20 Burst results for "Santa Clara University"

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

03:41 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Engineers have been a good position to be in you make the maximum contribution for three decades. You're going to have to start worrying about your tax rate in retirement. That was the best decision i made. The current paper is on what you didn't know about. Ross two versions for another time. We spend so much time in investing. Talk about the really sexy stuff. But that's what everyone wants to talk about. But i say look. Some of the most imported drivers are what you just alluded to how much you decide to save in the first place and when you start investing in the consistency like that trumps everything else in my mind and then taxes is such a massive one. That people don't like to talk to about because it's boring in sometimes. It's not only boring but it's also complicated and involves the government so it's even worse than just on and on but then it also gets complicated because you have history and then it's a potentially unknown uncertain future where tax rates may be higher or lower in the future when you retire and your tax rate may be higher lower and so it gets complicated quick for all sorts of those types of analysis which of course exactly right i found it to be my next fascinating topic. Because you're gonna dig into the details. Average tax rate versus marginal tax rate is just nine year old. And everyone's a seeing manhattan since the cease named danny madden knowsley listeners. Might know he likes to a barons piece. I put out in two thousand six hundred thousand seven roth accounts. And he explained to me how we're really worked in manhattan. I said there's so much pressure so much urge to recommend roth conversions. It makes no sense to me. Can't make taxes pencil out a said you don't understand. The adviser is seeking build this. He finds a wealthy client. Who is not any. It's any pinches. A roth conversion because tax forever. What's not to like in wins the account. These obviously the existing adviser had been too stupid to reprimand ross few version so that opened my eyes to games advisors play which is them. Hey i got this hot new idea to ernie to a roth counter current advisor. Not tell you about this then. I wanna switch sesame resins over here. I'll be handled. Version actually starts setting up. The stretch in conclusion of the current paper is roth. Conversions almost always out as long as you live past ninety in never touched on. What do you mean. I plan on. living to. At least one twenty is a good planning horizon that russell payoff one hundred twenty than professor. This has been a lot of fun. We didn't even get into about ten more topics. Ancient dna evidence all sorts of other fun topics but where do our listeners. Go they wanna read some more. Your papers your blog. What's the best spot to keep up to date with. What's up too awfully. Open it on the webpage. Ma'am i really start with the new lessons for market history. That's the rap among the four years of effort into two hundred years of financial market data. There's a link to the blog posts somewhere in that paper if you will put a link up to and then the other thing is if you go on. Sr in dot com on social science research network up on you can search author last name all the stuff i put up. There is free to down. I would welcome more readers. That's all missing awesome. Edward we will add. Those ought to the show chenault lakes listeners. Thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks.

Edward two thousand three decades Ross two hundred years today ernie two versions manhattan danny madden one hundred nine year old years dot com russell payoff ninety six hundred thousand seven first place one twenty twenty
"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

01:47 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Nine point nine percent of all total return not because they all but because of the funny math of compounding wounds excellence creighton lindor so basically i had to go back and kind of re look at metrics in invent a couple but let me tell you what i found decree nineteen twenty. Six relationship between dividends told returns is very different from post my interests relationship so anything you would gather from the stocks funds bills inflation yearbook wouldn't apply in earlier tracks in fact even since nineteen twenty six and thinks folks like yourself who are investing managing business for living no this contribution of dividends to total return has gone down down down and x. near a post nineteen twenty six weeks yet present. It used to be that dividends accounted for more than a hundred percent of return. What was that me. There was given in return and there was a blow zero price appreciation. Return so jolo return might have been five. Even yield was five and a half percent because rice appreciations consistent negative basically before the civil war and even before nineteen hundred everything was kind of super real estate investment trust reached today by law a up ninety percent of crooning says diverts and that was the concept back among anx insurance companies railroads if he made a profit apple shareholders notion.

nine percent five today more than a hundred percent civil war anx apple nineteen twenty six weeks Six Nine point five and a half percent nineteen twenty six ninety percent nineteen creighton lindor nineteen twenty couple hundred
"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

02:37 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"To accept asian. Data is kind of we have a different kind of economic system here in the united states. Young man bubble ball in france will nineteen sixty. Two twenty twenty ons beat stocks. So if you broaden the lambs away from the united states there does not appear to be any necessary limits on how long things can go before stocks. Come back into our what you might have a sixty year missing horizon. Although i think i'll be the old folks home by the end of that period but sixty years and you would have been better off than bonds rather than stocks frenching this. You got a good chart. We always like to talk about international investing. Because you look it's only one country and fewer. I were sipping champagne and argentina. One hundred and twenty years ago or many of the other countries in the world that were considered some of the top ten economies or countries. You'd place bets on you end up with a very different conclusion. One hundred twenty years hence austria being a country that had poor returns versus maybe a south africa which had great returns. Us is somewhere in the upper side of it. But yeah like you mentioned. I mean there's countries you have a great table in your paper looking at the worst case scenario outside the us for twenty thirty fifty years and you know many cases you have countries that are negative in all three buckets but particularly with the twenty years and so last year. We were talking about this on twitter. And i said. I just want people to remember this but us stocks and the long bond had the same returns last year for like forty years. You know i mean it was pretty darn close and i said just remember you know as you think about investing returns in all these survey after survey after survey that investors that they talk about an asset class or an active manager. God forbid they hire knocked a manager that they're going to judge based on one to two years and i say so much bad behavior i save you. Think even if you get a buffet even if you get a amazing manager they'll go through periods of three four five six years of terrible performance or an asset class right now that may be well before this year commodities or foreign stocks or who knows what value style but these things have a way of oscillating over time. Those oscillations can last a pretty darn longtime any of your listeners. You have cut the teen.

sixty year twitter france two years united states last year one forty years twenty thirty fifty years One hundred and twenty years a south africa One hundred twenty years one country this year sixty years asian nineteen sixty Two twenty twenty ons twenty years three
"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

02:20 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Then they fall all the way back the next few decades until the next door and they guess seagull again express the conventional wisdom when he said that you know basically all the inflation there's ever been in the united states from were to reflect through nineteen four that's like saying crisis were flat from july nineteen seven to july one thousand nine hundred ninety. Yeah sorta in the end because what it actually happened was inflation had gone up gonda on on now and ended flat there at were june in didn't really start what we think of as the currency stage until after nineteen sixty-five great inflation postings both break with gold lynch in the end of world war two by far to something else going on there i try not to give too many explanations at this stage were because it's more important to simply say dingy. No nineteenth century was a period that saw out of inflation followed by bouts of deflation deflation of fifty percent ext. japan look like a hiker. And yet you still economic growth. You still have stock market returns but during those deflationary you him trump on market turns the takeaway might be in the absence of deflation. Can you make any real money in bungs in the nineteenth century when there was plenty of deflation people. They good money in bonds buzz much. They made in stocks. As course deflation is not good for pricing power in a company profitability now. The deflation has been banished from these shores by government victim. Bonds may never return again but they did in the nineteenth century. Except after they've plunged you can show radically invite the reader to try this. You can do it with stocks bonds bills and inflation your data nine hundred eighty two to two thousand thirteen. Rake stock rally. You might remember. Most refund relatively performed about the same so the exceptional error. The thing that segel's entire.

fifty percent world war two nineteenth century nine hundred eighty july nineteen seven july trump united states june one thousand two thousand thirteen both nineteen sixty -five next few decades nineteen four japan ninety two nine hundred
"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

02:10 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"It. W now back the show putting this together you think about it. I have my own interpretations. But i'd like to hear yours certainly of someone who had their hands super in the weeds. On all this data you know as you look back and kinda extrapolate from these different periods. What are your main thoughts when it comes to stocks bonds bills inflation with your data sat. What's the main kind of way points. I'm glad you mentioned that. were inflation. because that's going to be another parts and let me start with a conventional. Wisdom is up. Everybody know that when the united states broke late to gold in nineteen thirty four. It was like someone rang. A bell in unrest. The inflationary hounds until that hero all fokker finally slain the beast as right see fiat currency is afraid that some of your listeners will move on to watch just paper money. How do you stop inflation. If you go back and look at record year-by-year two hundred years. That story is just practically a bedtime store. It's not very good sculpture. So what you actually want. Is that through the end of world. War chew in milton. Friedman had nineteen fifty two paper. He thought world war two inflation peaked in nineteen forty eight in half and he showed graphically that will were to inflation and will one inflation in civil war and they should in. I added ward eighteen. Twelve inflation during wartime. I says double. That's just what they do that. Let's the historical record and then. The missing cheeks not emphasized by friedman known to very many folks is that rice's double jury coming and then they fall all the way back the next few decades until the next door and they guess seagull again express the conventional.

Friedman two hundred years Twelve inflation world war eighteen milton nineteen fifty two paper civil war friedman next few decades double nineteen thirty four nineteen forty eight in half one inflation double jury united states two
"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

03:18 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"And that's the foundation of my challenge segel's stock market and so tell us the results i mean first of all i mean i was hoping you could say you just sent a bunch of poor grad students on the task. They're kinda lower cost wage but sounds like you did a lot of this work. So god bless you but what were some of the takeaways. Once you started compiling at would you start to draw out as far as insights will eventually have to sit way back to the bond history too long story. Short stocks didn't do as well before the civil war is senior. Would lead to expect in bonds did rather better after the civil war than sequel lead you to expect in the net of all that is that as of nineteen forty two if you invested in stocks or you invested in bonds you had the exact same portfolio first hundred fifteen years stocks and bonds repairing and. That's a pretty significant conclusion if you had to attributed to just any sort of main data points is it estimated dividend yield. They used or what were sort of the main muscle movements on why the conclusion is somewhat different than what others have found someone to my surprise segel's finger to the wind. Dividend estimate wasn't app are are now force. Fine constant he'll to what was fact. Fluctuating yields this dicey in the abstract but in the end that was not the problems. Seibel cbs's probably with seems thesis was the prior to eighteen seventy one. His sources left out the van. Pauls stock still went down canals. That never made a penny rewrote. That never paid. A dividend bust the second bank of the united states and the other banks that went bust through panic of eighteen nineteen panic meeting three so so most of the change. Most of the challenge to seagulls stock market is prior to the civil that period in us. Stock market street is different than looking after people did not make as much money as stock. Investors are accustomed to nick today returns for now the parody performance through one thousand nine hundred. Forty two is an amalgam of the newly discovered poor stock performance prior to the civil war in the newly discovery shining. Bond after civil war is putting those two together that creates the shocking to some finding of jerry lewis through nineteen to at some point. We'll have to talk about what changed. How different most nineteen forty two was. But i don't think we're there yet helped. Yes you yeah. I would still laying the foundation. I mean this is fascinating to me. You mentioned the bond data. Was that sort of a similar inquiry or was that something totally different again the source for bolan prices is the silla spreadsheets got.

civil war two first hundred fifteen years three today nineteen one thousand nine hundred second bank Forty two first eighteen seventy one nineteen forty two eighteen nineteen panic a penny segel united states forty two lewis Seibel
"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

06:47 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Thirty s. Soon as two hundred different stocks traded in the united states there by the eighteen twenties there's dozens bonafide index rate. Might ask why didn't see you in. How is this any better than what ever seen. But i you know. Silivatere wasn't around when he got started in second. The only thing that was published in nineteen thirty five harvard guys named smith in cold and they did fluctuations in american business and they created a seven stock index from eighteen to now segel's original data from eighteen to to eighteen seventy one seven stocks seven ex. That what i don't think siegel ever understood was how different smith and kohl's purposeless. They weren't trying to build in index of overturned. First of all they left out the demon. It's not everyone understands that. In siegel's stock stocks would finger up to win thinking of dividend yield at six point four percent. Yeah that's where. I'll put in here though data. Just guess so. He's got sent. Stocks in imputed dividend returns but the real problem is smith and coal selected those seven stocks from the roughly thirty or forty that retreating. The took. each stock's price chart monthly. Pricers used a crayon it on a transparency stack the transparencies on a light team and they threw away the discrepant. Rice earns like the ones that went down. When everything else was going up they recycle they wanted indicators can. The stock market predict the economy. Can the economy pretty stock. Unlike modest m. statisticians. They were looking at prototypical stocks. So they threw away all the ones that looked different including the one that plunged from one hundred twenty dollars share to a dollar and a half the sheer second bank united states of america equal as share of market capitalization to the fang stocks kessler. So the biggest single stock the traded between eighteen nineteen in eighteen forty three the biggest single star the one that went from one hundred twenty two one and a half in eighteen forty s. It was left out of single scene. You sources left out the batstone two quick comments for listeners who want a good introductory book on the early stages of that time as far as the economy you're talking about hamilton. There was a great book called. Hamilton's blessing the talks about the life and times of our national debt. It's a really fun book on the topic. And i was gonna say another one and i'm blanking on the name of william bernstein's got a couple of really interesting books about economic history and i'll throw in to that same genre if i can find it. The birth of plenty is run loose shelf year. He's got another one to history and he goes back certainly before. Us markets alexander hamilton. He's the fog. We have securities markets. The united states because of him. Only time i've ever been useful in trivia in los angeles. They have some of these trivia nights. You can go to irish pub irish times where it's like all the jeopardy winners and have some friends that are experts on sports and then obviously in los angeles pop culture and entertainment in my only real contribution on rare occasions. Just very esoteric knowledge. But i remember the question was. Where was the world's first stock exchange so finally i got to contribute. You could have even argued some points on this one too by the way depending on a rabbit hole you wanted to get but i finally got to contribute as a quant. We all know that quality. Data's everything and like you mentioned selection bias of taking out the bad performers. I used to always laugh when i would talk to. People would start their option trading strategies in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. I said well you're kind of missing a big event about a year earlier or they exclude certain countries from history. Because they say well no you know. Japan was obviously a crazy bubble in the eighties. We can include so it. Using the data that existed is tough and so what eventually drew the inspiration of starting to dig deep into this sort of idea and look back into the sort of pre roaring twenties dataset. I don't know why. But i had a hunch that segel's wrong in as i got into it and yet i needed this folks retirement project. It became apparent how slim in scanty the sources worthy strung together. We haven't even got to the problems with his bond market data. Come to that later but basically it was easy enough to look at. Richard sylla's spreadsheets and say. Wow smith and coal and siegel. They left out. Dozens and dozens. And then as i got into it. We're in more about stream woodley second bank. The united states we have a functioning central bank in the united states and president. Andrew jackson decides. It's his enemy in jackson. Had all oculus chumps so our most recent prison. So basically said yeah. I know it's a central bedding again. Maybe we need a central bank deva functioning national economy but it's my enemy so basically destroyed in when he destroyed it he destroyed about twenty five percents of stock market capitalisation. The united states the panic eighteen thirty seven. That's the one for listen. Instrument panic of eighteen. Thirty seven was one of the worst market breath. All's prior to nineteen twin in so basically step one was to yet. The stock price actually started with old railroad stocks asher. How many people know that. Standard and poor's came about his the merger through standard statistics company in the henry varna for publishing company and reform for being when i market statisticians working in the eighteen sixties for railroads. Four get all the difference difference. Real data just printed in table in.

william bernstein Andrew jackson los angeles Richard sylla thirty jackson kessler five percents Dozens one hundred twenty dollars four percent a dollar forty first stock exchange eighties Hamilton alexander hamilton Thirty seven six point step one
"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

04:17 min | 2 months ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Clara university. And today's show. We hear why the stocks for the long run thesis may not be so accurate. Our guests found digital archives and older data that gives a different conclusion than what others have found. We walk through how stock and bond returns have changed over time and learn that bonds have outperformed stocks for decades. Both here in the us. And in other countries like france and japan we hear about our guest regime these which says the risk return profile both stocks and bonds depends on what regime were in both capable of outperforming or underperforming over any time horizon. Please enjoy this episode with santa clara university's at professor edward. Welcome to the show. Thank you. I'm honored to be here. Where do we find you today. Right up the coast from us with a town. That's got a little relevance to What we're up to. Where in the world aria. Who knew i'm in cambria. Calhoun you actually mentioned in. The name preceded me my partner. His heritage was from the welsh part of the world. And as you mentioned that some sort of derivation as you cambria has dotted throughout the land. Is that sound right. It's originally latin cumbria. Something like that multi embarrassing story. Get it out of the way early. I've been in california since two thousand but at one point was driving up and down on the coast. And don't ask me why i got this in my head but little town up the center. I loved the central coast. California is town pismo beach listeners. And i don't know why. I got this in my head that i thought it was a place you could go clamming and i don't know if they were just famous for clams or not even. There's just a restaurant randomly with a clam on the side of the. I have no idea. I get some of these weird ideas in my head but i remember stopping and trying to go in the grocery store in fishing store and has like. Where can you buy clamming equipment in every single person. what are you talking about. And this may be an early two thousand. So i don't know if my motorola razor or whatever i had was useful in googling it but i tried like three or four times before eventually giving up. Your instincts are wealth. More dismal did make its reputation as betrays from the eighteen eighty s as a place to go clamming and you know the beach was covered with clamorous in they fished it out just like the abalone. So that probably hasn't been clam found in bismuth for kings while while. okay. I don't feel dumb now. I've always wanted to go abalone diving. I have a couple of buddies do that. Up north of san francisco. And i think of all the sports or activities that are sport like it has like one of the highest casualty rates of anything of any activity like abalone diving. I think is top three up. There were skydiving and who knows what else my cup of tea. I'm a safety secret. Yeah i know. I've never done is just on the to do list. Okay so we're gonna get into all sorts of fun things today. I thought we'd start off. I've been doing this. Asset management investing job for about two decades. In if you were to ask me if you're to grabbed me in a bar coffee shop right on the water up there in cambria great wine by the way down the road and you say mab. What is the single most universally held investment belief in all the land so all the dozens or hundreds of maximums out there. What is the single number one. And i would tell you i would say it's that stocks outperform bonds. Just kinda universally like. That's probably the number one most held truth. I can even think of and you published a lot of research a lot of interesting papers that i love and one of the reasons we got you on today. Why don't you walk us back to win. You put out your probably most famous paper at least to me about market history and what was the inspiration and let's walk through it. Let's get deep. Your listeners will be familiar with jeremy. Siegel working professor author of the book. Stocks for the long and basically seagull ratifies if he is actually the source of that. Maximum that you just. Vex seagal made two arguments in that book number one in the long run stocks.

california cambria California three santa clara university san francisco today Clara university hundreds Both two thousand eighteen eighty s dozens Siegel japan france one point both four times single
A protected right? Free speech and social media

WGN Programming

06:35 min | 8 months ago

A protected right? Free speech and social media

"President Trump was banned from Facebook and permanently banned from Twitter. For certain inciting language. We also watched his Amazon suspended the right wing social media platform parlor from its sight lawsuit ensued. It's pending. People are crying. First amendment has been violated. What are your rights are their First Amendment rights when it comes to Social Media and consortium media banned people for reasons that it feels are appropriate. Joining us to talk about this is very interesting is she was Eric Goldman. Who is a professor of LOT Santa Clara University School of Law in the Silicon Valley, his co director of the high tech Law Institute, and he is gonna explain it all to us. Hi, Professor Goldman. Thank you for joining me. My pleasure. Thanks for having me. I'm gonna start by asking you Is there a first Amendment right that a person has to use Twitter. The short answer is no. The First Amendment only applies to state actors entities of the government. Since Twitter is a private actor, private publisher. It's not covered by obligations that the government is So in and I just I wanna explain it this way. If I am saying things that are harmful or offensive, and I say to Twitter what you have to publish them, it doesn't create a First Amendment problem for Twitter. Meaning Twitter can't be forced to publish things that it doesn't believe are appropriate. Is that a fair way to look at? Yeah, that's 100% correct. In fact, if you look at the First Amendment guarantees the right to freedom of speech and freedom of the press, And so when Twitter is choosing to publish their party content, it's acting is a function of the press. So the First Amendment applies under that freedom of the press obligation Now, people there's something about it that Is driving everyone crazy because in this country, we believe we can say anything at any time. And who is it? Who are our Amazon? And who is Facebook? And who is Twitter to tell us what we should be hearing and not hearing. Explain to our listeners. Is this fair and I guess there's two questions. Is it fair? And what are the legalities of that? And what are the What are the ramifications of that? Yeah, it's the same question that we have with your own radio station that everyone's listen to. Right now. That's radio stations are obligated to provide air time to any listener who wants to call in. He just him screaming in terms of who calls in and then if someone's out of control, saying things that are inappropriate, you're going to cut the mic off and none of that. Whatever assume is a violation, their First Amendment rights, they would say. That we expect this radio station Tonto cater to its audience. So the entire premise of um WGN making sure that the broadcast continents fit for its listeners. It's identical to the thought process that we applied to places like Twitter or Amazon that they're going to publish what they think it's fit for their audience. I'm going to give out our phone numbers. I'm better. Some people have some questions for our professor here. 3129817 200 Let me play doubles advocate here and you look at the statistics on where people get news and this is so different than it used to be. When I was a kid. We was all the newspapers and and news on television, And now much of it is done on social media Getting news from The Internet and and things that are published online. How fair is it to have certain people be in charge of deciding what's harmful, inoffensive and what's not, and a lot of people are saying, you know, I hear all this horrible racist stuff that we, you know, on Twitter, but yet we are president can't be on Twitter. And what did he say? And what How is it that that was worse than what somebody else said? How is this fair? And how should we deal with this from a legal perspective going forward? Well, I think that people have very different views about what's fair. So I find that when we start shifting the evaluation metric there, um I think that we're probably not going to end up agreeing that a zoo community But just you went back to talking about how things were when you were kids. I don't know how far apart we are in aged, But when I was a kid in the mid 19 seventies, there was one local newspaper, and there were three television stations that could reach a community, right? WGN was one of them on and in those days, um even in when there was such Linda channels to reach a community there was a Supreme Court case called Miami Herald versus Tonio with the Supreme Court said You can't force that newspaper the only one that's catering to that local market to publish content that they don't want to publish that violates our freedom of the press. And so, it's said. That's true, even though that paper might have a local monopoly, even though there's only that one. We still don't think that that's permissible under the First Amendment. We're making incursion on their free speech rights. So you see why the conversation about fairness is so difficult because I want the right deal. Say whatever I want whenever I want. You said that earlier, um but but the reality is that we have to look at all the different competing interests when we think about Uh, who gets the right to say What toe Which audiences? Okay, so again, I'm just gonna go over this, because is there any obligation on the part of Twitter? Let's say to be fair, meaning if I said the same thing you said, and they cut me off and they didn't cut you off. Do I have a right to sue? Do I have a right to somehow have a legal argument that I'm not being treated fairly and I deserve to be treated fairly. It's a really great question, and I think it really gets at the heart of the challenges or bedeviling services like Facebook or Twitter. They really aspire to treat like cases equally. That if the Jackson birds, we say, said, by people in the same circumstance that they would apply the same rules to those that's an overwhelming challenge. It's actually not possible with the volume and scale that services like that engage in. It's simply not possible them toe always treat like cases equally, despite their best efforts, despite their intent. Um, but the reality is that because they're deciding what's safe for their audience, even if they make an arbitrary decision, one of which a content that was okay on day one from person A first would be a day two is cut off. That's their prerogative, and that's actually quite legally protected and their several layers legal protection. Provide Twitter Facebook, the ability to make those classifications sessions decisions, even though they're not going to get him all

Twitter President Trump Lot Santa Clara University Sch High Tech Law Institute Professor Goldman Amazon Eric Goldman Facebook Silicon Valley Miami Herald Supreme Court WGN Tonio Linda Jackson
Dr. Charles Binkley Discusses Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Charles Binkley Discusses Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David Intra. Cosso with me today discussed the nation's response, the ongoing Kobe nineteen, pandemic and context of healthcare ethics. Is Dr. Charles, Brinkley the director of bioethics at the Santa Clara University's or coolest center for Applied Ethics. Dr Bank welcome to the program. Thank you, David. It's really good to be with you today I have to say dark billy Bigley I particularly appreciate time since of course, California's once again. Experiencing another unprecedented wildfire season. So thank you. For making. Absolutely it's a real privilege to be on the show Dr. Bentley's vile is, of course, posted on the podcast website. On background, our nation's response to the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has been I would characterize as disastrous. For example, as has been widely reported approximately one third of all Kobe. Nineteen related deaths have been among Nursing Home Facility residents. African Americans have been more than twice as likely as non Hispanic whites to die of covid nineteen complications. Inadequately protected healthcare providers. Now conveniently turned heroes in a war against Covid as if the virus will one day surrender. Defeated, have been required to work in lethal environments as for Service Workers Moreover, minorities instead of recognizing their do a livable wage. Health Insurance and or sick leave. We term essential workers and give them a hand. Clap. Has for the federal government's response to the president's sensitivity apparently goes so far as his stating, it is what it is. That the dictionary defines a business phrase that can be literally translated as and pardon my French fuck it. As for the Congress's response seventy, five percent of direct and indirect cares act money's went to corporations any forthcoming or additional federal response must include for the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's prerequisite covid related legal immunity protection, or legislation consistent with what over twenty states have adopted to date. Are Spas the pandemic in some brings to light the chasm that continues to exist between medical ethics. Requires provider to support the betterment of public health and a responsibility to seek positive forms that are in the best injures of patience. And how we deliver health care that is substantially profit motive dominated. I'll add in my nearly twenty five years doing healthcare policy work in DC. I never wants to tenor meeting or participated in a conversation with the speaker disgust or made reference to, for example, John Rawls veil of big nurturance or tick him Olam. With Megan discuss the woeful state of healthcare ethics in the time of Covid is again Dr Charles Bentley. So with that as a somewhat lengthy introduction Dr Brinkley. Limb in assuming, you'd largely agree federal policymakers have to understated done a poor job of living up to their obligations and responding to the pandemic. So my question is in your view what generally accounts for this. David I. Think from a public policy perspective. Many of the issues have become overly politicized. So for instance, things like mask wearing school reopenings, how to reopen the economy have not always been based solely on the best medical or scientific principles but they've been put us is to take, for instance, the initial recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about school reopening those were revised based on the administration's desire to somehow make them more applicable or to open up things more aggressively. So science hasn't always. been the most respected voice in the pandemic Dr. Falcone has emerged as really a hero for what is truth, and so you have to consider the perspective of physicians in making recommendations in a physician or a scientist in general is going to base recommendations on doing good and avoiding harm. That's really the ethical principle of medicine, and so for instance, plan the American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations for. School reopening is a very child centric perspective as well. You would expect the group of pediatricians to speak from the perspective of children and when you take the balance of school opening on the whole, it's far more advantageous to children for schools to be reopened not only because of the intellectual benefit schools provide but all the other resources of schools provide for children besides the traditional reading writing and arithmetic. Takes Her instance the number of hungry children who rely on schools for nourishment, the number of children but medical problems who rely on schools For their care asthma screening vision dental care. You look at children with disabilities who really are dependent on their schools, not only for learning but also for occupational therapy physical therapy and those students not only are not progressing in minsters they're regressing during the pandemic when they're not in schools, you can't substitute the services that they were offered in person with remote learning and must be heartbreaking to those parents to see their children regress in this time. So really the perspective of the most vulnerable and some ways has come to light. During the pandemic when I think globally about how ethics the affected the pandemic

Dr Charles Bentley Covid Dr Brinkley David Intra Dr Bank Center For Applied Ethics Centers For Disease Control An Kobe Billy Bigley Santa Clara University John Rawls California Nursing Home Facility Mitch Mcconnell American Academy Of Pediatrics Congress Director
"santa clara university" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"The cartoonist and creator of Comex? Hi I'm Daniel. I'm a particle assist and I'd just like to point out that he is not just cartoonist. He also has a PhD from a famous university thank you. I'm glad you think it's a famous university. You being on the other side of the bay area. It's famously the second best university in the bay area enough to Santa Clara University. I think that's probably true. But welcome anyways to our podcast Daniel and explain the universe April election of Iheartmedia in which we take you on a tour of all the incredible amazing bunker stuff in the universe from tiny little particles that don't really spin two enormous galaxies. That's been mysteriously. Yeah we go from the crazy ideas that fizzes half about the universe to the actual nitty gritty theories that they have because everybody's curious about our universe. How does it work? What's really happening? The search for Truth and understanding is as old as human consciousness. And here we take you on some of the last steps we try to bring you up to speed to what scientists are thinking right now. What model is in the head of particle physicist when they think about a particle? How does it cosmologists think about the whole universe? And are they right or are they just making it up as they go along and does it make any sense. And what does it mean if the universe doesn't actually make sense? Oh boy now you got me worried well. After today's episode you'll discover that it's all sort of bunkers well these days. The universe doesn't seem to make a lot of things. But fortunately that's what we're here for. And that's what physicists are here for to try to put some order into the universe and so at and the program we'll be talking about a particular I don't know what do you what would you call it a hole in your theory of the universe or a hole in your theory of matter. It's sort of like a shift in your perspective. We're used to thinking about particles in one certain way. What are their spin whereas mass. What is your charge? But we discover. That didn't really make a lot of sense and what we had to do was think about particles in a totally different one. I see so when something's wrong or there's a big hole in it call. It needs to shift our perspective. That's sweep all that under the rug and then rug our new idea that's essentially with happening here. But that's that's an important part of physics when you have a model and you push on it and push on it and you discover air doesn't actually quite work. And then you have to accept something counterintuitive. Something new a new perspective on the universe but one that actually does work mathematic nets right and so to the on the program. We'll be tackling.

Santa Clara University Daniel physicist Iheartmedia
What's the Real History of El Camino Real?

Bay Curious

07:39 min | 1 year ago

What's the Real History of El Camino Real?

"If you live or work on the San Francisco Peninsula you probably spent a lot of time on El Camino Royale Road that runs from San Francisco to San Jose through the center of many towns. Along the way. It's one of California's best known roads. And if you grew grew up here you probably learned about it in school. The story goes L. Community out is an ancient road built by the Spanish to connect the twenty one missions along on California's coast. But here's the thing that story. It's not exactly true. This big curious. I'm Olivia Allen Price Today. We're bringing you a story that first aired on our show back in twenty seventeen about the real history of El Camino real support for bay. Curious comes from Sierra. Nevada Brewing Company family owned operated and argued over since one thousand nine hundred reminding listeners to think for themselves but drink with others. SIERRA SIERRA NEVADA DOT COM K. Committees Rachel myrow senior editor of the Silicon Valley Newsdesk hit the trail with this week's question. Asker we met at mission in Santa Clara because this story dates all the way back to the Spanish colonial era in California. My name is Debbie Tori. I live in Campbell California Tori aspect curious the question. What can you find out about the El Camino real history? My name is Robert Cinco. wits professor of history at Santa Clara University sank quits is the man who can answer that and then some starting with the perhaps surprising truth that there were many El Camino rails all over the land. Spain used to control in the WHO world from seventeen sixty nine to eighteen twenty one royal roads. That was what you would call the main roads in any particular area because technically all of us belong to the King of Spain but wait. I read on wikipedia that this El Camino real but one in silicon valley is part of the historic mission trail on ancient fro that connects the Spanish missions. Like a string of pearls along the California coast. Also I'm pretty sure I heard somewhere possibly in school that the distance between each mission. It's supposed to be about a day's journey. What happened has to do more with southern California than it does with with Northern California a by about the eighteen seventies? As you get more and more Anglo Americans coming in the southern California and the the angle population really increases With the arrival of the railroads in Los Angeles listen the eighteen eighties now in America. There's a rich tradition of just got here yesterday. People concocting romantic origin myths and a number of influential fluential southern Californians wanted one of their own. They looked around and saw crumbling. Spanish missions twenty one of them stretching from the Mexican border all the way north to Sonoma's. Here's the story is told in Nineteen Fifty one promotional film for Greyhound buses called Freedom Highway Bridge the same road. The Spaniards followed almost two hundred years ago. Only they call it El Camino real kings highway. China imagine how was on horseback. Of course what was really going on here was the enslavement of local tribespeople. who were reeling under? The impact of European diseases forced religious religious conversion and the destruction of their entire way of life. Not that our question Asker Debbie Tori or I learned much of this in the fourth grade which is when a lot of California school. Children studied the subject. You're right they did glamorize it thinking it was a wonderful. The mission passed that they've construct was a fantasy past ROIC missionaries happy contented. Indians Fandango is all over the place. You know the Spanish mich- often enough you read and textbook that they blazed trails but they didn't blaze trails. They follow trails. That had already been developed by the indigenous people up and down the California coast I but at the turn of the twentieth century few people wanted that version of history. They wanted something fun. Happy Exotic groups like the landmarks club and the native daughters of the Golden West pushed to reframe collection of dirt roads into a rediscovered king's highway and the Automobile Appeal Club of southern California kind of sides. This fantasy past is a great way of getting people to buy drive automobiles and so what they do. is they begin. The push the notion that there was one central road which they named the commuter rail that connected the missions they began to push the notion commissions were located A day's journey from each other. You know which kind of when you think about. It makes them motels rather than what they actually were. Agents of simulation immolation of of the native peoples so wind in northern California. Play along with this southern California Fantasy Sanca wits says the concept caught on with wealthy Californians leg Jane Stanford wife of the Real Road Barren Lewin Stanford and wealthy Catholics like San Francisco. Mayor James Phelan Eland. They wanted the Spanish missions restored to something like their former glory. Lot of them were in really sad shape. If you look at pictures from the eighteen sixties exceeds eighteen seventies. The missions are crumbling. Consider this if the Spanish revival movement had not happened we might be looking at a string ruins along the California coast standing inside the sumptuous renovated mission. Santa Clara on the Modern Day campus of Santa Clara University Tori agrees. I'm actually kind of speechless. Listen here it's it's just magnificent. I feel like I'm in Europe. Then we hop in a modern day car and drive a half an hour to mission San Jose which is actually in modern day Fremont think of it as a mini mission road trip focused on the South Bay and here in Fremont we find one of the most historically accurate restorations in the California commission system and the on site museum is not to miss. debby Tori grabs a fact based map of the missions from the gift shop. So so debbie do you see yourself going on a mission tour. After this as a matter of fact yes. Tory took her kids on a mission tour like this years ago but told them a lot of Steph. She genuinely believed the turns out to be bunk. Her grandkids will get the truth. But Rachel I still have a question so every now. And then. When I'm driving along El Camino scenerio I will see a shepherd's crook on the side of the road and from the Crook hangs a bell that I have been told Marks this historic historic trail. Are those what's deal with spells. I guess those also stem back to the same period of time when people I came up with El Camino Rail There was a wife of a foundry owner in Los Angeles who conveniently suggested that she could manufacture these handy bells that were sort of reminiscent. I'm a nuisance of the Spanish era. Up and down the new route that they had just created Mrs Arbitrage C. E. Forbes and and in one thousand nine hundred ninety six cal trans decided to resurrect the bells So you'll spot him one or two miles apart on a variety of state routes because of course there isn't one route reality fantasy. Don't quite match up REX payer dollar's have helped to feed this fantasy fans. Yes well the taxpayer dollars to feed it the first time too so people are making money off of this. Yes this is a a two million dollar testament to the enduring appeal wheel of a made up version of history.

California Asker Debbie Tori El Camino El Camino Rail Santa Clara San Jose San Francisco Peninsula Santa Clara University San Francisco Rachel Myrow Los Angeles Campbell California Northern California Spain California School Nevada Brewing Company Real Road Barren Lewin Stanfor L. Community Sonoma
"santa clara university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on WTVN

"Are right that we've elected her well and and don't get this this is not alone she is an environmental attorney who taught appellate law at Santa Clara University so this isn't like somebody that we're going to come up following this is a supposed to be a learning personal you would think which it into your home. how do you I mean she obviously knows not nothing's talking about which is that they're carrying the flag and we need to ban it yeah you know I want to take your rights I don't know what the heck I'm talking about but I'm gonna take your gun right it's the amount of things that we see with this it goes on and on I mean it's a weekly and stuff speaking of that get this one guys democratic Texas representative Sheila Jackson Lee has to serving thirteen thirty. yeah yeah is that thirteen times what to do okay I'm nice Kato at this is the majesty this out before you hear it and stuff she is the same one that in let's see in two thousand and three she went to Congress complaining that too many of the hurricanes are being named after white people and that we need all racial groups reflected in one more name in the end it came in a something that creates tragedy and everything right okay that's okay for elected officials that she's also voted the worst person to work for in Congress but she was voted that as yet worst person to work for in Congress wonder why but I think I'll just recently within the last week she was interviewed live in she want to talk a little bit about her thoughts on how to curb gun violence quite plate is initiatives today. hi thanks for Dale by. dealing with with the caliber weapon I feel that they are fifteen in my hand was added it is as heavy as ten boxes that you might be ten.

attorney Santa Clara University Sheila Jackson Lee Kato Congress Dale Texas representative
"santa clara university" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"We're focusing on ethics and technology last fall. When this next segment first aired? I was reading an article in Vandy Fair by the Software Engineer Susan Fowler you know she's the one who blew the whistle on Uber's then culture of sexual harassment she writes about how was she first started at Uber a colleague Senator privately quote. There's something you need to know. When you're writing code? You need to think of the drivers never forget that these are real people who have no benefits who have to live in this city who depend on us to write responsible code. Remember that and quote and story really jumped out at me because because why is that something needs pointing out I mean shouldn't every software engineer and computer scientists be taught that and taught to think effectively about the ethics of their profession. I teach a number of courses in philosophy of Technology Philosophy Law Sophy of science and ethics of technology. This is Shannon Valor. She teaches ethics and emerging technologies at Santa Clara University in California. She's been on the show before courses I teach range from of course called Science Technology and Society Heidi to of course called ethics in the digital age to another course that I teach at the graduate level to engineers in sustainable energy and Ethics Shannon teaches these courses to all kinds of students including engineering and. Computer Science Students. She's not a real change in attitudes about the ethics of the profession they hope to go into. What are you teaching these students primarily? I'm teaching them to think more critically and more reflectively eh about the kinds of social political and moral challenges that are emerging from new technologies and what kinds of resources as individuals as members of organizations and Industries Industries <hes> and as citizens of a democratic society they will need in order to manage those challenges wisely and well is it about teaching them specific rules or about the questions to ask themselves about a given situation so so many of my classes are taken by students who are majoring in the sciences and in various fields in engineering and increasingly we've seen a lot of our science and engineering students get particularly really interested in courses that deal with the ethical and social implications of emerging science and technology.

Shannon Valor Susan Fowler Science Technology software engineer Uber Santa Clara University Shannon Industries Industries harassment Senator California Heidi
"santa clara university" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"How's it going today? It's going great. Thanks so much for having me. Thank you so much for reaching out and answering our call for people who have happened into a financial windfall through whatever set of circumstances. And I'm really excited to start into your story. But first before we get into the the whole how to deal with a financial windfall. Let's talk about your journey with money, and can you walk us through where your journey with money begins. Sure. I think really a good starting places because with my parents, my dad was a high school teacher. My mom was a nurse and we were middle class, but I never felt deprived with money. They were always very frugal. They had a good long-term vision and the kind of prioritize savings and definitely didn't like debt. So that was kind of where I got my vision with money, and I started kind of having a long-term vision with money put prioritizing experiences and bigger ticket items. Like when I was growing up kind of let's see here coming out of college and starting into. Grad school is really when I started to have my own kind of money, and I was able to max out my Roth IRA each of those years, so even with a small stipend, I was able to kinda prioritize savings and long-term goals for retirement. So that's really where it all started for me, then kind of getting into post graduate school. I got a job as a professor at Santa Clara university. And that was my kind of preparing for that is really when I started to have my main education around money, and I just started reading a ton. I realized that I was already saving money in grad school. And I knew that I'd be making a lot more money after that. And so I really started to think about okay, what do you actually do with major savings and things like that? And one of the places that I initially found was the whole Bogle heads community and kind of vanguard diehards and all that stuff. I actually when I was doing my Roth IRA and everything I was actually at vanguard just by chance, but I was actually invested in active funds. I didn't understand, you know, why do I want to be average, you know, and I didn't get what pass. Investing was all about. But really in twenty thirteen is when I started to get my knack for it and really understand what passive investing was about. And so as starting my career at age twenty eight is when I started, you know, maxing out on my retirement accounts. They were available to me at work and really kind of all in on the index fund investing train fast forwarding couple years is really when we enter I think chapter two, and that's when my mom got diagnosed with terminal cancer, and I took leave from university. And I went home to Virginia to take care of her. And that's when I really started to get a sense of like, what her finances were like, what her all of her arrangements, relating and her affairs for like. And I started taking over them. I was also taking over all my Grandpa's affairs at that time. So he's over one hundred and she was taking care of him and all his affairs. And so I basically started managing both sets of their finances and aiming at its peak. It was just a mess. I mean, there were probably over a hundred different accounts. When you factor in everybody's bills and utilities and taxes and insurance and really it was just a monumental amount of work. So I got this kind of crash course in estate planning, and what happens to be end of life and also how to take care of someone who's in advanced age. That's not you..

Santa Clara university school teacher Bogle Virginia professor
"santa clara university" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"So, you know out around fifteen sixteen I just had had enough of not knowing really trying to figure it out. Like what what is this thing called life? And why do I feel like I am definitely not living the life that Suzy's live in across the street. She's happy. She likes her parents. It is me my mom. My brother in these random situations that never end. Well, yeah. Definitely. Concerned enough to just start asking these questions, and you know, your teenagers. So when you're a teenager, you're reckless anyways, which are words, right? I started having issues with just the people. She would bring around. I remember I asked her one day. I said why are all your boyfriend's losers in she about slap the taste out of my mouth. But I just wanted to know. And then later after she slapped me, then we had this conversation about who would is this and the truth of the matter is, and she was she was honest with me, and then we had even more conversation later in life. But that's just the type of guy that she preferred she was never a nine to five kind of guy type of girl, and it didn't matter that she had these two kids that she was pulling around while she was feeling with these men and whatever else came with them to which I would have said to her. Well, there's a lot of wiggle room between a nine. Five person and the guy you're choosing Becker. Yeah. That whole thing. Yeah. You know? But at that time to by the time, I started having these conversations, I was already eyeing college. Like, I couldn't get there fast enough that was your say out with my haven. I knew this was coming like, I was gonna do everything I needed to do to make that happen. I went to Santa Clara university and one of their summer programs are pre law program that was my first time really away from home for a week. It was amazing. I did great. They love me. I was like this is this is what life should be it should be easy to go to school and learn and give back, and it just that was not my reality. So I had that week that just really kept me focus on next steps. So by the time, we started having conversations about what had gone down. In my early childhood. I was already prepared to get away from it and keep in mind. It wasn't just her. I have a history of family dysfunction anyway. So that was my uncle that did the shooting. I used to watch my grandmother gets slapped around by her brothers. My mom got beat up by her brother in front of me. Stomped out on the street stomped out on the street, and which is over drugs. No, they just don't she just he just didn't like her. He was a bully. He doesn't like her. He just beat her up right in front of me, and my brother screening and she wanted to having to drag herself to her car in. We got in the car, and she drove herself to the hospital, we waited in the emergency room while she got her cast on and then we went home, and they'll thing was spoken. Nothing with spoken. And that's what we do in every weekend. We have a party in an ins with something. So you know, my wanting to leave had as much to do with the rest of the family as it did with her. Because there was there was no us like this is insane. This this can't be real. There was no island due to get a break from it, I suppose school and that was it. And you know school was for me. It wasn't really for her. I remember I was about maybe sixteen and she would pull me out of school and say, hey, let's let's go get a drink. We go to Red Lobster and have Bahama mama earth. Which was probably great until you as a as a kid. What do you think was going through her mind? I'm sure you've pondered this endlessly of what what was she thinking about so many of these circumstances. This is what I've come to realize and not just with her. But now that I'm older, and I see more women that will drag their children through situations. And I've had friends that we can have honest conversations..

Becker Suzy Red Lobster Santa Clara university one day
"santa clara university" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

"Last year. The p. says, apple business. Chad is meant to be a simple way for users to communicate with companies over I message according to the report international brands. You can send messages to include Burberry in the UK, Vodafone Germany, Swisscom, and h hotels in Spain, own g. and France, Credit Suisse and Singapore. Harvey, Norman Austrailia, and k d, d. I and Japan New US-based companies that have been added to the apple business chat list include men's warehouse, west elm overstock Quicken Loans and more. The student ID feature for wallets in Iowa's, twelve and watch OS four has gone live the MAG. Observers as the tech was turned on Tuesday for three schools in the states, Duke University university about Obama and university of Oklahoma, Johns Hopkins, Santa Clara university and temple university are expected to get with the program later this year. If you're up for a brain teaser, try figuring out what's going on with iphone in India, that country's economic times has a headline reading for first time, new iphones get weak response in India. The chorus headlines don't tell the whole story. If they did, we wouldn't need stories. The report has retailer saying that they are sitting on a little less than half the stock. They had headed into the first weekend of sales. Economic time says, this is in stark contrast to earlier years when demand would be much higher than supplies with Indian shoppers queuing up outside stores to grab the new iphone. But the piece goes on to say that apple expanded availability to more stores and more markets to ensure high sales momentum at launch couldn't more places to get iphones. Main fewer places selling out. Also, I. Own ten are is coming out soon. It offers many of the features of iphone ten as antennas max at a lower cost. It's possible people are waiting for that or they could be waiting for the spirits of their deceased relatives to saddle. I'm only sort of kidding economic times says Brian Baid, CEO of India's largest consumer electronics retail chain, reliance digital things. A lot of people are waiting for the period of shroud to be over the Cording to India's NDTV during shroud Hindus braver their deceased ancestors and their peaceful state in the afterlife reliance Digital's CEO. Things buying might pick up again when Nevada tree starts in the second week of October. The few sites say, Nevada tree is celebrated for many reasons. They all agree, though. It is a celebration which probably makes it a better time for shop. Ping than when you're supposed.

apple India reliance digital Chad Duke University university Nevada Burberry CEO university of Oklahoma Credit Suisse Vodafone Germany Johns Hopkins Singapore Japan New Santa Clara university Obama Iowa Swisscom
"santa clara university" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Priest how much say do you have about where you're going to be assigned to work and what your work will be like did you asked to work with gang members was at just the outcome of the neighborhood you are assigned to well well i i was ordained priest and eightyfour and then i went to a bolivia to learn spanish really and then it just turn me inside out i was is what you would call being vandalized by the poor i just said i want to cast my lot with the poorest folks at confined and it felt to me the fullness of were in my life had led me to that point so is supposed to go to santa clara university to work kind of in the campus ministry there and they just couldn't do it so i went to my provincial please send me to the poorest place you can and then by luck they sent me to delors mission in i figured i'd be the third guy on the totem pole but nobody was there when i got there so i was the pastor i was the youngest pasture in the history of the diocese he didn't make people my age pastor and the end it was a vocation within a vocation within a vocation than 88 started when i started to bury kids and then it was i feel connected to these folks so then i knew every gang member and we had the highest concentration of gang activity in all of los angeles was my parish so you could bury your head in the sand or you could roll up your sleeves and so was all an evolution people come to our headquarters now which is our fourth headquarters in it's huge in chinatown in la and it serves the whole county in beano people say did you think this up and the truth is nobody could you know put your faithful to putting one foot in front of the next and things evolve and you add things like tattoo removal on therapy in and you listen because inner the stances humility if your humble you'll you'll asked the poor what would help you but if you're led by hubris than you tell the poor here's what your problem is.

bolivia santa clara university los angeles la one foot
"santa clara university" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"As kind of a key way to the future how we as antibiotics to an astronaut is really with the question is here but there's a secondary purpose on the ground is are we going to discover something in space that can help antibiotic resistance um issues on the ground and it's becoming a really large problem for no terrestrial earth aspects of antibiotics i like whenever the talk about the international space station they always say working off of the earth four the earth because his all has benefits not only for going you know act going on the way to mars and this is you know you're talking about checklists before this is one of those things you need to understand before doing that journey to mars but then there's the side effects can be finding out how to solve other problems here on earth as well yeah absolutely in this case we might need to have the astronauts having you know dosing affleck for five ten times whatever the amount is and but also if we find a pathway of how antibioticresistant with the mechanism is um uh that that something a gamechanger in one thing i didn't mention is you know after the experiments done we had oral this data and then we to l'amateur that back down to earth i was going to say to the small sat hich is a ride on a rocket where somebody else's paid more money to go what goes off at safe you launch year is start that science experiment in yet is it just they sends that data back to you guys here so yes so we have a great program that basically we work with santa clara university and they have an around station we have two in ten as honor system and what happens is the electron annex store.

affleck santa clara university
"santa clara university" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"santa clara university" Discussed on Masters in Business

"This week on the podcast i have an extra special guest he is professor meyer statin of santa clara university and really he completes are cycle of behavioral economists beginning with professor schiller going onto thaler cannon and now start men we've essentially hit for the those cycle he's written a number of books on behavioral economics he's advised a number of financial institutions both in real life and online versions he is extremely knowledgeable about not just behavioral economics but contextual izing the development of this field relative to finance over the years and i really enjoyed the way he describe first generation second generation and in the not too distant future third generation behavioral economics because it shows how our understanding of homo economists of of humans as perfectly efficient rational prophet maximize irs how that model was so far off how we began to recognize it being often and you'll hear in the podcasts portion the discussion of how one of his first papers back in nineteen eighty four generated so much pushback it was one of the first behavioral economics papers published in a major journal of finance people threatened to never submit a paper again and it's really fascinating how the world has.

santa clara university professor schiller professor journal of finance