35 Burst results for "Santos"

Hospitalized coronavirus patients still suffer symptoms 6 months post-infection

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:19 min | 4 d ago

Hospitalized coronavirus patients still suffer symptoms 6 months post-infection

"Long haulers. Those those are people who have covert, whose symptoms just persist over weeks and or months at a time. The first large study of long haul covered patients found that Three out of four experienced symptoms. Six months after they've been hospitalized. KCBS is Margie Schaefer has more. The long haul symptoms include shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain and cognitive issues. But founder and physician faculty lead of the multi disciplinary post covert optimal clinic at UCSF Doctor lecture me, Santos says, Not all long hauls. Covert 19. I've seen people with new diagnoses of auto immune conditions, even cancer, other lung conditions where the doctors or the patients assumed This is just post covert. In fact, this is long prove it. She encourages doctors and patients to take a broad view and to maintain regular healthcare check ups that can allow for early detection. Ah, cute. Covert patients tend to be older and more frail. Some other research shows that perhaps people with the long term symptoms might actually be overrepresented. Younger people more than older people in women more than that similarities between long haul Covitz symptoms and chronic fatigue are being investigated. Margie Schaefer KCBS. Anyone flying to the

Margie Schaefer Kcbs Ucsf Fatigue Santos Cancer Chronic Fatigue
Florida's COVID rental assistance program to roll out $850M

Glenn Beck

00:21 sec | 4 d ago

Florida's COVID rental assistance program to roll out $850M

"To keep roofs over their heads could soon be getting some help from the federal government governor to Santos announced the state will participate in the emergency rental assistance program, offering residents $1.4 billion in relief cities and counties with populations of a least 200,000 will be directly paid through the Treasury Department. The state is expected to shell out about $850 million South

Santos Federal Government Treasury Department
Signing up for a COVID-19 vaccine in the Houston area sounds easy but often leads to a dead end

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

01:03 min | 5 d ago

Signing up for a COVID-19 vaccine in the Houston area sounds easy but often leads to a dead end

"Three large providers in harris county will serve as vaccine hubs in the houston region but as health reporter. Sir will ernst explains. The state did not designate any vaccine distribution centers and surrounding suburban counties texas shifting its approach to covid nineteen vaccine distribution by sending joses to large hubs that can immunize more than one hundred thousand people harris county public health houston health department and houston methodist. Hospitals are the designated providers in the houston metro area together. Bill received nearly twenty seven thousand doses this week to vaccinate healthcare workers older adults over sixty five and those with certain medical conditions neighboring counties were not on the list although some montgomery for ben in galveston will receive small shipments of six hundred doses or less others like santa santo chambers and liberty counties will receive no shipments this week. The state says it will also ship around five hundred thousand second doses to providers across the state for those who got vaccinated a few weeks ago. I'm sarah will ernst in houston.

Sir Will Ernst Joses Harris County Public Health Ho Houston Methodist Houston Harris County Texas Santa Santo Chambers Galveston Bill Liberty Sarah
Rodgers throws 4 TDs, Packers beat Bears 35-16 for top seed

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Rodgers throws 4 TDs, Packers beat Bears 35-16 for top seed

"Aaron Rodgers threw four touchdown passes as the Packers defeated the bears thirty five sixteen with the victory Green Bay wrapped up the number one seed in the NFC and a first round playoff by Rodgers completed nineteen of twenty four passes for two hundred forty yards it is for aerial strikes went to four different receivers he talks about getting that number one seed it's important you know we know that you know the weather is an issue always in these months so we'll definitely be open person cold frigid temperatures a couple weeks as for the bears Carol Santos set a franchise record with twenty seven straight successful field goal attempts and in spite of the loss the bears still make the playoffs taking on the saints next weekend David Shuster Chicago

Aaron Rodgers Packers Green Bay Bears NFC Rodgers Carol Santos Saints David Shuster Chicago
Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

All Things Considered

04:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

"Up, we're taking a look back at some of 20 twenties major events and one of the most remarkable scientific advances this year came in our understanding of how respiratory viruses can be transmitted from one person to another through the air. Krone virus pandemic obviously made this an urgent question. And NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys reports that old scientific ideas quickly got thrown out of the window. For decades. The prevailing idea about respiratory viruses was that some were airborne, and some just weren't so back in January, Thea understanding of how viruses spread through the air. Was really primitive and incorrect. Lindsay Mars, a researcher at Virginia Tech, who studies virus transmission, she says textbooks and research papers said an airborne virus was something like measles. It could be breathed out in tiny particles called aerosols that hang in the air. Those aerosols contractual long distances from room to room. All of that was very different from non airborne viruses like flew in the common cold. Those were thought to spread through coughs and sneezes, big droplets that travel just a few feet. Maher says. This whole simplistic picture was just wrong. There were very small number of people in the world. I think who really understood at that time how viruses spread through the air, and these people realize that the new coronavirus might be airborne at short distances. That is if people talked or saying the virus could be in small particles, as well as the big droplets and coughs and in a poorly ventilated space. These particles could build up as the Corona virus outbreak took off. These experts started making a lot of noise about this and people paid attention. Maher says She thought it would take 30 years for more nuanced ideas about airborne transmission to gain widespread acceptance. But it's happened in months. It's been pretty wild to see airborne transmission of viruses become Big news. Scientific studies came superfast Josh than Tar. Pia is a researcher at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. We're not even 12 months in and We know things about this virus that you know, we don't know about some viruses that we've had around for decades. His medical center took care of some of the first people with Corona virus in the United States. Santo Pia recalls standing at the end of their beds with a device that collected air while they talked or breathed his lab, then analyzed the tiny airborne droplets. Looking for the genetic signature of the Corona virus. We were getting positives more than one positive in the air samples, and I can't say the words that I said But you're kind of broadcast this, but I was shocked signs of the virus were in such tiny particles. He worried that nothing less than the most protective masks could stop it. Soon, though, studies showed that even basic cloth masks were able to reduce the amount of virus that gets out into the air and suddenly mask wearing became routine sent our P A was floored and how ventilation became part of the normal daily conversation. You know how well ventilated is the space shouldn't be spending time inside or outside. You know how much all these things it's changed so much about the way we view the world. The question is, Will this be a lasting change? Donald Milton is a research Teacher at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. He spent years showing how better ventilation in dorms or offices is associated with a lower risk of respiratory disease transmission, he says. We need to figure out engineering solutions to improve the safety of indoor spaces like getting better ventilation, using air filters, even using special lights up by a room ceiling to disinfect circulating air. I want to see us understand how it is that you can make her Restaurant, a safe place to be during flu season and during a pandemic. I think it's doable, but he's afraid that once vaccines get this virus in check, people will lose interest at least until the next pandemic. Nell Greenfield Boys NPR news

Nell Greenfield Lindsay Mars Maher Thea Santo Pia NPR Virginia Tech University Of Nebraska Medical PIA Josh Donald Milton University Of Maryland School United States Respiratory Disease FLU Npr News
Interview With Ron Fino

Gangland Wire

04:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Ron Fino

"Ron koslow bit. We'll see if anybody's got any questions every once in a while during these guys are all g- people who support the podcast nuts quite a little bit and i like to Give a little extra more than just a regular podcast. Each week all becoming friends of mine. We're just kind of having a monthly little zoom chat fest here. Sometimes we get out. You know paul sharp from there. Yeah last time. Since i seen them wonderful man a tragic bureau Still going through it. yeah. I know they'll say the how was a bunch of bad out there that i kinda kissed eight and somewhat contact with the social media partly and then my podcast stated don Quite a few guys danny griffin Are the guys who did griffin. Said he came on here. I started first time. I did talk about rank. Lada so i had a guy get a policeman. I used to work with and he sent me a link to interview franken lada. He said you know this guy. This guy was pretty impressed with what frank was had the say because he was my sergeant in the his thinking dang. This guy's landed out there. I didn't know frank when he was in chicago. The players chicago. But i didn't know frank I didn't know spiritual either. I have met him. You have recalled. Beat theo our recalled. Because i was running those days with vinny solano indo curdle really interesting iran. What you tell a tell. This guy's a little bit about how you started. Your dad was buffalo mob guy. yes naturally here are Was actually a became. The boss or the so-called called boss in the buffalo of magadino empire. And i grew up in. I mean i got to be clear ball over the world. It's just that. I did not want to participate nor did my father believe it or not. What burqas and so. I never joined a i did become the head of the labor's local to ten and officer for the laborers international union. So i did get to meet all the players in chicago new york city etc etc But i did like the way. The ma Because they were stealing for remembers and one at what what the fbi. I told him. I'll do whatever necessary but don't ever ask me about my father or my family and you know they never did. They never once. Did i bring the bureau up to speed on labor racketeering on at least one of the people that brought up to speed labor racketeering as well as some of the procedure that they were involved in operations with the benefit fund so they would bring back money kickbacks things of that nature but also at the same time you'll learn about killings you learned about other families operated Opened up it's surprisingly. Chicago was always very open about how they operated. As was a sub parts of new york city like gen of each family. They were more open than some others. I knew them about the best. Gambino was i knew. I knew a lot of colombo's Ropes at skoko was a friend of mine he worked with them. He was the one that actually started the soap. All-time prequel a for tony. Salerno all the various families so you meet tomato and you one what. What union is that. When you you guys. I was with the labor's international union Which was all mobbed up. We were up. Originally we were controlled by the chicago. Office of skiable family took over the presidency. But because of new york's power and things like that chicago would dare next up on their toes. They were allowed to main take exists. Well throughout their new england New york city down to florida and santo trump catchy quite well i never bet bird so but i knew santa why while he opened up a plaza strip land. They had ordered their tampa with menards. Their goal is so you get to beat the various players and you get to see the real story. It's not like a lot of the will be said i never will degrade an author or Burchett author because. I know how difficult it is.

Ron Koslow Paul Sharp Don Quite Danny Griffin Frank Chicago Vinny Solano Magadino Laborers International Union Buffalo Lada Franken Griffin New York City Skoko Iran FBI Labor's International Union Gambino Office Of Skiable
Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

Business Wars Daily

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

"Listen up. It's a great lesson for any business leader or marketer and a whole lot of schadenfreude of fun. well sherwin williams america's biggest paint company. Just got its comeuppance from a tiny florida rival and tiktok loving college kid and embarrassing. Faux pas by sherwin williams is the very example of a culture clash between behind the times corporate america and gen z creativity. Now perhaps like millions of us stuck at home. You've been on a painting. Bench come on admitted. Maybe you've even seen tony. Pilo pilarcitos tiktok channel tone. Stir paints until. Recently the ohio university business student worked at an athens. Ohio sherwin williams store a job loved in fact he so excited about paint that he started a tiktok channel on which he simply mixes paint typically with hip hop music playing in the background watching pillow saito. Mix paint whether it's a gray for sherwin williams shopper or the viral video in which he tints paint by mixing in real. Blueberries has proven to be oddly mesmerizing and incredibly popular. The paint mixing artists has more than one point. Two million tiktok followers. His short videos routinely receive half a million likes even more in fact it took pilarcitos tone stir paints virtually no time to go viral. According to buzzfeed the sixth video asano ever posted got more than a million views. So pilo saint did what any enterprising college senior might do. He whipped up a presentation for sherwin williams marketing department with such a huge following. Figured he could show the eighteen billion dollar company a thing or two about using tiktok to attract younger gen z shoppers. Alas his plan backfired for a while. Anyway rather than using enthusiasm about the million plus followers sherwin williams could have for free. The company fired him according to peel asano. The student told his story. On where else tiktok. He says sherwin williams marketing department. I ignored him but later they called the loss prevention department. Which accused peeler say no of stealing paint and making the videos on company time. He admitted to making some videos. While on the job at says he purchased the paint. He used no matter. Sherwin williams accused him of gross misconduct including quote seriously embarrassing. The company or its products at age reported one could easily argue that sherwin williams has its marketing covered and doesn't need any rogue creatives on its payroll. The paint giant suffered a bit during the early pandemic lockdowns but since then has surged with home sales renovations and diy decorating projects on the upswing. We all seem to be buying paint along with flour booze and toilet paper the today show points out. That's pushed sherwin williams sales up about five percent. The companies also persuading more and more customers to purchase premium paints as a result profits soared twenty one percent in the third quarter according to the motley fool. But this sort of publicity. Well that's not something. Any company would want news appeal. Santos firing elicited disdain on social media on twitter. One observer said some not so nice things about the presumed age of the marketing department. Staffers hello baby boomers and added that they quote missed out on a cutting edge marketing campaign for your products. That's why bear painting. Kelly moore paint or going to outsell. Y'all close quote an industry publication at age quoted. Pr executive andrew cross of agency walker sands cross said sherwin williams sent a signal as loud as it was unintentional that employees. Who do what they're told or more valuable than employees who think outside the box out cross added that the company had quote stifled ingenuity sherwin. Williams are the biggest beneficiaries of the outrage. And they were quick to take advantage of an opportunity. Lost pilo says he received job offers from bear. Benjamin moore and other major paint brands but he chose a role with regional chain. Florida paints the ohio university senior plans to finish studies online provided. He's not too busy. Establishing what will be his very own custom line of paint colors. Oh and keeping that tiktok channel up featuring colors only from florida paints saint story is now a marketing. Fabled should be repeated in entrepreneurship classes at business schools everywhere and perhaps quickly forgotten on purpose the boardroom sherwin williams

Sherwin Williams Tiktok Pilo Pilarcitos Pilo Peel Asano Ohio University America Saito Athens Tony Peeler Florida Ohio Andrew Cross Walker Sands Cross Kelly Moore
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott To Receive COVID-19 Vaccine Tuesday

Sean Hannity

00:18 sec | 3 weeks ago

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott To Receive COVID-19 Vaccine Tuesday

"Body camera footage from a fatal officer involved. Shooting is now available to the public. The footage from Lamarque police officer Jose Santos body camera show Santos shot 22 year old Joshua Feast earlier this month. The shooting happened across the street from Feast Uncle's home. The investigation is ongoing and no employment action has been taken against Santos

Lamarque Police Jose Santos Joshua Feast Santos Feast Uncle
La Marque, Texas, officials investigate fatal shooting of Joshua Feast

Rush Limbaugh

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

La Marque, Texas, officials investigate fatal shooting of Joshua Feast

"Officer involved. Shooting in East Texas 22 year old Joshua Feast died December 9th shot in the back by Lamarque Police officer Jose Santos. Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump represents the feast family, he says an independent autopsy finds what witnesses reported feast was running away from Police when he was shot now on paid leave. Attorney Crump wants Officer Santos fired Galveston County's sheriff's Department and the district attorney's office. Investigating this case. Kimberly James W. B.

Joshua Feast Lamarque Police Jose Santos Benjamin Crump East Texas Attorney Crump Officer Santos Sheriff's Department Galveston County Kimberly James W. B.
Panthers fire general manager Marty Hurney after 4-10 start; Carolina also fired Hurney in 2012

John Williams

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Panthers fire general manager Marty Hurney after 4-10 start; Carolina also fired Hurney in 2012

"Playoff hopes are still alive, if not exactly a flame. They did their part, though winning their second straight. Building a 20 to 7 first half lead than holding off the Vikings in a 33 27 win quarterback Mitch too risky pass for 202 yards and a touchdown. David Montgomery ran for a career high 1 46 and two scores and Cairo, Santos kicked four field goals. The Bear's back toe 507 and seven playing at one and 13 Jacksonville. Next week and still needing some help. The Arizona Cardinals have two games left. They have a one game lead on the Bears in the NFC playoff picture. Last night, Cleveland beat the Giants 20 to 6 tonight. Pittsburgh plays at Cincinnati and the Carolina Panthers today fired their general manager, Marty Hurting.

David Montgomery Vikings Mitch Santos Cairo Arizona Cardinals Jacksonville NFC Bears Cleveland Giants Pittsburgh Cincinnati Carolina Panthers Marty Hurting
Kelly Ripa, Mark Consuelos to Develop Primetime Version of ‘All My Children’ at ABC

Colleen and Bradley

00:32 sec | Last month

Kelly Ripa, Mark Consuelos to Develop Primetime Version of ‘All My Children’ at ABC

"Is in early development on a show called Pine Valley. Ah primetime version of the soap All my Children. Kelly Ripa and Mark Consuelo Sue both appeared on the show are executive producing, and in this all my Children follow up. A young journalist with secret agenda comes to expose the dark and murderous history of Pine Valley on Lee to become entangled in a feud between the cane and Santos families. I don't know what any of that means that I'm here operas, man. Yeah, well, if you watched all my Children, you know exactly what that means. Yes, Yes.

Pine Valley Mark Consuelo Sue Kelly Ripa Santos LEE
Columbus Crew: Nagbe, Santos out for MLS Cup against Seattle Sounders

News, Traffic and Weather

00:22 sec | Last month

Columbus Crew: Nagbe, Santos out for MLS Cup against Seattle Sounders

Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | Last month

Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

"All right. Let's get to today's episode. Twenty twenty as we all know sucked extremely hard already but we may now be entering into even more difficult months ahead as winter sets in and the case loads appear to be rising so we asked professor. Laurie santos to come on the show. She is overflowing with science based strategies for navigating this difficult time this is the second episode and our two part series that we are semi facetiously calling. Winter is coming. If you missed last week's episode zindel segal a pioneer in mindful treatment for depression and anxiety. Go back and check that. One out laurie. Meanwhile as a tenured professor at yale where she teaches a blockbuster course unhappiness. she's also now. The host of a really popular podcast. A really great podcast called the happiness lab and in this conversation we talk about how to handle the holidays in a pandemic how to have hard conversations with your family combating pandemic fatigue in your own mind. The need to double down on self care these days. Why the things we think will make us happy. Probably won't and the cultivation of jomo the opposite of fomo and time effluence. Here we go. Laurie santos laurie santos. Thanks for coming on. thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. So let me just start with your course which there been a bunch of articles about your course in the new york times in new york magazine and so i've been following your work for a long time. But can you just describe how you became interested in teaching this students. And why you think it took off in such an incredible way. Yeah so it. All started when i took on a new role so i've been teaching for over a decade. Now which makes me feel very old but in just the last couple of years. I took on this new position. I became a head of college on campus. And so y'all's one of these weird places like hogwarts where they're like colleges within a college like connect griffin doris leather in sort of thing And so i'm head of silliman college no relation to slither and even though people get that confused but what that means that. I live with students on campus. Like my house is literally in the middle of their quad. I e with them in the dining hall. I kind of hang out with them in the courtyard as i was seeing student. Life up. Close and personal and honestly. I didn't like what i was seeing. I was kinda shocked at the level of mental health. Dysfunction that my students were dealing with it was something. I was kind of blind to while i was like up at the front of the classroom. Which sort of embarrassing. Now in retrospect. But i kind of just didn't see it but you know so many students reporting. They're depressed and anxious and this caused me to like look. Is there something weird about yale or something. We're doing wrong but conceptually to something. We're seeing nationally like right now. The national statistics are really scary over forty percent of college students today. Report being too depressed to function. I shouldn't say today. this is more two thousand. Nineteen sorta of pre kovic time right so in two thousand nineteen over forty percent of college. Students were too depressed to function over sixty percent report. They felt overwhelmingly anxious most days and more than one in ten said. They'd seriously considered suicide in the last year. And so these are national statistics but this bore out what. I was seeing on campus. It just felt like you know honestly. We weren't meeting our educational mission at yale right. We're bringing these students here but you know for students in my lecture and forty percent of the kids out there. Too depressed function most days like they're not learning computer science or chaucer trying to teach them at yale right there just kinda missing it and so i thought it was sort of part of my educational mission to sort of fix this and as a psychologist i thought you know. There's lots of work on the kinds of practices. You can engage with to improve your mental health. It doesn't have to be this way. And so i thought i know i'll develop this whole new class about living a good life and all these evidence based practices students could use. I no idea. I thought it was going to be thirty or so students. Because that's what's typical for a new class. And i remember yale. Students don't register ahead of time so it's like once the classes offered you kind of watch. This little graph of how many students are interested in your course and the i noticed something weird was happening. Was that the graph in most classes went from zero to one hundred students but mine had an order of magnitude difference. It went from zero to one thousand students and then it went over. That and i was like this is strange and that was because over. A quarter of the students at yale wanted to take the class the first time it was offered over a thousand students and so that created lots of logistical hurdles. Like finding a concert hall. That was big enough to fit everyone. You know joked about putting it in the football stadium but that would be a little cold. And yeah i mean when it showed me. Was that students you know. They don't like this culture of feeling stressed anxious. They're really like searching for solutions. And i was sort of proud of them because they were really looking for evidence based solutions. Like they didn't want platitudes or just kind of self help but they wanted to know what did the science say about how you could live healthier.

Laurie Santos Yale Zindel Segal Griffin Doris Silliman College Laurie Anxiety Depression New York Times New York Football
Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:40 min | Last month

Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

"I just on your lawson. The founding director of the paloma in togo and andrew santo. Who's just written a book with twenty eight interviews with museum leaders across the world. I also speak to. Dan hicks about his book. The british museum's about the bronzes and for our work the week christopher repeal of the national gallery in london talks about san mateo painting of copernicus. That's coming to the national for an exhibition next year before that a reminder that you can sign up for the art newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories goes to the art newspaper dot com and the link is at the top right of the page. And while you're there you can also sign up for a range of other newsletters including the book club and the art market. I now a new book by the writer and cultural strategy advisor andhra santo features twenty eight conversations with directors of museums and other institutions oldham during the covid nineteen pandemic the future of the museum. Twenty eight dialogues. Include voices from across the world attempting to define museums and the challenges and opportunities ahead of them now and in the coming days among them. Direct is of african museums including sonia lawson the director of the paladin loma in togo in west africa. Andress and sonia join me to discuss the role of museums today and look at how sonya's togalese institution reflects a new coq drew dynamism on the african continent andress. I wanted to begin by asking you. This book was written on zoom. Just as we are now essentially so you talked to twenty eight museum or cultural institution directors about what they were doing. It happened to be done in the covy deer as it were but was it. Germinating is an idea for a much longer period this spring. I wrote an article in art. Net news actually wrote it over easter weekend. So i remember did very well I guess that was early april. I can't remember the exact dates and it was an article about reopening museums. And it just hit a nerve. It really got a lot of people talking at the time. And i heard from dozens and dozens of museum directors and just became part of illogic conversation. And that's when we really realized that this is the moment because it gave us an editorial frame because it it really was a moment that made us ask what is the future about. Still trying to figure it out. I think there's no doubt in all of our minds that this is one of those years in the calendar that will be a turning point. A historical marker where new phase is beginning persona. I think this phase is the one that started in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just ended. Now we have a new face. So what does that mean for museums. Once i figured out that this would be a book not just of conversations with museum. Directors conversations about the future not necessarily revisiting. Why museums have been great in the past of which many reasons to talk about that too but to really have a forward-looking and that is what led to choices like this extraordinary new institution in togo. Which i think is such a taste of where museums or cultural institutions or cultural centers are headed All around the world so so in a way this moment. This covert moment crystallized. How such a book could come about and how we would choose directors to be in it before we speak specifically about sons institution. I wanted to ask you about a phrase that you use in the to the book where you talk about how. The paradigm smashing experimentation in museums and cultural institutions is happening in effectively in the global south so in africa in asia in latin america. Can you expand on that a bit now. Because what do you think lies behind that. Well first of all i. That's not to say it's not happening elsewhere. And i think the book provides lots of examples of how people are thinking you in original ways about museums all around the world. But i think that there are perhaps two main reasons. Why so many of these truly interesting. And i would say inspiring. Examples of new practices are often happening in the global. South one is that many of these institutions are brand new. So it's you can speak to this. They have an opportunity to really design for the now and for the future. They're not dealing with a legacy infrastructure. They're not trying to retrofit something. That was already there and tried to adapt it to the future.

Togo Andrew Santo Sonia Lawson Dan Hicks National Gallery San Mateo Andress Oldham Sonya West Africa Sonia London Latin America Asia Africa
Why The Oil Industry Doesn't Fear Biden

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:47 min | Last month

Why The Oil Industry Doesn't Fear Biden

"To learn more on the surface. The oil and gas industry is losing a friend on january twentieth. Donald trump the departing president gave fossil fuels his loud support. President-elect biden supports efforts against climate change yet. Some in the oil and gas industry are feeling cautiously optimistic. Npr's camille mosque. Explains why you might have heard that biden's win could mean the end of the oil industry. President trump warned it. Would some climate activists hoped it would and in the final debate biden himself said this transition from their own industry. Yes it is a big statement and that would be a big change over the last decade. Us oil and gas production has boomed. The shale revolution turned the united states into the world's top oil producer. A lot of that remarkable growth happened. During the obama administration and trump promoted the jobs in prophets that resulted but emissions from burning oil gas and coal are the biggest contributors to climate change. Which is already starting to have devastating effects around the world. So how could biden tackle those emissions step one might be a ban on new drilling on federal lands and private loans. It's a different story. They do not have the power to your sake. Somebody in south texas. You can of drill anymore. Rene santos's with snp global plattsburgh says that that kind of a ban would be significant but not the end of the industry is also expected to restore some environmental regulations. Which again won't eliminate all gas. The big question mark is what a climate bill look like her personal. Don't think it's going to be sensitive radical unless you know the more liberal side. All the democratic party gets a lot of influence which are so we see right now. It does not appear to be the case. Climate activists and scientists have called for ambitious action. That might be impossible to push through congress if republicans keep the senate so for now. This doesn't seem like a doomsday. Scenario for oil gas. I don't think it's a wholesale assault on the oil industry. It's just not going to be in favour like it was under president. Trump halima croft is a managing director at arby's see capital markets. She says the biden is serious about climate change but also doesn't plan to do away with fossil fuels. We actually wrote a note over the summer about the biden. Energy plan called hugging the mid line. Not just because. I left the ladas but we really did see this as an effort to sort of the neo. All the oil and gas industry sees room for some compromises and negotiations which might raise the question. What about biden's big statement about transitioning away from oil and gas jin. Snyder is a director at in virus. Which provides data's oil and gas companies. She says that was hardly breaking news. To insider's they know that a global transition happening a move away from fossil fuels is underway at the society level regardless of the administration biden also said quote. We're not getting rid of fossil fuels for a very long time. Snyder argues a president who manages a gradual shift. Away from oil might actually be better for business. The gut reaction is that this isn't good news for the industry but we're actually cautiously positive and politics aside right now. Oil producers are facing a more immediate struggle. The

Biden Camille Mosque Obama Administration Donald Trump Rene Santos NPR Trump Halima Croft United States SNP Democratic Party Arby Texas Senate Congress Snyder
Amazon opens online pharmacy that delivers prescriptions

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

03:51 min | 2 months ago

Amazon opens online pharmacy that delivers prescriptions

"Amazon launching an online pharmacy customers will be able to buy prescription medications through a new store on its platform code amazon pharmacy. So now when you're at the doctor you can ask them to send prescriptions to amazon pharmacy. Just like any other retail pharmacy. Like you did before. It accepts quote unquote. Most insurance plans poll amazon launching. An online pharmacy was the points. What could possibly go wrong. There are two aspects of the recode article that used santos marcus that i thought were interesting. One is the fact that a lot of things that we didn't anticipate buying through amazon. Now we do so routinely. So i think that bodes well for prescription drugs being part of that but the other part that concerns me quite a bit is the just the number of knockoffs and how unregulated the amazon marketplace. Seems to be at times mock I would never bet against amazon in anything possible. Hitch in this. Is that the prescription. Drug markets skews toward older consumers. They they're the ones who who need this stuff more and that on average somewhat less comfortable with ecommerce younger people had the a lot of The pandemic learn to deal the e. Oh so that that's favor. But i'd be astonished if this flops blake yet had mark's got it exactly right. It's sort of the logical next step for amazon. Now that the pandemic has gotten older generations. Used to shopping for essentials online so sort of the next step beyond grocery in every other day household essentials and this is the age group that they're going to need if they want this to be successful so i think the time is right. Context on this story is comes about two years after amazon com susan company pill pack for seven hundred million dollars is also made other moves into the health space. Health insurance space amazon. Berkshire hathaway and j. p. morgan chase in twenty. Eighteen launched a joint health care venture code haven. We've yet to see where that's going to go. I'm was prime. Members will of course be able to save money paying for medications generic and off brands without using health insurance which is interesting. that's just chace took hit following the news. Drugstore companies like cvs and drug distributors like cardinal health. This will no doubt as well as vice out of walmart target costco's pharmacy businesses to joe this album praying and sharon tell up the wall street journal noting quote. Most americans still prescriptions at the traditional drugstore. Us prescription drug sales at pharmacies was over three hundred billion dollars in two thousand eighteen coins health research firm. A via nearly four billion prescriptions filled each year in the us in march. Mail order prescriptions. Mail order prescriptions. Were up twenty one percent from the previous giving them a six percent slice of the prescription drug market. Hi shannon lost two years. According to suntrust robinson humphrey. Wasn't there a time not long ago when there were a lot of rumors about amazon getting into not the prescription drug business but healthcare coverage insurance coverage. Am i imagining that. Or i might be the time with the two companies haven joint venture with halfway and j. p. morgan chase. So they got together to basically trying to put together some kind of umbrella coverage for all three companies. And somehow i pulled on everybody's sources provide coverage for all of their employees. I think that might be the thing. Maybe i i guess. I was on the impression that it was more comprehensive than just those companies and that they were basically going to try to roll out like you know obamacare. You know amazon care but yeah whether they were going to roll the roll that out to other companies as some kind of a model yet to be seen but i think with their own folks

Amazon Morgan Chase Santos Marcus Berkshire Hathaway Blake Chace Suntrust Robinson Humphrey Susan Costco Walmart The Wall Street Journal Sharon JOE United States
"santos" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"And as roma's joining us right. Now we have jordan. Clever and jedi hegel o. How are you guys doing doing. Great as well as you can be right now. Who are who. Who are you quarantining with jenny. I'm quarantining with my partner. Liz and my son who is six. My list has a very grown up lady job so she goes into one room all day and does zoom calls where she says things like she says. Business phrases like <hes>. Well we'll have to see if the juice is worth the squeeze. And that's not what i'm solving for. And wow what was happening. She i mean she says things that i've just never a side of her. I've never seen before having that thing. We were like who. Who are you is that. It's like really impressive though. Because it's like very like she's a very confident and she uses business lady terms and she uses them so like casually. Yes so it's kind of neat to see your partner do what they do because you hear about it. But it's kind of neat to watch your partner. Excel at what they do. Yeah jordan who are you. Who are you living with right now. I am with my wife right now. I like the journey is like it's nice to see your partner. Dana day out and see what they excel at and that is not the experience. My wife and i are having we are. We are watching each other disintegrated happening. It feels like talked to friends of mine. Who have been married like last week was the week like a lot of initial explosions. Took place of like yelling at people for like. You're closing the door too loudly. My wife thinks my voice is just too loud and not like an incident of being loud once but just generally j just too loud and we had. I don't think you fully mean that. But i think you also do because you've been in a room with me for the last month and a half but we're better cooking. I think that's the one thing we now know how to cook. You guys want to play a game. Yes i'm very excited about this game. Okay so first of all you are going to be competing in this game. So we're gonna go back and forth <hes>. This is audio quiz. About famous movie quotes. We're gonna play the dialogue. That comes right before a very famous movie quote and you just have to jump in <hes>. With the quote okay right okay. And if you don't know it just makes something up and it's possible you will still get credit all right jenny. This one's for you okay. I don't know if that's fair. I don't know is fair. I feel before we started this game. I felt like. I'd seen some movies but maybe ever seen one. No you've definitely seen this but maybe it was a long time ago. That's a classic chicago blues lick like they really laid out. I'm walking to walk you down a path here a little bit. Danny glover okay. Is this a lethal weapon situation. Oh yes this is like this characters. Well known line that he he says right after meeting milk. The yes pre problematic okay. So this is the thing he's gonna say to mel gibson. Yes gladys okay okay. Let's hear you got to get this. come on. are you the guy from braveheart. That is i mean pretty much pretty much. That

partner Liz jenny jordan Hbo seth meyers Judy hegel amazon writer Hong chow zeke smith roma nico santos Dana
Hong Chau & Nico Santos: Superheroes And Superstores

Ask Me Another

04:05 min | 2 months ago

Hong Chau & Nico Santos: Superheroes And Superstores

"And as roma's joining us right. Now we have jordan. Clever and jedi hegel o. How are you guys doing doing. Great as well as you can be right now. Who are who. Who are you quarantining with jenny. I'm quarantining with my partner. Liz and my son who is six. My list has a very grown up lady job so she goes into one room all day and does zoom calls where she says things like she says. Business phrases like Well we'll have to see if the juice is worth the squeeze. And that's not what i'm solving for. And wow what was happening. She i mean she says things that i've just never a side of her. I've never seen before having that thing. We were like who. Who are you is that. It's like really impressive though. Because it's like very like she's a very confident and she uses business lady terms and she uses them so like casually. Yes so it's kind of neat to see your partner do what they do because you hear about it. But it's kind of neat to watch your partner. Excel at what they do. Yeah jordan who are you. Who are you living with right now. I am with my wife right now. I like the journey is like it's nice to see your partner. Dana day out and see what they excel at and that is not the experience. My wife and i are having we are. We are watching each other disintegrated happening. It feels like talked to friends of mine. Who have been married like last week was the week like a lot of initial explosions. Took place of like yelling at people for like. You're closing the door too loudly. My wife thinks my voice is just too loud and not like an incident of being loud once but just generally j just too loud and we had. I don't think you fully mean that. But i think you also do because you've been in a room with me for the last month and a half but we're better cooking. I think that's the one thing we now know how to cook. You guys want to play a game. Yes i'm very excited about this game. Okay so first of all you are going to be competing in this game. So we're gonna go back and forth This is audio quiz. About famous movie quotes. We're gonna play the dialogue. That comes right before a very famous movie quote and you just have to jump in With the quote okay right okay. And if you don't know it just makes something up and it's possible you will still get credit all right jenny. This one's for you okay. I don't know if that's fair. I don't know is fair. I feel before we started this game. I felt like. I'd seen some movies but maybe ever seen one. No you've definitely seen this but maybe it was a long time ago. That's a classic chicago blues lick like they really laid out. I'm walking to walk you down a path here a little bit. Danny glover okay. Is this a lethal weapon situation. Oh yes this is like this characters. Well known line that he he says right after meeting milk. The yes pre problematic okay. So this is the thing he's gonna say to mel gibson. Yes gladys okay okay. Let's hear you got to get this. come on. are you the guy from braveheart. That is i mean pretty much pretty much. That

Jordan Jenny Roma LIZ Dana Danny Glover Chicago Mel Gibson Braveheart
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:38 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Fun and then what other Laurie do. I Know Laurie. Short for Lauren Lawrence Loren Loren. Oh thank but you know. Laurie Bell Laureus Short from which I love. Because of all Martingale Laura. Lie Tongue's strong feelings about Laurie but but I have very strong feelings about. Ezra an Justin Justin the other name. I have such profound feel about it. Well so the the coolest kid in my school was just into sure shoora and he had moved from California to elementary school. So He's from Kelley any. He was the first to have the Lee Pinstripe Denim jeans which became really popular like the next year. And I yes and I clocked. This motherfucker was one year ahead And then my cousin Justin. Lebow was like the coolest guy ever knew was sponsored as a BMX freestyler. He was sponsored as a snowboarder and he was in a band I loved. He was just the coolest and his name was Justin. And then a few don't Justin's and they're all cool. I guess many justice like Justin. Willman the magician. He's very cool. Nita's magic for humans legit for humans. Yeah he is a slick do he's there. Yeah it's a strong name is to e next to make a p baby if it's a boy we could name Justin. It's an interesting thought because I would be more inclined to name the baby like Ezra 'cause I think maybe the P. Baby will be capable of like genius yes highly intellectual pursuits but doesn't have the physical shape perform any kind of athletics or dancing or any of the things that would make you. Cool your idea of cool is so specific. It's like cool. It's like you can do shit. Really well physically. I think it's cool. To Be Smart. Yeah Yeah but but but just again. The Justice I knew are more like they were chill. They the Babes loved them. They were great at everything. They were like all the guys like them. Maybe our P. babies very likable. Our baby is gelatinous right. Or It's disgusting. It's it's in liquid form. It's not in solid fight. It's not gelatinous show Latin on how. Yeah Oh no one. It's sick like we have no experience with P. Children to know what their symptoms would be like. I guess if it got gelatinous. It's already jaundice looking. Well you could never determine if the kidneys were shot it. That's kind of part of its charm that in spite of looking so unhealthy thrives yeah. It'd be nice therapy baby to have a little brother sister. I could see a p. Baby being one of the X. men I don't know a ton about X. men but one guy's in a wheelchair right and he liked makes all the metal fly around like RPG be very powerful in a superhero world could even be the leader of the whole gang just sits in a toilet bowl come it they come to a toilet bowl that lives in a fancy toilet bowl probably like a crystal clear toilet bowl so that they can see him without having to lean over the toilet bowl to communicate with them renovate my house to make sure to make all the toilets translucent story Yeah Hey Laurie she talks about this psychologist Liz done. Who's doing all this research says if he for someone to spend money on other people are happier than when they spend money on themselves which was really interesting and so. I looked up. She is Ted. Talk is really worth listening to and yet says that but it also like they did this experiment with kids like starts even when you're too they bring these two year olds in and there's like a bowl of goldfish. They give them. The goldfish are very happy. Of course sure cute and then they have the stuffed monkey and they say like Oh. There's no none left for the Monkey. Can the monkey have one and they all like say sure and then give him one and then like mapped their response to after they received the goldfish and after they give the goldfish away and the kids are happier after they've given it away? Oh Jr is interesting. Yeah but okay. So this tedtalk was she'd already put out the research saying that and Tedtalk was basically like I put up this research and then I was like but this doesn't apply to me like I don't really give to charity and I don't really want and she's like maybe there's something wrong with my research of she went back in and basically the new conclusion is the benefits by when the people feel that they have a sense of connection to those that they're helping me and they can easily envision the difference that they're making So they did this experiment where they asked people to donate to either unison or this organization called spread the net and they picked those because they have the exact same goal. Okay but because UNICEF like this big well known charity and people don't really know exactly where things are going and spread the net like a very specific motivation which is for every ten dollars provide one bed net to a child with malaria for money. People's gave the spread the net the happier. They fell after but with UNICEF F. The emotional return on investment was flattened. So matters if you feel like you're connected personally it's also the kind of the Paul Bloom empathy thing it's like you feel one kid one net. I'm like in late to that. Yeah once you get into unison. So it's like a billion people just gets diluted you're feeling of impact. Yeah but even if you donate one thousand dollars you then no like. Oh I did this. You can like really connect you go. I got two hundred kids bednets so anyway. I thought that was interesting news. Okay so you said. The article in New York Times said five. Second bursts of exertion help break up lists rides Yeah four seconds of high intensity exertion repeated periodically throughout the day might counteract some of the unhealthy metabolic consequences of sitting for hours epidemiological studies indicate that most American adults set for at least ten hours a day. A total that is likely to reduce now that many of us are home. All Day. You in quarantine. I think I'm sitting like fourteen hours a day really. Oh sure I think you are to about are you..

Justin Justin Laurie Bell Laureus Ezra Lauren Lawrence Loren Loren New York Times jaundice Tedtalk Lebow California Nita Kelley malaria P. Children Paul Bloom Liz Ted
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

16:11 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Lori and now my favorite part of the show the fact check with my soul mate. Monica padme fact. Check take to all right. We're recording fact. Check number two. Let's start with some admissions by Dan. Sheppard there's two offers also with an admission. I I was late today. Oh I didn't care normally not late and I don't like it i. It just made me happy because I was like. Oh she knows what I'm feeling like when I'm way it was a rough literally just can't you can't get out of that Damn House. Yeah and then marches. Spills messes up your most beautiful. Blue Sweat. Tracksuit internet or Step on your macho with your stink. God it's almost too much to go on. It is okay so emission number one which I already made on Instagram. Which is in by the way. I didn't go back and listen but enough people voted that there was consensus. That fifty cent was doing exactly has as you interpreted is thing. Thank you for that admission. That's very big of you. And then secondly I didn't have corona. I got an antibody test and I didn't have it. Wow Yeah to my disappointment Abbott. No one in the house had it. Now Yeah which I mean. If one person had it likely the rest of us would have so it was really an all or nothing was y'alls tests came in really fast. Here's another frustrating things. I got a prescription than I went to. This quest place in a grocery store they took my blood had to go to the grocery store. Well that's where it was. Yes inside of a vons very weird to get your blood drawn volumes. Ed decide no and then I didn't get my results for like four days maybe five but then you guys took a task that you got the results in five minutes ten minutes Yep and all the you were negative for antibodies. Yes but I was still holding out like well. Maybe I got it when I was in Colorado or Texas and just you know pass through me by the time. I got back theory. Was we all have deer? Yeah we'll be going. Yeah it's just it's not the case not the case not the case. And I've never had it. I was pretty No no I was not excited but I was. I was saying apple time you were. You didn't think we had it and I fell validated. Sure of course feels nice. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah big time but I do. Of course wish I had it to to without knowing That's the best case scenario. Yeah you still had a inexplicably long stretch diarrhea that that is true. That is true. Everyone's in ancient it is. It is no God such a fun party. You January you. When you're at your mom's house you had like six days of I interrupted you think that I have no memory of no. It's so weird. I have total memory. I Have I keep pook journal though for you so anytime you say something. I market in there. I don't remember being with friends and then having to like I would remember that that would be um traumatic memorable. There's so many kinds of diarrhea right. There's like food poisoning diarrhea. Were you literally can't be away from a toy you can't be more than like three hundred feet from a toilet at any moment and then there's just like oh you went in the morning it was loosey-goosey and then you want to get in the afternoon. It was maybe straight water That's diarrhea. You could still carry about your business in that version of it that that's often what I'll experience for a little spell like it's unmanageable very manageable. And civil if it's only diarrhea in the morning okay. You don't count it sure. Yeah Okay Anyway. I know you gotTa keep it up because everyone talks about their poop with their friends they do. I don't know I don't talk about it with my other friends if I'm being honest or you don't know it's almost all I talk about with my friends. I don't think a lot of people do. Oh all right. Do you enjoy talking about your cycles. Fly No no no. You're you're brown cycles. I don't like talking about it with public. Okay see I think it's an extension of the vulnerable theme because it is so vulnerable? It's the grossest thing we do at the same time like sometimes I really think about it and I'm like it's not gross. You put food in and then it turns it into this thing. It's it's stained. Yes it's the exists so gross let's repellent so that you don't monkey around in other people's way. Sin Pickup Diseases. I think it's evolutionary but if if you trust that someone else's in disease carrier like your family members it's not as gross still pretty pretty gross so pretty Gross Murray time before this. Oh antibodies antibodies. Did it affect your position at all knowing you know for sure you didn't have it? Es why will say you know? This speaks to confirmation bias. I I'm holding it like a three percent chance I think the tests were flawed. But that's low was ninety seven percent accepting of the outcome. This is a bit hypocritical. Also because if I've said that you would not like you would say if he's at ninety seven no no no no sex if he said ninety seven percent. And you're only holding out three percent hope that the tests will be revealed. That's you make decisions a beyond fifty one percent. I think that would have elicited a reaction if I said that to you. You're also a fan of glimmers of hope if the tests were positive I need you to really step back. And think about the scenario in which the all the tests came back we had it And I said Okay but there's a there's a very small chance that this is wrong. You would not like it. I know it I want I want but if you said three percent at least go like. Oh you're the truth. Yeah I'm acknowledging the truth yeah I just have a fantasy that somehow still we could have all had it not worry about it. Don't you think most likely one of the test would have come back? Yes I do. Yeah I do use it. Is it change my position? I mean it does in that. I'm like before I was travelling through the city. Doing things simply for you guys like I had the. I have the gloves on in the mask. And it's really just for you guys. It's not for me. I don not worried about it but now like how I could catch it. Still so yes. There's another variable now that I think Oh should I could still catch this again. Which is tricky. Because I'm not afraid to have it but then the the hellfire I would if he could be figured out that it was. I who tainted the group thin. Yeah I would I would hate bat. I guess what it does do those. And I've learned this lesson before I knew who robbed our house. One time I was so convinced of it and then it turns out I was wrong. That was humiliated with the notion of how wrong I was similarly. I am not humiliated but reminded how wrong you can be in feel right for sure. You're trying your heart is not to gloat. Aren't you know you did a great job? Yeah I don't want you to feel bad knowing no you do. I actually forgot all about it. I wonder if he's going to tell everybody even totally didn't even think about it because I knew already knew in my heart that we didn't have it and I knew in my heart we did. That's what I'm saying. It could have gone either way. One of us was bound to be completely wrong and it was me which I'm owning show. I hope everyone's doing well me too. Laurie Santos Laurie assign. No in the episode. You start talking about names a little bit because you're talking about as being smart and then you said your name. Laurie like every Laurie. I know is so fun. Also what are you talking about? I was specifically thinking of like this Lori and my groundlings class. That was really.

diarrhea Laurie Santos Laurie Lori Damn House Monica padme corona Sheppard Dan pook journal apple Abbott Ed Murray Colorado don Texas
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:26 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Yeah stay tuned for more armchair if you dare. We are supported by square now. Monica do about hot see'ums in Detroit. Tell me they've been selling men's clothing for a hundred years and for the first time in its history. Hot Sam is selling online team and HOT SAM SET UP. Their page was square online store..

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

15:39 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Malcolm's company which I didn't even know he had until I listened yours which is exciting. A makes me want to explore all their stuff but you had one on grades and as a parent of two children in where we're like. Were just getting in the canoe and starting a paddle down the stream of this whole weird thing. There were so many fascinating things they even the history of it. Let's just start with the name. Ezra soon as I heard that the the guy who virtually invented the ABCD system albeit was written in Latin evolved that his name was Ezra. And I started thinking the only as resign. No were like hyper intelligent and I want the freakonomics guys to study that name. I don't know that that is so fascinating or not. But major major sidebar. Mr Ezra created grades. He didn't know what he was doing. This is as were styles president of Yale back in eighteen hundreds and he had just had his students having exam because before that there were no great. It's great aren't even that old. They're like only a couple of hundred years old you inherit this structure and you can't even comprehend what instruction and learning would be without those grades and I think it's just crazy. Yeah I mean basically they just like thought. You wanted to learn really. That's why he went to school right. So you're motivated to you this styles. At this moment. He was like I should probably just write down. Avi Did you know in what was interesting is two things one is. If you look at his grades he did Latin for Pajamas which was bad for different levels. But the highest level though was the what the most kids got like there was great inflation even from the moment which is kind of interesting but the only thing is that he didn't tell his learners about their grades. Kinda for his private like. How did I do as a teacher? You know who got it? Who didn't do so well right and I think all of that has changed a lot. Not only the kids know their grades. But they're obsessed with them. You know I'm not sure how old your kids are. You're just on the start but you already. They know that grades are thing that they're being evaluated and I mean they get evaluated preschools. They get their little. You know how well they shared and all this stuff and I think you know it matters for them right and it matters for parents right because we kind of soak up this culture where grades mean a lot will in that selfish way is we're really. It's a reflection of our own ego like we're doing a good job doing a bad job so it's like now we're inheriting these stupid grades exactly exactly and I think a lot of parents react incredibly strongly. We're seeing this now at Yale. Where in the midst of this pandemic you know. People don't have access to Wi fi there in these yucky situations. Many detentions said you know what no grades the semester. Just pass fail. Everything's just pass fail and we get parents who write to US fighting about this. That was like kid was on the verge of a minus this semester. And he can't get it now. Like what can I do like? I pay seventy five thousand dollars and I want my kid to like get a this semester. And you're like we're in a pandemic like dying. Your kids a minus. Is You know more. Your magna cum laude and I was magna cum laude and is a cornerstone of my self esteem. So I can relate strew Nova. What's crazy though is the I think he especially in the current time. The data suggesting that the grades are doing more harm than good. Like what they're doing is they're reducing. The students injuries motivation. So every time you stick an extra motivator on something now you're not doing it for the love of it anymore. You're doing it. 'cause you're getting some other award misstep tracker we were talking about right. You might just start because it's fun to walk around but as soon as you get like a fitbit grading you are giving you stars or giving you a ding. When you do a good job you know if you experience extras roads like I do. All of a sudden it's like is not about the steps anymore. It's about they'll beep at the end or something like that. And then they get obsessed. Stripe doesn't feel good anymore. You want to compete with other people you know. It's no longer about what it started. Which is it would just feel good to move my body now. It's like it's a thing. There's a wonderful David sedaris essay about this. And he calls it like the fitbit brain where he gets a fit and he started freaking out and waking up super early to get his steps in like not hang out with the people he cares about and is really obsessed and then it breaks and then he realizes all this craving that he had for number is that were like stupid but but functionally we in our society have turned learning into that kids like learning just for learning sake like it's fun to do puzzles. It's fun to learn. It's fun to get better when you slap grade on it. It's like saps the desire that kids would naturally bring to this otherwise fun activity and makes it Kinda Yucky. It makes the grade. And there's data the grades increase the desire to cheat so it makes kids cheat more because if it's all about the great if it's not about learning just do it the quickest way possible. Even if it's a little dastardly. There's evidence that grades make students take on less heart assignments because if you're just doing it for the grade pick easy book. Why would you pick the long one? Pick the super easy one to get the easy grade right. It was the gentleman you interview because he he was so mad. I enjoy listening to him speak. He has such a handle on this thing and he said you know we tend to blame. The students were like Oh they don't even want to learn they. Just want the and it's like well no the system is set up to get as that is the incentive. So what are you talking about your disappointed that they didn't read the Iliad instead of Catcher in the Rye of course they did because the is the incentive. It's the goal. Yeah this is this Guy Archie cone. He hates grades even more than I do. Strong a very strong statement but yeah I mean he's really suggests it's making kids not just that they hate learning like the best kids kids get the best grades hate learning the most which is just tragic and they also have the lowest levels of happiness as well as the lowest levels of self esteem optimism right and so this pursuit of grades like should be. I mean you didn't the nerdy kids who get the. A is are the kid who really love learning but these days it's not it's the opposite. They're the ones who are the most miserable this great job of pointing out that if you give people three letters and you ask them what would that is. What is that Anagram? And then if you give them you gave us a three letter one of five letter one and what's great is I was doing it real time and so is kristen because I was on the toilet listening to it loud and she was listening to and once you get to a nine letter word so there's a sweet spot in learning right which is if it's really easy. It's not that fun if it's kind of challenging but you can get it. It's really fun. And then if it's too hard it's just not and why pursue it? The grading system will actually steer people into wanting to do the three letter anagram because they will get an a for and that is now the outcome they want as opposed to the pleasure of being challenged and then in persevering that's so rewarding and fun but lop sides that system or that's not even why you would do it anymore exactly is both not fun and you end up engaging in practices that make you learn the least like imagine if we did this like for fitness. Like you're like I'm just GONNA like lift the lowest way over and over again because I can do ten reps right but you never challenge yourself. You just don't progress right and I think what we've done is create a system where it's not about progress. It's not about them. Loving learning is not even about their mental health. Because we're seeing like you know huge hits and happiness because of grades it's really about some arbitrary thing that we want to do and I do think it's a little bit about like parental kind of ego and that arbitrary thing that your kid is doing to which is even more dangerous. I think what is an a an a has no value only in its relativity. A B. exists right. There's no eight doesn't mean anything. I could define it any way. I'd like so long as it's above B. Yeah so implicit in that to me is comparison. It'd be great if an immense something that you would achieve some level that we all respect but in fact it's just that you beat the rest of the people or that you'd be right upstream. That's this huge bit of hardware. We have that were social. And we're all obsessed at all times with our status in our group where we have anxiety about. Where are we in this huge group? And this has been compounded by the fact that we used to live as a group of one hundred people. Now we're living in his group of seven billion people so our anxiety level is only win exponentially because we don't know where we fit in this so then we've come up with this arbitrary architecture to allow us to figure out where we're at think social hierarchy is so at the base of all this stuff. Oh yeah definitely and I think it's one of the reasons students are so much more anxious now. Right is that you know before back when I went to college like I was quote unquote competing with like other people. But you know I was doing my best now. I think a consequence of the fact that literally anybody can get into a school like Yale if they have certain grades. You know your income. Does it matter your prep? School doesn't matter means. These kids are competing with the other billions of kids out there and that is really exiled he provoking and there's this perception that the spoils of the war are really high and so kids are forgoing. They're asleep their mental health. All the stuff to get perfect grades to get into a place like yell and then they get there and they're kinda miserable you know it's kind of back to this. He Down Academy in that. We talked about that moment that they find out isn't really a great moment like students at Yale when they get in these days. They don't get a letter like I got back in the day. They click on this little link online and they get a little video is as you got into Yale. The class twenty twenty four and it's like places like bulldog bulldog bow plays this song and so there are videos online. If you watch this kind of some feel good. Wholesome mean CONTO. Students clicking on and finding out like screaming decided what students often report is the moment after that. Click when they're really excited? They have this like incredible emptiness. 'cause it was like that was working for like. I didn't really love chemistry or any of my stupid extracurriculars. I was just trying to get this moment to get in and now happened and now I'm like okay. There's the rest of my life like what's what's the next carrot like. Oh yes jake reward and you're probably now evaluating the effort versus reward like wow. That was four years of effort in it was for that forty second moment. Is that a good cost benefit analysis. And they're hopping right back on that treadmill. 'cause now they're like all right now. I gotta go to Yale. Where the spoils of the war even higher and they haven't figured out. Do you actually love chemistry? You know maybe photographer. Maybe you'd really love to be a janitor. We don't know you know knowing and graduate top of your class and then get the best job and then get promoted to the best position at the Joe ever what's driving. All of it is primate status thing. I am was so flattered to get to give this speech for the ANTHRO CLASS AT UCLA last year.

Yale Mr Ezra president Malcolm fitbit US David sedaris Wi Stripe jake Archie cone UCLA Joe kristen
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

06:39 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"We know we're safe but we get to experience enough of it that we can kind of comprehend it. I don't know an reason. I think people are still fight about that. It's actually a great mystery. My colleague L. Paul Bloom has a whole book on this about how pleasure is kind of weird right. But that's one of the theories it's like sort of practicing what those things feel and that's true for fear that's true for sadness right like why do people watch depressing movies you know. Why DO PEOPLE WATCH? You know terms of endearment something like really Super Super Sad. That's dumb like with that. Feel good right but we like to engage those things like year and sadness even discussed or pain sometimes people who eat the really hot hot chili peppers. So it's almost at the point of really hurting your mouth but not that bad. I'm going to go through so much. I told the story once on here but I have very distinct childhood memory of coming up on a pile of horse poop in the woods and I could not stop staring at it was making me sick and I hated it and yet I just and even walk away and then I had to go back and look again and get to the brink of throwing up and I have no clue why that was happening but it was a good fifteen minute exercise and just grossing myself out. Yeah looking to some bread. It's like like really dig this weird anyway yet. Another feature of the mind but yeah back to the breath I think regulating your breath. Controlling your sympathetic nervous system is a way that we can make. The threat is threatening right now and I use it I can watch myself. Kinda get really anxious of Panics Rolling on twitter and I've just been realizing like this is the time to do just like three D. belly breaths and afterward you just you feel so much better. Yeah okay number. Two was do acts of kindness and of course for in a that is like be of service. You have to be observers. It's so tell us the advantages of doing acts of kindness. Yeah I mean the advantages are huge and I think our culture just really doesn't realize this is another spot where I think our intuitions lead US astray. But also our culture like right now. It's all about treat yourself like self care like as soon as cova kicked in. It was like article after article about bathtubs self-care which is like again. It's not the bathrooms but the point is there's an opportunity cost to do stuff for other people right and so there's all these data suggesting happy. People do nice stuff for others acquainted for income or happy person. You tend to give more to charity. You tend to volunteer more. And there's some lovely work by folks like Liz done and others that show that if you force people to spend their money on other people they end up happier than if you force them to spend their money to do something to treat themselves. Yeah well okay. So an air explanation of that is my real. Problem is thinking about myself and all my needs and then craving but when I'm helping you it's nearly impossible to be thinking about my own desires and wants and so I'm just stepping out of that craving it forces me to stop thinking about myself and I find great relief in not thinking about myself. No totally think as we get inward focused. You know again this is what the Buddhists getting back to injure. Traditions realized about desire. Soon as you satisfy your GonNa come back right and so that the craving is just going to be a vicious cycle that you can never get over but the hit that you get from helping somebody. You can kind of do that again like you get the sort of warm glow as scientists. Call it from kind of helping other people. This is the sort of happiness that we get from doing. Nice things for others. It just kind of feels good so both gets you out of your head but it's also the you get kind of a double reward hit because like it feels good to help another person and then the research suggests it also helps your social connection right because often the people were helping. Our social relationship is going to give back to us. You know that service that you're doing in AA which is often with other addicts. Those people could help you when you're in a tough time so you're developing these meaningful important social relationships which is exactly. Yeah we we had this discussion the other day about being charitable and whether that's just ego or not and I was arguing no and you were saying everything stems from a selfish perspective of an an ran point of view that you can't do anything on planet earth that's not selfishly motivated now. You could have different selfish. Motivations that have outcomes that are beneficial to all but there's no way you can pretend that is this organism on planet earth. You're not I starting with your own desire. I guess yes like that is borne out by an evolutionary perspective. Natural selection would hopefully not believing stuff in that was actively bad for our own reproductive success. Just wouldn't do that right. That might not be the motivation in your head when you're doing it and so as onto polished you probably remember these. Biologists distinguish between what they call ultimate level. Which is like why is it selfish for your own survival and reproduction versus what's the proximate level. Which is like what does it feel like to you right now and your head right and so if you think about why you might want to have sex with somebody at the ultimate level that is always about getting your genes your next generation. That's why the instincts there but at the proximate level. You're not thinking about babies like you're probably thinking about like movies early didn't even they didn't even know that made a baby for years or when or why or yeah and so. My guess is like doing nice things for others. When people have this motivation works the same way right like selfishly natural selections like Oh help other people because reciprocity and you'll get all these goods leader and this is so great whereas the proximate level where like we just feel better if we do stuff for other people or we just really are motivated to do nice stuff rather people so sometimes it can be both and like. That's good yes. There's diminished returns when we satisfy ourselves so I can buy the perfect house and then I can buy the perfect couch and I can make the perfect meal and I can have the perfect wind and a certain point. I'm just going to Max out on things I can do for myself to amp up pleasure. It just keeps falling off whereas every person you help in the gratitude that you experience. That's not a diminished return. It doesn't kind of run out. Yeah and I think this is something that happiness researchers are just starting to figure out which is like so everything we do for ourselves. Has THIS APP teaching the researchers call it? He Donna Adaptation Right. Where it's like you buy yourself a new phone awesome for the first week but then you know over time you just get used to buy a new border bike and the first time you ride. It's great but then time number eighty seven. You ride it. You're just bored with it. But what's weird? Is that acts of kindness that we do to other people. Don't have that feature. I think is there like individual. There's a moment you do act of kindness and then you do another one it like you. Just don't get the adaptation to doing more of them. Each one is as good a hit. And so you you kinda end up helping yourself by investing and doing nice stuff for others because you just. It's not a subject to this attestation. Over time.

twitter L. Paul Bloom US sympathetic nervous system cova Liz
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

06:39 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"We know we're safe but we get to experience enough of it that we can kind of comprehend it. I don't know an reason. I think people are still fight about that. It's actually a great mystery. My colleague L. Paul Bloom has a whole book on this about how pleasure is kind of weird right. But that's one of the theories it's like sort of practicing what those things feel and that's true for fear that's true for sadness right like why do people watch depressing movies you know. Why DO PEOPLE WATCH? You know terms of endearment something like really Super Super Sad. That's dumb like with that. Feel good right but we like to engage those things like year and sadness even discussed or pain sometimes people who eat the really hot hot chili peppers. So it's almost at the point of really hurting your mouth but not that bad. I'm going to go through so much. I told the story once on here but I have very distinct childhood memory of coming up on a pile of horse poop in the woods and I could not stop staring at it was making me sick and I hated it and yet I just and even walk away and then I had to go back and look again and get to the brink of throwing up and I have no clue why that was happening but it was a good fifteen minute exercise and just grossing myself out. Yeah looking to some bread. It's like like really dig this weird anyway yet. Another feature of the mind but yeah back to the breath I think regulating your breath. Controlling your sympathetic nervous system is a way that we can make. The threat is threatening right now and I use it I can watch myself. Kinda get really anxious of Panics Rolling on twitter and I've just been realizing like okay. This is the time to do. Just like three D. belly breaths and afterward you just you feel so much better. Yeah okay number. Two was do acts of kindness and of course for in a that is like be of service. You have to be observers. It's ten so. Tell us the advantages of doing acts of kindness. Yeah I mean the advantages are huge and I think our culture just really doesn't realize this is another spot where I think our intuitions lead US astray. But also our culture like right now. It's all about treat yourself like self care like as soon as cova kicked in. It was like article after article about bathtubs self-care which is like again. It's not the bathrooms but the point is there's an opportunity cost to do stuff for other people right and so there's all these data suggesting happy. People do nice stuff for others acquainted for income or happy person. You tend to give more to charity. You tend to volunteer more. And there's some lovely work by folks like Liz done and others that show that if you force people to spend their money on other people they end up happier than if you force them to spend their money to do something to treat themselves. Yeah well okay. So an air explanation of that is my real. Problem is thinking about myself and all my needs and then craving but when I'm helping you it's nearly impossible to be thinking about my own desires and wants and so I'm just stepping out of that craving it forces me to stop thinking about myself and I find great relief in not thinking about myself. No totally think as we get inward focused. You know again this is what the Buddhists getting back to injure. Traditions realized about desire. Soon as you satisfy it's just gonNA come back right and so that the craving is just going to be a vicious cycle that you can never get over but the hit that you get from helping somebody. You can kind of do that again like you get the sort of warm glow as scientists call it from kind of helping other people. This is the sort of happiness that we get from doing. Nice things for others. It just kind of feels good so both gets you out of your head but it's also the you get kind of a double reward hit because like it feels good to help another person and then the research suggests it also helps your social connection right because often the people were helping. Our social relationship is going to give back to us. You know that service that you're doing in a which is often with other addicts. Those people could help you when you're in a tough time. So you're developing these meaningful important social relationships which is exactly. Yeah we we had this discussion the other day about being charitable and whether that's just ego or not and I was arguing no and you were saying everything stems from a selfish perspective of an an ran point of view that you can't do anything on planet earth that's not selfishly motivated now. You could have different selfish. Motivations that have outcomes that are beneficial to all. But there's no way you can pretend that this organism on planet earth. You're not I starting with your own desire. I guess yes like that is borne out by an evolutionary perspective. Natural selection would hopefully not believing stuff in that was actively bad for our own reproductive success. Just wouldn't do that right. That might not be the motivation in your head when you're doing it and so as polished you probably remember these. Biologists distinguish between what they call ultimate level. Which is like why is it selfish for your own survival and reproduction versus what's the proximate level. Which is like what does it feel like to you right now and your head right and so if you think about why you might want to have sex with somebody at the ultimate level that is always about getting your genes your next generation. That's why the instincts there but at the proximate level. You're not thinking about babies like you're probably thinking about like movies early didn't even they didn't even know that made a baby for years or when or why or yeah and so. My guess is like doing nice things for others. When people have this motivation works the same way right like selfishly natural selections like Oh help other people because reciprocity and you'll get all these goods leader and this is so great whereas the proximate level where like we just feel better if we do stuff for other people or we just really are motivated to do nice stuff rather people so sometimes it can be both and like. That's good yes. There's diminished returns when we satisfy ourselves so I can buy the perfect house and then I can buy the perfect couch and I can make the perfect meal and I can have the perfect wind and a certain point. I'm just going to Max out on things I can do for myself to amp up pleasure. It just keeps falling off whereas every person you help in the gratitude that you experience. That's not a diminished return. It doesn't kind of run out. Yeah and I think this is something that happiness researchers are just starting to figure out which is like so everything we do for ourselves. Has THIS APP teaching the researchers call it? He Donna Gadap teach-in right where it's like you buy yourself a new phone awesome for the first week but then you know over time you just get used to buy a new border bike and the first time you ride. It's great but then time number eighty seven. You ride it. You're just bored with it. But what's weird? Is that acts of kindness that we do to other people. Don't have that feature. I think is there like individual. There's a moment you do act of kindness and then you do another one it like you. Just don't get the adaptation to doing more of them. Each one is as good a hit. And so you you kinda end up helping yourself by investing and doing nice stuff for others because you just subject to this attestation over time.

twitter L. Paul Bloom US sympathetic nervous system cova Liz Donna Gadap
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

12:13 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I'm going to figure this out. And then what the discipline taught me is like? No what's built in is just all these biopsies. All these stupid strategies intuitions. That are just completely wrong and leading you astray the time. Thanks a lot natural selection. Like what did we you know? Wait around for this. This sucks. Yeah for me the tastiest thing I can learn and it's why I love Malcolm glad well it's almost entire. Work is in pursuit of debunking. A very commonly held intuition and that is a deeply fun thing about psychology but also a deeply frustrating thing about psychology. Because we get that. Our intuitions are wrong. But we actually don't have fantastic solutions for fixing those intuitions like the mere act actor realizing like hey. My intuition was wrong before it doesn't immediately update it which means you can be like an expert psychology and have like the years of training that. I do and still suck at life and still have really bad tuition. Still get wrong all the time. Do you think that humans? Actually I don't know if this is true but I think it is that humans have the highest emotional capacity than other animals. So we get blinded by those in a way that others don't yeah. I think we're part of the problem is like we're carrying around these sort of like old school emotions tendencies. Yeah some people call it our lizard brain but I don't know if that term's fantastic but basically like we were carrying around this old school architecture. Inner minds at the same time as we have these really smart frontal lobes that can and do all this stuff but the interaction between those just doesn't work. There's also all these ways that our brains are shaped. Just make no sense whatsoever. Now that I'm doing work in the happiness space one of the ones. I've been super interested in lease saintly as it turns out that the circuits that govern wanting in the brain. Like how much what you crave and what you go after are just completely different than the circuits that govern liking like we are actually going so. I know from your history doctor. You probably know this. You see this a lot in the context of addiction like you're craving in the wanting systems like go get this job or go get this thing then you get it and you're like I'm super habituated to this didn't even work right and system doesn't update. I mean it's just like not working in the way that we think and then the flip side is true right like there's all these things that feel really nice when I do them for me. It's like meditation or like a really hard exercise. But I don't have a craving like I do for you know like a sugary snack or like a drug user would have for how and I just have to like force myself to be like no no. No it's GonNa feel good like just force yourself to do it but then I like it and I'm like systems. Why can't you just frigging talk to each other? Everything would be so much easier. Yeah in is that. Because the chemistry that the frontal lobes and you have to imagine that the frontal lobes kind of in charge of the pleasure behind meditating or things that are you know are productive and positive for your future in a sense that though the chemical actually isn't as strong is that rewards center one that is like Faulk e. kill all those things. There's just no comparison in the strength of those right. Yeah part of it is that. There's just certain things that wig out the dopamine system. That's that reward. System like heroin was basically kind of almost like synthetic dopamine ways like drugs mimic these chemicals. Really well so part of it's that the chemicals are different for the good stuff that we really like part of. It's just like the systems are different so the liking system is registering information but it's not updating in the wanting system and that just means there's this disconnect there's actually cool kind of techniques you can use to try to get its update better. One actually is mindfulness and taking time to pay attention. You know if you are really mindful about what you like you know after eating your like. That feels really good. I feel really calm now. You can kind of get your wanting system to notice a little bit because it's like. Oh wait there was a reward. They're like Spitzer little dopamine like I should update things yet in my experience. Because I'm a very big proponent of exercise that actually mentally have to link the negative thing that's very very powerful for me so it's like I know what I feel like in the absence of exercise that has to be motivator versus the marginal uplifting mood after I exercise. Yeah I think both of those are super Yeah for me for me. It's the noticing the good parts afterwards which I tend not to do I. This wonderful yoga teacher wants to at the end of a practice would take a moment. When you're Shiva's it'd be like notice how you feel right now like really notice how you feel and if it's different from how you felt when you start in whatever and again my liking systems like wait a minute does feels nice like John this again. You know we should get together again. I totally agree with you. I've had that that that sensation post yoga where I'm like while. This is the sedative I always dreamt of when doing drug yeah. It's one of the many tools we don't employ when we're feeling bad. I mean there's evidence. Now that like a half hour of really strong cardio can be as effective as a prescription zoloft which is one of the leading anti depression medications. But you know psychiatrists don't prescribe exercise if people they prescribed pharmaceuticals so we forget that there are other things that can give us those hits especially if we're paying attention to the benefit in the end you're think the NHS right in England. They years ago stopped. Prescribing inhibitors for people with mild depression and instead prescribed access to a gym. Or some kind of you know trainer related. Exercise did yield on the long term. Better results which is fascinating is tricky. Because I almost feel like the liking system is attracted to things that take time that are slow processes and the wanting system is like a quick. Fix Yeah totally. If you can get a you know a heroin level banged your dopamine system. The wanting system notices that and it really likes it right but yeah the slow burns. You know. It doesn't as much but but again it's it's so frustrating when you think evolutionary because like I don't know if every quick hit evolutionary was like the thing that we really wanted like natural selection could have built in some slow Burns that had them you know but somehow it never did you get the in biology and psychology and then you get your masters in Psychology. Then you get a PhD psychology all from Harvard. Monica Harvard Harvard Harvard Harvard. We'd love and you have the distinction. We interviewed tall. Ben Shahar and I do think it's interesting writer. The Gates that he teaches the most popular class at Harvard. Which is unhappiness and you teach the most popular class in the history of yell which is also unhappiness. Yep So what I glean from that as we all we want won't be happy right. I mean I think that's exactly the right intuition also. Funniest the tall did this about a decade. Before I did you know. His glass was huge. Famous are heard and then he went off and became a popularizer and did other things and then many years later I did the same thing yell and get all this press for and what was funny was in every article I interviewed for like this is like my their other schools. That did this before me. But Eh somehow never makes it into the media but yeah I think people really want to figure out what they can do to be happy you know and I think in this day and age people really want evidence based strategies for what they can do to be happy. You know these days. I think students are as much drawn to the humanities or great literature to explore this question of how live a good life. I think they're like what does the science say about living a good life you know give. GimMe the neuroscience of the good life and I think that's part of what drew people to my in toss class which I think is a fall. I think my read is a lot of the stuff in science. Right now is just validating. What great literature and Philosophy told us before and good religions and things like that but you know bracketed. I think the way students want is they. Don't just want to hear what somebody did. They're like show me the graph that this makes my anxiety better and then I'm going to do it so to that exact point. I watched you on the news. Recently in reference to Covid you'd given five tips on how to feel good in quarantine and got say four of the five or like tenants of AA and like. Isn't this interesting that like some of these things are known but they do eventually take data to be recognize Israel. So you're I was deep belly. Breathing right yeah. This is important to explain because I think people can sometimes get pissed off when I give this tip because everyone's had the experience of like getting really mad at somebody's like just take a deep breath and like nephew But but scientifically. We know that this is one of the few ways. We can hack our automatic nervous system so quick biology lesson even though I didn't really take the right biology classes. But I got enough to do this. This podcast the sympathetic nervous system is your fight or flight system like it. Evolutionary is built. So that when there's like a lion about to jump out and attack you you can either freeze or flee like it's ready to like tighten. Your muscles gave heart beating fast and to do that. Has the shutdown all the other normal systems like your digestive system shuts down your immune function shutdown. Your Sexual Systems Shutdown. Just like runaway. Right we are now in the context. Cove it into the context of lots of life stressors just like activating that fight or flight system constantly right. It was never made to be on repeat like a youtube video that keeps going. It was meant to play the one two minute spot and then shut off. But we don't do that and in the context Cova. I think it's really hard to shut off because this crisis isn't going away. The one way our bodies have to hack you other than actually shutting off the threat which is impossible is to to regulate our breath such that our bodies think the threat is gone. You know you're sprinting. From a lion you cannot take deep breaths right. You're just like chess breathing. You're running a marathon right but if you just like really slowly take a deep belly breath then your mind is like hang on. There can't be alive. We're not running away anymore. There's a lion activate the vagus nerve once you do that you kick in the opposite system. Which is the Paris empathetic nervous system? That's what's like the rest and digest turns back on your immune function turns on your Gestion and all that stuff but the key is the way you you kind of. Turn it into high gear. The way you turn on the rest digest is actually through your breath that would happen. Naturally if the lion ran away and things went back to normal and it was chill. You'd be taking deep breaths but you can kind of force it and SORTA HACK THE SYSTEM. So the statement that like usually pisses people off. Just take a deep breath. I'm like no no no this wonderful neuroscience like hacking your nervous system totally works your breath and your heart rate in your brain are all connected up and you know there. There are a few ways to hack the system. Because you don't want to have full control over your autonomic nervous system because like you might not turn it on when it needs to go on but this is one way we can do it in a nice way and it has these corresponding effects on our her on what we're thinking about on what we're able to think about lots of evidence that those kinds of Brett's can reduce anxious thoughts right because again you might not just like threat- threat- threat- threat- where's the lion. It can like you know back and focus on the stuff we wanNA focus on. I'm just now realizing as you explain it. I think that's part of the major appeal to me for motor sports. You're exercising this exact same thing so every single turn a challenge in every single turn has the stakes of death. Potentially I suppose so it forces you to be in control of that panic so that you're doing your best thinking you're staying calm wallet inches lap after lap of almost mastering that of pushing that feeling aside and keeping yourself aware in calm making good decisions and there's something very rewarding about that a lot of people kind of get a high from it but also self report being like almost zen afterwards right and ability to like shift back and forth can be really powerful because we definitely do things that put us in. Lake death situations. This is another stupid weird thing about human nature is that we love sticking ourselves into awful negative emotion situations like. I'm a huge huge fan of Halloween and I love watching these haunted houses that show the lakes snap videos of people freaking out when they're getting scared. If you showed those pictures to sue an anthropologist who studied fear they'd be like these people are miserable but these people pay like sixty bucks in some cases to have someone do that to them. Why that on here? A lot like what is happening there. I think when we have fear of things we want to get as close as we can to the thing. We're afraid of but in a safe way so that we can process it like work through it so I think that's why we enjoy murder mystery shows because it's like it's are alternate fear but we're consuming it in a safe environment..

dopamine Monica Harvard Harvard Harvard heroin sympathetic nervous system Harvard Malcolm youtube mild depression Faulk murder Spitzer John Paris Ben Shahar NHS Covid
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

10:16 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"And foremost please excuse. Our tardiness. Two minutes was really tell we had a little conversation. We're in Monica's apartment. And she was a looking. I Say I'm always the one that's late so this is not to throw her under the bus but she was doing some things I said. I think we're getting close to what she said anything for minutes or under a fine. What what's your stance on that? Yeah I think. Four minutes are under academic. We always window for classes usually like a six minute window. Oh Can the students leave at my school? The students could like leave after ten minutes. If the professor didn't show up when so messed up his. So My UNDERGRAD INSTITUTION. Had It that you could leave early like that was like you left before the end But then the Yale institution like it was switched and so it was like this weird culture shock of Lake. Some people showing up early and some people leaving early in his lorry. Were so excited to talk to you and you came to us by way of what I think is a God living among us. Which is Malcolm Glad? Well he emailed me and said you really need to get him to Laurie. And let's just take one second to talk about how much we love Malcolm. No Malcolm is fantastic. I think I met Malcolm for the First Time. I was like a new assistant professor. I just started at Yale and he was doing this dinner party with one of my colleagues and the whole time I was just like. Wow this was like right when I think The tipping point had just come out and I was God among men. You know apex glad well as I was learning about you today. Laurie excited. Because you've done a ton of primate work. Yeah I did Collagen anthropology but it was like anthropology side Major. Unofficially you got a BA in both biology and psychology. Al From Harvard. Yeah although it was kind of a little bit of a like a trick though because they just they just started this new joint major and so they hadn't really worked out like which classes you needed to take yet and so I manage to get a biology degree from Harvard by taking the minimum possible amount of biology classes embarrassing now. I try to teach things like genetics. Because I'm like you. You know that stuff. They see Geez de Cuba going exactly. Did you have a lab as part of that? I did some lab stuff but not that I remember super well mostly. I did animal behavior stuff that was like my main thrust in biology which the monkey work. What was the genesis of your working with animals or or studying animals in relation to human psychology? Well it actually came out of a hatred of running human experiments. I started doing work when I was like a freshman working in a lab that studied humans and we studying this thing called implicit memory which is just this phenomenon that the stimuli that in your world they're kind of affecting you without realizing it. You know so if I give you a list of words that are all related to elderly people. You can kind of prime that without you realizing it right but the whole point of this effect is like you're supposed to not know it's happening but it's something we teach. We teach like in the interest class. So I you know a freshman. Loria go in to try to test implicit memory in these. Freshmen who are taking a class about implicit memory and at the end of every study. I'm like did you have any ideas. About what the study was about and everyone was like. Was it an an implicit memory? Study and we're yes. And then we'd have to throw out their data and so moved to go to animals like animals. Don't have hypotheses about what the study is about. They're not messing up my data with their big conscious thinking brain and so that was part one. So let's digress. For a second this is one of the most fascinating aspects of anthro which is like they're studying humans for one hundred years and you just almost can't study human and we're trying to figure out the study you're a part of and you're you're almost probably trying to be a great subject and help the professor or person doing the study. Get the results they want. It's all were conscious of all the things right. Yeah and it's super I mean that and it's like super hard to get it why humans are really like because of all these cultural influences right like if I want to study the human. It's hard to not be studying the American human or the Zimbabwean human or like you know your culture prevents me from knowing what's really in to being a human and so so monkeys book for both of these reasons where a breath of fresh air like they don't have all these cultural influences messing with them and they definitely don't know that they're in your study they don't want to do a good job in your out actively not want to fish. Sure I listen to your podcast. And there's a couple of different areas and I really wanted to explore in. I'm kind of obsessed with status. So many primates are are highly social. Animals were the apex of social animal. Right and so. We have so much hard wiring. An evolution to make us cohesive group. And I think we're largely unaware of it right so I do wonder even your your primate studies like you're capuchins right there. They're very smart. Did they ever interpret your status as being like Alpha do any of the people conducting the experiment become the Alpha? Yeah not so much with my guys. We because status wasn't that much of a thing like the other one alpha male and so on but researchers in chimpanzee labs report this all the time in fact would super interesting as you get cultural differences in these different primate labs so the chimpanzee labs in Japan. The chimps are really clued into who is the high status researcher. So if you come in and you're like Joe Freshman like I was in that experiment the chimps will dominate you. And you can't get them to do anything or whatever but then the Pi principal investigator big head. Honcho comes in and all of a sudden the chimps are like Oh gosh. I'll do everything you want. And so it's like the chimps are somehow of just such a question. There's somehow implicitly. Picking up on the human status is not just like we're all higher status is like well some of the humans might be higher status but like some of them are completely low ranking and I should just abuse in the. Who's you would have to be that we're sharing so much nonverbal communication that they are able to witness how we look the length of time who has the floor of the longest. They're probably just aware of subconsciously as we are aware of it. Yeah I mean. They're not looking at people's academic titles like somehow we're giving oft these cues that we don't even realize which is so fascinating it is it is. I love it okay. So let's go through your history a little bit because I always liked knowing why people gravitated towards the thing they did so you're from Massachusetts. I'm probably saying that wrong. I have a hard time with that word and your dad is from a chain of islands that I would have only known because the Canary Islands or close. He asks them. My Dad's side of the family is from Cape Bird Which is a set of islands off the coast of Africa? Very few people in the US from Cape Bird but they tend to like cluster in cities that were big like seaports or whaling ports in particular. So like the whaling ships would kind of go around Africa. They would stop and fuel up in these tiny islands off the western coast of Africa called Cape and Cape Verdeans. Were like I'm going to get involved in this. Seems like a great lucrative enterprise and so they wound up kind of in Massachusetts like my my hometown new Bedford is the town of Moby Dick Right. So it's like Oh wailing town you know for today and so so you get these tiny clusters in seaports but but it's sort of an African Portuguese mix I'm like Biracial by nature. But even more biracial because you know one of one of my sides already biracial by nature of the way. Those islands work and mom was a guidance counselor in school. You actually attended a Massachusetts. Yeah that's right so she she always really loved education and kind of wanted me and my my brother to like go off and get the best education we could. She kind of instilled that in us from a really early age. Were you delivered and I check off a passion of hers but it wasn't necessarily something everybody in my town did like. I don't know anybody else for my town who like went to Harvard or like my Taibbi League schools and things so it was kind of it was kind of a strange thing to do to double down. It was a working class town. I assume yeah because I mean it was back. In the movie. Dicta as it was the richest town in in the US but wailings not like a super huge industry anymore. There wasn't new industry that kind of came in I never see the whalers on the Forbes one hundred I know yeah so so yes so. It wasn't in a town where a lot of people went off to these schools but But it was awesome. I mean we completely changed my life. It it's nowadays when I advise high school students. Your I'm like education is the way to completely transform what your opportunities look like definitely worked for me but wh why were you drawn to psychology because I have a really offensive theory on most psychology majors which is generally they were from a pretty fucked up home and they kind of wanted some answers or they themselves drift in a little confused ups? There's no need some answers. What was your. Maybe that's because I never wanted to do clinical psychology like. I never wanted to shrink or help people. I was just fascinated by people. I was like one of these nerdy kids. Who like you're the mom was always like go? Go play with your friends. Like stop paying out with adults like I just wanted to kind of be watching people and pay attention the whole time. Are you the oldest? I am the oldest always psychologists even before I was technically an academic psychologist. Yeah and it sounds like your interest is in interest. I share which is like. I'm deeply curious about why people do the things they do. More than any other thing like most specifically why I do the things I do because so often. I think I know why and then upon closer inspection. I don't know why I do it or I have to learn because there's all these biological impulses in the mixers there's ego there's culture there is so dense. How much stuff is contributing to our decision making right. Do you think you know why you wanted to know why people work. The way they did. People are just weird like where weird as organisms like. They're no species on the planet. That has kind of like us. You know we should be just one of billions of other species or there should be some species that are. Kinda like us you know. We're just even our closest. Living relatives are smart. But they're not making podcasts or having are around them like communicating like sharing ideas. That are in my head with your head like no other species. Does this really so weird? But at the same time we're also just like not good understanding our own. Psychology self insight is a problem for our species even though are so smart as a that was something that always fascinated with me and then. I think I was drawn to the discipline to be like..

Malcolm Glad Massachusetts professor US Harvard Africa Laurie Cape Bird Yale Monica Yale institution assistant professor Moby Dick Right First Time Joe Freshman Canary Islands principal investigator Lake
"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Will COME WELCOME. Welcomed armchair expert experts on expert. I'm Dan Sheppard joined by modest mouse. Man How you doing good. It's the Sunny Day in Los Angeles is a little rain yesterday and now the Sun's back today we have Lori Santos who is a cognitive scientist and professor of psychology at Yale University. You know she has the most popular class in Yale's history on happiness and she is also the host of the podcast the happiness lab so everyone should listen to that. She's very fascinating and has such good tips for wellness for feeling happy professor right now especially right now so please enjoy Laurie. Santos we are supported by shady raise. Monica shady raise makes the handsomeness sunglasses. I have a few pair. They're very high quality in there so inexpensive. That's what's crazy is the look is fantastic. Reminiscent of some of my favorite brands there out to do differently. Premium polarized shades at a fraction of the big name brand costs there an independent sunglasses company. Just some big corporation overcharges for shades. Everyone knows sunglasses are way overpriced there insane and break them or lose them and it hurts expense. Glad you're bringing that up because the best part of shady raise is their warranty replacements if shades are lost or broken for any reason. It doesn't matter what happens. Okay now it's already a winner but they're just throwing this..

Lori Santos Monica shady Yale University Dan Sheppard Yale professor professor of psychology Los Angeles Laurie handsomeness scientist
"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Will COME WELCOME. Welcomed armchair expert experts on expert. I'm Dan Sheppard joined by modest mouse. Man How you doing good. It's the Sunny Day in Los Angeles. Is We a little rain yesterday? And now the sun's back today we have Lori Santos who is a cognitive scientist and professor of psychology at Yale University. You know she has the most popular class in Yale's history on happiness and she is also the host of the podcast the happiness lab so everyone should listen to that. She's very fascinating and has such good tips for wellness for feeling happy professor right now especially right now so please enjoy Laurie. Santos we are supported by shady raise. Monica shady raise makes the handsomeness sunglasses. I have a few pair. They're very high quality in there so inexpensive. That's what's crazy is the look is fantastic. Reminiscent of some of my favorite brands there out to do differently. Premium polarized shades at a fraction of the big name brand costs there an independent sunglasses company. Just some big corporation overcharges for shades. Everyone knows sunglasses are way overpriced there insane and break them or lose them and it hurts expense. Glad you're bringing that up because the best part of shady raise is their warranty replacements if shades are lost or broken for any reason. It doesn't matter what happens. Okay now it's already a winner but they're just throwing this..

Lori Santos Monica shady Yale University Dan Sheppard Yale Los Angeles professor professor of psychology handsomeness Laurie scientist
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 9 months ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
"santos" Discussed on Tamarindo

Tamarindo

04:21 min | 9 months ago

"santos" Discussed on Tamarindo

"Welcome to another episode of the podcast in the closet brought to you by the krona virus. Shayla welcome back to the closet. We you are probably still on cloud nine from fabulous event that took place yesterday. Although when they're listening to this it'll be a few days after that but can you please tell us about? Luna and Tamarine does recent partnership this story Storytelling Workshop. That happened via zoom to. What are the highlights? Gosh it was so beautiful Brenda so the event was called. Your story is your superpower. And that's what I feel like. We were all kind of coming in touch with you now. It was beautiful. I started off by you know. I'm not an expert in teaching storytelling so my contributions to the grounding exercise and walk the participants through kind of how to set intentions in how to set a soft intention for the event. So kind of you know. Grounded us in in the exercise and yeah it was. We had an amazing turnout in and it was just a testament to people need these kinds of offering and how healing writing can be you know so whether using it or because you want to share your story with the world or you just need it for your own personal growth. You know fantastic spent has exploded a lot of people. I think there was ninety. Plus registrants amazing methods us. Honest here and you know it's it's it's that we that we really wanted to host. Because it's part of our mission is to go to to amplify voices are stories and we want to hear more of yours more of your voices in mortgage story so that was was all about that fantastic. And we have a joint my thoracic today to the Fabulous Team. Luna for basically putting pulling it together. It's amazing joint cow. Okay Joy Mothra Cup for Thanksgiving shoutout to them and they're the they were the storytelling experts that brought in the great content for that partnership. So much fun. Originally this was going to be a live event right that we ended up committing to do it. Virtually so beautiful that we were actually able to provide this workshop for so many more people than we originally because we did it virtually so that was really cool to excellent. Well you know what someone else that has adapted to the Times is actually today's special guest. We have actor Comedian Carlo. Santos who plays Chris? Morale is one of three cousins. That are the central characters in the Netflix. Show head defied personally. I think that character steals every scene. I just really really identified with Chris. Mortensen Listrik the coconut. The Whitewash Mexican. If you will of the series and just the way. He was kind of struggling with his identity. I'm sure that spoke to a lot of our listener. So super cool to have you legged get a chance to interview. Carlos was so so much fun and you know what it was. It was great and I got to preview the the interview and I have to say that it was surprisingly comforting Carlos. Take on how everybody is dealing with the corona virus in their own way and that every single way is fine. Like every way is perfectly acceptable for how we are all coping with. What's going on today superbowl exactly before we dive into that interview? Though a couple things one is we're going to have a PSA for y'all but also. I thought we could maybe quickly also tell folks that we have more of this virtual gatherings happening. We're actually hosting a podcasting workshop. So that's coming up and you can follow basically go to our website that many podcast dot com for everything that we've got going on. And when you go in there you could actually sign up for our newsletter. We are going to preview newsletter very very soon and we want all to not miss out on any of the thumbing the cheese so stay connected and sign up for that anything else. We should highlight for our folks or is that we have a lot. I think that's it we're doing. We're doing what we can for. Y'All yes doing what we can with creativity of using digital tools so that we can keep this thing going. Even though we can't be together in the studio I miss Shayla and Youtube. Soon Zoom. We'll have to do all right. So let's I take a quick break. We'll be right back with our chat with fellow.

Carlos Shayla Mortensen Listrik Chris Luna Fabulous Team Tamarine Netflix Brenda Santos
"santos" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"santos" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Officers Santos was a mutual friend who offered to drive her home from a birthday party at the venue club she got in that car but then hopped out and said she was going to call a ride share the alleged victim says Santos grabbed her and pushed her back against a brick wall before she called for help go to the gold says a not guilty plea was Saturday on Santos his behalf the suspect in a shooting at an Arkansas Walmart is dead this happen in forest city it's west of the Tennessee border mayor said of Williams as two police officers were injured we did have a shooting of that that took place here and Walmart across live about ten twenty four AM this morning officers engaged to suspect the suspect is the seas there is no word right now the officer's condition witnesses say they heard at least eight shots Attorney General William Barr says he is outraged after two police officers were shot over the weekend in New York City I have the full support of this administration and this department of cast yes police say one person is responsible one officer was shot in a patrol van Saturday structure that chain in the back twelve hours later police say that same person sprayed a precinct headquarters with gunfire hitting a lieutenant in the arm he then put the gun on the floor and surrendered the injured officers are now out of the hospital two more New York City firefighters die from nine eleven related sicknesses correspondent Scott Pringle has the update officials are saying sixty three year old Richard Jones in the seventy four year old Paul DO junior spent time in the toxic rubble at ground zero after the nine eleven attacks and both passed away from nine eleven related illnesses on Friday they had spent decades with the FDNY retiring in two thousand and two now more than two hundred firefighters have died from nine eleven related illnesses reports say that number could one day it's close three hundred and forty who says complaining on social media doesn't do anything rash at the TD garden decide to make some changes after they heard some colorful input from some fans of the Bruins and Celtics Newbold seats installed last year at Boston garden or soon to be history after one season on causeway street and poor reviews from keyboard cowboys and cowgirls CMOS Richmond concentrate on like social media you know people like to complain what can I say so what's the buzz legroom no place to put concessions without kicking over that I suppose of one person wanted to get up it's it's really difficult everyone in the room has to kind of get out like an airplane seat a hassle for sure but where pray tell is it written that fans need to be comfortable as they watch a game or show you go certainly grants and ephemera Parkinson and wouldn't see that does not have leg room at all I can imagine it's much worse than that he says the new seeds are just fine however certainly heard the complaints when it seems like the garden listened at north station Chris fama WBZ Boston's news radio update now on the varsity blues scandal the fake resume that Lori Loughlin's daughter submitted to the university of southern California can now be seen by anyone TMZ obtained the document from federal prosecutors it says that a livia generally won several gold silver and bronze medals in high school for rolling turns out she's never competed in that sport for eight it is time to get a check on Wall Street and through all day as a Bloomberg closing bell is wrong and we have ourselves a winner indeed anticipation ahead of big earnings reports and hope for the global economy as several big companies get back to work in China following coronavirus closings lend a hand to Wall Street today the Dow ends up one hundred seventy four points nasdaq of one hundred eight that's a new record high as to be five hundred up twenty four also to a record high Sony is joining a growing list of tech firms canceling plans to travel to the mobile World Congress a big tech show in Barcelona because of coronavirus concern Amazon LG Erickson nvidia also not going with the show or one hundred thousand people including as many as six thousand from China are expected Andro day Bloomberg.

Santos
"santos" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"santos" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Today the Guardian investigation which exposed how is about a Santos Africa's first us. Female billionaire amassed a huge fortune. Why after three thousand years? A California's sequoia trees dying. And thank thank you for having me and I WANNA thank also London Business School for inviting me here so he let everybody. The voice you can hear belongs to Isabel. Santos Africa's richest chaste woman Forbes have estimated to be worth two point two billion dollars. Commodity prices are down. So what do we do. Santos comes one of Africa's focused poorest countries Angola a former Portuguese colony. That was ruled over by her father. Jose Eduardo Santos for nearly forty years. So yes she. She describes herself as an entrepreneur but a home. She's known as the princess have long been questions about how she acquired her wealth. The billionaire has always claimed to be a self made businesswoman. But this week the cachet of documents investigated by the Guardian and other news organizations appear to tell a different story. What the leak AAC showed us is the extent to which dos Santos semester large fortune at vast cost to the angle and state from the Guardian? I'm Rachel have phrase today in Focus. How about Santos really.

Santos Africa Jose Eduardo Santos Guardian London Business School Isabel California Angola Rachel Forbes
"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

10:13 min | 1 year ago

"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Available for free on the online course site core surro- and over four hundred and ten thousand people have been ruled already. I mean this thing his taking the world by storm. It's causing go on television shows and you're starting your own podcast which we're GONNA get to and it's it's not that surprising when you think about it if if you teach a class psychology and the good life or the science of wellbeing were you know basically how to be happy. People are going to be drawn to that but I still imagine that. There's a part of view. The couldn't have possibly envisioned that it would blow up like this. No it's still completely surreal. Honestly I mean from just on campus. It felt really surreal. All right you know I designed the class thinking you know probably like fifty students would take it and that would feel like a lot of students on campus when over a thousand students enrolled and I had to teach that class laugh in a concert hall that so you know completely real and Humboldt and I was like wow this is totally crazy but more crazy was when I started getting a lot of outside type press for the class a couple of weeks into the class. There was a New York Times article about the class in in the kind of like exactly what you said which is like you know no one ahead. Y'All students like many college students face this mental health crisis but I think the article is more about you know. I'm one in you. Yell students can have mental health crisis but then they're also kind of really lucky. You know they're young. They're like nineteen like they got into Yale. Most of them are pretty harrowing. You like what about the rest of us like. If eighty two class on happiness you know what what about the poor you know fifty something you know all the rest of us and so how is kind of what launched the next wave of kind of when it became really surreal which is that we had the national national news media and international articles about this class it kind of became the thing that lots of folks were fascinated by like why all these young yell kids needed to class on happiest. Yes kind of figure out how to live a good life and the fascinating thing is of course how you can you can kind of say the same about other parts of life. I had a former lawyer turned yoga studio owner who does presentations for law firms and other big companies on mental health and gratitude and presence in whatever and he felt the same way about his fellow lawyers. Why is there this dearth of of happy successful lawyers. There's some of the most well to do professionals and yet there was this suicide crisis amongst them and you can apply that to so many places right and so much of that of course which you talk about in your class is that we don't still still really understand what makes us happy. We have a lot of misconceptions about what will bring us happiness how to find it and how to keep it and and also your dilemma which is of course you can tell people how to get there and they still won't do the things that will make them happier. you have a new podcast called the happiness lab so I'm not going to give away the entirety of your course or all those things but I do want to get into the things that will maybe push some of those people who are reticent to get involved into better understanding. You know what you're teaching in this class and and how it's not just okay well if you smile more your brain will make you like really small for real right like it's it's. It's pretty in depth in terms of I'm having to rewire ourselves. Yes yeah I think that's right. I mean I think you know the sometimes people see here that there is a class on the size of happiness and they think it's going to be like all who or like like you know positively and like your smile all the time I get letters from people who take the class sometimes and they're you know they come around with the weather usually starts with you know I started this thinking that was gonna be like hippy dippy crap and I you know it's California stuff and in practice like what the science well-being is about is it's like really a rich empirical. TIRICO science and the way it works is to say okay. Let's there's some very at some people out. There are just happier more satisfied with their life than other people. What are they doing right you know what are they doing right. And what can we copy. If you're not feeling satisfied. What can you do to kind of feel a little bit more satisfied and when you look at the science but they can say you get which is kind of striking is that we don't have a great gauge on what we can do to be happy. You know we were just talking about the work with the monkeys jesting that we're really good at getting out of her own head. We can make all these predictions about what life will be like. You know if we do take certain kinds of actions. You know the road not taken like we can make lots of predictions about what are what is going to be like depending on how things go the problem is that a lot of those predictions are off like we have these motivations to seek out certain things and we often. I think that those things will make us happy but in practice they don't work in the way we think and so that's why I think the science is so important. I've Kinda gotten. You know almost evangelical about trying trying to get the science out there to as many audiences as possible from the online class to the podcast. It's the we need some help here. You know our our central motivations the the things that we have that it's telling us how to make decisions. They're not leading us in the right direction. We're kinda going wrong and science can really help us decide like OK. Actually those things don't work in the way you think and you might need to be seeking out other stuff that you didn't realize from your own kind of decision material brain's not telling you the right thing to do and that's why so many of the feeling. We're working really hard. You know we're putting time into our own well-being but it's not the only well we feel like something still missing yeah. It's fascinating that you use the word hippy dippy because I always say that what I'm talking about this kind of stuff because that used to be what it seemed like to me as someone who was a very grazed by lawyers. Everything must be proven questioned everything type. A overachiever like Oh that sounds very flower child Donald but as soon as I learned about the concept of Neuro plasticity insurnace science behind it I completely changed my tune and now I'm like all in on it and now I want everyone around me to be all in all of them to learn all the things and so we're going to get to that part the frustration that you feel when you have people around you and you're like do this thing. I swear it will make it better and they still refuse up but I wanted to you know that actual science that you talk about because it does I think for a lot of people who are reticent to really jump in they need that like like push of like no this is proven and we can show you how and why let's start with the GI Joe Fouls. He can you kind of explain that and how that influences what you were saying about sometimes your brain. He doesn't even know what you need to do. Yeah I think the G. I. Joe Foss. He's one of my favorite cognitive bias us in some ways. It's scary cognitive bias I don't know if you're listening all my age or about that children of the eighties basically but if you remember Gi Joe it was just Kinda g army cartoon no-one Really Remembers. Gi Joe But but many many folks who've enjoyed the cartoon remember how ended which is at ended with this public service announcement or gi. Joe Explains like don't talk to strangers raising you cross the street you you know big things in the US but ended with the child thinking. Gi Joe Thank you Joe. Now I know and then Joe would say this for you and knowing is half the battle and then it would not do you know if you remember the but but this is what we think we think you know knowing is half the battle once. I know like what I should do. I'm just going to do it. You know I can know well how many reps I need to do on day and like that's good. I'll just get really buff like there. I can know how much sugar I should have in my dire much sleep. I should have and I can just do it right but the sad thing is like that's not the case. You can know exactly what you're supposed to do. The TAT doesn't immediately mean you translate it into what you're supposed to be. Actually doing you know like I know. It's really good for me to get up and do a half hour of cardio every morning but you know if I hit the snooze button every day just knowing that is not going to be enough. You have to actually do the stuff and so that's been the kind of this. Gi Joe Fallacy so that's the judge Ovallis you think that knowing is half the battle but it's Kinda not and so we really teach students to not fall prey to the GI Joe fallacies kind of one of the principles of the course and even the podcast which is I'm GonNa teach you all this stuff. That science says you know. It's not well. It's going to be real. Scientific results else you're. GonNa see graphs and all this stuff but then it's up to you to translate that into your own here because if you're just here the study like that sounds good you know brain plasticity. I'd love up to change my brain but you don't do anything like nothing's really GonNa Change and so much of it to stems from these very strongly held ideas about happiness happiness that turned to be misconceptions ideas that we've been taught or have for whatever reason ingrained in ourselves that this will make me happier if I do X. Y. Or if I achieve achieve or can you talk about how the studies and science actually tells us that some of our most widely held beliefs about what makes you happy are wrong. Yeah I mean it's really jarring and this is the spot where you know I keep this stuff and my students will fight me about it right because it's like our intuition strong you know so so one of the one of the best ones is is money right. You know if I could just get more money. I'd be happy or so many of those like plays a lottery in thank you know like the day. I went powerball. You know it's going to be awesome day right but does that really happen. Well you can look to people who have lots of money and ask if they're really happy and what you find is that you know it's it's you're really poor and I give you an infusion of some more or money. You know if you're earning like ten thousand dollars the US right now and I double your salary. That's GonNa feel good. It's GonNa increase your positive mood and it's going to decrease your stress levels but but if you're earning enough money that you kind of have a roof over your head and food on the table researchers kind of define this at around seventy five k. and the US right now. We're just you know pretty so you know decent middle class wage if you're earning that much and I all your salary triple it. You don't get any corresponding increase in your wellbeing which which is definitely not what we think you know. Some of your listeners might be earning around that level and they you know if I could quadruple my salary like things would be better but the data when you really look at people who make those different salaries suggest that that's just not the case you can also see this when you look at it kind of wellbeing levels of people who are lottery winners. You know you're kind of we're getting more anecdotal here here. But what you find is that don't folks just aren't happy. we were able to interview on my podcast. I interviewed this psychotherapist name Klay Cockerel he's the psychotherapist to the insanely rich rich so he has clients who earn more than fifty million dollars..

US Joe Joe Foss Joe Fouls New York Times Humboldt Klay Cockerel Yale California Donald Ovallis fifty million dollars ten thousand dollars seventy five k
"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"santos" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"My name is Laurie. Tinto's and my dilemma is how you get people people to do not really want to do like even know what we need to do to be happy. We don't want to do that. So how can we force people to behave better. I mean I feel like you're the expert thread on this right. You literally teach the class on this but seriously I can imagine you've got when you've got a third of the students at Yale in your classes probably going to be some that aren't listening or aren't buying lying in or you've got people in your work or personal life that don't care about all the research you've done all the ways that you can prove that our lives actually get better when we're meditating and connecting with people and exercising and being grateful and all that goodness so even though I know you're the expert. I know you're not immune to having people around you that you'd like to help and I feel the same way ever. Since I got into into learning more about neural plasticity in the ways we can actually change our brain and personality and moods. I've been wanting to share it people. Which is why I have people like you on the podcast to get as many people as as possible to sort of buy in on it and join me in this new super happy place that I founded understand all the science that backs it up so if they're not naturally predisposed to believe it they'll they'll by in and I bet you research would tell you the same thing as the author of the book better than before which I've been reading which is about sort of changing your habits and she writes that people respond better to watching someone else live great life to have an practice good habits than than being told about it why they should do it and that they respond better to you kind of talking about about how great it is and then letting them be versus nagging or demanding that they changed so it can be tough. I've got friends and family that I want to shake because they aren't doing the things that they could to make themselves happier more satisfied edified but I know that they respond better to saying join me at Yoga or check out this great book than to say tell them what they're doing wrong repeatedly and I think that's all we can do but I'm sure you already know that like. I said you teach the class on this girl. The Commission's spoken my guest this week is Laurie Santos professor of psychology at Yale University Director of Yells Comparative Cognition Laboratory and Canine Cognition Center and the head of Silliman College at Yale in January of two thousand eighteen started teaching a class called psychology and the good life and it's breaking attendance records at the university. She's won countless awards as a student and teacher and in two thousand eighteen she received a genius award from the Liberty Science Center in New Jersey. She's also also hosted the new podcast the happiness lab which launches today September Seventeenth we talk about her groundbreaking course about finding and maintaining happiness and how our brains trick us why the Gi Joe Fallacy leads us astray and how to rewire ourselves to lead happier lives plus her work with dogs and monkeys to better understand human brains and stuff like do dogs really feel guilt. Take are they more rational than humans and learn new things plus. Our dog breeds all that different or is it just their training and their experiences. I think you guys are GonNa love this. I really love talking to her. That's what she said. I am super pumped for this and yes I know I'm going to get all the comments that I say that every single podcast but this time I really mean it even more of the other ones because even just doing the research for this has been so fascinating and all of you who are regular listeners to the podcast are absolutely going immediately understand all the ways the the things that I always talk about are going to come to a head and sort of become one in this conversation with Santos before we get to all the amazing stuff you're working on now. I quickly the and I want to do it more quickly than I usually do because I want to get to all that good stuff want to go back and start from the beginning when you were going up in new Bedford Massachusetts. Your Dad was a programmer. Your mom was a guidance counselor when you were growing up. What did you think you wanted to do when you were an adult. I think like you know there. Just weren't that many people who had all kinds of crazy careers when I was growing up so if you went to college you're either going to be a doctor or a lawyer and I knew I didn't want to be medical. Doctor that just blood is icky and that stuff so I think I wanted to be a lawyer but I have zero concept. What lawyer is actually did your data's Cape Verdi in which I believe is like an African American Portuguese descent. That's right yes. I'm Kinda Biracial kind of a mix of lots of different ethnicities. Yeah did that affect you growing up. Were you in an area that was it's pretty diverse. Yeah I think there's lots of Cape Verdeans in new Bedford lots of Puerto Rican Portuguese individual like other kinds of like lucky. Latin X folks folks and I think that was awesome. It kind of felt like you know you're growing up with like these rich communities of people from different backgrounds but kind of just this idea that you know everyone was kind of a mixed six and diverse is when he growing up in new Bedford Being Cape Verde and isn't all that strange because there are lots of keep brigands there but I learned the hard way that everywhere else in the world like they're not that many Koreans Iranians around you. Kinda have to explain it to like what ethnicity is. Most people myself included before reading. This did not even know where it was like. Yeah people are like you you Cambodian like what are they know and so if the set of islands off the coast Africa and they there's lots of folks around the northeast because folks came over on whaling ships and kind of jobs that way so go to New England seaports you tend to meet a lot of Brady and so a lot of your work is predicated predicated on observing people understanding people and even now animals when you were growing up. was that a natural thing for you or something that came about later in life yeah. I think I was always sort of a natural psychologist. I was like you know the kid that would always like try to hang out with the adult table and find out what was going on and you know what people's motivations whereas best I think you know I was always sort of fascinated with mind and how people work and just kind of the puzzle the fact that people you know they don't always act in the way you think they're going to act or you know even kind of trying. I understand my own motivations you know why is it so hard to get yourself to do. The things you really WanNa do or you know like why do we rationalize like they're just going to be so many puzzles that human behavior her and even from as young as I remember. I was sort of fascinated by them so you're in high school. Did you do sorts of activities or sports or anything I was like a full on nerd and just like not very athletic. I played I played baseball like little league for a while and golfed which was mostly just 'cause you know what's fun to Kinda around around in a golf cart so not huge not huge sporty sporty chick sadly so not into like music and theater and stuff. You're really just interested I in in your studies yeah. I did a little bit on the theater side like if I if I was going to be characterized by anything I'd be more like you know theater nerd and not even an acting nerd more like blake back tech folk stage crew stage so you ended up at Harvard University and while you were there you were a research assistant and your travels to an island east of Puerto Rico really influence what you wanted to study before that trip did you have an idea of what kind of psychology would be would be of interest yeah. I think I just Kinda did no. I mean the kind of Allah psychology was sort of interesting but what that trip changed is i. I ended up working with a faculty member. There who does work with with monkeys like basically studying how monkeys thinking what that tells us about human nature and so even when I was just like a sophomore off more I got to head to his field site in Puerto Rico and it Kinda just a lot of things for me when you when you're hanging out with interesting group of monkeys it's like completely habituated to humans and they're just fascinating and you kinda wonder like well. What are they thinking. And how are they different from us so that Kinda just launched a long path of me trying to study this question. About what makes us human mind in unique yeah. There's there's this fascinating studies about monkeys that I think are like the gateway for so many people my favorite class in college as an English major who only took one thing remotely related late into like psychology and stuff was human bonding studying how you studied rhesus monkeys to help determine patterns and raising human infants and stuff so it's really interesting that would be the thing that sort of spurred you to not only continue following psychology but specifically the psychology of animals so at that point you come back from that trip and what do you envision in terms of your career based on your newfound interest in that yeah. I think you know maybe for better for worse. I'm not sure I was thinking my career back then you know this is a ninety s when like the dot com boom was happening and people just were like no one was scared of jobs. We're like Oh. I'll just you know found facebook or something like that right. so. I just Kinda thought the scientists fun you know I was sort of enjoying asking those questions questions and kind of exploring thing I was a little bit blindsided when my senior year came around and I had to pick a career but your next step of doing a PhD in kind of keeping going with what had been working so so far seem to make sense at the time yeah she stuck with school you got your masters and PhD from Harvard in psychology with the focus on cognition brain and behavior sure and was it right after you were done with your Giga Gail Yay kind of happened in like really fortuitous where near Gale was looking for somebody doing this on and I was Kinda in the right place at the right time in some ways. It's really fast like most people in my field you know do what's called the post doc which you Kinda like training. Someone's lab for a while before you become a professor. I was a little bit more on the fasttrack which wound up being amazing just amazing place to kind of do my work but you know it was a bit of a sprint for president right out of Grad School. You know basically teaching college students in my late twenties right as a professor there so there's a little bit fast yeah absolutely so was the Comparative Cognition Laboratory and Canine Cognition those in existence at Yale when you arrived both of those kind of things that I had I started up the starting with the Comparative Cognition Lab. That's the lab where we try to study like how monkeys make sense of the world to get some hints about how humans sick and the idea there is is it. If you really want to understand what makes US special you know why we have sports and podcasts and language and conversations like we're doing now like you actually have to figure out what animal all do and why they don't do the same stuff that we do and so I started a lab where I also was doing research in Puerto Rico where we studied monkeys and then more recently tried to to study this question with some critters..

Laurie Santos Puerto Rico Yale Harvard University Comparative Cognition Laborato professor Tinto Comparative Cognition Lab facebook Bedford Being Cape Verde Liberty Science Center professor of psychology Yale University New Jersey Comparative Cognition Laborato baseball Silliman College Bedford Massachusetts Cape Verdi
"santos" Discussed on Nacht Beauty

Nacht Beauty

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"santos" Discussed on Nacht Beauty

"Don't you think everyone should do that yes give me some laura thank you welcome to natch butte everybody it's yoga jackie j your host jaggi johnson and this is the last week of all male march it's gone by so fast we've learned so many things and the cuteness continues okay let me tell you who we have in studio today he's a comedian he's an actor he's a cutie you can see him on superstore on nbc which is entering its fourth season congratulations what an amazing thing and later this summer you can see on the big screen in the upcoming movie crazy rich asians what's like literally everyone so excited about so we'll talk about that too but as welcome nico santos can i just say you have like the best name your parents about like our sun will be famous he's either going to be an attorney or like a weather man or comedian like niko santos is just so sink listen because a nickname yeah because like when you're philipino you have your your given to first name and then you're always your mother's maiden name and then but then you go by a nickname that you're pairs gives you didn't know that my real name is michael nncholas santos santos and then by nico i've always gone by nico because of nncholas yeah yeah you know my nephew's name is nncholas and it's spelled in icy oh les and they call him nico does exist that.

jaggi johnson nbc nico santos attorney niko santos michael nncholas santos santos