Systems Shutdown. Just like runaway. Right we are now in the context. Cove it into the context of lots of life stressors just like activating that fight or flight system constantly right. It was never made to be on repeat like a youtube video that keeps going. It was meant to play the one two minute spot and then shut off. But we don't do that and in the context Cova. I think it's really hard to shut off because this crisis isn't going away. The one way our bodies have to hack you other than actually shutting off the threat which is impossible is to to regulate our breath such that our bodies think the threat is gone. You know you're sprinting. From a lion you cannot take deep breaths right. You're just like chess breathing. You're running a marathon right but if you just like really slowly take a deep belly breath then your mind is like hang on. There can't be alive. We're not running away anymore. There's a lion activate the vagus nerve once you do that you kick in the opposite system. Which is the Paris empathetic nervous system? That's what's like the rest and digest turns back on your immune function turns on your Gestion and all that stuff but the key is the way you you kind of. Turn it into high gear. The way you turn on the rest digest is actually through your breath that would happen. Naturally if the lion ran away and things went back to normal and it was chill. You'd be taking deep breaths but you can kind of force it and SORTA HACK THE SYSTEM. So the statement that like usually pisses people off. Just take a deep breath. I'm like no no no this wonderful neuroscience like hacking your nervous system totally works your breath and your heart rate in your brain are all connected up and you know there. There are a few ways to hack the system. Because you don't want to have full control over your autonomic nervous system because like you might not turn it on when it needs to go on but this is one way we can do it in a nice way and it has these corresponding effects on our her on what we're thinking about on what we're able to think about lots of evidence that those kinds of Brett's can reduce anxious thoughts right because again you might not just like threat- threat- threat- threat- where's the lion. It can like you know back and focus on the stuff we wanNA focus on. I'm just now realizing as you explain it. I think that's part of the major appeal to me for motor sports. You're exercising this exact same thing so every single turn a challenge in every single turn has the stakes of death. Potentially I suppose so it forces you to be in control of that panic so that you're doing your best thinking you're staying calm wallet inches lap after lap of almost mastering that of pushing that feeling aside and keeping yourself aware in calm making good decisions and there's something very rewarding about that a lot of people kind of get a high from it but also self report being like almost zen afterwards right and ability to like shift back and forth can be really powerful because we definitely do things that put us in. Lake death situations. This is another stupid weird thing about human nature is that we love sticking ourselves into awful negative emotion situations like. I'm a huge huge fan of Halloween and I love watching these haunted houses that show the lakes snap videos of people freaking out when they're getting scared. If you showed those pictures to sue an anthropologist who studied fear they'd be like these people are miserable but these people pay like sixty bucks in some cases to have someone do that to them. Why that on here? A lot like what is happening there. I think when we have fear of things we want to get as close as we can to the thing. We're afraid of but in a safe way so that we can process it like work through it so I think that's why we enjoy murder mystery shows because it's like it's are alternate fear but we're consuming it in a safe environment..

dopamine Monica Harvard Harvard Harvard heroin sympathetic nervous system Harvard Malcolm youtube mild depression Faulk murder Spitzer John Paris Ben Shahar NHS Covid
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

10:16 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"And foremost please excuse. Our tardiness. Two minutes was really tell we had a little conversation. We're in Monica's apartment. And she was a looking. I Say I'm always the one that's late so this is not to throw her under the bus but she was doing some things I said. I think we're getting close to what she said anything for minutes or under a fine. What what's your stance on that? Yeah I think. Four minutes are under academic. We always window for classes usually like a six minute window. Oh Can the students leave at my school? The students could like leave after ten minutes. If the professor didn't show up when so messed up his. So My UNDERGRAD INSTITUTION. Had It that you could leave early like that was like you left before the end But then the Yale institution like it was switched and so it was like this weird culture shock of Lake. Some people showing up early and some people leaving early in his lorry. Were so excited to talk to you and you came to us by way of what I think is a God living among us. Which is Malcolm Glad? Well he emailed me and said you really need to get him to Laurie. And let's just take one second to talk about how much we love Malcolm. No Malcolm is fantastic. I think I met Malcolm for the First Time. I was like a new assistant professor. I just started at Yale and he was doing this dinner party with one of my colleagues and the whole time I was just like. Wow this was like right when I think The tipping point had just come out and I was God among men. You know apex glad well as I was learning about you today. Laurie excited. Because you've done a ton of primate work. Yeah I did Collagen anthropology but it was like anthropology side Major. Unofficially you got a BA in both biology and psychology. Al From Harvard. Yeah although it was kind of a little bit of a like a trick though because they just they just started this new joint major and so they hadn't really worked out like which classes you needed to take yet and so I manage to get a biology degree from Harvard by taking the minimum possible amount of biology classes embarrassing now. I try to teach things like genetics. Because I'm like you. You know that stuff. They see Geez de Cuba going exactly. Did you have a lab as part of that? I did some lab stuff but not that I remember super well mostly. I did animal behavior stuff that was like my main thrust in biology which the monkey work. What was the genesis of your working with animals or or studying animals in relation to human psychology? Well it actually came out of a hatred of running human experiments. I started doing work when I was like a freshman working in a lab that studied humans and we studying this thing called implicit memory which is just this phenomenon that the stimuli that in your world they're kind of affecting you without realizing it. You know so if I give you a list of words that are all related to elderly people. You can kind of prime that without you realizing it right but the whole point of this effect is like you're supposed to not know it's happening but it's something we teach. We teach like in the interest class. So I you know a freshman. Loria go in to try to test implicit memory in these. Freshmen who are taking a class about implicit memory and at the end of every study. I'm like did you have any ideas. About what the study was about and everyone was like. Was it an an implicit memory? Study and we're yes. And then we'd have to throw out their data and so moved to go to animals like animals. Don't have hypotheses about what the study is about. They're not messing up my data with their big conscious thinking brain and so that was part one. So let's digress. For a second this is one of the most fascinating aspects of anthro which is like they're studying humans for one hundred years and you just almost can't study human and we're trying to figure out the study you're a part of and you're you're almost probably trying to be a great subject and help the professor or person doing the study. Get the results they want. It's all were conscious of all the things right. Yeah and it's super I mean that and it's like super hard to get it why humans are really like because of all these cultural influences right like if I want to study the human. It's hard to not be studying the American human or the Zimbabwean human or like you know your culture prevents me from knowing what's really in to being a human and so so monkeys book for both of these reasons where a breath of fresh air like they don't have all these cultural influences messing with them and they definitely don't know that they're in your study they don't want to do a good job in your out actively not want to fish. Sure I listen to your podcast. And there's a couple of different areas and I really wanted to explore in. I'm kind of obsessed with status. So many primates are are highly social. Animals were the apex of social animal. Right and so. We have so much hard wiring. An evolution to make us cohesive group. And I think we're largely unaware of it right so I do wonder even your your primate studies like you're capuchins right there. They're very smart. Did they ever interpret your status as being like Alpha do any of the people conducting the experiment become the Alpha? Yeah not so much with my guys. We because status wasn't that much of a thing like the other one alpha male and so on but researchers in chimpanzee labs report this all the time in fact would super interesting as you get cultural differences in these different primate labs so the chimpanzee labs in Japan. The chimps are really clued into who is the high status researcher. So if you come in and you're like Joe Freshman like I was in that experiment the chimps will dominate you. And you can't get them to do anything or whatever but then the Pi principal investigator big head. Honcho comes in and all of a sudden the chimps are like Oh gosh. I'll do everything you want. And so it's like the chimps are somehow of just such a question. There's somehow implicitly. Picking up on the human status is not just like we're all higher status is like well some of the humans might be higher status but like some of them are completely low ranking and I should just abuse in the. Who's you would have to be that we're sharing so much nonverbal communication that they are able to witness how we look the length of time who has the floor of the longest. They're probably just aware of subconsciously as we are aware of it. Yeah I mean. They're not looking at people's academic titles like somehow we're giving oft these cues that we don't even realize which is so fascinating it is it is. I love it okay. So let's go through your history a little bit because I always liked knowing why people gravitated towards the thing they did so you're from Massachusetts. I'm probably saying that wrong. I have a hard time with that word and your dad is from a chain of islands that I would have only known because the Canary Islands or close. He asks them. My Dad's side of the family is from Cape Bird Which is a set of islands off the coast of Africa? Very few people in the US from Cape Bird but they tend to like cluster in cities that were big like seaports or whaling ports in particular. So like the whaling ships would kind of go around Africa. They would stop and fuel up in these tiny islands off the western coast of Africa called Cape and Cape Verdeans. Were like I'm going to get involved in this. Seems like a great lucrative enterprise and so they wound up kind of in Massachusetts like my my hometown new Bedford is the town of Moby Dick Right. So it's like Oh wailing town you know for today and so so you get these tiny clusters in seaports but but it's sort of an African Portuguese mix I'm like Biracial by nature. But even more biracial because you know one of one of my sides already biracial by nature of the way. Those islands work and mom was a guidance counselor in school. You actually attended a Massachusetts. Yeah that's right so she she always really loved education and kind of wanted me and my my brother to like go off and get the best education we could. She kind of instilled that in us from a really early age. Were you delivered and I check off a passion of hers but it wasn't necessarily something everybody in my town did like. I don't know anybody else for my town who like went to Harvard or like my Taibbi League schools and things so it was kind of it was kind of a strange thing to do to double down. It was a working class town. I assume yeah because I mean it was back. In the movie. Dicta as it was the richest town in in the US but wailings not like a super huge industry anymore. There wasn't new industry that kind of came in I never see the whalers on the Forbes one hundred I know yeah so so yes so. It wasn't in a town where a lot of people went off to these schools but But it was awesome. I mean we completely changed my life. It it's nowadays when I advise high school students. Your I'm like education is the way to completely transform what your opportunities look like definitely worked for me but wh why were you drawn to psychology because I have a really offensive theory on most psychology majors which is generally they were from a pretty fucked up home and they kind of wanted some answers or they themselves drift in a little confused ups? There's no need some answers. What was your. Maybe that's because I never wanted to do clinical psychology like. I never wanted to shrink or help people. I was just fascinated by people. I was like one of these nerdy kids. Who like you're the mom was always like go? Go play with your friends. Like stop paying out with adults like I just wanted to kind of be watching people and pay attention the whole time. Are you the oldest? I am the oldest always psychologists even before I was technically an academic psychologist. Yeah and it sounds like your interest is in interest. I share which is like. I'm deeply curious about why people do the things they do. More than any other thing like most specifically why I do the things I do because so often. I think I know why and then upon closer inspection. I don't know why I do it or I have to learn because there's all these biological impulses in the mixers there's ego there's culture there is so dense. How much stuff is contributing to our decision making right. Do you think you know why you wanted to know why people work. The way they did. People are just weird like where weird as organisms like. They're no species on the planet. That has kind of like us. You know we should be just one of billions of other species or there should be some species that are. Kinda like us you know. We're just even our closest. Living relatives are smart. But they're not making podcasts or having are around them like communicating like sharing ideas. That are in my head with your head like no other species. Does this really so weird? But at the same time we're also just like not good understanding our own. Psychology self insight is a problem for our species even though are so smart as a that was something that always fascinated with me and then. I think I was drawn to the discipline to be like..

Malcolm Glad Massachusetts professor US Harvard Africa Laurie Cape Bird Yale Monica Yale institution assistant professor Moby Dick Right First Time Joe Freshman Canary Islands principal investigator Lake
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Will COME WELCOME. Welcomed armchair expert experts on expert. I'm Dan Sheppard joined by modest mouse. Man How you doing good. It's the Sunny Day in Los Angeles is a little rain yesterday and now the Sun's back today we have Lori Santos who is a cognitive scientist and professor of psychology at Yale University. You know she has the most popular class in Yale's history on happiness and she is also the host of the podcast the happiness lab so everyone should listen to that. She's very fascinating and has such good tips for wellness for feeling happy professor right now especially right now so please enjoy Laurie. Santos we are supported by shady raise. Monica shady raise makes the handsomeness sunglasses. I have a few pair. They're very high quality in there so inexpensive. That's what's crazy is the look is fantastic. Reminiscent of some of my favorite brands there out to do differently. Premium polarized shades at a fraction of the big name brand costs there an independent sunglasses company. Just some big corporation overcharges for shades. Everyone knows sunglasses are way overpriced there insane and break them or lose them and it hurts expense. Glad you're bringing that up because the best part of shady raise is their warranty replacements if shades are lost or broken for any reason. It doesn't matter what happens. Okay now it's already a winner but they're just throwing this..

Lori Santos Monica shady Yale University Dan Sheppard Yale professor professor of psychology Los Angeles Laurie handsomeness scientist
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Will COME WELCOME. Welcomed armchair expert experts on expert. I'm Dan Sheppard joined by modest mouse. Man How you doing good. It's the Sunny Day in Los Angeles. Is We a little rain yesterday? And now the sun's back today we have Lori Santos who is a cognitive scientist and professor of psychology at Yale University. You know she has the most popular class in Yale's history on happiness and she is also the host of the podcast the happiness lab so everyone should listen to that. She's very fascinating and has such good tips for wellness for feeling happy professor right now especially right now so please enjoy Laurie. Santos we are supported by shady raise. Monica shady raise makes the handsomeness sunglasses. I have a few pair. They're very high quality in there so inexpensive. That's what's crazy is the look is fantastic. Reminiscent of some of my favorite brands there out to do differently. Premium polarized shades at a fraction of the big name brand costs there an independent sunglasses company. Just some big corporation overcharges for shades. Everyone knows sunglasses are way overpriced there insane and break them or lose them and it hurts expense. Glad you're bringing that up because the best part of shady raise is their warranty replacements if shades are lost or broken for any reason. It doesn't matter what happens. Okay now it's already a winner but they're just throwing this..

Lori Santos Monica shady Yale University Dan Sheppard Yale Los Angeles professor professor of psychology handsomeness Laurie scientist
"santos" Discussed on Tamarindo

Tamarindo

04:21 min | 4 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Tamarindo

"Welcome to another episode of the podcast in the closet brought to you by the krona virus. Shayla welcome back to the closet. We you are probably still on cloud nine from fabulous event that took place yesterday. Although when they're listening to this it'll be a few days after that but can you please tell us about? Luna and Tamarine does recent partnership this story Storytelling Workshop. That happened via zoom to. What are the highlights? Gosh it was so beautiful Brenda so the event was called. Your story is your superpower. And that's what I feel like. We were all kind of coming in touch with you now. It was beautiful. I started off by you know. I'm not an expert in teaching storytelling so my contributions to the grounding exercise and walk the participants through kind of how to set intentions in how to set a soft intention for the event. So kind of you know. Grounded us in in the exercise and yeah it was. We had an amazing turnout in and it was just a testament to people need these kinds of offering and how healing writing can be you know so whether using it or because you want to share your story with the world or you just need it for your own personal growth. You know fantastic spent has exploded a lot of people. I think there was ninety. Plus registrants amazing methods us. Honest here and you know it's it's it's that we that we really wanted to host. Because it's part of our mission is to go to to amplify voices are stories and we want to hear more of yours more of your voices in mortgage story so that was was all about that fantastic. And we have a joint my thoracic today to the Fabulous Team. Luna for basically putting pulling it together. It's amazing joint cow. Okay Joy Mothra Cup for Thanksgiving shoutout to them and they're the they were the storytelling experts that brought in the great content for that partnership. So much fun. Originally this was going to be a live event right that we ended up committing to do it. Virtually so beautiful that we were actually able to provide this workshop for so many more people than we originally because we did it virtually so that was really cool to excellent. Well you know what someone else that has adapted to the Times is actually today's special guest. We have actor Comedian Carlo. Santos who plays Chris? Morale is one of three cousins. That are the central characters in the Netflix. Show head defied personally. I think that character steals every scene. I just really really identified with Chris. Mortensen Listrik the coconut. The Whitewash Mexican. If you will of the series and just the way. He was kind of struggling with his identity. I'm sure that spoke to a lot of our listener. So super cool to have you legged get a chance to interview. Carlos was so so much fun and you know what it was. It was great and I got to preview the the interview and I have to say that it was surprisingly comforting Carlos. Take on how everybody is dealing with the corona virus in their own way and that every single way is fine. Like every way is perfectly acceptable for how we are all coping with. What's going on today superbowl exactly before we dive into that interview? Though a couple things one is we're going to have a PSA for y'all but also. I thought we could maybe quickly also tell folks that we have more of this virtual gatherings happening. We're actually hosting a podcasting workshop. So that's coming up and you can follow basically go to our website that many podcast dot com for everything that we've got going on. And when you go in there you could actually sign up for our newsletter. We are going to preview newsletter very very soon and we want all to not miss out on any of the thumbing the cheese so stay connected and sign up for that anything else. We should highlight for our folks or is that we have a lot. I think that's it we're doing. We're doing what we can for. Y'All yes doing what we can with creativity of using digital tools so that we can keep this thing going. Even though we can't be together in the studio I miss Shayla and Youtube. Soon Zoom. We'll have to do all right. So let's I take a quick break. We'll be right back with our chat with fellow.

Carlos Shayla Mortensen Listrik Chris Luna Fabulous Team Tamarine Netflix Brenda Santos
Miami - Florida workers denied unemployment benefits need to resubmit if they applied before April 5

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

Miami - Florida workers denied unemployment benefits need to resubmit if they applied before April 5

"Floridians who applied for unemployment benefits but were denied or now being told to reapply the department of economic opportunity says individuals who filed the claim in the first quarter of the year before April fifth will need to file a new state assistance application anyone deemed ineligible for state benefits may be eligible for the pandemic unemployment assistance program from the federal government governor Rhonda Santos had a sit down meeting in the oval office with president trump Tuesday to talk about Florida's response to the corona virus outbreak the governor told the president about infection rates testing rates even the number of ventilators but there was no direct talk publicly of Uncle Sam bailing out Florida's budget we had billions of dollars in reserve but even with that you are facing I had the Senate majority leader suggested states could declare bankruptcy but house leaders are open to the idea of a bailout and the president it's unfair to many of the state's most of the states that have done such a good job house members were supposed to return next week but canceled because of the high infection rates in DC

Rhonda Santos Florida President Trump Federal Government Senate
Climate catastrophes and now coronavirus, Pacific islands in the crosshairs

UN News

12:10 min | 5 months ago

Climate catastrophes and now coronavirus, Pacific islands in the crosshairs

"The covert nineteen pandemic is wreaking havoc around the globe. The remoteness of the Pacific Islands has left people living there vulnerable in many different ways. You and resident coordinator Seneca Summer Sheena said in an interview with UN news that with borders an airport shutdown protection gear specialist personnel and lifesaving medical supplies have been unable to reach many areas in need and the crisis has only been heightened by the devastation inflicted by category five. Cyclone Herald which ripped through Vanuatu. Mr Samora Sheena overseas you and Operations Fiji Micronesia. The Salomon Islands Marshall Islands. Kiribati Palau Tonga. Vanuatu Nehru and Tuva. Lou acknowledged to Julia Dean. The difficulties in moving people and cargo has been impinging on the UN's ability to respond to the corona virus crisis. Will I think that you know? Some of the challenges are much the same as everywhere else in terms of making sure that the people are tested that people are safe social distancing action sinks in people follow the policies. Making sure that the equipment that's necessary for health workers are in place you know these are of course the challenges around the world with you're talking about New York City of Fiji but I think particularly challenging here in the Pacific as the remoteness of the locations it is also an sending that the number of people in the Pacific have different types of underlying health conditions. So if you actually have a massive outbreak with very concerned that this could have serious consequences for a significant segment of the population. I think the fact that the borders have been closed in many places and flights have stopped. Mix The issue of remoteness even more challenging so we are finding it difficult to move whether we're talking about personal protection equipment or other types of medical equipment and supplies are specialists and experts that we need in order to respond to this the movement of people in Congress very difficult at the moment. And what else is the UN doing to support the communities and governments of the UN has really come together this time and we have a range of things that we have responded. We've set up something old joint incident Management Team to look at the immediate health sector preparedness and Response Plans of countries. We received requests from the country's is you are aware. I covered ten countries in the Pacific. These requests come not only from those ten countries but from around the Pacific all of the country in the Pacific. And then we've prioritized. We look at the logistics capabilities in terms of the procuring and delivering what is being requested from us. And the the requests you know range of things from testing laboratories setting up testing laboratories to Mosques for health workers too Water and sanitation supplies etcetera at the same time we are acutely rather than multiple needs in multiple sectors whether we are talking about protecting women and children when we talk about places where cities have been locked down for weeks at a time. Or we're talking about food security right now because people are unable to work and don't have an income or you're talking about multiple disasters had a cycle of the number of countries and that compounds the crisis that Corbett nineteen is brought all the Pacific Tropical Cyclone Herald. I think is better. Four countries in as many days. Can you expand on what happens in a situation where you've got a health issue plus a natural disaster happening at the same time so on the one hand you could argue that up to a little bit better prepared here in the Pacific because we have to deal with a measles outbreak several months ago and some of these structures and mechanisms already in place to ensure that we fight the measles outbreak in fact the joint Incident Management Team? That I mentioned to you before was something that existed from that outbreak and was re purposed into dealing the covert nineteen similarly We have something in the Pacific humanitarian team functions. Here brings together all of the U. N. and other partners like the Red Cross and the NGOs are now we have government representatives and the regional organisations bilateral Austrailia New Zealand so those structures are in place and it really helped in some ways arguably to respond as will two TC herald which had an impact on four of the countries. All of them are in the Pacific quality which I support the Solomon Islands Tonga Fiji and Vanuatu by far based on preliminary analysis. Certain parts of Vanuatu are the worst hit followed by a couple of areas in Fiji Solomon Islands Tonga thankfully a not impacted significantly as went to sadly though twenty seven. People lost their lives in Solomon Islands. As a result of this cyclone-hit abort that Kept signs people washed off the boat and have one confirmed death in Fiji a six year old child. That was confirmed with just this morning. We're still waiting for the data from Anwar two areas of Vanuatu that We don't have any communication with in Pentecost Island. For instance the first teams have been going there yesterday and this morning to make detailed assessments but clearly we can see based on the aerial photography and other reports that some one hundred sixty thousand people in. Monroe ought to have been affected by this especially badly affected Guyland of Santo and And penticost lagoon. Bill is a second largest city in Vanuatu. In that's on the island of Center. We know that the infrastructure people's homes roofs blown off. We know that there has been some shortage of water. There's no electricity many pants. Also the that's the case in Fiji in terms of the deputy and we are very concerned about food security We think that if we don't get things sorted we will have people going hungry in a metro. Weeks the secretary-general Monster Reform Agenda in two thousand. Nineteen with this double crosses happening in areas of the Pacific Reform Agenda Aid situation. I can already see that happening in the past few weeks as we've been working together as one. Un system. I think it's an important change to how the UN has maybe functioned in some other places during times of disaster even in between disasters. So for instance if you you have all of the sectors coming together we know that this for instance Kobe. Nine hundred ninety s right now is something that is a health sector response or largely so. But it's not only you cannot possibly move your medical equipment and personnel from one place to another. If you don't have your logistics people work so whilst you have W at show and unit steph looking at the medical supplies you'll have. Wfp leading logistics identifying aircraft. And actually getting things for months the other you have other parts of the UN like U. N. O. P. S. O. U. N. D. P. who have existing long-term agreements with suppliers in China or North America or elsewhere who's agreements can be used to procure things that we need. You have like. Un Women the officer High Commissioner for Human Rights and others NGOs as well the very important issue of protection for children for women for people with disabilities when they're curfews when they're lockdowns as I mentioned before you have very important role being played by UNHCR IOM. We know that refugees and migrants are especially vulnerable at this time when borders of closed. And they don't have the coping mechanisms that perhaps People who are living in their homes half so these dishonor accept food security as I mentioned before is a big problem. It's not just a problem in the context of the cyclone because several countries that depend on tourism in the Pacific as you know some of those countries Fiji for instance Vanuatu more than forty percents of the GDP is based on tourists industry and people have no income. Now they have no income and as a result that have very little access to food. So there are agencies like F your and uplift be Undp looking at Making sure that cash transfers cash grants can take place now while of course trying to support the government's in dealing with economic impacts the medium-term and long-term economic impacts of this crisis Hannah seeing the reform saving lives. Yes indeed in fact I was not so long ago in Liberia and I was Impressed by how the UN First of all came together but importantly all of the other partners came together as well. There was something called the incident management team and we used to meet three times a week. You had countries like China and the US are the CDC sitting there with. The government was led by the government. So first of all you know these things work well when governments are able to coordinate all of the actors and would we've tried to do here is wherever governments have needed. A wanted our support in terms of accord initiative. We've done that. We support the government. The governments are still in the league but we support them. I think what I am seeing now in terms of covert nineteen in the Pacific as a repeat of what I saw in Liberia and sadly that was not always the case was also in some other countries during this Nami and other cyclones. But I do see that here. There is a commitment on the part of all of the agencies to actually come together in some sense you know having a different role for a resident coordinator has also made a difference speakers agencies. Feel that the President. Coordinator is a neutral entity at the same time is a person that the government knows Vagan Goto to without having to go to seventeen different agencies during crisis like this but it's also important to know that this collaboration between W A chore and the Resident Coordinator Is something quite unique. It's happening really for the first time and I. It seems to be working not only in the Pacific but everywhere around the world. And what is your call to actions? Nice listening but in the Pacific and globally. I believe that this crisis can only be dealt with if we work together. It is of course human nature when something like this happening on. One tends to think of how one CAN PROTECT. Oneself one's family perhaps wants community and by extension When country but at the end of the day we can't respond to crisis legs alone Whether we are an individual or family or community or country we need to help each other so as much as we need to ensure that the right protocols are in place that we do our best to keep ourselves and our loved one safe we must understand that the only way we can actually beat this is my reaching out and helping each as well and we cannot just circle the wagons and hope that this will pasta and we will be protected. We have to find ways. Safeway's creative ways using technology but if technology is not available sometime through physical movement but safely to get the expertise to get the and this applies to places where it's needed especially so that the most vulnerable populations are supported and helped during this terrible crisis.

Pacific UN Fiji Vanuatu Pacific Islands Vanuatu Nehru Salomon Islands Marshall Islan Coordinator Solomon Islands Tonga Fiji Fiji Solomon Islands Tonga Operations Fiji Micronesia Kiribati Palau Tonga Cyclone Herald Mr Samora Sheena Liberia Solomon Islands Measles
Saints of Spain; David Suchet  Footsteps of St. Paul;  Michelangelo In Florence

Travel with Rick Steves

07:50 min | 5 months ago

Saints of Spain; David Suchet Footsteps of St. Paul; Michelangelo In Florence

"Whether you're looking at Michelangelo's magnificent statue of David or you get caught up in a ruckus crowd at a street festival in Spain or even if you just listen to the wind whisper. What life was once like among the sun bleached ruins of the Mediterranean? Your travels can lift your spirit in many ways. Hi I'm Rick Steves in just a bit. We'll take a closer look at the world. Michelangelo lived in influence. Five hundred years ago and actor. David Suchet tells us how he retraced the route that Saint Paul traveled through the eastern Roman Empire. Nearly two thousand years ago. Let's start the hour with a look at how people in Spain honor the lives of important figures from their past. There are actually hundreds of national and regional saints in Spain. And you'll find that many of them get a festival that brings their communities out into the streets to celebrate to explain the role of Saint in the culture of Spain. We're joined now by tour guides or hate Roman from Madrid and Francisco Gloria from pump. Lona or Hey in Francisco. Happy Easter Thank. You thank you so. Spain is a Catholic country in in the church is a huge part of the political and spiritual past. To what extent is the Catholic Church? Still a big part of Spanish society. Today it is. I mean now. The government that we have now is very conservative and they relates a political issues with the church. Not Everybody is happy about that but still part of it and also the most of the celebrations in Spain national holidays. They advocated saints. Lady's name names. I think a lot how. How does the naming of children work compared to the Catholic faith? I mean you're or hey your Cisco do they have any with your parents. Passion for Saints a Whole Mike. As many Ms Francis Xavier because your middle name is executive because for some frantic savior was born in my town so and he was the first Jesuit Right. He was one of the founders of Jesuits Yep okay main signatures which is a very common name. Ignatius and Francisco Xavier. That's a common name where you come from pump loan and actually my name is the ACLU into English degeorge and is the only saint in the Catholic Church actually wasn't a saint also warrior that killed the Dragon Saint George killing the Dragon. Yeah it wasn't saying actually but so there are a lot of festivals when you travel in and almost all of them seem to be related to the church. Talk about a couple of the the great festivals in the Saints Days. That are important in your life in your travels Francisco I am from component the running of the Bulls on what we celebrate. The death of Seinfeld mean so. It's like huge huge celebration. That week starts July six hundred ends July fourteenth saint for me and I. You wouldn't even know who saint for me unless you went to. The running of the Bulls and pump. Lana developed comes from employees. They don't even know who he is attacked because everybody wears the red Kerchief around their neck and when people go to the running of the Bulls they wear this red neckerchiefs symbolism planet. We are under two hundred thousand people. I didn't know we. We welcome one million people and everybody's wearing white unread and nobody knows why like. Excuse me you do get excuse me. I'M A tour guide. I want to explain to you why. You're wearing this red handkerchief. That was the first person that was baptized employees and they cut his head for the recent. So what we represent the white outfit Represents Holiness and the Redmond nights the blood coming out of his neck so he was an early Christian. Pump Loner who was beheaded. Yes he was. We hit it. We say that he was beheaded any Pamplona although history tells us that he was beheaded in France. But Hey ho hey. From Madrid what festivals would impact a traveler when that we should know about quite Madrid? Not Maniacs you say but there is one very close which is Toledo the Corpus Christi is the big the there in Corpus Christi in Toledo is and that's the the corporate the body the body of Christ that's correct. Yeah and that's the Big Day in Toledo and they do bring some things to parade around. And he's part of a could be the equivalent of the beaches. Pelton SPAIN LIKELY. You have here states them. They're very conservative in there. That's interesting because in the United States We've got a region called the Bible Belt in Spain. Is there a region that would be the Bible belt get could be the political? Be One of them if you go around. Let's say like half Mouche from Madrid to the West from Madrid to the West Toledo Arbella. Salunke that part of your Browning what do you? What is your image of being? We'll have to think that we had the Muslim heritage Muslim heritage started to come down of it from the north down. Thanks Community Santos on James. Drake has just for the historic context. The Muslims came in and took over Spain and Portugal in from the eighth century until fourteen. Ninety two a good part of Spain was ruled by Muslim overlords. And then for centuries there was the RECON keystone reconquering has finally fourteen ninety two. The last Muslim was pushed out of Granada and back into Africa. What I make the difference that the Community Santiago okay. The origin was by the coast and it was the beginning of the Spanish reconquista. So this is the Camino Santiago. This is the big pilgrimage trail that cuts across from France all the way across north Spain the major city in the north west of Spain Santiago de Compostela. They'll go and How what's the historical roots for this pilgrimage? Because thousands and thousands of people make this high out there still do it people at the beginning they did it by the coast so those kingdoms those ancient kingdoms there the realize that whatever was going there were no Muslims so th would they decided to push it south and south and south and south until the Camino we know today so I am from the north in the north we barely have any Muslim heritage. We were more Christine. Must time before. But if you go down to under Lucia there you find. Churches generally built upon a mosque. Correct and mosque was built upon a church than they destroyed. If you go to civilian you see them at Nickerson Tarver. A Cathedral Tower actually was the minaret of the old mosque. So there's this layering of history. And what's very poignant to me? Is We hear about people. Being beheaded today in this struggle of fanatic Islam and Christians and so on but if you go to a church in southern Spain it's very common to see a man on a horse with a big sword cutting off the heads of Muslims and at the feet of the Horse. There's six or eight heads of beheaded Muslims as correct. Lose this man that is son James. The son teams we're representing three ways bishop as more slayer the more slayer so his. His nickname was saint. James the slater the more killer. Well enter the Moore's for the Muslims. Yeah most of our lives and today's politically incorrect. So we're beginning to cover those heads on the floor seriously. Some of those old statues and paintings are getting with put flowers well enough so you hide them so you hide you see a guy on a white horse with a sore but every time a Christian is just so disgusted by a Muslim fanatic. That cut off one of his people's heads we've got to remember. This is nothing new in history Spanish. I consider myself Catholic. We've been the worst ever I mean. We've inquisition the request. We have expelled. The Jews I mean with excuse of religion with Don's much bad. The inquisition is Sort of gift of Spain to the rest of Europe. What gave yeah. I poisoned gift. Would you describe the The inquisition you see the palace don't you out l. escorial that's right correct. What is the inquisition? Mean to to church history It's a sad episode. I mean this might personal opinion. Very site I mean also gave us practical thing. But it's a very very sad history. Every time I talk to them to my travelers about inquisition unites ties with Catholic moral and they kept going on.

Spain Madrid Saint Michelangelo Saint Paul Rick Steves Spain Santiago De Compostela David Suchet France Catholic Church Ms Francis Xavier Bulls Francisco Aclu Roman Empire Toledo Pamplona Cisco Saints
"santos" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:47 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Officers Santos was a mutual friend who offered to drive her home from a birthday party at the venue club she got in that car but then hopped out and said she was going to call a ride share the alleged victim says Santos grabbed her and pushed her back against a brick wall before she called for help go to the gold says a not guilty plea was Saturday on Santos his behalf the suspect in a shooting at an Arkansas Walmart is dead this happen in forest city it's west of the Tennessee border mayor said of Williams as two police officers were injured we did have a shooting of that that took place here and Walmart across live about ten twenty four AM this morning officers engaged to suspect the suspect is the seas there is no word right now the officer's condition witnesses say they heard at least eight shots Attorney General William Barr says he is outraged after two police officers were shot over the weekend in New York City I have the full support of this administration and this department of cast yes police say one person is responsible one officer was shot in a patrol van Saturday structure that chain in the back twelve hours later police say that same person sprayed a precinct headquarters with gunfire hitting a lieutenant in the arm he then put the gun on the floor and surrendered the injured officers are now out of the hospital two more New York City firefighters die from nine eleven related sicknesses correspondent Scott Pringle has the update officials are saying sixty three year old Richard Jones in the seventy four year old Paul DO junior spent time in the toxic rubble at ground zero after the nine eleven attacks and both passed away from nine eleven related illnesses on Friday they had spent decades with the FDNY retiring in two thousand and two now more than two hundred firefighters have died from nine eleven related illnesses reports say that number could one day it's close three hundred and forty who says complaining on social media doesn't do anything rash at the TD garden decide to make some changes after they heard some colorful input from some fans of the Bruins and Celtics Newbold seats installed last year at Boston garden or soon to be history after one season on causeway street and poor reviews from keyboard cowboys and cowgirls CMOS Richmond concentrate on like social media you know people like to complain what can I say so what's the buzz legroom no place to put concessions without kicking over that I suppose of one person wanted to get up it's it's really difficult everyone in the room has to kind of get out like an airplane seat a hassle for sure but where pray tell is it written that fans need to be comfortable as they watch a game or show you go certainly grants and ephemera Parkinson and wouldn't see that does not have leg room at all I can imagine it's much worse than that he says the new seeds are just fine however certainly heard the complaints when it seems like the garden listened at north station Chris fama WBZ Boston's news radio update now on the varsity blues scandal the fake resume that Lori Loughlin's daughter submitted to the university of southern California can now be seen by anyone TMZ obtained the document from federal prosecutors it says that a livia generally won several gold silver and bronze medals in high school for rolling turns out she's never competed in that sport for eight it is time to get a check on Wall Street and through all day as a Bloomberg closing bell is wrong and we have ourselves a winner indeed anticipation ahead of big earnings reports and hope for the global economy as several big companies get back to work in China following coronavirus closings lend a hand to Wall Street today the Dow ends up one hundred seventy four points nasdaq of one hundred eight that's a new record high as to be five hundred up twenty four also to a record high Sony is joining a growing list of tech firms canceling plans to travel to the mobile World Congress a big tech show in Barcelona because of coronavirus concern Amazon LG Erickson nvidia also not going with the show or one hundred thousand people including as many as six thousand from China are expected Andro day Bloomberg.

Santos
"santos" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Today the Guardian investigation which exposed how is about a Santos Africa's first us. Female billionaire amassed a huge fortune. Why after three thousand years? A California's sequoia trees dying. And thank thank you for having me and I WANNA thank also London Business School for inviting me here so he let everybody. The voice you can hear belongs to Isabel. Santos Africa's richest chaste woman Forbes have estimated to be worth two point two billion dollars. Commodity prices are down. So what do we do. Santos comes one of Africa's focused poorest countries Angola a former Portuguese colony. That was ruled over by her father. Jose Eduardo Santos for nearly forty years. So yes she. She describes herself as an entrepreneur but a home. She's known as the princess have long been questions about how she acquired her wealth. The billionaire has always claimed to be a self made businesswoman. But this week the cachet of documents investigated by the Guardian and other news organizations appear to tell a different story. What the leak AAC showed us is the extent to which dos Santos semester large fortune at vast cost to the angle and state from the Guardian? I'm Rachel have phrase today in Focus. How about Santos really.

Santos Africa Jose Eduardo Santos Guardian London Business School Isabel California Angola Rachel Forbes
"santos" Discussed on Hustleshare

Hustleshare

09:58 min | 10 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Hustleshare

"And we're back on record. Paul Santos Meeker only God that was intense and already know that this is going to be one one of our best episodes traction so far because whole startup community Mel for real the whole startup community should hear about this because because this is the big boys game and it doesn't a lot of US talk about ourselves in the same level but in order for you to be able learn you need to punch awake last higher in and Cedar Perspective Dose of People. Who've come before you in that's why we? This is a special episode import we were highlighting the startups here and hopefully better investments and whatnot. But let's let's continue continue. Okay so Paul. What was it like now? Doing your wasn't even business. Was it a VERTEX or India. I India in the okay so you were an agency yeah okay. So typically agencies are designed shops to grow up to become big advertising agency For some reason I started to get interested in where where marketing and technology within thirsting. And it didn't look like an AD agency so it didn't look like in the end this. This was Asian financial crisis. Laugh okay so good quite good Would have been very difficult already. So so we we started basic design going up right so some some life lessons there right so the first time. I became an entrepreneur on. Just something like cashflow. Yeah you something. You take for granted because you'll have to sink about right you you get your salary not every month once you approve. Your budget gets approved. You just I mean you don't really see the bank accounts you don't. I'm sorry about that. You just business right and in the real world obviously doesn't work payroll is the biggest bitch. Yeah so one of those things would be a my colleague. Dennis with with the These how much we have in the bank account and how much we need to make payroll and said okay so I have to go out and hustle find somebody itself do exactly and fortunately we never missed barrel. We we were somehow and so so as we were doing it this whole question of so. What did we d whether we be when we grow up with something I was always thinking about okay and again? The initial assumption is maybe we become sort of agency. Yeah I'd agency hybrid and then I started to see you decide of technology. How can use it and the Internet Internet was was just starting so it wasn't really right away but And so that sort of the direction we headed in we brought in so so so the first thing is you know just practical things around the business again like you said Gosh lows and audits and the second is the real real world is very different from being Zinedine Z.. You're forced do your bosses. They called them by the first name. And I remember the first time I I did it even as a summer intern. It was difficult for me to call very senior people by their first name. Say Sir yes sir or Mr this this right yes but they forced you to do that because they wanted you. I mean I guess it's a culture thing thing right again to help promote this whole meritocracy of ideas through right not have a hierarchy. Yes it's there but they do things like this to to enable it correct but in the real world people like being called Sir. Yeah and you know. I guess the the training didn't help again because your various spectrum you could say maybe could come across this overconfident. Oh Wow now because you're incident and Andy. I thought it was probably the best place to learn this stuff and if I had clients in my mind I know at least as much as you about marketing right Because I think the brand is handled still deceive guard was was credible enough and so let's say in always go down so well got it and and so I realized about myself that maybe maybe I shouldn't be playing this role and so- classmate of mine was associate managing director. WBZ and we got the talking in you know she. She came on and she became the Managing Director Director Together. And so you had a buffer. Now I I myself up sort of the board chairman call. It and I would just come in when needed grounded G or certain bitches but managing the clients and isn't that was not same. Exactly my skill sets. That's kind of what they do now in Chat Bot beach before hours in the frontline the war but I realized I'll be more effective if someone was there as a new face and then someone I'll just like be thanos come in and like up here. You're you know you're you're there to support well. It's also their skills. Get these very good clients trust servicing and this and that allowed got part. That's the one of the most important thing you know because if if so it's it's different it's not just a one time thing we're closed down. Oh this is a relationship bourcher and so the the next thing I learned around this is around business models. So it's it's it's fun because you're creating but in some sense it's also thankless job because it never stops correct because you know it's competition so when you're working in the client to develop their marketing. They have competitors will will have their own lives right and so you have to keep getting better and better and there are certain aspects of the business model because it's a time based business horse right so you know there would be elements like peaks and valleys. There would be adamant like you know every marketing at the early sexually co-created with the client. If it's good the client looks good. If it's bad agency looks sort of like a coach. The team plays good. The layers look good. If the team please bad it's gorgeous mall but then you think about the Business Mondo then in and if you have a good client relationship and they move And then somebody new has a good land rash relationship with another agency your jobs in trouble too so it was like this is tiring and so either we we find a way to scale right or resell. It was sort of the conclusion like it. And what did YOU DO I. I'm looking at your way maker dot the profile and the one thing that I'm very curious to ask is you've sold you've founded six companies you sold three of them peop- the percent shooting a field goal but how this is like Philippine passes. Let's be real like okay. I understand but I I do say I I say that just to make sure that you know we're not trying to say that we're we're we're megastars or anything like that but again the experience of going through it. The difference is very helpful for sort of helps me. I guess make decisions of course so with India. You've got the Senate. How do you decide died at all right? I'm pretty sure you're twenties and this happened. Yeah how's that process. Because I went through this as a thirty year old chat. Bot Beach came from a loss Sold it twelve months after I put it. Oh yeah so. I started twenty-five an entrepreneur. The twenty six now. I was early thirties. Already when I saw me right No bankers then so bootstrap. Wow now we we. We had some investors. I know investment bankers to like how many acquisitions were done as the United States. Yeah you're you're just basically learning as you do correct No so so studied the agency models studying and got to talk to a few God. There's there's a formula remember typically five times Ebitda plus net asset value. Wow are there I remember. We'll put that initial five. I Times Ebitda less net asset value. Right so we will put in the show notes but it doesn't matter in the tech world because you have no and and most of them are not even profitable you probably are asset light correct so anyway so that was the formula. I remember at that time right. And so you argue around that and and they'll typically fifty one percent and then over time you you already and I guess from among the groups we met we were able to strike a deal with with then sued the Vegas Network in Japan yet but yeah yeah and let's just say we. I think.

India Paul Santos Meeker US United States Bot Beach Senate Dennis Japan Andy Vegas Network thanos
"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

10:13 min | 1 year ago

"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Available for free on the online course site core surro- and over four hundred and ten thousand people have been ruled already. I mean this thing his taking the world by storm. It's causing go on television shows and you're starting your own podcast which we're GONNA get to and it's it's not that surprising when you think about it if if you teach a class psychology and the good life or the science of wellbeing were you know basically how to be happy. People are going to be drawn to that but I still imagine that. There's a part of view. The couldn't have possibly envisioned that it would blow up like this. No it's still completely surreal. Honestly I mean from just on campus. It felt really surreal. All right you know I designed the class thinking you know probably like fifty students would take it and that would feel like a lot of students on campus when over a thousand students enrolled and I had to teach that class laugh in a concert hall that so you know completely real and Humboldt and I was like wow this is totally crazy but more crazy was when I started getting a lot of outside type press for the class a couple of weeks into the class. There was a New York Times article about the class in in the kind of like exactly what you said which is like you know no one ahead. Y'All students like many college students face this mental health crisis but I think the article is more about you know. I'm one in you. Yell students can have mental health crisis but then they're also kind of really lucky. You know they're young. They're like nineteen like they got into Yale. Most of them are pretty harrowing. You like what about the rest of us like. If eighty two class on happiness you know what what about the poor you know fifty something you know all the rest of us and so how is kind of what launched the next wave of kind of when it became really surreal which is that we had the national national news media and international articles about this class it kind of became the thing that lots of folks were fascinated by like why all these young yell kids needed to class on happiest. Yes kind of figure out how to live a good life and the fascinating thing is of course how you can you can kind of say the same about other parts of life. I had a former lawyer turned yoga studio owner who does presentations for law firms and other big companies on mental health and gratitude and presence in whatever and he felt the same way about his fellow lawyers. Why is there this dearth of of happy successful lawyers. There's some of the most well to do professionals and yet there was this suicide crisis amongst them and you can apply that to so many places right and so much of that of course which you talk about in your class is that we don't still still really understand what makes us happy. We have a lot of misconceptions about what will bring us happiness how to find it and how to keep it and and also your dilemma which is of course you can tell people how to get there and they still won't do the things that will make them happier. you have a new podcast called the happiness lab so I'm not going to give away the entirety of your course or all those things but I do want to get into the things that will maybe push some of those people who are reticent to get involved into better understanding. You know what you're teaching in this class and and how it's not just okay well if you smile more your brain will make you like really small for real right like it's it's. It's pretty in depth in terms of I'm having to rewire ourselves. Yes yeah I think that's right. I mean I think you know the sometimes people see here that there is a class on the size of happiness and they think it's going to be like all who or like like you know positively and like your smile all the time I get letters from people who take the class sometimes and they're you know they come around with the weather usually starts with you know I started this thinking that was gonna be like hippy dippy crap and I you know it's California stuff and in practice like what the science well-being is about is it's like really a rich empirical. TIRICO science and the way it works is to say okay. Let's there's some very at some people out. There are just happier more satisfied with their life than other people. What are they doing right you know what are they doing right. And what can we copy. If you're not feeling satisfied. What can you do to kind of feel a little bit more satisfied and when you look at the science but they can say you get which is kind of striking is that we don't have a great gauge on what we can do to be happy. You know we were just talking about the work with the monkeys jesting that we're really good at getting out of her own head. We can make all these predictions about what life will be like. You know if we do take certain kinds of actions. You know the road not taken like we can make lots of predictions about what are what is going to be like depending on how things go the problem is that a lot of those predictions are off like we have these motivations to seek out certain things and we often. I think that those things will make us happy but in practice they don't work in the way we think and so that's why I think the science is so important. I've Kinda gotten. You know almost evangelical about trying trying to get the science out there to as many audiences as possible from the online class to the podcast. It's the we need some help here. You know our our central motivations the the things that we have that it's telling us how to make decisions. They're not leading us in the right direction. We're kinda going wrong and science can really help us decide like OK. Actually those things don't work in the way you think and you might need to be seeking out other stuff that you didn't realize from your own kind of decision material brain's not telling you the right thing to do and that's why so many of the feeling. We're working really hard. You know we're putting time into our own well-being but it's not the only well we feel like something still missing yeah. It's fascinating that you use the word hippy dippy because I always say that what I'm talking about this kind of stuff because that used to be what it seemed like to me as someone who was a very grazed by lawyers. Everything must be proven questioned everything type. A overachiever like Oh that sounds very flower child Donald but as soon as I learned about the concept of Neuro plasticity insurnace science behind it I completely changed my tune and now I'm like all in on it and now I want everyone around me to be all in all of them to learn all the things and so we're going to get to that part the frustration that you feel when you have people around you and you're like do this thing. I swear it will make it better and they still refuse up but I wanted to you know that actual science that you talk about because it does I think for a lot of people who are reticent to really jump in they need that like like push of like no this is proven and we can show you how and why let's start with the GI Joe Fouls. He can you kind of explain that and how that influences what you were saying about sometimes your brain. He doesn't even know what you need to do. Yeah I think the G. I. Joe Foss. He's one of my favorite cognitive bias us in some ways. It's scary cognitive bias I don't know if you're listening all my age or about that children of the eighties basically but if you remember Gi Joe it was just Kinda g army cartoon no-one Really Remembers. Gi Joe But but many many folks who've enjoyed the cartoon remember how ended which is at ended with this public service announcement or gi. Joe Explains like don't talk to strangers raising you cross the street you you know big things in the US but ended with the child thinking. Gi Joe Thank you Joe. Now I know and then Joe would say this for you and knowing is half the battle and then it would not do you know if you remember the but but this is what we think we think you know knowing is half the battle once. I know like what I should do. I'm just going to do it. You know I can know well how many reps I need to do on day and like that's good. I'll just get really buff like there. I can know how much sugar I should have in my dire much sleep. I should have and I can just do it right but the sad thing is like that's not the case. You can know exactly what you're supposed to do. The TAT doesn't immediately mean you translate it into what you're supposed to be. Actually doing you know like I know. It's really good for me to get up and do a half hour of cardio every morning but you know if I hit the snooze button every day just knowing that is not going to be enough. You have to actually do the stuff and so that's been the kind of this. Gi Joe Fallacy so that's the judge Ovallis you think that knowing is half the battle but it's Kinda not and so we really teach students to not fall prey to the GI Joe fallacies kind of one of the principles of the course and even the podcast which is I'm GonNa teach you all this stuff. That science says you know. It's not well. It's going to be real. Scientific results else you're. GonNa see graphs and all this stuff but then it's up to you to translate that into your own here because if you're just here the study like that sounds good you know brain plasticity. I'd love up to change my brain but you don't do anything like nothing's really GonNa Change and so much of it to stems from these very strongly held ideas about happiness happiness that turned to be misconceptions ideas that we've been taught or have for whatever reason ingrained in ourselves that this will make me happier if I do X. Y. Or if I achieve achieve or can you talk about how the studies and science actually tells us that some of our most widely held beliefs about what makes you happy are wrong. Yeah I mean it's really jarring and this is the spot where you know I keep this stuff and my students will fight me about it right because it's like our intuition strong you know so so one of the one of the best ones is is money right. You know if I could just get more money. I'd be happy or so many of those like plays a lottery in thank you know like the day. I went powerball. You know it's going to be awesome day right but does that really happen. Well you can look to people who have lots of money and ask if they're really happy and what you find is that you know it's it's you're really poor and I give you an infusion of some more or money. You know if you're earning like ten thousand dollars the US right now and I double your salary. That's GonNa feel good. It's GonNa increase your positive mood and it's going to decrease your stress levels but but if you're earning enough money that you kind of have a roof over your head and food on the table researchers kind of define this at around seventy five k. and the US right now. We're just you know pretty so you know decent middle class wage if you're earning that much and I all your salary triple it. You don't get any corresponding increase in your wellbeing which which is definitely not what we think you know. Some of your listeners might be earning around that level and they you know if I could quadruple my salary like things would be better but the data when you really look at people who make those different salaries suggest that that's just not the case you can also see this when you look at it kind of wellbeing levels of people who are lottery winners. You know you're kind of we're getting more anecdotal here here. But what you find is that don't folks just aren't happy. we were able to interview on my podcast. I interviewed this psychotherapist name Klay Cockerel he's the psychotherapist to the insanely rich rich so he has clients who earn more than fifty million dollars..

US Joe Joe Foss Joe Fouls New York Times Humboldt Klay Cockerel Yale California Donald Ovallis fifty million dollars ten thousand dollars seventy five k
"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"My name is Laurie. Tinto's and my dilemma is how you get people people to do not really want to do like even know what we need to do to be happy. We don't want to do that. So how can we force people to behave better. I mean I feel like you're the expert thread on this right. You literally teach the class on this but seriously I can imagine you've got when you've got a third of the students at Yale in your classes probably going to be some that aren't listening or aren't buying lying in or you've got people in your work or personal life that don't care about all the research you've done all the ways that you can prove that our lives actually get better when we're meditating and connecting with people and exercising and being grateful and all that goodness so even though I know you're the expert. I know you're not immune to having people around you that you'd like to help and I feel the same way ever. Since I got into into learning more about neural plasticity in the ways we can actually change our brain and personality and moods. I've been wanting to share it people. Which is why I have people like you on the podcast to get as many people as as possible to sort of buy in on it and join me in this new super happy place that I founded understand all the science that backs it up so if they're not naturally predisposed to believe it they'll they'll by in and I bet you research would tell you the same thing as the author of the book better than before which I've been reading which is about sort of changing your habits and she writes that people respond better to watching someone else live great life to have an practice good habits than than being told about it why they should do it and that they respond better to you kind of talking about about how great it is and then letting them be versus nagging or demanding that they changed so it can be tough. I've got friends and family that I want to shake because they aren't doing the things that they could to make themselves happier more satisfied edified but I know that they respond better to saying join me at Yoga or check out this great book than to say tell them what they're doing wrong repeatedly and I think that's all we can do but I'm sure you already know that like. I said you teach the class on this girl. The Commission's spoken my guest this week is Laurie Santos professor of psychology at Yale University Director of Yells Comparative Cognition Laboratory and Canine Cognition Center and the head of Silliman College at Yale in January of two thousand eighteen started teaching a class called psychology and the good life and it's breaking attendance records at the university. She's won countless awards as a student and teacher and in two thousand eighteen she received a genius award from the Liberty Science Center in New Jersey. She's also also hosted the new podcast the happiness lab which launches today September Seventeenth we talk about her groundbreaking course about finding and maintaining happiness and how our brains trick us why the Gi Joe Fallacy leads us astray and how to rewire ourselves to lead happier lives plus her work with dogs and monkeys to better understand human brains and stuff like do dogs really feel guilt. Take are they more rational than humans and learn new things plus. Our dog breeds all that different or is it just their training and their experiences. I think you guys are GonNa love this. I really love talking to her. That's what she said. I am super pumped for this and yes I know I'm going to get all the comments that I say that every single podcast but this time I really mean it even more of the other ones because even just doing the research for this has been so fascinating and all of you who are regular listeners to the podcast are absolutely going immediately understand all the ways the the things that I always talk about are going to come to a head and sort of become one in this conversation with Santos before we get to all the amazing stuff you're working on now. I quickly the and I want to do it more quickly than I usually do because I want to get to all that good stuff want to go back and start from the beginning when you were going up in new Bedford Massachusetts. Your Dad was a programmer. Your mom was a guidance counselor when you were growing up. What did you think you wanted to do when you were an adult. I think like you know there. Just weren't that many people who had all kinds of crazy careers when I was growing up so if you went to college you're either going to be a doctor or a lawyer and I knew I didn't want to be medical. Doctor that just blood is icky and that stuff so I think I wanted to be a lawyer but I have zero concept. What lawyer is actually did your data's Cape Verdi in which I believe is like an African American Portuguese descent. That's right yes. I'm Kinda Biracial kind of a mix of lots of different ethnicities. Yeah did that affect you growing up. Were you in an area that was it's pretty diverse. Yeah I think there's lots of Cape Verdeans in new Bedford lots of Puerto Rican Portuguese individual like other kinds of like lucky. Latin X folks folks and I think that was awesome. It kind of felt like you know you're growing up with like these rich communities of people from different backgrounds but kind of just this idea that you know everyone was kind of a mixed six and diverse is when he growing up in new Bedford Being Cape Verde and isn't all that strange because there are lots of keep brigands there but I learned the hard way that everywhere else in the world like they're not that many Koreans Iranians around you. Kinda have to explain it to like what ethnicity is. Most people myself included before reading. This did not even know where it was like. Yeah people are like you you Cambodian like what are they know and so if the set of islands off the coast Africa and they there's lots of folks around the northeast because folks came over on whaling ships and kind of jobs that way so go to New England seaports you tend to meet a lot of Brady and so a lot of your work is predicated predicated on observing people understanding people and even now animals when you were growing up. was that a natural thing for you or something that came about later in life yeah. I think I was always sort of a natural psychologist. I was like you know the kid that would always like try to hang out with the adult table and find out what was going on and you know what people's motivations whereas best I think you know I was always sort of fascinated with mind and how people work and just kind of the puzzle the fact that people you know they don't always act in the way you think they're going to act or you know even kind of trying. I understand my own motivations you know why is it so hard to get yourself to do. The things you really WanNa do or you know like why do we rationalize like they're just going to be so many puzzles that human behavior her and even from as young as I remember. I was sort of fascinated by them so you're in high school. Did you do sorts of activities or sports or anything I was like a full on nerd and just like not very athletic. I played I played baseball like little league for a while and golfed which was mostly just 'cause you know what's fun to Kinda around around in a golf cart so not huge not huge sporty sporty chick sadly so not into like music and theater and stuff. You're really just interested I in in your studies yeah. I did a little bit on the theater side like if I if I was going to be characterized by anything I'd be more like you know theater nerd and not even an acting nerd more like blake back tech folk stage crew stage so you ended up at Harvard University and while you were there you were a research assistant and your travels to an island east of Puerto Rico really influence what you wanted to study before that trip did you have an idea of what kind of psychology would be would be of interest yeah. I think I just Kinda did no. I mean the kind of Allah psychology was sort of interesting but what that trip changed is i. I ended up working with a faculty member. There who does work with with monkeys like basically studying how monkeys thinking what that tells us about human nature and so even when I was just like a sophomore off more I got to head to his field site in Puerto Rico and it Kinda just a lot of things for me when you when you're hanging out with interesting group of monkeys it's like completely habituated to humans and they're just fascinating and you kinda wonder like well. What are they thinking. And how are they different from us so that Kinda just launched a long path of me trying to study this question. About what makes us human mind in unique yeah. There's there's this fascinating studies about monkeys that I think are like the gateway for so many people my favorite class in college as an English major who only took one thing remotely related late into like psychology and stuff was human bonding studying how you studied rhesus monkeys to help determine patterns and raising human infants and stuff so it's really interesting that would be the thing that sort of spurred you to not only continue following psychology but specifically the psychology of animals so at that point you come back from that trip and what do you envision in terms of your career based on your newfound interest in that yeah. I think you know maybe for better for worse. I'm not sure I was thinking my career back then you know this is a ninety s when like the dot com boom was happening and people just were like no one was scared of jobs. We're like Oh. I'll just you know found facebook or something like that right. so. I just Kinda thought the scientists fun you know I was sort of enjoying asking those questions questions and kind of exploring thing I was a little bit blindsided when my senior year came around and I had to pick a career but your next step of doing a PhD in kind of keeping going with what had been working so so far seem to make sense at the time yeah she stuck with school you got your masters and PhD from Harvard in psychology with the focus on cognition brain and behavior sure and was it right after you were done with your Giga Gail Yay kind of happened in like really fortuitous where near Gale was looking for somebody doing this on and I was Kinda in the right place at the right time in some ways. It's really fast like most people in my field you know do what's called the post doc which you Kinda like training. Someone's lab for a while before you become a professor. I was a little bit more on the fasttrack which wound up being amazing just amazing place to kind of do my work but you know it was a bit of a sprint for president right out of Grad School. You know basically teaching college students in my late twenties right as a professor there so there's a little bit fast yeah absolutely so was the Comparative Cognition Laboratory and Canine Cognition those in existence at Yale when you arrived both of those kind of things that I had I started up the starting with the Comparative Cognition Lab. That's the lab where we try to study like how monkeys make sense of the world to get some hints about how humans sick and the idea there is is it. If you really want to understand what makes US special you know why we have sports and podcasts and language and conversations like we're doing now like you actually have to figure out what animal all do and why they don't do the same stuff that we do and so I started a lab where I also was doing research in Puerto Rico where we studied monkeys and then more recently tried to to study this question with some critters..

Laurie Santos Puerto Rico Yale Harvard University Comparative Cognition Laborato professor Tinto Comparative Cognition Lab facebook Bedford Being Cape Verde Liberty Science Center professor of psychology Yale University New Jersey Comparative Cognition Laborato baseball Silliman College Bedford Massachusetts Cape Verdi
"santos" Discussed on Nacht Beauty

Nacht Beauty

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"santos" Discussed on Nacht Beauty

"Don't you think everyone should do that yes give me some laura thank you welcome to natch butte everybody it's yoga jackie j your host jaggi johnson and this is the last week of all male march it's gone by so fast we've learned so many things and the cuteness continues okay let me tell you who we have in studio today he's a comedian he's an actor he's a cutie you can see him on superstore on nbc which is entering its fourth season congratulations what an amazing thing and later this summer you can see on the big screen in the upcoming movie crazy rich asians what's like literally everyone so excited about so we'll talk about that too but as welcome nico santos can i just say you have like the best name your parents about like our sun will be famous he's either going to be an attorney or like a weather man or comedian like niko santos is just so sink listen because a nickname yeah because like when you're philipino you have your your given to first name and then you're always your mother's maiden name and then but then you go by a nickname that you're pairs gives you didn't know that my real name is michael nncholas santos santos and then by nico i've always gone by nico because of nncholas yeah yeah you know my nephew's name is nncholas and it's spelled in icy oh les and they call him nico does exist that.

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