35 Burst results for "Santa Fe"

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:39 min | 3 months ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Basically, every artist has to give their quote credentials whether it's their status card from Canada or the number, what is the city IV for? Yeah. So you just have to basically have the credentials. Which can be problematic because there are full indigenous artists who just is complicated and go down that road, but there are fully indigenous artists who don't have that quote stamp of approval from the government. So when we talk about appropriation and blood, that's a whole, like we could have a whole day talking about that. And of course, the problem of artists who are pretending to be native and being shown through just the number of shows that come out and then once it gets more and more entrenched, the more they show, the more people write about them following that misrepresentation, the more it becomes something that people consider to be a fact, absolutely. Folks, we're talking with three people here at the Santa Fe Indian market, the Centennial, and we're learning a lot about the history of the Santa Fe and market. We're learning about the jury process for how works are submitted. We're learning about how artists apply to the end in market. We're learning about a lot about history and how it was formed and how it's evolving in recent years. And there's still time to join our conversation. So if you want to get a call in, you can squeeze one in. We've got our producer standing by. One 809 9 native. That is the number to call. You can also connect with us through social media. We've got our Facebook set up. We've got our Instagram. We've got all the channels going all the platforms that we would love to hear from our listeners, all of our fans out there to comment and join us. Amber Don, what's in the works for the fashion show this year specifically, in terms of what are you looking for in the future, how are you hoping to evolve and grow the fashion portion of end and market in the years to come? Well, this year we have two full fashion shows on Saturday and Sunday. They both 100 foot runways and both two different sets of designers. So the goal is to have a swipe fashion week. That is because Toronto, they have the indigenous Toronto fashion week Vancouver, fashion week, and they actually, their fashion week started after soy indigenous fashion. And so I feel like swi is kind of behind the ball here in terms of we need to have this way of fashion week. Now. But it's not going to happen next year because that's a lot of work, a lot of money. Right now, it's a one man team. Well, let's hope you have more than a $200 budget to make that happen, right?

Santa Fe Indian market Amber Don Canada Santa Fe Facebook Toronto swi Vancouver
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:35 min | 3 months ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"We know from the indigenous futures research. These are some of the big issues that are top of mind for our folks and so that's going to be part of what's being curated in that space. We did know from indigenous futures as well. We have data from 49 different states from the folks who took place in indigenous features, survey, right? And so the panel that's taking place that's why or at the Santa Fe event really is just the first of many different steps. We're getting ready to launch our natives vote 2022 campaign work, right? And so this is just one of many events to come over the course of the fall. We know the midterms are there going to be a big part of our work as well. I'm going to go back to Stephanie. This type of advocacy awareness addressing pressing social issues and early we talked about how much end in market has evolved in all of these different collaborators now that are coming to get so much more than just an art show and are we going to expect more of this in the future just continued collaboration and bringing in issues and other organizations like illuminative to really highlight and celebrate just so many different aspects of native America. Oh, absolutely. I think collaboration is the way to go as tribal communities throughout Indian country. We know that we are stronger together. So when we really lift each other lift each other's organizations that we can do so much more and it just is proven time and time again. So collaboration for sure in the future. Leah, a lot of different events going on throughout the week, where can our listeners go to learn more?

Santa Fe Stephanie America Leah
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Thanks for tuning in. You are listening to native America calling live from Santa Fe and markets. I'm your host Sean spruce. We're hearing about the legacy of the market. Here in New Mexico's capital city, there is lots going on and we're getting a glimpse of that today. We've got another guest on our show right now, Leah S elgato. She is the chief impact officer at illuminative. She's Pascal yaki. Leah, welcome to the show. Appreciate you being patient. Thanks for having me. Pleasure to be here. Absolutely. And illuminate a very high profile native led organization, lots of fun, interesting projects, very impactful, and you've got a lot going on here this year at Santa Fe Indian market. Tell us about it. Yeah, this is the first year that we're hosting an event at Indian market. We are hosting indigenous futures envisioning the next 100 years. It's a two day event on Saturday and Sunday at la Fonda. We're going to have panels. We're going to have guest speakers. We're going to have pop up shops. We have some high profile folks that are going to come in. We have a space with 20 different artists that are going to be featured that's been curated by the incredible and wonderful care Romero. We are going to be screening in partnership with the Sundance indigenous program, shaden Tomei's long line of ladies, which if you haven't seen, is an incredibly beautiful film I'm going to have a panel with her and John McLaren and Adam Peron on Sunday. So it's going to be a time where we get to really just be in good community and have conversations about what the next 100 years looks like. We know that artists and creatives filmmakers really are at the forefront of really helping us imagine what the future is going to look like. And how we are in good community together about what that's going to look like. So on Saturday, we're going to have Sierra teller and Ella's Janice meeting, taskbar and taz Bach Chavez, Bobby Wilson, who are on reservation dogs and Rutherford falls, going to be in there for a panel. We're going to have talk about women in leadership, we are going to have amber midthunder and Jane Myers from praying to come in and talk about representation in that film on Saturday. Sunday, we're going to talk about native people in film.

Sean spruce Leah S elgato Pascal yaki Santa Fe Indian shaden Tomei Santa Fe la Fonda Leah New Mexico Adam Peron America John McLaren Romero Sierra teller Bach Chavez Bobby Wilson Rutherford falls Ella Janice amber midthunder
Gov. Abbott: No Laws I Signed Had Any Intersection With Shooting

Mark Levin

01:44 min | 6 months ago

Gov. Abbott: No Laws I Signed Had Any Intersection With Shooting

"You talked about the rollback of any of the legislation that I signed this past session Let's be clear about one thing None of the laws that I signed this past session had any intersection with this crime at all No law that is not allowed him to get a gun The gun that he did get and so again there was nothing about the laws from this past session that has any relevancy to the crime that did occur here With regard to special session let me just say this and that is first of all all options are on the table Second most importantly to your point do we expect laws to come out of this devastating crime The answer is absolutely yes And there will be laws in multiple different subject areas For example I do fully expect to have every law that we pass in the aftermath of the Santa Fe shooting to be completely revisited and first we need to gain the information about exactly what happened at the school to find out the extent to which those laws were complied with to the extent that they were not complied with to find out what shortcomings allowed the city to occur And right there is what I said in the first hour which your Congress refuses to do Which your major media refused to do He wants to look at everything and anything Once we get the facts Schumer said no Waltman said no at the post My liberal friend who wrote me said no Guns That's it

Santa Fe Waltman Congress Schumer
Joe Biden Blames the Uvalde Shooting on the Gun Lobby

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:33 min | 6 months ago

Joe Biden Blames the Uvalde Shooting on the Gun Lobby

"I try to understand the mindset of the thinking process that says some monster slaughters 19 children in an elementary school in Texas and it's the gun lobbies fault. I can not get there. I'm going to try. Let's listen to the president of the United States. As a nation, we have to ask, when in God's name, are we going to stand up to the gun lobby? When in God's name, we do we all know in our gut needs to be done is through 340 3448 days. Ten years since I stood up at a high school in Connecticut, a great school in Connecticut. Or another government massacred 26 people, including 21st graders at sandy hook elementary school. Since then, there have been over 900 incidents of gunfires reported on school grounds. Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida. Santa Fe high school in Texas. Oxford high school in Michigan. The list goes on and on and on this grows. When it includes mass shootings at places like movie theaters, houses of worship, as we saw just ten days ago to grocery store in Buffalo, New York. I am sick and tired of it. We have to act.

Sandy Hook Elementary School Connecticut Texas Marjory Stoneman Douglas High Santa Fe High School Oxford High School United States Parkland Florida Michigan Buffalo New York
New Mexico fines 'Rust' for willful gun safety failures

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

New Mexico fines 'Rust' for willful gun safety failures

"The the the the film film film film company company company company that that that that was was was was making making making making the the the the Alec Alec Alec Alec Baldwin Baldwin Baldwin Baldwin movie movie movie movie rust rust rust rust when when when when a a a a cinematographer cinematographer cinematographer cinematographer was was was was killed killed killed killed last last last last year year year year has has has has been been been been hit hit hit hit with with with with the the the the maximum maximum maximum maximum possible possible possible possible fine fine fine fine by by by by New New New New Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico authorities authorities authorities authorities I I I I marches marches marches marches are are are are a a a a letter letter letter letter with with with with the the the the latest latest latest latest the the the the New New New New Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico occupational occupational occupational occupational health health health health and and and and safety safety safety safety bureau bureau bureau bureau has has has has fined fined fined fined of of of of rust rust rust rust movie movie movie movie productions productions productions productions nearly nearly nearly nearly one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred forty forty forty forty thousand thousand thousand thousand dollars dollars dollars dollars for for for for safety safety safety safety failures failures failures failures involving involving involving involving firearms firearms firearms firearms on on on on a a a a ranch ranch ranch ranch outside outside outside outside Santa Santa Santa Santa Fe Fe Fe Fe in in in in October October October October after after after after Alec Alec Alec Alec Baldwin Baldwin Baldwin Baldwin was was was was setting setting setting setting up up up up a a a a scene scene scene scene that that that that involves involves involves involves pointing pointing pointing pointing a a a a gun gun gun gun it it it it went went went went off off off off killing killing killing killing cinematographer cinematographer cinematographer cinematographer Galina Galina Galina Galina Hutchins Hutchins Hutchins Hutchins and and and and wounding wounding wounding wounding director director director director Joel Joel Joel Joel Souza Souza Souza Souza the the the the bureau bureau bureau bureau finds finds finds finds that that that that there there there there were were were were other other other other misfires misfires misfires misfires an an an an accidental accidental accidental accidental discharges discharges discharges discharges of of of of rifles rifles rifles rifles on on on on the the the the set set set set and and and and safety safety safety safety protocols protocols protocols protocols were were were were ignored ignored ignored ignored a a a a spokesman spokesman spokesman spokesman for for for for rust rust rust rust movie movie movie movie productions productions productions productions and and and and an an an an attorney attorney attorney attorney for for for for Baldwin Baldwin Baldwin Baldwin could could could could not not not not be be be be reached reached reached reached for for for for comment comment comment comment

Alec Alec Alec Alec Baldwin Ba Mexico New New New New Mexico Mexico Occupational Occupation New New New Ranch Ranch Ranch Ranch Santa Santa Santa Santa Fe Fe Galina Galina Galina Galina Hutchins Hutchin Hutchins Hutchins New Mexico Joel Joel Joel Joel Souza Souz Bureau Bureau Bureau Bureau FE Baldwin Baldwin Baldwin Baldwi
Junior Legends of Their Era: Philip Francis and Rickie Fowler

Fore The People

01:11 min | 7 months ago

Junior Legends of Their Era: Philip Francis and Rickie Fowler

"You know who else was there was that was like an elite junior player Philip Francis. I remember seeing him thinking like this guy is national junior golf scoreboard numero uno and then Ricky, it was just like those two guys were Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson out there. They were. I remember stepping on the first T playing Ricky. I was dude. That's probably one of the most nervous first tea tea shots I've ever hit. And I step up on the T and I look around and there's probably 50 college coaches. I mean, no less than 50. And 49 of them were for Rickie Fowler. And then the chuck with chuck was over here. Let's go JP. They had the local juco guy out there for Petey just like he was close. He's like, I've never been in Rancho Santa Fe. I'm not allowed. I might as well go out here and we'll pretend I'm watching somebody. Yeah, Philip Francis. I just looked it up. Dude, he won. Phillip Francis won this, yeah. I would do that. You didn't even go to college. Didn't he turn pro like right after you went to multiple schools. Oh, he did. Oh, it's one of those. No, he committed to Oklahoma state and then he decommitted went to UCLA. Remember, Ricky committed to UCLA and then decommitted it with the Oklahoma

Philip Francis Ricky Phil Mickelson Chuck Rancho Santa Tiger Woods Rickie Fowler Phillip Francis Golf Petey FE Ucla Oklahoma
Smylie Kaufman Reminisces About the 2006 Junior Amateur Championship

Fore The People

01:02 min | 7 months ago

Smylie Kaufman Reminisces About the 2006 Junior Amateur Championship

"What do you remember about the 2006 United States junior amateur? They're in Rancho Santa Fe. Man, I was 14. And you guys were about to go to school. It was me, you loop and rot. I think that's quite a practice round. You were already committed at 14. Was I? You had the head cover and this I had the head cover. I was basically committed. I don't think I committed to a couple of years later. But I just remember, I remember hauling out on the 9th hole on after round one, and then I think I missed a couple like one or two. And you made the cut for match play and played like Ricky, didn't you? That's a hell of a memory there, SK, yeah. I actually got through in a playoff for the last few spots in match play. And my reward for getting through the playoffs. The number one junior in all of the world, Rickie

Rancho Santa FE United States Ricky Rickie
Official: Alec Baldwin surrenders phone for shooting probe

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 11 months ago

Official: Alec Baldwin surrenders phone for shooting probe

"Authorities authorities in in New New Mexico Mexico now now have have what what they they feel feel is is a a key key bit bit of of evidence evidence and and the the fatal fatal accidental accidental shooting shooting on on the the set set of of the the movie movie rust rust it's it's been been nearly nearly three three months months and and cinematographer cinematographer Helena Helena Hutchins Hutchins was was shot shot to to death death and and about about a a month month since since authorities authorities in in Santa Santa Fe Fe ask ask for for Alec Alec Baldwin Baldwin cell cell phone phone they they now now finally finally have have it it it it was was turned turned over over this this past past weekend weekend and and investigators investigators hope hope information information on on it it might might yield yield some some clues clues about about the the case case Walden Walden was was an an actor actor and and co co producer producer of of the the movie movie which which is is now now on on hiatus hiatus a a search search warrant warrant for for the the phone phone sought sought text text messages messages photos photos videos videos calls calls and and other other information information related related to to the the movie movie Baldwin's Baldwin's lawyer lawyer says says the the actor actor has has cooperated cooperated with with authorities authorities from from the the get get go go and and the the delay delay in in getting getting the the phone phone to to them them should should not not suggest suggest otherwise otherwise I'm I'm Oscar Oscar wells wells Gabriel Gabriel

New New Mexico Helena Helena Hutchins Hutchin Santa Santa Alec Alec Baldwin Baldwin Walden Walden Mexico FE Baldwin Oscar Oscar Wells Gabriel Gabriel
New Mexico church official urges nuclear disarmament talks

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 11 months ago

New Mexico church official urges nuclear disarmament talks

"The the head head of of one one of of the the oldest oldest Roman Roman Catholic Catholic diocese diocese in in the the U. U. S. S. says says now now is is the the time time to to rejuvenate rejuvenate a a global global conversation conversation about about the the need need for for nuclear nuclear disarmament disarmament and and avoiding avoiding a a new new nuclear nuclear arms arms race race Santa Santa Fe Fe archbishop archbishop John John Wester Wester released released a a lengthy lengthy pastoral pastoral letter letter on on the the subject subject he he noted noted during during a a virtual virtual news news conference conference at at Los Los Alamos Alamos National National Laboratory Laboratory the the birthplace birthplace of of the the atomic atomic bomb bomb is is preparing preparing to to ramp ramp up up production production of of the the plutonium plutonium cores cores used used in in the the nation's nation's nuclear nuclear arsenal arsenal Wester Wester called called the the arms arms race race a a vicious vicious spiral spiral nuclear nuclear watchdog watchdog groups groups welcome welcome the the letter letter which which marks marks the the latest latest instance instance of of the the Catholic Catholic Church Church wading wading into into the the debate debate I'm I'm Walter Walter Ratliff Ratliff

Roman Roman Catholic Catholic U. S. S. Santa Santa John John Wester Wester Los Los Alamos Alamos National U. FE Wester Wester Catholic Catholic Church Churc Walter Walter Ratliff Ratliff
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

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"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"It's hard to tell. A piece published in what's called the field journal, it's from the symphony in Flint hills in Kansas. And they did a special issue on the Santa Fe trail. And they have part of my work in that. So, you know, at least my view and the views of others has been incorporated into this journal. But I don't know how widespread it's been. I need to go back and look at some of the studies that have been done since I did the study. You know, kind of updated. And I plan to do that as I get to do so. But changing the way that the history is written is difficult. It's an ongoing struggle. And we need younger scholars to step up and carry on this effort to make history more accurate. And more inclusive of the people who are involved in it. And less bias ways. James for better or worse, I like so many Americans go to Wikipedia for a lot of my educational and historical information. And I did wiki the Santa Fe trail and it only mentions specific tribes in terms of how they violently resisted people who they considered trespassers. Do you know of anybody who expressed interest in editing that page to add more context to the Santa Fe trail from a native perspective? No, I don't. When I was asked to do this program, I was asked if there's any other scholars who I could recommend to share this program with the presentation. I couldn't think of any. It's just such an important part of history, but one it hasn't really attracted native scholarly attention to the degree that it should have. So you mentioned earlier James that the Santa Fe trail began in 1821 when and why did the Santa Fe trail cease to be used by travelers? It continued to be an important route of travel until 1880 when the attribute to peak and Santa Fe railroad was constructed linked eastern states with New Mexico territory. And it used to take several months for most caravans to make the trip. But with the U railroad, the travel was much faster. So the railroad is ultimately what ended the Santa Fe trail as it was known throughout the 1800s as this major thoroughfare for travelers for traders for settlers for Native American peoples as well. That's all the time we have for today's show. I want to thank my guest, doctor James writing in and also thank him for his scholarship on this very important historical issue affecting Native Americans of many, many different tribal backgrounds and communities, the Santa Fe trail. Join us tomorrow for a discussion about Major League Baseball and the World Series between Atlanta and Houston. The signature sporting event puts imagery on display that Native Americans have complained about for years. We'll also take your calls. This is.

Santa Fe trail field journal Flint hills Santa Fe James Santa Fe railroad Kansas New Mexico Major League Baseball Atlanta Houston
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is creation, this legal creation to promote colonial expansionism. And that mentality is still with us today, I think in many respects, some of the racial attitudes of white America have diminished and enjoy many positive relationships with non Indians. But there's also a segment of the population who have at all mindset, I believe. And I think we're seeing that today in some of the political protests going on. There's opposition to the removal of these southern heroes during the Civil War like Lee, Robert E. Lee and others take down statues and the confederate flag. Well, you know, those are symbols of oppression. And even genocide. And so we have those same symbols with the Santa Fe trail. And also the way that historians have sought to tell the story that makes white America feel comfortable about this history. And this history denies us knowledge about this history and the fact that aspects of it. And I appreciate that the culture brother and what he said from scurvy is still with us. Absolutely. So you mentioned confederate monuments. And let's bring this into the present. So for example, if somebody were to be driving along roads where the Santa Fe trail once existed. And there's a lot of roadside markers right there, monuments and related to the Santa Fe trail. If somebody were to stop and look at one of those roadside markers today, what are they likely to learn about the Santa Fe trail? Just to get a little germ of in factual history. And I mean, let me go back to the question that you asked earlier, but my trip through Kansas and my trip to forlorn. I didn't really develop that. And what I was for it, I spoke to one of the guides there who would give presentations. And I raised the question about related to what was on a marker said it 300 kiosks had attacked that fort. And I asked that individual do you have any information about why the kiowa is might have attacked that sport? And he started talking in coded terms about Indian savagery. So, you know, I call him out on that, but then, you know, he's an older male who probably had no desire to learn the actual history. I just wanted to promote those that false history that existed and share his bias views with visitors to that florent. So it's no wonder that there's so many misunderstandings about the flirt with that type of mentality. Yeah, so those roadside markers are very problematic. I've noticed that the museums, there's a couple of museums along the way. And some of them will briefly acknowledge that Indians were trying to defend their lands. But, you know, there's also a defensive sovereignty that went into this. The sense of human rights that went into this in terms of Indian resistance to the trail. So you know that whole history needs to be reconceptualized. And when it comes down to it, there's only one set of facts. And it's how those facts are interpreted. And historians have tended to interpret those facts in ways that continue to denigrate Indians and to promote this notion of white American supremacy. With the means justifying ends that Indians had to be subjected and placed on reservations subjected to course either simulation programs for the benefit of the growth of the nation. Let's talk a little bit more in detail about your research James and I know it's carried out by the National Park Service. And we have an interesting comment on Twitter from Bill and Albuquerque who wants to know if there is a way to include a more balanced account of history that includes what actually went on along the Santa Fe trail. James, can you comment on that for our Twitter audience? Yes. These are markers, the problematic ones need to be done away with. And a better interpretation used to be put in their place. But it's difficult to do because these roadside markers are not designed to provide a lot of information. And I don't know how many people stop at historical markers besides me in a few others. You know, when I try these places, you know, you don't see too many people looking at historical markers. But, you know, it has to travel centers. There's so many travel centers along the road that it's just sometimes you just want to stop off and grab something to drink. I'm sorry, James, go ahead. I just had to add that. Yeah. But it has to be done in a more comprehensive method about finding means to incorporate a more inclusive aspect of this history to do away with the racism that has permeated much of that historical discourse. And then to incorporate indigenous views into it at a meaningful way. Not just a very superficial way. And I think that has been the case that is superficial acknowledgment of Indian rights. So yeah, I'll be given a talk on the 13th. I believe this in Santa Fe on Indians and set up a trail. And this is a part of the commemoration of the 200 year founding of the Santa Fe trail. And for many of us, we can not commemorate colonialism. We can not commemorate these policies and practices that were genocidal to our people. And it led to our placement on reservations in Oklahoma and because you know, when a trail started, they were a number of Indian nations along the trail. But by the 19 excuse me by that later 1860s early 1870, as there were no India on the trail because it had all been placed on reservations. And subjected to a course of assimilation programs. James, your research dates back over a dozen years back to 2008, 2009. Do you think it's had an impact in terms of how officials present this history today?.

Santa Fe trail Robert E. Lee America florent James Lee Kansas Twitter National Park Service Albuquerque Bill Santa Fe Oklahoma India
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"That history of manifest destiny. Settlers obviously many of them stopped in New Mexico made homes in New Mexico, what other areas of the west were settlers traveling to via the Santa Fe trail? The Santa Fe trail went on through Santa Fe and to California. It went south into Mexico. So it became an important route that took expeditions, exploratory expeditions into California, the army of the west used the Santa Fe trail as it moved into New Mexico during the Mexican war in the 1840s. So it served as an important route for the expansionistic endeavors of the United States to the detriment of indigenous people. Now you mentioned earlier how you had driven that route where the Santa Fe trail once was. And I've driven that route number of times myself through the Midwest into New Mexico. And I think of interstate 40 that runs through parts of Oklahoma, the Texas Panhandle is how closely does modern day interstate 40 a line with what was once the Santa Fe trail? Yeah, having been raised in New Mexico a number of years when I was young. And New Mexico, now I Arizona for all these years I've traveled high 40 many times. But the trail was basically a north of I 40. The trail went from a general area of Kansas City, Missouri and a southwestern direction to the Oklahoma Panhandle, then through Las Vegas. My biggest provolone and then up to Santa Fe, then there was the lemon, which called the mountain rafter that right about the Oklahoma Panhandle. It went into Colorado. And then saw from there to rattle and pass down to my poor union was established in the 1850s and joined up with the other side of the trail. This is native America calling, we would love to hear from you today, call in at one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. We're having a wonderful discussion today with doctor James riding in. You can also reach out on Facebook at native America calling or on Twitter at one 8 zero zero 9 9 native. We have to take a short break. We'll be right back. Life's an adventure, but your health shouldn't be. Check out open in Roman option, November 1 through January 15, contact your local Indian healthcare provider for more information, visit healthcare dot gov or call one 803 one 8 two 5 9 6 message from center for Medicare Medicaid service. Thanks for tuning in today. This is Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. We're learning about one of the most influential routes in American history. The Santa Fe trail. It was a means for displacement of many tribes from Missouri to New Mexico. It was also a source of commerce and cultural interaction for other tribes. Join our conversation today, the number is one 800 9 9 6 two 8 four 8 that's one 809 9 native. And we have a caller on the line, Tom. He's in wounded knee, South Dakota, he's listening on Keeley. Tom, you're on the air. Don't scale. I like to say, how are you doing? My beautiful sacred people out there. My comment on this Santa Fe trail, it leads me to talk about the man who is talking about doctrine of discovery that is itself deceiving. Just like here in Lakota land, the doctrine of discovery is a dimensional two dimensional doctrine. Now, in our ways, Lakota, when you reach Lakota, that's sacred. And it's all around. It's like water. It's all around us. And it's not deceiving. Where we learn it through years and many, many, many generations are to the tongue. That language itself keeps our people alive. Whether the doctrine of discovery is a two dimensional doctrine, where you could deceiving just like our language today in the school systems. They teach them with a two dimensional method. Okay, here's a piece of paper, you say, how are you? Don't scale or any write it down. Well, along ago, I ancestors didn't do that. We learned it through ears. We learned that through our tongue and I have a grandfather that we have a grandfather that always told us about that doctrine of discovery. I'll always remember, that's just invading piece of paper that they threw at us. Well, with our tongue, was our language. That's what keeps us alive. And I believe that. But with this pandemic going on, my mother, she's an elder. She's always saying prey every morning and every night. So I do. I do, I pray for my people. Not to I pray for first, but the Santa Fe trail itself is just the same thing what we went to and all the goods in stock can be thrown in. But that's their ways. Tom, thank you for those comments. And I'd like to ask James, Tom just mentioned the doctrine of discovery. How does that play into the creation or how did it play into the creation of the Santa Fe trail James? Well, it's just part of a broader mentality that Europeans and their progeny white Americans had superior rights to indigenous peoples. And we have to keep in mind that the mindset cast India's as warlike vicious and inferior subhumans. And that was just the justification. I think maybe to sue the consciousness or give the facade of legitimacy to ruthless territorial expansion and the access of lands and resource and to gain access to lands of resources belong to other peoples. And it's still a part of U.S. well today. The Supreme Court has cited a doctrine of discovery in recent years to help deny India land claims. So it's still witnesses of foundation of federal Indian policy. So what the doctor does at says that Indians do not have ownership rights of the land with discovery the land passed from the hands of indigenous peoples to the discovery European nation. Which.

Santa Fe trail New Mexico Oklahoma Panhandle James riding Santa Fe center for Medicare Medicaid s Sean spruce California Texas Panhandle Missouri U.S. Tom native America Midwest Kansas City Oklahoma Mexico army Arizona Keeley
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I was finished with that thought. James, your research begins with a really compelling narrative about you driving along the current route of where the Santa Fe trail was. Can you describe that experience and what information was available when you began your research? I took that trip because I had already begun that project on the Sanofi trail. I had gone to Nebraska, our ancestral plenty of homeland, which, you know, we were removed to Oklahoma in the 1870s. But I wanted to go along that route just to get an idea of the landscape because models places along the road and on a place names like plenty of rock, which was a view that several hundred feet tall that had a lot of mythology amongst quite Americans attached to it. There was a pawnee river and other places that had pony name. So I wanted to go through there just to look at it. And to see what was left of the trail and to look at some of those historical markers. And portal Arnold fort that was important along the trail. We need to mention that U.S. beginning in the late 18 20s. The United States military began to play a very vigorous role in the trail's history in trying to protect settlers who play in India's view to trespassers because no consent was given by them except in two instances in our treaties with the cause and the osage Indians that. Addressed the Senate trail in its traffic, but all the other groups we didn't have trails are treating excuse me that authorized the United States to expand into the plane. So Indians do this as trespassing. And the United States military came in to try to protect the settlers and their activities and their activities were along with travel. The travel spread disease led to conflict. Also peaceful relations. The livestock and the settlers are the travelers. Polluted water destroyed trees, plants, and other vegetation that Indians relied on. They desecrated sacred lands, the looted Indian burials. And engaged in other activities that created conflict that helped lead the conflict of perpetuate. That complex. So the United States military responded not to protect Indian rights and interests but to facilitate that trade to keep a lucrative end to try to protect these aggressors against the Indian reprisals. So there were forts established beginning in 1840s and 1820s moving patrols were used as mostly by infantry, which the planes India's were mounted. And they had a hard time training all these foot soldiers had a hard time trying to fight the plane's Indians because of their mobility. And so a whole string of floors were established. Now, James, there were some tribes that benefited from the Santa Fe trail. How did they do that? The ones that gained the most benefit from the trail were those Indian nations that were removed from east Mississippi River to west of the Mississippi River because of the Indian removal program the Indian removal act was passed, I believe it was an 1830. But even before then on the United States had purchased what's called Louisiana territory, which was still Indian territory, but that's the deed game that the Europeans played amongst themselves and white America was to trade or sell these land claims of lands belonging to Indian peoples. But anyways, the federal government almost 30 Indians into Kansas, eastern Kansas. And by then these groups have been pretty much politically subjugated and had lost the ability to resist U.S. expansion like Shawnee, who undertook her and others, you don't try to stop the expansion United States in the early 1800s. So these groups, they had to make some tough choices about how to live, and of many of them developed policies of accommodation and even cultural adaptation. So when I came into Kansas, the trail went right through the lands that were attained by the shawnees and the delawares and others. And these people began to service employees or some of these caravans guides, hunters, and even U.S. Military expeditions that went along the trail. And they also traded for their manual their agricultural produce with the travelers on the Santa Fe trail. So it did bring a degree of prosperity for many of them, not all. But after that territory was established as a U.S. territory, this eastern Kansas to the Kansas Nebraska act of 1854 settlers began moving in treaties where externalities encourage Indians or to force enhance to see more land than after the Civil War, the United States government began to move people from Kansas and the Indian territory or Oklahoma. And today there's a group left in Kansas and they were removed there up to the U.S. policies of removal. Now, you mentioned that the U.S. established the Santa Fe trail for the use of settlers, heading west, they then authorized federal troops to protect those settlers. Did the U.S. government anticipate that settlers wouldn't be welcomed? By these tribes, it was mostly traders who were using the trade route. To go over the trail. And by this time, that notion of manifest destiny was alive and well, even though that term manifest destiny wasn't coined until the 1840s by a guy named John Sullivan, but the concept of manifest destiny was ongoing and it's meant that quite Americans had a God given right to expand across the continent. And to take the land and resources for long to others. So it was a part of that mentality of expansionism, this mindset that the country was going to expand. And our Santa Fe trail was definitely a part of that of.

U.S. Santa Fe trail pawnee river Kansas Sanofi east Mississippi River Nebraska James Oklahoma India U.S. government Senate Mississippi River Shawnee Louisiana John Sullivan
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Too many do not have access to affordable high-speed Internet. That's why AARP fought for the emergency broadband benefit of federal program to help lower the cost of high-speed Internet for eligible households. Those who may have experienced financial setbacks during the pandemic or are struggling to get by may be eligible for a discount of up to $50 per month for high-speed Internet or up to $75 per month for households on tribal lands. Info at AARP dot org slash EB, AARP supports this show. You're listening to Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. The start of the Santa Fe trail turns 200 this year. For about 80 years, it was the main route west for countless settlers. Today we're getting the native view of the Santa Fe trail that cut across lands occupied by kiowa Cheyenne pawnee arapaho and other tribes. What do you know about the Santa Fe trail? Give us a call, the number is one 800, 9 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's one 809 9 native, and we're talking with doctor James writing in and James we've spoken earlier about the trade in connecting tribes with European settlers. And I remember as a young young child growing up in New Mexico and speaking with my grandmother and she would explain to me, especially I remember going up to Taos Pueblo one time and noticing that the Taos people had very different styles than our southern Pueblo people. And they wore their hair differently and they dressed differently. And she explained to me then that Taos at one point was a major trading hub for Pueblo people and native peoples in that area. And you had a lot of southern plains tribes that would come and trade with its house. And because of that, some of those cultural styles and appearances, the tells people adapted. So I'm curious, what are different cultural exchanges that occurred amongst different Native American tribes because of this Santa Fe trail? Those relations existed as you mentioned before the Sinai trail. Various playing groups had trading relations with the problems of Pegasus, which show with right by but at a time when pay close was in decline. There was a great deal of trade at the existing between the planes Indians and the pueblos. And it tells us a major trade center that brought a lot of people into the area and even tell us and other problems would go on to the planes and hunt buffalo periodically. After the Pueblo involved, a number of to house moved on to the planes for a number of years. And I think that probably helps explain the difference in the dress and the way that the Taos people wore the heroin and brains like a lot of the planes people did. In those years. So it was a trade that continued even after the Santa Fe trail. And it was just a part of that history of indigenous peoples come together in both the conflict and peaceful relations. What were some of the goods that were traded on the Santa Fe trail? These were good that were brought from the United States and these goods could be anything like cloth manufactured goods. Just a whole assortment of types of trade goods. And it was a very lucrative business for white America. A lot of money was made, so that's why the trail prospered and it became such a huge factor. And bringing non Indians through Indian land was the prospect of making the money a lot of money was indeed made off of the trail. But in it was also a route to bring sellers into New Mexico as well. And as I mentioned earlier about Spain, one, not quite Americans into their territory, especially for trading purposes. And Mexico changed that policy to the detriment of landholdings. So the Mexican war broke out in the United States of justification for forcing Mexico to see the hazardous territory, which I should mention was still in the land India has never seen it as land. It was acquired with some establish through what's called a doctrine to discovery this notion that Europeans were culturally and had this superior religion Christianity. And just the European passing through land or coming to the tip of it or whatever and claiming that land on the behalf of its crown. And so it's a part of this history of Western European expansion competition between competing coordinations and oftentimes and they just people being caught up in those relationships and that history. Now, you mentioned the Spanish-American War in its influence with the trail. The Civil War also occurred around that same time frame was the Santa Fe trail, a factor in the Civil War? It had to do with expansion, U.S. expansion, slavery was a big issue. And the country was divided over whether new territories should be free or a slave. And so, you know, that came into play that dialog compromises were tried to work out to keep the union together. To try to limit a number or keep balance problem between the number of free and slave states. I think the major impact of the Civil War would be was that it opened up more travel along the side of the trail, into New Mexico because resources that the country had that could have been used to support expansion where used to support bloody Civil War, which resulted in the deaths of about 600 thousand Americans. Yes. I'm sorry, go ahead. No, go ahead..

Santa Fe trail AARP Sean spruce Sinai trail Taos Pueblo James New Mexico United States Pueblo Santa Fe buffalo Mexico Spain India
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Like pandemics too. So beyond just being a trade route with goods being exchanged was also an avenue for sickness in pandemic, apparently. Now, the trail ran through what is now the state of Missouri into what is now New Mexico, but initially there were multiple trade routes that connected those territories. Can you talk about those different routes? Yeah. These people had lived in that area since the beginning of time according to our traditions. And there was a great deal of contact between the various Indian nations trade networks that existed throughout the Americas. So it's very likely that there was already a route there that the indigenous peoples had. Previously in the trail started a group of ponies actually led out an individual by the name of I forget his name, but he became one of the first governors of governors and New Mexico under the U.S. and they let him across southern plains into New Mexico. So that's just an example showing the knowledge that indigenous peoples had of the land. And the way to get from one destination to another. Folks we're talking today with doctor James riding in or learning about the Santa Fe trail, and we really would love to get your comments. Give us a call. One 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. We'll get you on the air. James, you mentioned earlier that New Mexico was at one time and during the early years of the Santa Fe trail it was under rule of the Spanish crown. And at one point, the Spanish crown made it illegal for trade among Native Americans. How did that impact the trail? The Spain's influence was our presence was pretty much gone by the time that the trail started. And then it became Mexican territory. So Mexico was open to trade. With the United States. So Spain was pretty much out of the picture by then, but before then Spain was a typical European colonizer trying to control indigenous peoples lands, resources and. Managed to conquer the pueblos of New Mexico and keep them under critical and cultural subjugation a number of years, but it didn't have the power to extend its reach into the planes. In 1721, Spain, delegation into pawnee countries had tried to control upon these ponies sometimes rated New Mexico and also engaged in trade relations with New Mexico. So the parties responded to that the Visa expedition was to fight and to defeat that party and just send it back to New Mexico. So my interpretation of that is that the pawnees contacts with those and other new about the negative aspects of Spanish colonization that tends to resist conversion to take lands. And to subject indigenous people still, of course, policies and involuntary labor. Folks, if you have a comment for today's show, call in one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. We're talking about the Santa Fe trail with doctor James riding in. You can also email at comments at native America calling dot.

New Mexico James riding Spain Santa Fe Missouri Americas U.S. James Mexico native America
"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Native America Calling

"And Prevention who support this show. Info at IP dot org or CDC dot gov slash coronavirus. Native voice one the Native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. An American history, perhaps no other established trade route had more influence than the Santa Fe trail. The nearly 900 mile link between Missouri, New Mexico could be considered the country's first major interstate highway, bringing loads of settlers to the southwest and beyond. If you're only introduction to the history of the Santa Fe trail, comes from old movies, are from many of the modern historical markers along the route. You might think tribes only connection to the trail were as relentless and violent aggressors to the lives and property of peaceful settlers, looking for a better life out west. But the true history ranges from displacement of established civilizations to a period of prosperity for some tribes. This year marks the 200th anniversary of the start of the Santa Fe trail. This hour will get a better view of what it meant for the many tribes in its path and its continuing legacy. And as always, we want to hear from you. Give us a call, the number is one 800 9 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's a one 809 9 native. Joining us today from Tempe, Arizona is doctor James writing in. He's the lead researcher and author of American Indians in the Santa Fe trail. Retired professor and founding member of the American Indian studies program at Arizona state university. He's pawnee. Welcome back to NEC James. Thank you. It's good to be back on air with you. James, I'd like to begin by asking you what inspired you to start your research on the Santa Fe trail. I began my research on the Santa Fe trail as I was doing my thesis and dissertation research back in the 1980s. And I wrote about the impact of the trail. Some of the impacts on the trail on people and pawnee confederacy. Then in around probably around 2009, 2010 I was contacted by the long distance trail program of the National Park Service to do an in depth study. On Indian relationships with the Santa Fe trail. And that project consisted of three separate components. One was an annotated heavily, which did about I looked at about 1500 sources and wrote blurbs on each of those as a part of that. And then the second part was a calendar contact this at all documented contact if I could come across between various Indian peoples and the Santa Fe trail. And that was very extensive and that the calendar of contact shows as your introduction mentioned that contact varied. It wasn't all warfare like. Historians often presented to be it's a very complex nuanced history. And then the third part was to write the impact right the impact of the trail on several different Indian nations. And I did it on my own people to play the comanches of the central planes and then to in the nations that had been removed from these Mississippi River to the wireless Mississippi River after the trail had already begun to function. And those were Shawnee and Delaware. Now, approximately when did the Santa Fe trail begin? It began in 1821 when an individual by the name of impact now. Traveled from Missouri to New Mexico and hopes of gaining trade relations with New Mexico at that time. It was a Spanish colony. And then the Mexican revolt occurred and Spain had tried to keep the U.S. out and for good reason. United States wherever went the citizens would move in and before you know it they were trying to take the land in which they often did. So you can understand why Spain tried to keep off the white Americans. But then Mexico had a policy of opening up trade. So that all happened in 1821 about the time back now entered in New Mexico. And it continued as an important, mostly a commercial trade route, and then as you mentioned in your introduction of bringing settlers into New Mexico. It began in earnest in 1822 and continued until Santa Fe the edges center peak in Santa Fe railroad came to a New Mexico, which made travel substantial leader easier for those who wanted to go back and forth between New Mexico and by which time New Mexico had become a territory of the United States. Now, there has not been a lot of research on the Santa Fe trail from a Native American perspective. Why is that, James? For one reason we have very few scholars. And there are so many issues to deal with. I think it's existed beyond a scope of 80 scholars. And my research, as I mentioned, has dealt with the pony confederacy in the pawnee people by and large. So the trail became a very important part of that relationship between the parties and the U.S. government and quite American citizens. And there was peaceful trade at times, but there was also some aspects of a very dark history. For example, in the early 1830s, a group of ponies had visited a caravan that was traveling along the trail. And when those pawnees got back to the pawnee homeland in central basket along the flat river, a smallpox epidemic broke out in the ponies attributed smallpox epidemic to gifts given to those individuals that were tainted with a smallpox virus. And that epidemic had a tremendous impact on the pawnee people. It killed about half of the population. And creates a lot of hardships.

Santa Fe trail New Mexico Sean spruce American Indian studies progra NEC James United States Missouri James Mississippi River Santa Fe Arizona state university Tempe National Park Service Arizona Spain Shawnee Delaware Mexico
 Sheriff: Movie set showed 'some complacency' with weapons

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Sheriff: Movie set showed 'some complacency' with weapons

"Investigators say there was some complacency and how weapons were handled last week on a movie set when actor Alec Baldwin accidentally shot two crew members one fatally I marches are a letter with the latest Santa Fe county sheriff adamant does assess testing is under way to determine whether the projectile taken from director Joe Sousa shoulder is the same one that killed cinematographer Colina Hutchins Mendoza says investigators are examining two other guns that were recovered from the set as well as five hundred rounds of ammunition we suspect that there was other live rounds that were found on the set I won't comment further on how they got there Mendoza says there is no film footage of the incident scent

Joe Sousa Alec Baldwin Santa Fe County Colina Hutchins Mendoza Mendoza
Advice for Alec Baldwin after the shooting tragedy on the set of 'Rust'

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Advice for Alec Baldwin after the shooting tragedy on the set of 'Rust'

"Idea of what investigators have learned about the fatal shooting on the set of rust last week so far most of what we have learned officially has come from court papers to support warrants that were filed in the case in which Alec Baldwin accidentally kill the cinematographer on the movie rust but today the Santa Fe county sheriff's department and county district attorney got to meet with reporters and share what they've learned the DA Mary Carmack old wise tells the Associated Press that the probe is still in its early stages that suggests we will not be hearing any bombshell news such as whether criminal charges will be filed he says the investigation is nowhere near the point where decisions are being made about filing charges and that prosecutors will not act until the probe is complete meanwhile

Santa Fe County Sheriff's Depa Mary Carmack Alec Baldwin The Associated Press
Alec Baldwin fatally shoots crew member with prop gun

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Alec Baldwin fatally shoots crew member with prop gun

"Court records include new details on the shooting death of a cinematographer on the New Mexico set of Alec Baldwin's new movie a search warrant obtained by the Santa Fe county sheriff's office so they could document the scene says the gun was one of three that the film's armorer had said on a cart outside the wooden structure were seen was being filmed and that the assistant director who grabbed the gun from the cart handed the gun to Alec Baldwin without realizing the gun was loaded with live rounds cinematographer Elena Hutchins was fatally shot in the chest director Joel Souza who was standing behind her was wounded Baldwin says he's shocked and saddened by what he described as a tragic accident Adam Egypt Mortimer who worked with Hutchins on a twenty twenty action film arch enemy said she was a brilliant talent like she was smiled and she was like oh so you mean we're gonna shoot it European style I'm

Santa Fe County Sheriff's Offi Alec Baldwin Elena Hutchins Joel Souza New Mexico Adam Egypt Mortimer Baldwin Hutchins
Sheriff: Baldwin fired prop gun that killed cinematographer

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Sheriff: Baldwin fired prop gun that killed cinematographer

"Authorities are investigating a deadly incident involving actor Alec Baldwin Alec Baldwin was making a movie in New Mexico when he fired a prop gun killing the cinematographer and wounding the director say authorities Alec Baldwin spokesman says this was an accident involving the miss buyer of a prop gun with blanks Alec Baldwin reportedly was seen crying outside the sheriff's office but he didn't say anything to reporters a Santa Fe county sheriff's spokesman says detectives are investigating no immediate charges were filed I'm ready to fall lady

Alec Baldwin New Mexico Santa Fe County
Alec Baldwin Kills a Cinematographer on Set

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Alec Baldwin Kills a Cinematographer on Set

"We got to talk about Alec Baldwin. The tragedy of killing a cinematographer on this set of a movie called rust in New Mexico. How weird. How weird that on yesterday's Patreon. I ended the show by saying, and this was before the news had happened. I ended the show by saying, you know what? I want to do some shows next week on John Eric hexum and Brandon Lee, two actors who had killed on set with prop guns. I wish you would Patreon so you could have heard that. So eerie, I'll get those shows to you guys next week. But for now, we've got to try and figure out and make sense. What the hell happened was Baldwin? The Santa Fe sheriff's department confirmed that Thursday night, Alec Baldwin discharged the prop gun that killed the cinematographer, halyna Hutchins and injured the director Joel Souza on the set of this big western feature film on location in New Mexico. Hutchins was 42 years old. She died being transported to the hospital in Albuquerque. Sus 48 remains in a local hospital and his condition is going to be fine. It's unknown, but he ain't gonna die. And of course, they're saying mister Baldwin was questioned by investigators and released no arrests or charges have been filed. We've seen pictures of him and I'm sure you haven't been crying on cell phones bent over distraught. I'm not trying to make light of this. This is horrible. This is horrifying. I love Alec Baldwin as an actor. I hate his politics, but I love him as an

Alec Baldwin John Eric Hexum Patreon Santa Fe Sheriff's Department New Mexico Brandon Lee Halyna Hutchins Joel Souza Baldwin Mister Baldwin Hutchins Albuquerque
Sheriff: Baldwin fired shot on movie set that killed woman

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Sheriff: Baldwin fired shot on movie set that killed woman

"A famous actor has been involved in the deadly incident on a movie set in New Mexico what was supposed to be a routine day of filming for the western movie Restos turned tragic the movie's director of photography it's dead and director Joe Sousa was injured when they were shot by a prop gun discharged by actor Alec Baldwin it's unclear how the incident occurred authorities near Santa Fe are investigating the photo director identified as halo Hutchins was airlifted to a hospital where she died so that was taken to the ER at another hospital local news reports say Baldwin was seen at the sheriff's office in tears but reporters were unable to listen a comment from him Baldwin is listed as both star and producer of the movie production on it has been shut down I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Restos Joe Sousa Halo Hutchins New Mexico Alec Baldwin Santa Fe Baldwin Oscar Gabriel
1 dead, 1 wounded after prop firearm discharged on "Rust" movie set

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

1 dead, 1 wounded after prop firearm discharged on "Rust" movie set

"A tragic incident on a movie set in New Mexico authorities near Santa Fe New Mexico say a woman is dead and a man injured after they were both shot by a prop fire arm on a movie set the woman aged forty two was airlifted to a hospital where she died the man also forty two was receiving emergency care at another hospital authorities did not identify either victim nor did they say whether they were actors or crew members the victims were working on the western movie rust directed by Joel Souza and produced by Alec Baldwin production on the movie now has been halted I'm

New Mexico Santa Fe Joel Souza Alec Baldwin
A highlight from In the Rear-View Mirror

Does This Happen to You

02:24 min | 1 year ago

A highlight from In the Rear-View Mirror

"I've only ever owned one car. She was my first grownup purchase. After graduation it became quickly evident. That the scooter. I'd used zip around campus. Wasn't going to cut it on the streets of seattle. My dad helped me find her on e. bay. She was a used. Two thousand two hyundai santa fe with skin peppered and dense. She'd previously been involved in a rollover situation but her guts were unharmed while her previous owner wasn't thrilled at the thought of hanging onto an imperfect vehicle. I was poor and open to the idea. She costs seven thousand dollars. It was a fortune. Then let's be honest also now but she seemed worth it as she was sturdy. Safe and even trendy. If you squinted your eyes and allowed for creative liberties. I was bigger than still swollen with the possibilities of the lives. I might lead a wealthy novelist a stylish professor or quirky artist a journalist and actor or maybe a movie director but most of all a dancer. Fuck i wanted to be a dancer so badly in made my stomach hurt if i reflected on it too long as i couldn't possibly want something that much and not get it. I was certain everything would work out. I drove the santa fe. Too many exotic locations my retail jobs. My performing jobs might teaching jobs. My dance students thought she was cool. And everyone knows high-schoolers get to decide these things. I started a dance company. I piled costumes props and dancers into the santa fe and drove them to every show. I could book. my friends. were beginning to quit dance. Giving up the old dream for husbands and office jobs. I decided to be better than that. I was going to dance forever. I was probably going to drive the santa fe forever because there was no way i'd ever afford another car on what i was making foreshadowing. I hold onto

Comedy Humor Audiobooks Narration Stories Funnystories Hyundai Seattle Santa Santa Fe
Biden's Vaccine Mandate Spawns New GOP Fears: Finding and Keeping Workers

AP News Radio

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Biden's Vaccine Mandate Spawns New GOP Fears: Finding and Keeping Workers

"The president's executive order setting vaccine mandates for both public and private employers touches off a chorus of legal threats from GOP governors Florida governor Ron DeSantis spears massive job losses this order would result potentially and millions of Americans losing their jobs but Jonathan cherub the CEO of a company that runs a number of car dealerships in South Florida since two of his workers have died and a number of others had to leave the job because of long term effects of covert nineteen we need to get it under control we need to be able to go forward in our lives as we once know it at the la Fonda on the plaza hotel in Santa Fe New Mexico general manager Rick blight says eighty five percent of his staff of well more than one hundred people are vaccinated and the mandate will eliminate his concerns about guests who may or may not be vaccinated having my step after that is one thing and that's great and I'll be very happy about that but also knowing that a lot of people walking through our doors are working for bigger employers hopefully and also vaccinated I'm timid wire

Ron Desantis Spears Jonathan Cherub Rick Blight GOP La Fonda South Florida Florida Plaza Hotel Santa Fe New Mexico
"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Good afternoon. Santa Fe. Good after north New northern one of my sins. Good afternoon, northern New Mexico. Happy Friday. I'm drunk today. No, I'm not efcc. I'm not. I swear to God him. It's Friday. Ninth day of July, seven minutes after 1 91 degrees, air quality is excellent. It's in the team's humidity is 21%. Yeah, we got big, old white puffy clouds out there in A chance terrain, not a great chance, but a chance of rain. Air quality is 16, which is in the green. Good number. Today. 93 63 overnight can terrain tomorrow mid nineties low eighties on Sunday with a 60% chance some ran and then continuing every day next week, but immediately 20% chance of rain today in 91, Alright in honor of mumble be Bob. Bumble Bee Bob will New Bumblebee Bob He was a jazz aficionado, so I thought I'd play a little Ornette today in honor of the passing Bumble Bee Bumble want to get into that a little bit because it's It's so Santa, but it is so Serapis All right. First half hours wide. Open Anything you want to chat about phone number. 505424 12 60. Email Richard N. Santa fe dot com. Be now in 1 30 Wide open Mayor Alan Webber at 1 30 today. The New Mexico Tourism Department. Deputy Secretary Antoinette Vehicle two o'clock Author.

21% 505424 12 60 60% 20% Today Sunday Santa Fe today next week Bob Santa northern New Mexico two o'clock Friday 1 30 today 91 Richard N. Santa 16 tomorrow mid nineties First half hours
Summer Camps Return With Fewer Campers and Counselors

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Summer Camps Return With Fewer Campers and Counselors

"Summer camps are back but with fewer campers and counselors all fifty states are allowing summer camps this year corona virus related rules will be in place Tom Rosenberg with the American camp association says the goal this summer is to have fun to get there we actually have to agree to follow these basic rules and I'll listen to this camp directors who are doing their best to care for children Josh Nelson says the Glorietta adventure camps near Santa Fe New Mexico a ready to go fly lines you have mountain scooters the waterfront's huge the camps will have mask rules they have the same book rooms so that's where they can take the mask off at night or when they're sitting down at meals at their table Margaret JP's children are going to camp in Kansas it's a sign that things are getting back to normal the camps in New Mexico will be at one third capacity I bet Donahue

Tom Rosenberg Josh Nelson American Camp Association Santa Fe New Mexico Margaret Jp Kansas Donahue
Santa Fe Women Built Air Purifiers to Protect People From Smoke

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Santa Fe Women Built Air Purifiers to Protect People From Smoke

"Org. summer approaches sodas the worst wildfire season last summer a wildfire burned thousands of acres in the sangre de cristo mountains in new mexico people in the knobby pueblo and several other nearby indigenous communities face dangerous air pollution so they were getting a lot of smoke and being severely affected by kerry wood is with three sisters collective a group of indigenous activists women in santa fe during the fire the group mobilized to help protect pablo residents from breathing. Smoke polluted air. They collected donations and purchase. More than fifty air purifiers but local stores soon ran out so the women made about sixty by hand so you just buy a basic box some duct tape and an air filter that is rated to filter smoke and you literally just duct tape the filter to the box fast. The collective donated the air purifiers to vulnerable pueblo residence. They're fast response and ingenuity help. Protect people during a crisis but woods says his wildfires get more extreme. Local agency should take steps to

Sangre De Cristo Mountains Kerry Wood New Mexico Santa Fe Pablo Pueblo Woods
"santa fe" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Our strategy this year and has it worked. I mean obviously it's not going to like literally replace the physical exhibitions but has done a decent job for you. All it has it definitely has and then we've also paired that with our photo i. conversations series so if you go to the photo blog and type in so do i. Conversations you can find a number of those both the mark levin exhibition and the edward bateman exhibition we actually or the artist and i collaborated on virtual walk. Throughs of online exhibitions. So this is not something you would have seen in past years. But think mark and i spent a good hour and a half walking through his entire online exhibition virtually as the gallery director. Did you find it to be sort of like you. Do realize these new technologies even though there are technologies your company created but like utilize. New technologies was it. Did it save you all time. Like soleil in the long run like did you spend less time than you would physically installing or or money. For that matter then doing physical exhibition you can definitely put together an online exhibition a little bit faster. And the third is no. You don't have to worry about shipping and framing or or how you know maybe we wouldn't have been able to show a seventy by eighty piece because we didn't have the space for it when you're looking at online it doesn't matter you don't have to worry about those details. In terms of the programming rixon actually designed a whole new templates specifically for the online exhibitions. So there there was a lot of work that went into that. We still have plenty of things to do. It's just a different way of going about it. Okay last little bit. I swear. I keep saying last question last. 'cause you brought up this new technology and stuff in your not really asking you to prognosticate the future but like as your experiences of doing both like brick and mortar exhibitions will probably continue once. Everything is opened up again. Do you foresee still continuing to do these. Virtual exhibitions also or they. Are you gonna stop planned to stop doing those once. You have brick and mortar ability. Hard to say. But i as of today i believe will probably continue to do both on a certain level. The technology in the website for waistband. A big part of what we do to begin with. So i think just this strange year. We've all had had just kind of pushed us to be a little. Yeah however long it's been going on has pushed us to be a little more creative and just think of different ways that we can reach. Our audience and a lot of our audience is actually outside of santa fe so having the online exhibitions and the talks on zoom will be helpful. I think moving forward even when we can resume business as usual or whatever that's going to be more true okay. Well thank you very much. For your time allie. Welcome nice to meet you too. Hopefully you'll come to prague and you bring that print with you. So i can see what this or a tone pronuncia truly looks like in reality at gotta add just because i love them. They look different in different light. Sources more excited. You can lower the lights and the any ambient light in the room. We'll just bounce off that gold. So that's one thing that is missing and the online exhibitions again video. Submissions this talking about got to be able to do these kinds of things to show people how things can look different in different situations. I think it's important in the future. I enjoy making these podcasts. And having all these great conversations. I hope you're enjoying them as much as i do. If you joy in appreciate podcast please give us a five star rating and a nice comment would also be greatly appreciated. Please tell your friends to listen to subscribe. You can find us on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. And if there's a professional person in the arts industry any level of the arts industry. I don't care if they're institutional museum curator's or if they're your local galleries or artist if you would like me to have a conversation with them. Please send me a message through instagram. And i'll do my best to get them as a guest on the podcast. additionally if you have any questions but specific questions not vague. Open-ended interpretive questions for future guests send them to me and i will be happy to ask them on your behalf. Please be sure to follow us on instagram. Until your friends about us as well we will be starting a newsletter in the near future which will keep you updated with our future plans future guests and everything else that we're going to be doing associated with the podcast. Please sign up at our website. Wise fool pod dot com. And whatever you're doing right now be sure to have fun.

seventy today mark this year eighty piece both third mark levin hour and a half rixon edward bateman
"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Of Santa Fe on Katie RC Santa Fes News talk leader. What All right. Well, I think that was the that was that there there draw things so I'm only going to be the end of mad experiment. But you don't know until you try right? Lose his 30 minutes after three o'clock. It's gotten really confusing as Tonto. This new vaccine by Johnson and Johnson. Obviously, there's big upside much easier to manufacture much easier, too. Ship and to store and it's one shot and yet You see that? It's Mean that's the danger of headlines once again, just reading the headlines. It's 85% effective. Actually, that's not really the truth. It's 66% effective and preventing covert 19. It's 85% effect, even preventing you if you have a code night covered 19 from getting really, really sick. Those are not the same things at least in my mind when I'm gonna evaluate. Um I'm gonna get two shots. I'm going to get one shot. I'm gonna go suffer a little bit of a sore arm. Maybe a slight fever. And get 95% protection from the disease or the one shot and basically get 66% protection from the disease. Oh, my goodness. 31 minutes after three. Anything on your mind? We gotta happen our wide open.

Santa Fes News Santa Fe Johnson
"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Afternoon Santa Fe. Happy Tuesday. My test seven minutes after one o'clock, Nice day in the capital right now it's 40 degrees a little bit of wind. And a whole bunch of smoke. We'll get to that in the 2nd 40 right now. True. Wind from the north. When a minute 12 meeting you humidity 22% with the cat today 43 20 overnight Tomorrow 50 Thursday, probably around 50, Friday, mid forties, the 50 Saturday the sin. Well overnight in the mid to upper twenties, But tonight 21 degrees right now it's 40 here and sentiment. Eight minutes after one o'clock. First hour is wide open. I wanna call and vent. Hall and promote talk about Chad about 505424 12 61st hours wide open. Dr Michael Lin Wan will join us at two o'clock medical doctor heads up the African American Wellness Project. Three o'clock today. We're gonna talk to Julian Overton from the Santa Fe National Fourth. What's up with the smoke? Julianne? And then Dr Windy Johnson. Our weekly chat with the doctor about co vered 19 505424 12, 60. Anything which had about Oh, okay, we'll stand by..

Santa Fe Santa Fe National Fourth Dr Michael Lin Wan Dr Windy Johnson Julian Overton African American Wellness Proj Julianne Chad Hall
"santa fe" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"santa fe" Discussed on KOMO

"Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway, says three of the car's ruptured, spilling crude oil onto the ground. Greg Hershel to comb Oh news and a major mess in traffic headache for those writing the Kingston Edmund Ferry route this morning, a logging truck dumped its load as it was trying to get off the ferry blocking the ramp. Preventing anyone else from leaving. Michael Galligan was in a car behind the track when it happened to the log truck basically disconnected in the lost so Covering the entire around The accident forced the Edmund's very to be out of service for several hours this afternoon. Come on news time. 3 34. Let's find out what kind of a mess we have out there now. Traffic every 10 minutes on the force from the Dubin Law Group Traffic Center. Here's Marina. Well, it's definitely been a mess, trying to head through North Bend towards Snoqualmie area to Highway 18 because of an earlier car fire. It was a collision car fire that had several lanes blocked at one point, So that's why it's so incredibly tough. Westbound. I 90 at the moment. On DeSoto it once you get to just before you get to highway 18, Then things clear out and it's looking good. All the way through is a quality sound down. Four or five is slow in Bellevue from Northeast eight to Newcastle north and by five getting quite heavy from north Gate to the county line amount like terrorist south and I five slow from Highway 18 into The five curve, and we've had quite the fairy Wait today From Michael T. O to Clinton. It's now a two hour way. At one point, it was a three hour wait from Michael T. O to Clinton. This next look at traffic at 3 44 an update on the weather. Now here's Coma meteorologist Kristen Clarke. What a beautiful day of whether we have on the last Monday in 2020. Today is gonna be the lone sunny.

Dubin Law Group Traffic Center Kingston Edmund Ferry Michael T. O Michael Galligan Clinton Greg Hershel Santa Fe Railway Kristen Clarke Edmund Burlington north Gate Newcastle Bellevue
"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"santa fe" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Leader at 12 60 am 1037 FM. I'm your host Jennifer Viele and I am very pleased to welcome sage paste are today he is the founder and executive Director of Photo Forum Gallery Welcome Thank you. Thanks for having. Yeah, It's nice to meet you, Um, so photo Forum. Santa Fe is a nonprofit. Um, photography organization. Um, tell us a little bit about the gallery and the organization. Yes. Oh, photo form Santa Fe. I opened up three years ago. And we're right down the street from sight. Santa Fe at 17 14% area, Peralta and, um, I grew up here in Santa Fe. I got my undergrad at University of New Mexico. Oh, and then I left. Like a lot of us dream to do When we come from such a small town and I write California and spent about 10 years out there, got my masters at Cal Arts and came back to New Mexico to teach at Santa Fe is too Of university tonight and closed. I always want to start this nonprofit that focused on photography and education and teaching. And so when they closed and lost my job there, and it now is the time and so we want this non profit on. We have a gallery in the front where we give artist solar shows, and we do workshops in the back, So that's a little bit about us. That's great. So you do you involve the community through workshops you have visiting artists, lectures do some research and community outreach. What did you study at Cowards? Colorants. I studied in the photo immediate apartment with Alan School and a bunch of great professors up there. So are you a photographer? Yeah, you are. That's great. So you have a show up right now in, um, photo from Santa Fe, right? Yeah, we have made gold show up. It's our first show after really opening after the pandemic. Um and we had a nice opening, and we just let about five people in at a time. And yes, she's an amazing artist from U. N. M. And she really focuses on the apparatus and the camera and the tools that we use to make our pictures Right now she's working on a body of work that focus is on using all the dies from the leftover inks in the printers. So she takes those dies. And then she dies. Different things and Photographs them or uses them as objects to create different art. She also did a great series where she did kind of the inside of the camera, the viewfinder, so she's very interested in kind of how we create these images and the tools we use. It's so interesting because photography is really a diverse medium, isn't it? Yeah, There's so many different ways to kind of articulate your ideas of how we see the world using a camera And then as well, like, you know, you give someone a camera and you put him in the same, uh, Situations. Same, You know, portraiture object and you're always going to get a different picture. So that's amazing. So growing up in Santa Fe, you know What? What sort of led you to want to study photography? And what kind of drove you to be a photographer? You know, I think being around the arts in Santa Fe, I was always around the arts. And it's always the inspiration and then going to you and M. I kind of just stumbled into at the time it was. You know, the top program in the nation and we had Patrick, not Akani there and then Joyce naming this from Chicago moved there. Who ran the Chicago Art Institute for a really long time. And so I was just really inspired by the faculty there and kind of the way of using this camera to tell your story, And that was kind of like my inspiration. And then you never know you pick up that camera and then you start telling that story, and if it clips you keep continuing that on your path, and it clicked for me so Right? I think Sometimes people do not realize that you and him photography department is really a renowned photo department. Was Joel. Peter Witkin still there when you were there? No, he wasn't there at the time. It was Joyce Patrick and Jim Stone and Adrienne Salinger. Cool cook. Well, if you're interested in photo forum, Santa Fe you can tell us your website. It Z. Yeah, our website f o T. O f o R um Santa fe dot com. And you can visit that and check out what we're up to The shows that we have. We're doing a member show that's coming up. Yeah, Let's talk about this. So if you're just joining us, you're listening to coffee and culture here on Katie RC. I'm Jennifer Viele. And I'm speaking with sage paste Er, who is the founder and executive director of Photo Forum Santa Fe, which is a nonprofit organization, and so you have membership program. Um Right? Yeah, we were trying to activate the community and be an asset and really bring the community together. So last year we had our first annual members show It was a hit. We had over 25 artists in it. Um, you know, it's before coded, so it was packed. It was great to just see all the you know, Young told artists in the community getting together and talking and And really enjoying themselves. So we're doing it again this year. Um, the deadline is January 15th. So if you'd like to become a member of that our website go to memberships last donate, and you can see all the information how you become a member as well as how you enter the dream show. That's great. Yes, So the pandemic is just kind of put a big crimp in everyone's style, to say the least, to say the least. That's been tough. So you had to close for a little while, huh? Yeah, we've been closed during the pandemic, and then we reopened for make sure we had a really nice opening. But then the governor closed everything down again. And we closed. Um you know, we are small space and Santa faces sleepy town, So we're still able to operate at 25% and get people in here, You know, wearing masks, we provide hand sanitizer, and we only allow before people and at a time so that Z great and again and tell people if they want to come Visit what your hours are and the address again. You're down the street from sight. Santa Fe, Right? Yeah, we're right in a great area right in the gallery district. Right down the street from sight. Santa Fe at 17 14 Paseo De Peralta on our hours are Thursday Friday from 12 to 5 over by appointment and just email Me and it's sage at photo Forum Santa fe dot com..

Santa Fe founder and executive Director Um Santa Jennifer Viele Joyce Patrick Paseo De Peralta University of New Mexico Chicago Art Institute Cal Arts California Peralta New Mexico Alan School Peter Witkin Chicago Katie RC Joel Young