2 Burst results for "Santa Rosa Lee"

"santa rosa lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"santa rosa lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It was a didn't know why they were so physical with each other, but It really just kept, you know, kept feeding this oxy toes and being released, which helps with the bonding. And here's Valley. Joining us from Santa Rosa Lee. Welcome. Thanks for waiting. I I think so much. But I'm comment within regard, actually, but restaurants I have been fortunate enough through my 30 some odd years of strong work to work it really special places. And it was because you get that Sort of release when you have such a good team, and you're busy and you're working, and there's a school of the and we'd have complications like who control the most glasses arose a break into teams and there'd be a times at the end. You know, I've I've been it was physical. I formed a lifelong friendship. With people through the restaurant teamwork. That I've had the fortunate Tio workout for many, many, many years. Ellie, It's good of you to share that with us. And I thank you for that. Appreciate your calling in. I want to get another caller bar here and We'll go to Sacramento and welcome Warren. Warren. Good morning. Hi. Yeah. Good morning. I was killing your your screener that it's been 50 years, but I worked with this incredibly nice gentleman. It was a retired Air force officer and had been part of a bomber crew over Europe in the second World War. And I looked at him and I said You're just a kid. How did you get through it? And he said We had one another, He said. We had one another and death didn't make any difference at all. Just because we had one another. If we went down, we're going to go down together. And he said, it got me through. It set up an archetype in my head that I held for 50 years, and I've never achieve that level of residents. But I've always understood the emotion that he experienced 20 articulated that statement. That is touching to hear you say, Tell us about it. Thank you warned for the call. Appreciate it. And here's Larry, who isn't interesting email, Joanie says, Have you thought of compiling a fantasy team of Hall of Famers that have such bad chemistry that they would be beat by a team with lesser talent? Every list I compile is Ty Cobb playing center field. That's great. That's really funny. Well, the interesting thing is, you know we talked about you know, earlier caller mentioned the Yankees and the core four and you know that was the best and you know, the Giants had their core for the bullpen. That The Yankees back in the seventies, and the eighties, too, you know, had those teams where they had had a fist fight before the afternoon was over. Yet on the field, they were amazing. And, you know, I started to talk about this earlier that they had task chemistry. So you can have the worst human beings like a Ty Cobb. You could have nine Ty Cubs out on the field. But if they trusted each trust is such a foundation of every relationship right if they trusted each other on the field, they had each other's back. They knew they knew the other guy next to them was working as hard as he was wanted to win as much as he was. That was all they needed. Was this great task chemistry? And that's why when people say Well, obviously don't need chemistry because look at those eighties, you know the seventies Yankees and a snow. They did have chemistry. It's not just not the chemistry. That we think of when we think of chemistry. Will you also write about this? Ah, this kind of chemical notion of of contagion for lack of a better word. Ah, right about, for example, Buster Posey, the great Buster Posey telling a rookie But he did a really good job with a ground ball and then or throw and then another rookie observing this, and it's contagious. He feels something as a result of that he might feel envy to perhaps Buster Posey. But you know, it's an interesting example of what can go on in terms of what you call contagion. No, it is And it's those mirror neurons, right? They discovered this. I mean, just in the last last century that we have these mirror neurons. And this is why and, you know, notice this next when you're in conversation with people, especially people that you're You know, fairly close with we mimic each other. You know, we mimic a tilted ahead. We mimic their facial expression. We mimic their their body language, and we do that, in order to actually understand what they're feeling like We think it's that they're feeling something. And then they you know, we do that We're mimicking the feeling. No. We're mimicking their body, which then sends the signal to our brain that this is what they're feeling right? So when you know this kid across the clubhouse is watching this Buster Posey interaction. His mirror. Neurons are firing in exactly the same way as if Lester Posey had his arm around him and was telling him that you're the guy we need right now. It's the same part of his brain that is firing. And I thought, Okay, that's how this spread For all of us, but especially mean think about a closed locker room. You know, All of these things were happening, and it's spreading from person to person. If that's what's happening that you have the Buster Posey. Now if you have negativity, Guess what. That spreads. We'll bring another follow around with us. Let's have Jim and Livermore. Join us, Jim. Thanks for waiting. You're on. Oh, thanks. Thanks for taking my call. I was telling the screener I'm Ah Absolutely lifelong Giants fan. My first game was when I was four years old Steel stadium and I still Look at that block 16 and Bryant was Reverend and I just love my crew. I've had a number of interactions with him. Later on in my life when I had seats behind the dugout. I remember one time I had an old baseball cap with an orange Bill giants and it was my softball hat. He looked at me and he said That is the ugliest had ever seen in my life, and I took it off and threw it to him..

Buster Posey Yankees Ty Cobb Giants Warren Lester Posey Santa Rosa Lee Sacramento Jim Ellie Europe baseball Steel stadium softball Air force officer Larry Hall of Famers Joanie
"santa rosa lee" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:39 min | 2 years ago

"santa rosa lee" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"California Public employees retirees. In the National Enquirer. We'll talk about that in a few minutes. This is one of these situations where you know, if this is your household. Maybe you need to come down hard on your sons and make some changes apparently a mother up in the Santa Rosa area had to call nine one one because her son's got into a bloody fight over a broken marijuana Bong. The day comes and you have to call nine one one because you sons are cutting each other with the jagged glass, it's too late. After one of them broke, the Bong, and they got into a fight over it. You got you got you already blew it though. You got a couple of near dwells who were just slacking off. This is how old they are nineteen and twenty oh you missed the boat. Yeah. Yep. Yeah. You screwed up Samuel j for row. F A U R O T. You nineteen was on the porch when cops arrived, and he was he was washing away blood. I guess trying to clean up the evidence. He was cutting his brother with the broken glass, the jagged edges the brother had lacerations and wounds. Police detained him and his mother and found the brother who had been stabbed bleeding profusely from his wounds. He was lying across the street where he'd gone to hide from the brother. The brothers been hospitalized for some stab wounds and lacerations, and he is twenty years old. Good work. I'm sure they're going to be useful. Where is this near Santa Rosa, Santa Rosa? I don't know if it was in Santa Rosa was reported by Santa Rosa Lee, probably children of hippies. That's what happens. No disciplined overrules. School. Yeah. No, stab at each other with Bong shards. What are the funnier stories we've seen lately, which brings CalPERS into question as the California Public employees retirement system, it's humongous, of course. Because even though the private sector long ago decided you cannot pay fixed pensions to employees for the rest of their lives. So you'll go bankrupt. We haven't learned that yet in the public sector. We ever will. Because the unions have a stranglehold on the politician it goes bankrupt. That's what they'll learn. Now. I think that I think would eventually she'll just raise tax money. That's okay. Each soaking tax payers to make up the difference. That's where exit you have always the union you have to get out dominance over the politicians. Every state pretty much has this states, give their employees. I think father got to fix pension from New York, California is most generous and has the biggest big one of the biggest deaths. I think Illinois has a slightly larger debt as a percentage of Konami. We're one of the worst states. Well through an investment managed by New Jersey. Hedge fund California's public pension fund CalPERS appears to have owned as much as one third of American media Inc. Which is the national enquirers parent company. Third a third. I mean, that's that's that's really size when I saw the strength of. Well, it's probably just a few thousand shares or something about a third of it. I guess it was working for them. And it's sort of like, well, maybe they didn't know they just hired the hedge fund the hedge fund makes the investments and they picked American media because they thought that the stock. Yeah. Actually, they invested this through a hedge fund run by Chatham asset management and Chatham has only returned two point three percent a year. Since they made the investment in two thousand nine. No, it is low. It's it's bad. If CalPERS just put money into an index fund. They would've made five times as much money. Is there some connection they had to this fund CalPERS? Oh, many years of Calpers's notorious for making bad investments, they have like stupid people running it. And and every few years, there's another story about a bad CalPERS investment. And they never they never seemed to come close to what the market is giving. And by the way was one fund something called the Eureka fund. And apparently ninety nine percent of it is held by CalPERS. Well, that doesn't sound like you're spreading the risk much all the money in one fund. They make they make decisions over the years. A number of articles Chatham asset management snapped up a majority stake in American media in twenty fourteen the publisher was struggling to emerge from twenty ten bankruptcy. And he's a financial lifeline. So it almost looks to me like this company, which is Chatham asset management hedge fund, they they basically we're using the CalPERS money to exact their own gains. That's how it looks to me because they took the money in the they took Alpers money invested in American media of which they own a majority stake. So the so the teachers the. The government workers in California. One of their big investments was in a newspaper that was going out of its way to trash Hillary Clinton and protect Trump. They were the ones paying Trump's girlfriends the berry stories about his indiscretions. Any? That's just that's nice irony. Isn't it is? One of the most anti Trump, public employees. Apparently, there's was one point nine member invest in his propaganda outlet. Because he's such close friends with the with the publisher of the National Enquirer. And they were they were the ones going after Jeff Bezos and his mistress. Now CalPERS wants to make it clear to things that they are winding down their investments in hedge funds over the last five years and the Chatham Chapman. Hedge fund did represent a small percentage of their three hundred and fifty billion dollar pension fund. It shows you just how big this thing is how mantra services and you're responsible for it listeners. Oh, yes. The employee's kick into know a lot of the money comes from the state in from the towns and cities have to kick into the pension fund, which is your tax money, right? Supposedly the pension fund has closed down a majority of its investment in this them Eureka fund, the remaining stake now is supposedly a little more than two hundred million dollars. But you're right. Calpers has seen an unimpressive. Two point three percent rate of annual return out of its regional investment in the Eureka fund in two thousand nine doesn't somebody look at that like a couple of years ago? It's not working for us. Should we look around for? I mean, what does it sit there for nine years serve their lazy? There's there's always a bottom ten percent of investment firms. Bottom ten percent of hedge funds a bottom ten percent of anything in life. Right. You're right. There's a you wonder who they are this is it this is it CalPERS is in the bottom. Ten percent. It's like being the stupidest guy, you know, at at an Ivy league school somebody's graduating last. So, you know, there's only so many smart people in the world. And I think there's a lot better jobs in the investment in the investment profession, then running a government workers fund. I mean, if you're showing up for that job, how many other jobs have you been kicked out of? The other people won't hire you if you're available to run the California government, pension, and the other irony here is that the Cowboys is one of these funds that always claims their pension fund that they tried to be socially responsible and this supposed to just get money for people. So the tax payers don't get hosed a little less enough with their social responsibility, and they're politically correct investments and here they ended up here. They ended up investing in Trump. All right. When we come back. A couple of things to say concerning last week's big stories and the people that went in the dumpster Friday. The Justice small at story is taken a couple of new turns coming up, John and Ken KFI. Debra Mark has.

CalPERS Eureka fund Santa Rosa California National Enquirer Chatham asset management California Public Chatham Trump publisher Santa Rosa Lee marijuana New Jersey Jeff Bezos American media Inc New York Chatham Chapman California government