35 Burst results for "Sanjay Gupta"

Fauci says he was in surgery when task force discussed changing CDC testing guidelines

Atlanta's Morning News

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Fauci says he was in surgery when task force discussed changing CDC testing guidelines

"House Coronavirus task force and exchanges to CDC testing guidance, while infectious disease expert Dr Anthony found she's undergoing surgery. CNN's Dr Sanjay Gupta reveals that I was Sir. General anesthesia in the operating room last Thursday was not part of any discussion or deliberation. Regarding these new testing recommendation. Dr. Fauci also disagrees with them. The new guidance recommends no testing for people who are exposed, but do not show symptoms. Despite the risk of a symptomatic transmission. California, New York governor say they'll ignore the revised guidelines. President Trump frequently complains the US does too much testing and there would be fewer cases with fewer tests.

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr Anthony New York CNN CDC Donald Trump President Trump United States Dr. Fauci California
Fauci recovering after surgery to remove vocal cord polyp

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:01 min | Last month

Fauci recovering after surgery to remove vocal cord polyp

"Found she loves to talk, and he's been an important voice in the battle against Corona virus, but we might not be hearing from him for a while. CNN medical reporter Dr Sanjay Gupta says found she has undergone surgery on a vocal cord. Dr. Fauci has been dealing with this polyp on his vocal court for some time. And that way we know this because he's been having some challenges with his voice. He wanted to have this polyp sort of taken care of for sometime he had AH flew. This is last year. It's sort of Costs and disruptions to his voice, But he's been waiting obviously is we're in the middle of co vitto have this procedure done. He just had it done. It was under general anesthesia. He texted me after you get out of the hospital, saying he's doing OK, but it was a a significant procedures by not going to be able to talk or talk much for a while. And, you know, hopefully get out of the hospital today or possibly tomorrow. Doctor found she will turn 80 on Christmas Eve. Fire

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr. Fauci Corona CNN Medical Reporter
Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

The Takeaway

12:36 min | Last month

Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

"Threats for me and my family and harassing my daughters to the point where I have to get security is just I mean, it's amazing I wouldn't have imagined in my wildest dreams. That people who object to things that are pure public health principles are so set against it and don't like what you and I say it, namely in the word of science. That they actually threaten you. That's Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases, speaking to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, about threats he and his family have received because of his work. And Dr Fauci is not alone. Public health officials across the US are also receiving threats from people who are against the policies they put forth to combat the corona virus. Things like recommendations to wear masks and practice social distancing. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and she's been researching this exact topic. Michelle, Welcome to the show. Happy to be here. Shall you wrote an article about the attacks on public health officials during covert 19. What was it that prompted you to even look into this? Well, it happens that one of my bosses that Stanford is married to our Santa Clara County local health officer here in the Bay Area, So I do have a personal connection to somebody who's experienced these kind of attacks. Tell us a little bit about what kinds of attacks were talking about. All across the country. We've really seen a number of things that made your audience seem pretty shocking and are unusual even in the American context we have seen, you know the usual Internet trawling, but the attacks have taken on a highly personal and almost violent dimension. Across the country. We've seen health officer subject to dock, saying the exposure of their personal information like their addresses or loved ones, names on the Internet. Angry and sometimes armed protestors showing up at their private residences, vandalism of their offices and homes, lots of harassing telephone calls and even death threats to the point of having to have private security details assigned to their families. Michelle, one of the things that prompted me. I'd saw the research here and then saw that Dr Anthony Fauci has needed to get his own extra private security because I believed his family had been threatened. Are we primarily talking about high profile figures like that, Or are we talking about? Anyone who's sort of on the front lines dealing with Corona virus cases. In particular, we're talking about people who ordinarily are about his low profile. As you can get local public health is thean visible angel that keeps us all healthy. But most of us until this pandemic you never heard of or seen our local health officer. They have been in the news lately on television and newspaper a lot, so they're no longer such private figures. But these are not high profile figures. They're not national figures. In most cases, they're not. They don't have a political agenda. There are doctors trying to do their jobs. Who are making these threats. Well, it comes from a variety of quarters. Ah, leader in Catalyst in this movement has been the anti vaccination movement here in the U. S. That has all of a sudden pivoted from their usual agenda of attacking public figures who advocate vaccination to going after health officers who are advocating masking and the extension of state home or business closure orders, But it's not on ly these groups. They've been joined by thousands of people across the country who are just really disgruntled and incredibly stressed. By the long term economic impact and social isolation that has stemmed from public health orders during the pandemic. Medical professionals are take a Hippocratic oath to serve whoever it is that needs their help. So like this, this feels like doctors and nurses didn't necessarily sign up to be. In such a political battle, You know, it's interesting the politicization of first responders because those on the front lines were actually caring for covert patients have been politicized as heroes in this pandemic. But the same groups of individuals, doctors and nurses who are working in the public health sector have been demonised as villains. They're all working toward the same goals, and we need to understand that, although they execute their objectives in different ways, they're all working towards a single and so are we. So it's really striking to me that there's been this polarization and how folks have viewed First responders and public health doctor's Michelle. Stick with us. We'll be back in a moment. This is the take away. On the next. All of it, looking for a job thinking about switching to a new one will discuss how to navigate the remote workforce in our series, the future of work, and we meet the director of the new documentary Boy State, which goes inside the weeklong mock government exercise that gathers more than 1000 high schoolers to create their own state government. I'm Alison Stewart. Join me for all of it weekdays at noon. We're back and you're listening to the takeaway. I'm tansy. No Vega. Michelle Mellow is on the line with me. She's a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and we're talking about recent threats against public health officials all around the country. Michelle. Have we heard anything from the Trump Administration or other politicians at any level of government about this? Because recently in New Jersey, there was a federal judge whose family was attacked. Now there are talks of increasing protections for federal judges. And I'm wondering if this is now transferring over to medical professionals and health professionals. Well, yet we have to distinguish between medical professionals who are on the frontline response like the ones who are working in hospitals and the ones I'm talking about. Are those were working in public health departments. I'm not aware of specific problems involving the folks who are working in hospitals other than nobody wants to stand next to them at the grocery store. But the public health officials really have had to have protection stepped up. Unfortunately, most of our elected officials to the extent that they're speaking to this issue at all have been joining in the attacks. You know, there are folks who are making their name for themselves politically. By joining in the chorus of attacks against public health officials. In some cases, their own public health officers, you know, saying things like their anti Democratic their tyrannical when in reality, those same health officers are the only people in that state who can issue these orders. They're executing. Planning done by other elected officials, who then sort of hide behind this rhetoric, So it really is, in my view, despicable that instead of offering support to these hardworking, underpaid under attack health officers State and local officials. And in some cases, congressmen and the president have joined in the attacks, and the president himself has been the foam enter and chief here Retweeting such statements as everyone is lying. The CDC media Democrats are doctors, everyone we're told to trust That kind of statement fans the flames. Michelle did your research show whether or not there was a difference in health officers who are in red states versus blue states or our folks that work in these positions across the board, subject to this type of harassment. You know, we really have seen it in all kinds of communities. Certainly there is a red and blue divide in willingness to accept public health measures like masking and to the extent that you're leading a community that's more red than blue. You might have a larger segment of the population going after you. But some of the people who have been under attack are in heavily blue communities were actually most of the population really supports what they're doing. Polling is very much in their favor. But there is a vocal extreme of vocal minority that is dominating attention. Is there anything that public health officials Khun do to protect themselves? You know, to protect themselves. Many of them do need security details, and they need elected officials to stand up and indicate that when these actions crossed the line into illegal forms of harassment, they'll be subject to prosecution in terms of self defense strategies. You know, I think it may be late in the game for this, but there are some things that I think We know help to cultivate public trust and buy in to coerce of public health legal measures. Polling shows us that when people feel that they have a say in public health policy agendas when quote unquote people like me can influence agendas in public health policy, they're more likely to accept laws, even the ones that they don't love. So I think there are opportunities for some health officers to double down on the transparency and candor in their public communications. We do have examples of where this has been done Extraordinary. Well. I think it helps to humanize health officers to telegraph that they're really struggling with these decisions. They don't take them lightly, and also that they have the support of consultation of a number of other people. Well, they're not acting alone and imposing these orders. Do you know of any health officers who have decided to leave? Ah, the job as a result of this because it doesn't feel like you know, the virus is not going away. Assume as many of us would have liked, and people are going to have to make policies and an implement policies until we've got some clarity on where what the next phase of this is so have folks that you know, decided to leave their jobs as a result. Absolutely. I think the count is up near 30. Now, health officers who have either resigned or been forced out by their elected officials since the start of the disease pandemic because of the politicization of their orders. And that includes Oxiris Barbeau, who was the New York City health commissioner. It includes Nicole Quick, the health commissioner of Orange County are most affected County in California. In terms of covert cases it includes West Virginia health officer for the state had the slam so lots of folks who are dealing very, very difficult situation simply, it's just not reasonable to expect them to go on month after month. In this kind of climate, especially when they're not getting any support from other officials mentioned Oxygen's Barbeau and I know that was a big issue here in New York, particularly because she clashed with Mayor Bill de Blasio. Are we seeing a lot of that? A CZ? Well, just internally among Officers and public health officials, and also just, you know, the other officials that they're dealing with. It feels like I don't know if that was very specific to New York City politics or if that's also happening across the board. I think that is happening in a lot of communities. Yes, where you have a schism between elected branches of government that represent communities that have a particular ideological bent and help officers who have been serving you know for many, many administrations many many years and you are You're acting on the science a TTE this point of the pandemic. People are fed up with the science. They want a balance of between health concerns and economic and other concerns. And again. Some health officers have been very good at explaining how public health orders balanced. Those concerns and others who are maybe less transparent, really have been confronted by a lot of attacks from Ah, elsewhere in government. But, you know, responding to local political pressures themselves you mentioned earlier. We we are having to differentiate between threatening health officers and health officials and making and threatening frontline workers like doctors and nurses. But Our doctors and nurses subject to any type of politicization and threats right now, because of the role that they what they could possibly represent, or have they gotten off Have they sort of not been in the cross hairs? If you will. You know, I'm not aware of those kinds of attacks. I think it's more just that What we hear from them is the difficulty that they have in their personal lives Because people know they work with sick people. They don't want to be around him. They don't want to be around their kids. So it's the usual story in any pandemic, where You're the child of somebody who's working with an affected patient. Nobody wants their kid in school with you. I think that causes some difficulties for them, but it's a different quality and caliber of attack than what we've been talking about with public health officers. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law at Stanford Law School and a professor of medicine at Stanford University. School of Medicine. Michelle. Thanks so much, Thank you.

Michelle Mellow Officer Stanford University Dr Anthony Fauci Professor Of Law Professor Of Medicine United States Sanjay Gupta Bay Area CNN Santa Clara County Stanford New York Alison Stewart New Jersey CDC Social Isolation Vandalism
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

02:47 min | 2 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"I should i. Didn't alleviated. That's really really funny. Psych. MIC drop. In terms of Emulating I think that there are there's there's so much. I mean I think. This answer won't do it justice but Long time ago, I read a book called feeling good. And the one of the psychology book by a guy named David Burns and one of the things that he wrote in the book is that. We need to treat the world as if we all have one unit of worth. Amount no matter who that person is no matter even if that person is your boss. That person is worth the same as you. You're worth the same as them. The person serving food the person you're serving food to we all have one unit of human worth. And I think Sunday has always got not at his at his deepest deepest level. No matter, no matter where he is what what he's doing Just this idea that we are all in this together you can say that but to believe it at your core to have that be what fuels you every single day I. Think is really special thing and he's always had that and always admired that and I want to. I want I want more of that genuinely. For me and for everybody I think I think the thing that I would alleviate. I think is is You don't Sunday night. Talk about this. Sometimes I think and I think that we've both evolved with this feeling of. Of Needing to leave a legacy. You Know I. think that there's always so much pressure of like what how the world remember you and I think You know if there's. If there's anything I, think we've kind of both realized together now, is that what we really have is our kids like those are the people who are going to be. Talking about us more than anything else as the stories that are going to be shared, those are the things that matter most us and and I in any pressure at all to leave a legacy. Is the thing that I feel like I would want to be eight. Whatever's left that? Love. That's awesome. Guys. Thank you so so. Sibling revelry is executive goose by Kate Hudson Oliver Hudson and Simpson supervising producers. Alison President Editor is Josh Windisch music by mark. Hudson Aka uncle..

David Burns Kate Hudson Hudson Oliver Hudson Editor Alison President executive mark Simpson
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

08:25 min | 2 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"The body then is basically saying that's great getting serotonin elsewhere. I no longer need to make it. So when you stop taking the Serotonin or or Serotonin, reuptake inhibitor, which is what these medications are, then you crash, and you can have these horrible horrible sort of episodes and effects for whatever reason Silla Sivan seems to create a pattern and the brain where the body essentially is teaching itself to make the Serotonin to again the specific serotonin again. It's wild. Why would that happen? We don't know but I think this idea that we did. With these plants. No. I mean peop-, you know now I will say that the difference I guess a little bit between suicide and cannabis cannabis side, effect, profile, super, super low I mean nobody. Nobody's ever five really had significant problems. You know on cannabis and some people do with civil side, and you know, but and so I think you would need to be studied in terms of dosing it and whether microdosing makes sense, and all these various things that they're looking at but I think that this is another example of a plant of a naturally occurring thing being being ostracized for political reasons. You know it's for cultural reasons, not scientific. But it's shifting. At least it's shifting. We couldn't talk about these things at all I mean. When I I did the. We'd documentary and I wrote an OP. Ed, the I was worried, I? Think I've probably been called Sunil and said the I. Don't know what's going to happen tomorrow. When this thing gets published I you know I. Don't know how I still practice neurosurgery. Colleagues in the hospital are going to look at me or think about this. Are they going to think of me as some pothead? On My. Right exactly. But she favorite stories very stories from that time Sunday was at the. New York York CNN office and he was going out to lunch with like a few of the executives, getting suit types, and they're like on the street and York, walking down the street, and all of sudden like there's. A bunch of guys across the street. The like Yo Dr Sanjay Gupta you fucking rule. There were clearly high. Look at them and Kinda give you this look like this year. Your buds and I'm like. The documentaries a it's. Funny. It is, but it speaks volumes to expanding your demographic for real I mean that one better were the documentary boom. You have just expanded your demographic by at least twenty five million people. It's crazy right I. I know and you know one thing I'll say about that. Is that as you know as a lot of people who've been beating the drum on this issue? No, and they would rightfully say this is that so I've been saying this for twenty years. The other people would say that I've been saying. Saying this for twenty years, and then Sanjay Gupta gets on. Does this thing and all of a sudden? Well you know I. Would No way dismiss all the work that came ahead of time I I admitted it I wasn't listening to people. I dismiss them because I thought it was a just a ladder towards recreational. There wasn't any other motive in my mind. You know I I, so it did take a digging, but there are people who've been saying this for a long time. You know and and. We just got to amplify that message. Are you still practicing by the way I practice? Yeah, do you get people calling you like I want Gupta to do my surgery I just think he's a amazing. Found like this three. There's three types of patients. I realized that there is there. Is that type who they see you on television and they figure well. If he's on television, he must be good, which is ridiculous, no way to think about the world I think I'm good. Don't get me wrong but I. don't have any better because I'm on television. The second type I think is people who actually prefer that. You're not on television like hey, so just so we're clear you're thinking about nothing, but my brain during this time right, which is which is what I would do anyways, and then there was a significant population that just doesn't doesn't register doesn't clink. That somebody, tell them afterward or something like that. That'd be like. Wait what that guy so really, but yeah, you get patients who aren't aware that you're going to be doing their surgery and they're like Yeah, so Sanjiv Gupta will be doing your surgery and they're like what fucking little man! Well the the. We're doing like doing elective operations I'll go meet with the patient in the office and talk to them in the clinic and stuff like that, so we have that relationship already okay. Now we there will be trauma sometimes like I'll take care of trauma patients, and then after trauma, a car accident gunshot wound to the head or something like that I'll go talk to the family afterwards and the patient and. They'll be that that moment of sort of. Sight God. Like, doing great I mean that would be shocking. I would think that that family would that would be one of those shocking moments like Oh my God. Sanjay Gupta Save my life. You tell the story about about Jesus Hayes. Oh as Love this well. That's right so. I'll summarize because it's but when I was out in a rocky no covering a war as neurosurgeon Zeros a journalist, but the coverings neurosurgeon. There weren't neurosurgeons out there in the particular area. The battlefield I was and and I was embedded with a group of doctors called the devil docs and we were. Got Really tight you're in a war together, and you get really close and so there for weeks and one day. Somebody got shot in the head. a lieutenant was on patrol outside Baghdad, and they came to me, and I was again the only neurosurgeon. They're like, can you? Take off your journalist. Gavin put on your servants cap and take care of him. Which I? Which of course I wanted to to do and was honored to do, and and ended up operating on him and. decompressing his brain taken this bullet out of his brain in the desert. and which is a whole sort of you know? Life sort of moment but but. I didn't know how he was going to do. He he a significant injury of the sniper injury and months later I'm home and get a call from. From San Diego where he lived, and it was the the Rehab Center where they were taking care of him and I didn't even know that he had survived. There was no medical records in the desert. They call them. They think you know. Do you remember operating and Zeus? The Don over in Iraq and I'm like yeah operating on Jesus in the middle of the desert. How do you forget that right? and. I are. Has He? How's he doing in this? He's know he's got a little bit of left hand. Weakness ground that he's doing great. You should pay him a visit. Some time, which was so I was out in southern California. I I go to. Look them up goes housecall head of time. It wasn't a total surprise. He answered the door handsome marine. You know last I'd seen him. He was just beaten and battered on the desert floor, and you know, and he was great, and just kind of fall into it right Dr Talking. And we go inside his house. He's young guys with his parents and. His mom comes out a few minutes later, and she's so sweet, and she takes my hands, are you the guy that operated on my son said yes Ma'am I am, and she holds my hands. Thank you very much, you know, and then a couple minutes later. Dad comes out. DADS are different and he's like. The Guy that operated on my son. I, said yes, sir. I, am he goes and you're a journalist. The whole story. So. You know I tell you one other thing that reminded of this podcast. Is We we? We just sat down to talk zoos. His Mom and dad and I we just started talking. And I realized something, and this is months after the guy been shot in the head, almost died in the middle of a war zone outside of Baghdad went to Germany for Rehab, for I, went to Walter Reed ended up going back to southern California where he lived. And I realized after a few minutes of being there with them. They never really talked about it. I mean they SORTA talked about?.

Dr Sanjay Gupta cannabis Baghdad California Silla Sivan microdosing CNN Sunil Ed Iraq New York York San Diego Jesus Hayes Dr Talking Germany Rehab Center Gavin York Walter Reed
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

07:16 min | 2 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Absolutely and we were the world leaders in that stuff I mean we, we are the. We originated smallpox. We're on the verge of radical polio. We came up with some of the most effective vaccines anywhere in the world. Yeah, we other other organizations in other countries. Call their organizations the CDC in deference to our CDC. We you know we. That was our. That was our bread and butter. Really in this country. You guys like Larry Brilliant. Who who is still alive and you know talks about things I'll say. He advocated smallpox eradication a disease. Know nobody gets to say that and and they knew how to do this even even before even anticipating that there wouldn't be a vaccine available for some time, so it's it's It's tough. I know people who've died of this disease and it's very tough to go out there and say you know. Their desks were preventable doesn't make the families feel any better. That's for sure makes them feel worse but you know there's going to be other ways to this and I'm sure. They talked about this as well so hopefully we'll learn. Some of these things going forward. We're going to have to apply these lessons right away. It's not like this. One Hundred Years from now. We need to apply these in the fall. Maybe in a couple of months. Because there's GonNa be a second wave. The virus out there. Is So so good at what he does, because he he he does this. I told them this flat out I. said You have this amazing ability to sort of slow roll the country into things we're GONNA. Do a fifteen day pause. We'll see how things go. Yeah, it was never going to be a fifteen day pause. He knew at that point. This was going to be months. Of having to slow the country down, but you can't say that. And then you know we'll have a vaccine. You know twelve eighteen months. We don't know. Maybe that's true, but he has this way of of of slow rolling things, so yes, if he told you. Maybe there'd be a second wave. There's going to be a second wave. Has Sanjay always been a person who was interested in like a little bit of everything you know to be to go? He goes to become a doctor, then he then he becomes journalist. And now you know you, you've a brother. That's like in Iraq and then he's in. Covering Bola, and then he's in Puerto, Rico, and all over the world putting themselves dangerous. Literally a front. You are a frontline journalist. All that making time for the air band which is. Going to be the headline, thank you very much. No but I mean have was. Was He always like that as a kid? Now you're right, I mean such as always the guy who's running as people running away from the Fire Sundays running into the fire, and that was true New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina earthquake. Haiti. Aska during the Bola life and I think that Y-. He's always been that way I. Mean He's always been. He's always been someone who is curious and. Interested in wants to wants to serve wants to wants to be useful in a one one of the pieces of advice Sunday gave me which is kind of related to this is like. Always want to be running towards something and not away from something. And you know I, think in the context that he came back. It was career. Advice know I was I was in a job at didn't like and I'm like I think I'm GonNa, go do something else, and he's a cool go. Do something else, but figure out what it is. You WanNa go do go do that run towards something rather than sort of saying I hate this job and I'm gonNA. Run away from it. And I think that that's Kinda you know how I how I've seen Sunday service. Lift his career as well. Life and career is is always kind of being willing to run towards something always always feeling like. Even if people are running away from it, I'll run towards it. Brel that's relevant. That's relevant advice right now in these last in this last nine days by the way. It's not easy to run towards the burning building, but you know it's it's a necessity at this point, even if it's uncomfortable and you know, you might get burned a little bit here and there, but it's important to run towards the problem and I'm learning that right now. You know what I mean. I'm going through these motions of men. What do I do? How do I? Do you know I? I need to move forward and not backwards. It's not time to treat, and I've never been someone honestly to run forward. I, kind of hang out in my spot. Watch things go by like that's my nature. Literally literally watched him do that I. Watched my career go by? No but you know. That's a relevant. Relevant? That's relevant information right now. It's a great great sort of I. Mean in, also you. I mean I'm just GonNa put myself in your shoes for a second where ten years older, which is a significant amount of time to be older and doing all of these really like amazing interesting selfless things in my mind I would wonder if that would affect how you would look your future. Like what am I gonNa, do am I going to become? You know and interestingly enough you become I mean what you're. You recalled like what the the great young innovator. That was what was the title like this? Always stay with you forever. The world's sexiest innovator. Innovation. Facing. If you ever want to ask yourself the question like what the Hell am I doing with my life? Right like have have Sunday your brother exactly. Like, you're always I'm always asking myself that question at the same time like he is, he is the guide. He prompts me to ask myself that question and that he guides me to the answer. So it's this, it's this sort of pushing poll, but it is funny like. Two Thousand Sixteen after the presidential election I moved back to Michigan to run for Congress, and and I I moved back here because I felt like our our community were did I grew up was one of the communities that decided to flip from blue to red that year and I really wanted to kind of run. Run, Fella, my brother's advice run run towards the problem. Figure out what I could do and ultimately that ended up. Being me running for office and it's funny because. It was the first time that you know in my own community in this congressional district, I walk around and people would would recognize me. When I wasn't walking with Sunday when I walk in with Sunday, they're coming up to us all the time. This is the first time people come up to me and you know like asking for like You know photo or something like that, so you know. I still remember the first time it happened. This guy comes up and he says hey, can I. Can I get a Selfie and I said? Yeah again. With, Jay not used to this alone, and the guy says yells to his buddy before he takes the shoddy else's basis. Brian, commended here getting this photo at Dr Sanjay Gupta's brother. Welcome to my world man, welcome to my world..

Dr Sanjay Gupta CDC Larry Brilliant New Orleans Haiti Bola Fella Hurricane Katrina Iraq Brel Rico Jay Brian Michigan Congress
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

06:43 min | 2 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"She drives to Detroit and she basically finds a way to get herself in front of a hiring manager, but there's one big problem because this is the nineteen sixties while Ford Motor, company is like in its heyday. This is Ford versus Ferrari had just happened. Out The auto industry is doing really well. Four does not have a single woman working as an engineer. The Guy looks at her. This hiring manager and he says we don't have any bill engineers working here. You know my mom is at this point in time deflated. She gets up. She's she's up a person getting ready to walk out of the room. And then all of a sudden, she turns around. She looks at the guy and she says if you don't hire me, you may never have the benefit of having a woman worker as at engineer. And, so this guy ends up getting so inspired with this meeting with my mom. The two of them advocate in an August nineteen, sixty seven. She becomes Ford Motor Company's first female engineer. Gives me the. Movie is a story. Restore you know what a beautiful! That's amazing. It was the hidden figures story before hidden figures. You know there's and then there's all the stuff that's baked into that right. I! mean she was the first woman who attended an all male engineering college in India in there was a lot of just sexism and stuff that you had to endure doing that and. It's funny. I had this conversation with her the other day. That's obviously like the the more subjective obstacles that you you have to overcome, and and how do you like as a woman you know? How did you navigate that stuff? Did you do? Did you always push back on everything? Did you did you? Take great pride in the moment. Did you realize how significant was in the moment? The two are the first woman engineer. Am I think about that all the time like even historically now all the things that we're going through? Do. In the moment that something is so significant like in one thousand nine hundred. They know that one hundred years from now they would be talking about what happened with that flu pandemic, or was it just something? I think about that with mom all the time. I'll just tell you know so now. We're just talking among the other day. She told me this quick story. I'll tell you which I think in some ways encapsulates mom. I don't know if you've even heard. My Nani. WHO's my mom's mom? You know they think when you're living the life of a refugee there's. There's a lot of safe that you need to have and things. You've just got to believe that things are GonNa? Get better because he had no proof that it will. And so they they believe in certain things like like palm reading, and that was a big thing with my ninety, which was surprising, because she was a very objectively minded woman but you believe in palm reading and she wanted to take my mom who was a little kid at the time. To get her palm read to determine whether or not she was going to actually. Amount to something and they should invest in her all that stuff. Can you imagine all based on your palm? So my mom did not believe in that at all thought it was hocus-pocus, and and but she read to find out what they would be looking for. And she took a piece of glass and cut the line in our own palm that she knew would would reflect what the palmist would look for. Now obviously, they would know that that was cut, but it was just like the okay I. Don't believe in this at all, but you. WanNa play the game. I will cut my hand as an eight or nine year old girl to make you believe that I. Am that person that that's kind of who she? That's kind of issue. That you heard that before so new I had not heard that story and then Cresco many so many parts of the story about when I had not heard I know. I spending a lotta time talking to mom lately, which is weird because in the middle of a pandemic. I feel like in some ways. We've become a little bit more connected strange, but we will do facetime calls and she loves to do it, and usually she wants to talk to the girls and the girls get quickly. You know they're. They're very distracting. And so, but then I just sit there and I talked to spend these kind of amazing conversations about nothing. Of Off. If you heard this, but. The story of how their parents met is pretty amazing. Do you want to share that with us? Today you. You give the the story I'll add in some of my little detail I've just. Even beforehand just typically though was. There was arranged marriage, but that wasn't the case for them. For what reason right that part of it, okay? I'll just preface one thing say that the arranged marriages still happen. Yeah I mean that is still part of the culture and we're now. We're talking sick nineteen sixties some Yes so it kind of picks up where we left off. Mom is now Ford Motor Company's first. Female Engineer. Oh, Kate. You'll appreciate this. Her name at this point is dementia karate, just kind of a long name the Dirani, and so one of the one of the manager said you know we might, we might want to short. Not find find a nickname of some sort, and so she comes up with Ronnie as her. Yes I, get! Eights. I love. Like Oh my God, it means Queen and she was like she was like I. Love the idea of these white guys. Call Me Queen every day. My Name. You will call queen rest of. Ronnie mom is You know she is living alone. She's living in Dearborn area and again nineteen sixties, not not a lot of Indians. People in our community around up, but she had heard that in Ann Arbor. There were more there were more Indians hanging out, you know. People went there for the University of Michigan, and so she every once in a while, get in her car and drive from Dearborn and Arbor which was maybe about a forty minute drive and one day she does that and her car breaks down right on the outskirts of campus and and so she walks to local phone booth. Phone booths back in the day, and it had one of those wires connecting an actual phone book row the big. Books I remember she goes, she goes. flips to the as an. She thinks that the most common India name in the as that you can think of which is Agarwal. And Chicago Chicago's up. The First Agarwal in the phone book. Guy Answers the phone and she's like. Hi. This Mr Augur Wall and the Guy Says No. He's out of this his roommate. The Guy. Who answered? The phone was my father. Wow Isn't that amazing, and then He. He helped her with the car. Damn. And how did how? How did their parents react to their coming together? Was it something that was looked down upon because it wasn't arranged, or were they okay with it?.

engineer Ford Motor Company Ronnie mom India Detroit Dearborn Ferrari Engineer University of Michigan Ann Arbor Mr Augur Wall First Agarwal Chicago Cresco Kate Agarwal
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

07:32 min | 2 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"We are assembling rail though. Now. Don't do that with your mouth. Revelry. That's good. So we got an opportunity to talk to our favorite Sanjay Gupta and his brother Sin Neal Gupta and. We got so excited that we literally just jumped into a conversation. When when the episode starts, it's literally. It literally goes right into a conversation. Yes, and but him, and his have such like a beautiful relationship in it's. It's It was nice to hear them. Talk about how they haven't had time to talk like that before. Bringing them on was interesting. They got to have a conversation with each other that they haven't had in a long time. And it was fun to sort of feel that energy back and back, and forth with the two of them are so great, and and during this time during the penick Sanjay has been this very comforting educational voice for us about Corona, virus and Covid nineteen and and. They're just both so smart and so in tune and. You know they're so curious in different in their respective fields, and it's just it's been really it was really fun I. Could've could've talked to them for six hours. I had so many questions. It was really lovely to talk to Sanjay and he'll get an understanding of how they grew up and. They're a decade apart tenures so quite different upbringings and reminiscing about childhood You know getting into Sanjay's air band where he had you know, hide a band with just all air instruments unlike performed across the Greater Michigan area. I mean so much happens just a week so even just to go back from a month. It feels like forever ago. but this we recorded I would say about a month ago and and it was just a lovely wonderful conversation. We love getting to know the Gupta. So here. It is and enjoy this episode. Sunday's been telling me this for a long time when he was trying to get me better. Now, so he's always as. He was not the he was not the healthiest kid. And we're ten years. Age Difference Yeah, so I was kind of I was kind of a third parent to him, and and and when and then when I was going. You know getting interested in medicine I was sort of my Guinea pig I'd. I'd try out various things but he. Can I tell the story. About Your Diet? Is that a yeah? You could tell the story, but this this will clear up for both of you Cape Colliver like if you like. This guy is weird. Sunday to blame. Away I wasn't going in that direction and. Action I want that. Way I was taking credit for your exquisite, physical and mental. Right, right right. One time I was I was home I was i. was home visiting from college and. Medical minutes, types and Neil you were I think you're eight or nine years old. You were young and I was in college and I came home, and I was sitting at the kitchen table and I was just sitting there and our parents, both worked in Santio came home from school. And you know we were latchkey. Kids right, so you come home. You're doing your thing. He didn't know that I was home, but I was sitting at the kitchen table. watching him he, he came into the house and mom would stick all the all. The hostess treats like the twinkies and the king and the. King Dongs Kingdoms were those Ching. You're next on the on the upper upper shelf, the highest shelf of the closet, and so I was sitting there, and he came in in a in a Salami of activity, and threw down his bags, immediately grabbed a chair, and then stacked another chair on top of that it was it was like you. Might you know you might fall? Got Up on. Both chairs reached at the very top of the shelf and took town took down to twinkies while he's still precariously balanced stuff. Both of these twinkies in his mouth left the rappers on the top shelf. Down I didn't want to say anything so I was afraid. If I said something I, would jar him and he would fall. Then, he got down and he was starting to stack the chairs and I said hastening. The. Tweaking Rosbif. Literally kidding with his hand in the cookie jar, not even go ahead, go ahead. It was it was the most. It was the most sort of primal sort of act I think I'd seen of eating. You know it just. It was just he was hungry. It was it was a comfort food I. Think there was it was? It was the mix of of the sweetness and the calories and the emotional sort of fix that comes with that. It was just wild for me to watch as an as an older brother of an eight year old kid, and made you realize how quickly these things start in life, but you didn't even take the rappers to forever evidence. Evidence I mean. You. You didn't care about the consequences. You're like forget the consequences. I need it now. I believe the rappers right with us. It made me. To with Sunday a journalist 'cause he's like someone should be going this. So let's start from the beginning. You are ten years apart. You were born and raised where. Michigan Michigan for both of us. small town in Michigan. I was born outside Detroit. parents were auto, industry, folks and was born in Michigan as well. We we had moved a couple of times by the time scale was born, but But a pretty small town as well. All the way, always in southeastern Michigan I was reading about. Your mom would amazing woman. She's incredible I mean she really. Is that person I mean I don't know what specifically you read, but whatever you read I can tell you it's true. I mean First Female Engineer Ford? Female in story story leading up to that is is like really really incredible as well I. Mean you know you talking about a little girl who was a refugee on the border of India and Pakistan? Who you know, basically grew up with no water, no electricity. And she does something really remarkable, which is, she teaches yourself to read? And the first book that she reads from cover to cover. Is The biography Henry Ford? And she decides after reading that book that somehow some way she wants to become an engineer at Ford Motor Company. And her parents like completely behind this dream. They save every penny they have they get her somehow to America. She gets an education. She went to Oklahoma State University the day after she graduates, she get. She gets in her car..

Sanjay Gupta Michigan Sin Neal Gupta Henry Ford engineer Ford Motor Company Greater Michigan twinkies Cape Colliver Corona Oklahoma State University Guinea America India Santio Neil Pakistan Detroit.
Coronavirus task force holds first briefing in months as cases hit record high

Erin Burnett OutFront

07:51 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus task force holds first briefing in months as cases hit record high

"The United States about to hit forty thousand new corona virus cases today. The first time that we've had that many one day, the death toll in the United States closing in on one hundred twenty five thousand people, but if all you did was listened to the president and vice president today, you would be absolutely stunned here what I just said because this is what they said. Today? All fifty states and territories across this country are are opening up safely and responsibly. Well, that's incorrect. It's factually incorrect. They're not I mean eleven. States are currently on pause. Some of them are actually backtracking and closing some things down on plans to reopen Texas and Florida specifically. They are rolling back reopening plans governors of the other nine states. They are not moving forward with the next phase of reopening. So that was incorrect, and then the vice president went on to make this claim. The truth is we did slow the spread. We flattened the curve. So he says we flattened curve, so let me just show you America's curve. So you see, the surge right and then in in March and then you see the plateau. And then you see. The jump there at the end where we are now getting to fifty forty thousand cases today. That was a plateau, and it's on its way back up and I want you to compare the graph to these other graphs. These are countries around the world right? They have that surge at the beginning the UK Germany France Italy Japan South Korea European countries measured in thousands of cases Asian in hundreds, but look what happens at the bottom. They go all the way back down and stay that way. Ours never went down right, and now it's going back up currently with the same steepness of slope as it did at the beginning. And yet the vice president was taking a victory lap during today's briefing and he made sure to credit person number one. Under the leadership of President, trump is the president's made clear credit I believe to our president of the president made that decision. So, where was the president during this briefing while he was somewhere in the vicinity, but he was on twitter, talking about confederate statues, tweeting this image of people suspected of trying to vandalize statue of Andrew Jackson and what he was writing was that many people in custody with many others being sought for vandalisation of federal property in Lafayette Park Ten year prison sentences. It was hours later that the president did finally say something about the pandemic. That's amazing raging right now in the United States like nowhere else here he s. We have work to do that. We'll get it done. while. That's an understatement it. We are learning tonight that people traveling from the United States most likely will not be allowed to even enter the European Union. Banned, because the United States has gotten the virus under control Kaitlan Collins is out front. She's live outside. The White House Tonight Caitlyn. No briefings for eight weeks the White House. Felt like they had to do something here, but then they came out and said everything's opening you safely and responsibly opening fifty states. When that's just you know factually untrue. Yeah. It wasn't the message that some people were expecting the vice president to project from that briefing today after Wednesday's coronavirus task force briefing, and after you're seeing these numbers from this week including yesterday setting a record high of cases per day since the month of April, of course, which is the last time that they had these coronavirus briefings now you would that they would have. have taken more questions. The vice president instead of Aaron only took a handful of them, but before he started taking questions, you saw him arguing saying that he doesn't want the American people to think that because of these new surging infections that the United States where it was two months ago, even though the case numbers per day or mirroring that or beating it and. And of course, the vice president went on to talk about what precautions Americans should be taking. He ticked off a list of things that the CDC has recommended. But Aaron he notably left out wearing a mask when a reporter asked about the fact, that mask have become this political issue. He then only told people that they should be following local or state guidance ignoring the. The fact that the CDC a Federal Agency of course, has recommended that people wear masks when they are out in public, and within the vicinity of other people. He also defended those rallies that he and the president have been holding and encouraging their supporters to come to where thousands of people are put indoors with very little social distancing errand by saying that it was people's. People's right to the first amendment characterizing it more as a personal decision than something that they're organizing and urging people to come in to attend, but I do want to note to striking things that came out of that briefing today was the vice president offering a pretty rosy assessment of these numbers, and then Dr Falcon getting up there and having a very sobering warning. What's to? To come and personal responsibility and this, but also Aaron the vice president saying he believed it's an arguable that the reason that there are more cases in the united. States because there's more testing Dr. burks got up and she was going through these slides and one of the ones she pointed to was Texas where it showed in May as they were increasing testing their positive. Positive test rates were going down in the last two and a half weeks they continue to increase testing, but now those positive test rates Aaron are going up, and that completely refutes with the president and the vice president have been telling people and governors for the last several weeks. All right, thank you very much. CAITLIN absolutely makes the crucial point. Right the percent test rate. Rate is what they're looking at twenty percent of them. Positive that that's that's the relevant point. It's not the absolute number and Caitlyn I. Appreciate Your Time, so let me go now to Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Dr Jonathan Reiner. Who Advise the White House medical team under president? George W Bush currently in Cardiac Cath lab at Gw so so sanjay the vice president today. Came out and presented an alternate reality. he said all fifty states and territories. This country are opening up safely and responsibly. That is quote obviously the have double digit states halting stepping back. They're reopening all together big steps back. Yeah I mean. I. Don't even know where to begin with this particular briefing. You know you think two months. We haven't had a briefing. There's obviously some real trouble spots in the country and I'm. Saying that almost euphemistically I thought there was going to be an acknowledgement that look. We have some problems. Significant ones in here is our plan to address them. Here's what we're GonNa do we're convening the coronavirus task force to to address this? We didn't see that at all. I mean there's the last task force briefing. You can see what the numbers were at that point and obviously just see how the numbers have grown even over the last few weeks. Weeks, so it it it was it was a real concern, and there were a lot of things that were said that were just basically a whitewash of what's actually happening in the country, and that's what I think. Worries me. How are you GonNa fix the problem. If you don't even acknowledge it right well, that's the thing. If you're in complete denial about it, then you obviously don't have a plan to fix it because you don't believe it's their. Running when the president actually gave a nod to this this afternoon, his comment was making a lot of progress with the whole situation, but we have a lot of work to do but he did not attend the briefing instead he was treating about those confederate Mon. Monuments So, you know in the vice president. There was talking about all the encouraging news again. His words talking about Krona virus so. What do you make of this and I guess specifically the president's refusal to be there. Yeah the president. In a tweet about the monument seems to be more interested in protecting long dead confederate traitors. He is in protecting Americans right now. Yeah, I was really appalled. When the vice president today said well, we've all heard the encouraging news you encouraging news, really

Vice President President Trump United States Aaron Texas Caitlyn CDC White House Uk Germany France Italy Japan America Twitter Florida European Union Andrew Jackson George W Bush Dr. Sanjay Gupta Kaitlan Collins Caitlin
Trump campaign plans to resume rallies in 2 weeks

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Trump campaign plans to resume rallies in 2 weeks

"Well the president's team actually sees these protests is one of the reasons that they should launch their own campaign rallies they feel as though you see you know thousands and thousands of people shoulder to shoulder without much criticism from the general public even though some have raised alarms as to you know the safety of this because of the corona virus pandemic that these protests actually sped up their time line they were planning on starting rallies again until sometime in July and now they plan to announce rallies as soon as the next two weeks but to answer your question Bruce are your doctor Sanjay Gupta my colleague at C. N. N. he said yesterday that this is going to be a rescued so different than the rest that expendable testers as well they're both risks we don't won't know exactly you know just how damaging both of these rests will be for much later because we you know won't be able to see the data that comes as a result of it but chance your question it's a rest but at this point it's a rest the trump campaign's

President Trump Bruce Sanjay Gupta
Social Distancing in Summer

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

06:49 min | 3 months ago

Social Distancing in Summer

"Has the summer heats up. People all over the country are considering now. How much risk they are willing to take as they venture outside. Some are thinking about reuniting with friends and family for the first time. Others are trying to decide whether or not to take a road trip. What about physically distanced backyard barbecue? Just. How risky is it to make this summer? Feel like well summer. It is important to understand what the likelihood of contracting the corona virus is and transmitting it. So that you can make the right decisions for yourself and for your family. I'm Dr Sanjay. Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent. And this is corona, vice, fact versus fiction. So I have an eleven at neely eleven and thirteen year olds, and so the conversations were having now are about what else summa looks like. That's Aaron Judge, Professor, at UMASS DARTMOUTH and CNN contributor since his blog post about avoiding situations with a high risk of infection went viral. He's become a resource for many people. Some does look a little bit different, and there's been a lot of tears in this house over the last eight weeks, but We're trying to gain normalcy for our children as much as we can. The possibility of having a normal summer is not a lot of our minds. So I asked Erin about some of the questions. I've been hearing from you. Starting with pools is it safe to take a dip properly maintain to pull. Water will not be a source of spread of the virus. The chlorine that's in its will inactivate virus fairly quickly and the level of dilution that would happen in a pool or notional or lodge freshwater body would not lead to enough virus to establish an infection. But when you do this, you need to just make sure that we're maintaining an appropriate physical distance and create a little bit of extra space I. Don't know if you or your family members have been doing any hiking or going for long walks around your neighborhood. What precautions do do you think people should take if they just WANNA go for a walk or a hike? So, we have as a family, we each have three mosques We have a better quality one if we get into grocery stores or anywhere. We know there's going to be a lot of people. We have one win. We're just going to do a show. Than we have out general sort of mosque, which is a neck data that we use any time we go hiking or around the neighborhoods where we know that we are able to social distance the vast majority of time, but there are some times where the path my narrow and. while. The brief encounter is not as risky as the longer one. It's not no risk and you don't know the risk factors of the person that is walking past you and I tend to take mosques a little bit more altruistically. It is about me wearing them to protect us, and so when we get in that situation, we just literally pull up gate of mosques over our face. We do that about fifty feet out from the person or people. People so they can see what we're doing. And then we just run a little bit of a wider above as we possibly can. Games like soccer or basketball, would you? Would you be okay? People playing those? Yeah, I'm eat soccer coach and I really want to get my teams out on the fields, but not playing scrimmages yet were not sure enough especially with children about their role in infection and transmission, so no, I'm not yet there for. Those sports, but as long as it doesn't bring you in face to face contact. I think the the risk is low. A baseball of Frisbee is not right up there where I'm spending my anxiety. What about a road trip this summer for family? They want to go on a road trip and stay in either a hotel or an AIRBNB. Something like that. If it's your own family, I'm not to consent. Call head to the hotel. Will the YOU'RE GONNA? Stay at ask what they cleaning protocols are end what this Stafa wearing while they cleaning the room and if that comes into line with what your risk is for your. Your family then I would proceed a medium sized gathering like a birthday party or a wedding ceremony. Would you be okay with that? Weddings done outsides with appropriate spacing. Absolutely it can be done a birthday party again in a backyard outside can be done. I. Just encourage people to bring their own chairs while it's nice to stand up in chat, we find. People stopped to move closer and closer the more comfortable they feel, and if you've got a chair, you don't drift and that just maintains the safety while keeping the social aspect I. I really love your your practicality because you are thinking exactly how people probably behave. Disneyworld they're planning on opening up in July. What do you think about amusement parks? Yes, so amusement parks I mean if they they can institutionalize cleaning and. Keeping. Systems like lines organized better than almost anyone. We know they're in the business of doing that. But when we're bringing a lot of people together, we know the risks come up. My major concern comes with the rides that put people into slipstream. I don't know enough about aerodynamics and transmission on Roller coasters, but I can only imagine from being on them in the past that someone that screaming in front of you. Whatever's coming out of them as coming directly onto you in pretty intense. For a few minutes.

CNN Soccer Dr Sanjay Neely Airbnb Erin Aaron Judge Umass Professor Stafa Basketball
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:46 min | 3 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Sanjay Gupta sometimes it's important to just go back to the basics I'm doctor Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent we haven't talked about masks in awhile so I want to use this minute today trying to remind you just how important it is to still wear a face mask when you venture out in public they're not so much to prevent you from getting sick but to prevent you from possibly making other people sick as you've heard me say many times we're all in this together face coverings are especially helpful when you can't maintain proper social distancing and if you know you are or could be infected with rotavirus but don't forget the symptomatic transmission is a big driver of the spread I mean you could be sick and not even know it if you're having trouble getting your kids to wear a mask buy ones with the cool design or draw your own to make them look a little bit more fun I'm doctor Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life no broadcasting from the underground command post from the files of the heaven somewhere under the brick and steel over nondescript building we once again made contact without a leader the end mark Levin are number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one there's peaceful protesters.

Sanjay Gupta CNN rotavirus mark Levin
It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 4 months ago

It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

"It broke my heart. It was devastating. There are no words in the English language that will convey the despair that I felt watching that man life. Leave his body and him scream out for his mother. Here. Get Justice for my city. My city has been going through a lot of pain. This is not the first second or third time you see all this other than this is what we have to do to get hurt. All over the country, people are filling the streets to protest police brutality and the death of George Floyd a black man who died in Minneapolis while a police officer. Kneel down his neck. Disturbing video of this was seen all over the world. We are all seeing so much pain and anger and outrage. In this episode I spoke with the Mayor of Atlanta. Key Chalance bottoms about how she's dealing with the crisis as a leader. As a mother of four children. All unfolding against the backdrop of a global pandemic. Most of America caught sight of her recently, she gave an incredibly powerful press conference this past Friday. We are better than Nisus. We're better than this. As a city, we are better than this as a country. Go home. Go home. Born and raised in Atlanta Mayor Bottoms was a lawyer and a judge and has been in office since two thousand eighteen. She's only the second woman ever to hold the job. Heard. There were rumors about balanced protests in Atlanta. Idea with a mother would do I. Call My son and I said. Where are you? I said I cannot protect you in black. Boys shouldn't be out today. I spoke to her about this important moment in history as black and Brown America, disproportionately face to deadly threats. Police brutality, and they global pandemic. I'm Dr. Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent. And this is corona virus, fact versus fiction. Thank you again. Mayor Bottoms I very much been looking forward to this. Let me just ask. How are you? Are you doing over the last few days? You know I'm doing okay. I think I'm doing as well as all of America's doing right now. It's Um. It's very stressful in exhausting time for all of us but I'm doing okay. Thank you for asking. Have you been worried for your own safety for the safety of the people that you love it all over the last few days? In s Sunday. That's a good question, the one think. Carrying heaviest on my heart right now is my eighteen year old. Because he's, he's eighteen and he very much to be in the middle of everything. That's happening. Anna I know that they're so much. That can go wrong so much that we've been watching. Go wrong across I I want to ask you a couple of questions about protests in the midst of a pandemic I mean we are truly going through something that is unchartered here. We don't know the impact that these protests will have on the pandemic itself the spread of the virus. There were some powerful moments of solidarity. Though during the protests people came together. They sang a hugged. They were walking hand in hand. Those and the images. A lot of people will see. At a time when so many people are hurting like this? Are Those moments worth suspending the physical distancing mandates. Feel. This is just this convergence of where we are. Globally like I, don't we? Any of us will see again and our lifetime. Getting a covid nineteen tests today. Because everything that we've talked about over the past two months. just became secondary or has become secondary so. I just I just hope that people will get tested and will remember that we are really. We're still in the middle of Panton. Our communities are sick in their tired. In they're dying dying from covid nineteen, dying from poverty dime from police. Brutality! We're exploding. These forces seen unseen covid. Nineteen is the one that's that's unseen. Police brutality is the one that we can say. I I. DO Wonder How how did you navigate? the policies regarding the pandemic in Atlanta specifically, which at times seemed at odds with the governor, the data for example in the state of Georgia did not show a fourteen consecutive decline, which was one of the guiding criteria for reopening things. As a elected leader. How do you? How do you balance that on Friday governor? Kim Call in as asked me. What do we need in Atlanta in what he can do to help and he's provided the assistance from the state that we've needed. And I think you know when you're in leadership it. You can't take things personally. I didn't like the decisions made about covid. Nineteen and I'm sure the governor didn't like lab response. To the decisions he made. But it didn't stop him as a leader from coming to me asking me how we could help. How the state could help in I wouldn't too prideful to go to him and say we need your help. Your the mother of four children mayor, three sons and a daughter. You're having conversations with them. I'm sure as many parents are with their children across America right now. I heard you talking about conversations. You've had with your own mother back when you were a child. Historic Times back then, and it feels like these are historic times as well all. I feel like sometimes. You don't know how historic something is at the time you're going through it. Does the gravity does the importance of what's happening right now? Has it settled in with you and your family? In terms of the conversation you're having. I asked my husband the other day at What will this moment in time be call and I don't think any of us know the answer to that. I just know it something extraordinary that we're witnessing and I said. In my remarks a couple of days ago. What we say in happening across Atlanta. We didn't see when Dr King was assassinated. And so we know that this is this. Is something different? And not only is it happening across America will now see a having the globe. And the question will be what will be the difference on the other side of this moment. Will. We continue to see the disruption and all that we've been saying over the past few days or Or will truly be a revolutionary moment, and I think about the words of Audrey lowered quite a bit. Revolution is not a one time event. Do you remember the moment when you first

Atlanta America George Floyd Minneapolis Dr. Sanjay Gupta Cnn Brown America Dr King Officer Bottoms Panton Kim Call Anna Audrey Georgia
U.S. coronavirus deaths top 100,000 as country reopens

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:57 min | 4 months ago

U.S. coronavirus deaths top 100,000 as country reopens

"Joining us now. Our chief medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta and our chief political correspondent Dana Bash Sanjay cases of this virus. There clearly rising across the south. And there's new model predicts hospitalizations will actually take up up by mid June. Could we actually soon see certain areas of the country? Go the other direction. Shut back down. Yeah I mean I think that's a real concern wolf if you look at four of the five states that have had greater than a fifty percent increase in overall infections They're all states that have reopened early at the end of April or the beginning of May and we may be seen now the impact of that or people out more people getting exposed and more people will get sick as a result. So that. But that's GonNa be the real concern wolf which you're raising. We know there's going to be more infections as you start to reopen will surge and start to go into exponential growth in these places which would then require a possibly having to shut things down again will it keep it a sort of higher baseline level. We don't know yet but it is concerning that we're starting to see the correlation between early reopening now and this increase in infections and we do know. Sanjay that that Model that the White House coronavirus task force relies on from the University of Washington. Medical School is projecting. Yes one hundred and one thousand deaths so far over these past three months in the United States. But they're still projecting by early August and that's not very far down the road it could be more than one hundred forty thousand deaths in the United States. That's their assumption right now. That's their assumption and it constantly changes. I mean these models are tough. You know if you look at at one point that same model said there might be sixty thousand people who have died by the middle of August and obviously the number greatly surpassed. You gotta take these models with a little bit of grain of salt. I think the big question here wolf is that this isn't a bifurcated either. You're open or your shut in terms of these states Is almost like a policy issue versus a people issue. The policy is these states are reopening but if people are still being careful maintaining physical distance not having long interactions with people which is defined as around fifteen minutes Not Being in close spaces together not gathering emerged groups all those things that can make a significant difference. We now have evidence of that here in this country. There's evidence of it around the the world. So if opening doesn't mean pre March sixteenth could hopefully be a beneficial thing in terms of not letting these infections start to go into exponential growth. And these these new concerns come as the death toll clearly has now surpassed one hundred thousand one hundred one thousand right now but it took the president quite a while to make any comment at all on this very very grim and sad milestone. What does that tell you he? It's not who he is. He did eventually put out a tweet and say exactly what a president should say but it did take longer than perhaps it should have and he didn't come out and make a statement and that is kind of in keeping with the way that he and his administration but particularly he with his towards reelection or he hopes. Reelection is Doing this now. At a distance at an arm's length the time of him being on about this hour on a daily basis for sometimes ninety minutes to two hours. That seems like ancient. History now because backfired. He wanted to be a wartime president And for while he tried to do it. It didn't work Because it backfire because of this statement that he made and he never did it again but there is a middle ground and that is to be a leader let Americans here from the scientists and to not stoke cultural differences when it comes to masks and other things. But he's not dealing

United States Dr Sanjay Gupta President Trump Dana Bash Medical School University Of Washington White House
Together, We Grieve

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

03:57 min | 4 months ago

Together, We Grieve

"Yesterday. The number of people who died from covid nineteen in the United States surpassed. One hundred thousand doesn't even feel like I can say that number out loud without getting a pit in my stomach. I know you've probably heard this number by now. The please let that settle in for a minute too. Often we see numbers on the screen and we forget the real stories of people who are not here today because of this virus we have known at least for the last few weeks that this tragic milestone would come but it makes it no less painful. Everyone's going to try and contextualising comparing the tragic number of deaths to pass wars terrorist. Attacks Plane Crashes Natural Disasters But one way should not be described as is inevitable. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Six months ago most of the world had never even heard of this novel Coronavirus Cove Nineteen. It was a virus that would change their whole lives. Some people would develop a cough a fever and then have a sudden decline. Some would require a breathing machine. Some never even made it to the hospital most dying alone because of the brutal contagious -ness of this virus family members of the sick and dying could not even be there so here we are left with memories and sadness and sinking feeling that we could have done better. And that's perhaps the most painful part of this whole thing so many of these deaths could have been prevented. We saw countries around the world afflicted with the same disease around the same time and yet heavy miniscule fraction of the infections in debts of the United States. Yes South Korea. It is one seventh the size of the United States but they have had fewer than three hundred people die total not three thousand not thirty thousand but fewer than three hundred. They didn't have a new magical therapy or a vaccine. They had nothing we didn't have. It was that they acted early. And we now know it made an exponential difference in lives saved about one in seven Americans. Now know someone who has died. I'm the corona virus. I am one of them. My friend Doctor. James T goodrich a truly gifted neurosurgeon. We first met when I was just a resident it would be a couple of decades before I got a chance to operate side by side with him during a groundbreaking operation separating the McDonnell twins little baby boy's conjoined at the head. Doctor Goodrich was considered the most experienced neurosurgeon in the world when it came to doing that operation when he died due to Covid we lost. Someone truly irreplaceable. The memory. I'll always hold onto about. Him is his smiling eyes peeking out from his surgical mask doing the thing that he loved more than anything else. So let's honor the memory of the more than one hundred thousand lives lost by committing ourselves to taking this virus. Seriously I will go ahead and just say it. It sucks what is happening. Right now is awful. Our country in the world had become infected and now we are dealing with an illness so different than any illness ever experienced by someone living today. It is a once in a century illness. And it sucks. We don't know exactly why we were stricken with this illness at this time in our collective human history but that doesn't mean we can't act. We must act. There are lessons to be learned not only from the past but from countries who battled against the same virus with greater success.

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

11:18 min | 4 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

"Our medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta's at a hospital east of Baghdad. Sanjay tell us what's going on where you are. We're invite an operating room that's unusual in. That's from two thousand three when I was embedded with a group of medics during the Iraq war and still relatively new to CNN the anchor introducing me is probably a familiar voice. Many of my friend and colleague Wolf Blitzer. How are you holding up Sanjay? It's been difficult yet. These convoy rides will be you know much about Bacon. Be a very challenging bank wolf and I have both been at CNN for decades which is kind of surreal to say. We've been at the front lines of some of history's most life changing moments nine eleven. Hurricane Katrina the Bala crisis but this pandemic has had no precedent in our lifetime as host of CNN's. The Situation Room Wolf says this has been one of the most intense experiences of his career. He joins me today to talk about the challenges of covering tragedies the political is ation of facts and how he keeps going during this never ending new cycle. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Doing Hi Sandra. My got my clorox disinfecting wipes cleaned off his microphone. This little table here. and you would be very proud wolf. Thank you I've really been looking forward to this. Let me start off by asking. How long have we have? We known each other well. I've been with CNN for thirty years. And and I think you've been with CNN West for about twenty years. Is that right? Such young two thousand and one I started so nineteen years coming up on twenty years. That's amazing I I remember. Of course the first major story you and I covered Was in February march of two thousand three just before the war with Iraq and we were both in Kuwait You and me we're recovering. Anchoring my show from Kuwait City from a hotel balcony and all of a sudden the war started and the first Scuds came in and a few of them landed about a mile or so behind where I was reporting from And we see this huge plume of smoke. Go Up And the wind was blowing towards us and I said well let. Let's wait and see where the smoke goes And the next thing I knew is Dr Sanjay Gupta our chief. Medical correspondent was in a vehicle. You were heading to that high end mall where the Scuds landed and you were wearing your gas mask and you were getting ready to report the news right. Yeah that's exactly right. I I wanted to go over there and And see at the time it made total sense. Yes I will go exactly where that big plume of. Smoke is where that missile landed in the middle of a war where there's concerns about bio weapons. It made perfect sense. In retrospect I was thinking what am I doing? Let let me let me ask you wolf about this this particular time now covering this pandemic You've covered so many stories again These wars Oklahoma City nine eleven hurricane Katrina other outbreaks. How how is this? Been different than those well. This has been At least from my personal perspective. The most deadly You know as we speak more than ninety thousand Americans have been have died and hundreds of thousands have been you know had to suffer through corona virus and and so many more around the world and these are people. These are wonderful people. These are mothers and fathers sons and daughters brothers and sisters They're younger. They're middle aged. They're older they're wonderful people. Many of them were looking For the prime of their lives spending time with their families enjoying life The economy was good and all of a sudden. It's a disaster. We've got millions and millions of people who are unemployed applying for unemployment benefits Many of them can't even apply. What's so heartbreaking to see these long food lines people waiting to just get food to put on the table to feed their kids And themselves and who would have thought this was going to happen and even something as simple as wearing a face mask you go out and you see all. These people wearing face bests You see people all over the place. Who would have thought that was going to be happening here. So this has been so so intense so riveting so scary so crazy in many respects. It's just an awful awful situation and I and I would say it's it's certainly you know the the most intense period two months that we've been doing this in all the years of my journalism that this is the most intense while. I mean that's saying something given your career and yet you do a story like this and it's it's difficult nowadays seemingly wolf to disentangle anything from from politics and the more subjective nature of the story. The opinion part of story people weighing in From a Political Lens. Do you sense that as well is is? Is it truly impossible to disentangle just about any new story from politics nowadays? Well look. There's the political story. There's a political angle to what's going on and the country is deeply divided as you know I I will say this. Sanjay the article you wrote for CNN DOT COM On Your personal thoughts and I have it right here in front of me You know that it for the for the for a moment. Think of the United States as a human body at that and people haven't read that article they should go back and look it up And the last words you wrote and I have it right here in front of me. It's they were so powerful because I truly agree and I truly believe what you said is true. You said the country and the world are facing a serious illness but it is treatable. It is fixable. Let's do this together. You're absolutely right. We're we're going through HAL right now. This is an awful awful situation and it's going to get worse as these numbers get worse and and hopefully there won't be a second wave that comes in the fall or anything like that but I totally agree it is treatable. It is fixable. Let's do this together when you think about your your your tone. I mean do you think about your your tone? When you're delivering news stories Wolf. A lot of it nowadays has been you know frightening news to give. How do you balance being hopeful for an audience and being honest I do think about my tone And I try to. You know to be as objective as I possibly can be but sometimes you know the the story is so painful you you're gonna see that you know on my face you'll hear it in my tone you'll hear my words And you know I've been trying over these days To end the situation room with some images and pictures of a real people who unfortunately passed away from the corona virus and we tell those stories who these people are because it's one thing to say ninety thousand people have died. It's another thing to say. Look at this individual. Look at this woman. Look at this man. Look at this teacher this nurse look at this This a first responder And you put the face on these people. And it's sad. It's it's heartbreaking because you think of their families and so often their families they can't even say goodbye in a hospital or they see they can't even sometimes go to a funeral To say goodbye to their father mother or whatever and You know you gotTa have some emotion when you just feel that it's it's so powerful so so awful Science reporting in some ways I feel wolf is a luxury in that we can always rely on data and science and evidence facts to bolster up our reporting There's not a lot of opinion science reporting although sometimes you do have to offer up some thoughts on things but for you. In an era where alternative facts have become a term that people become familiar with. How do you think that that is affected the reporting on this pandemic the idea that the truth and the science? That's just another avenue of information. Here's here's another avenue. You could pay attention to the most important thing we can do. And you're part of our fact checking team Sanjay's went when we hear government. People including the president makes statements do a news conference and say all sorts of things I want to come out and say well. Let's let's check what we just heard? And we'll have you We'll have John King have Daniel. Dale our chief fact. Checker will have Gloria Borger Dana Bash But we'll have doctors And in addition to you who come on and say well what he said just not true. What he said is true And I think that's a real service that CNN does provide that. We're not just listening and reporting but Ross fact checking and making sure that the viewers get an honest understanding of what's going on not just propaganda from time to time. I think it's so important. Everything gets sort of polarized and and sometimes it gets minimized inappropriately. So I really do appreciate the sort of work that you do wolf. How about you? I mean even your site in the pandemic Wolf. I think you are known to the iron man at At CNN and in the media business. In general I mean you work hard weekend. Shows Weekday shows What what was the work life balance like for you well right now. I I love working and I've been working during this during this current pandemic seven days a week. I woke up this morning. You know I got a little routine. I got on a treadmill for an hour and I watched the news on television as I'm getting a good little sweat Excited because I know that you know in the situation room gets on the air. Five o'clock I'm going to be ready to report the news as fairly and as responsibly as accurately I as I possibly can and the viewers will be grateful. And I'll be grateful that it's not as if if I took a day or offer You know or a weekend off. I could go to. A restaurant can't do that. It's not as if I could go watch my Washington nationals. Play baseball game. I can't do that. It's not as if I can you know. Go see my family down in Miami. 'cause I'm not going to get on a plane right now and I'm not going to be able to do that and whenever I used to complain to my dad about how hard I was working he would always say listens on. There are harder ways to make a living what you do so. Just go ahead and enjoy your job. That's my attitude you know. It's my attitude to despite the long days and frantic research. I've always tried to follow wolves lead. I WanNa think wolf again. Not only for his hard work but also for being a constant source of inspiration for me and everyone else at the network. If you have questions please record voice memo and email them to ask. Sanjay at CNN dot com might include them in our next podcast. We'll be back tomorrow. Thanks for listening..

Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN Wolf Blitzer Iraq Hurricane Katrina Baghdad Kuwait City clorox Oklahoma Kuwait United States Washington nationals Sandra Political Lens baseball Gloria Borger Miami John King president
When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:25 min | 4 months ago

When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

"Corona virus versus fiction is sponsored by express. Vpn We've heard stories. Where survivors are saying. My relationship with emotionally abusive became physically abusive last night. We've heard stories from women whose partners were coming home and coughing on them and telling them that they were acting them with the coronavirus. That was Katie. Ray Jones the head of the national domestic violence hotline for most of us. Staying at home has been the safest way to protect ourselves from the krona virus but for others home can be a dangerous place worrying experts about what is happening behind closed doors. So what do we really know? And what can we do to help those? Who may be isolated and afraid? I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction in the past we've seen increases in domestic violence during times of crisis and stress. We've seen spikes in two thousand and eight during the Economic Crisis James Goggle. Yano is a former. Fbi agent and CNN's law enforcement analyst. He says this pandemic is putting victims in particularly vulnerable situation. We've seen spikes during national disasters like say Hurricane Katrina Hurricane. Sandy and we've also seen it during times of the Super Bowl major sporting events and look correlation doesn't always equal causation here. But there's a lot of factors at play in one of is. These victims are trapped in a cohabitation situation with the abuser. As stay at home orders went into effect in March. Several cities across the United States reported a steep increase in domestic violence calls as compared to last year. Cities like Seattle Portland and Boston have all reported increases in calls to hotlines or reports or arrests related to domestic violence in April Chicago. City officials told CNN the Illinois domestic violence hotline saw the highest daily call volume in. Its twenty year history. Meanwhile in other parts of the country calls to domestic abuse hotlines and reports to law enforcement have stayed flat or even declined experts. Worry that victim stuck at home with their abusers may not know how to get help one group that is working to assist victims of domestic. Violence is safe horizon based in New York City. They're one of the largest victim service organizations in the country. We work with victims of all crimes and abuse and that includes family. Violence Domestic Violence Child Abuse Sexual assault human trafficking elder abuse and we help people to heal and rebuild their lives areas weighing is the CEO of safe horizon. I started by asking her what she had been hearing for. People who need help during this pandemic when nobody's supposed to be out and about the choice to leave a situation or leave home is definitely complicated by concerns about getting. The virus others can include. Let's say the victim is someone? That had not been economically dependent on the Abuser. But now they've lost their job Maybe that's an economic dependence. That has now begun. Are there particular signs of an abusive situation? If that person doesn't seem to have the freedom to go where and when they want seems to have to account for every dollar or every place they go seems to be separated from loving relationships that used to be important to them in the relationship. You may experience all of those things and also threats and then of course every form of physical violence that people experience. But if someone is hurting you physically choking US spitting on you. You absolutely have a right to seek help into not expect that that behavior is normal. I imagine that the problem has worsened during this pandemic of both intimate partner. Violence Child Abuse. But I wonder do we know for sure I mean the because the reporting of this I imagine is is part of the challenge as well right. The story reporting is complicated in the first month of the stay at home orders. Here New York calls to our hotline. Were DOWN. That's for a couple of reasons. One people just prioritizing their Their health but another is an assumption. That help wasn't available and that is tragic because help is available. Are Hotline is functioning. The national domestic violence hotline is functioning. Police are responding to calls were able to provide a tremendous range of services. Virtually and as the word has gotten out about that our calls have increased child abuses a different because those reports come from teachers who are mandated reporters and doctors. Those reports are down by seventy five percent over. The prior period is heartbreaking and tragic because the abuse cannot be down by seventy five percent. It means that teachers that would normally see something and be concerned about. It are not able to see that over revolt learning. Let me ask you though. Short of opening up. Are there other things that can be done to to address this issue specifically with child abuse? We've done research over. The years about Bystanders to child abuse people who may suspect that there's something abusive happening in a family and overwhelmingly members of the public. Say I wouldn't want to report that because I might be wrong. What if I'm wrong and it's really none of my business and my response to that is what if you're not wrong. What if you're right and so I would say if anyone listening to this? Podcast has a nagging suspicion. That child is not being treated right in their home. Find out where in your state you can call it in it. Just strikes me from a pragmatic sense that it might be challenging. If you're in an apartment you know with people and you're you're trying to see cal. But you're worried about stigma even within your own living situation or privacy concerns. What do you recommend for someone who who says I want to get help but you know frankly? I got someone listening in the next room. Try and get on the call or seek help. I recommend chat can be much more private and there are many mental health services available over chat. A large part of what we do with victims of domestic. Violence is safety planning. What can that particular person? Due TO BE SAFER WITH. Sheltering at home that's become much more complicated because safety plans often would include something like I can spend the night at my mother's if I see certain signs of behavior that are worrisome. That sort of thing may not be option now but options. That can still work for this time. Might be a code word that your child does that. If I say a certain word the child should call nine one one. It might be something lake a neighbor when I put the shade in the bathroom Or put a plant in the window. The neighbor knows that you're in distress and to keep an ear out and to call the police as you pointed out it's about giving people help. Yes first and foremost if you imagine or think about what it might be like or what. It must be like to be a child or to be an adult trapped in a situation where you feel. Fear every minute of the day and you could help that person. Think of what that would mean victims of domestic abuse faced significant challenges leaving before the pandemic but wants people to know that organizations like safe horizon.

CNN Dr Sanjay Gupta Katie Hurricane Katrina Ray Jones Elder Abuse FBI United States New York City Yano Illinois Sandy Seattle Chicago Partner
The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 4 months ago

The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

"But of all the places we like to gather now shutdown by this pandemic restaurants are also some of the hardest hit so today. We're going to talk to people in the industry. The chefs the restaurant tours to find out what they're trying to do to survive for them for us for everyone. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction restaurants. Sort OF BOTTLE. The zeitgeist their community. And it's where people celebrate as not just about eating. That's David Chang. He's a chef and the founder of the momofuku group which has restaurants around the world. He's also the host of the Netflix show ugly delicious if food establishments were important. People wouldn't want it so badly. There's just somethin'. That is a connection to just being human besides tasting delicious foods. Chang calls restaurants quote cultural banks and worries about the erosion. This pandemic has had on all aspects of the dining experience. We literally take ninety percent of cash flowing. Give it back to everybody else. On top of trying to make delicious food and build organizations however small they might be no one gets in this business at least that. Iron Meyer so they can make a ton of money they do it because of the life and the positive impact you can have both on yourself and others around you and you that away that that. That's that's going to be pretty brutal closing. His restaurants in March was extremely difficult. He had to furlough around. Eight hundred workers in this week decided to close to of his restaurants reopening others. Maybe even harder. You have to reconfigure literally every decision of how you operate in a restaurant. It was hard enough to begin with. How do you taste food? How you order food. How do you sanitize now? How do you do contact with delivery? You even allowed transaction via credit cards anymore. So now you there's like all of these things now that are going to be expensive. Chang doesn't have the answers yet. But he thinks he knows what it's GonNa take. Define I just think that we're going to need some ingenuity and creativity to sort of align some mutual problems that we have in this country particularly in the food space and sort of reconfigure. How this whole works on his twitter feed. Chang has also been asking people to send him photos of reopened restaurants in cities like Taipei and Hong Kong. It's fascinating to look at them. Some of the photos show. Police Systems delivering coffee. Temperature checks at the door and customers. Even receiving full body disinfectant sprays. Don't worry with their clothes on too many. These measures may seem a little over the top. The common thread is we have to actually make impossible hap and that gives me optimism really genuinely does because these kinds of impossible tasks that sort of her. My brain are what I most attracted to. And we can't have anyone working off a different playbook everyone needs to be working the same playbook every restaurant every business in the absence of a so called restaurant playbook the National Restaurant Association which is a lobbying group is doing what it can to try and offer some guidelines for reopening obviously frequent hand washing some element of distancing some element of face covering certainly reduced interaction between the host. And the guest. That's Larry Lynch Senior Vice. President of Science and Industry at the National Restaurant Association Lynch said it's already begun. Restaurants are already testing out new methods. Everyone's looking visit different ways just this weekend. We saw one of the towns here in Florida. Closed down one of their street to the restaurant. Tours could pull the chairs out into the street. If you're used to going out as being a curated. Dining Experience Lynch describes the post pandemic world as sort of a safety focused obstacle. Course I would say what you're probably GonNa find is before you get there. You're going to look online and look what the instructions are in that particular restaurant what their expectations or. It may tell you to wait outside. May Ask you to place your order online. It may tell you that once you get outside. Send them attacks and let them know. You're outside wait once you're inside. You may wait a bit before the waiter or waitress actually comes up and greets you greeting maybe something as simple as confirming your order rather than taking your order. Once you die. You may find that your table is included as fasces. Wasn't it passed. It's going to be cleared all at once rather than sporadically during the dining experience. When you're dining probably won't see the manager come over to ask how your view was and whether or not you enjoyed yourself. Restaurants are going to have to tailor safety measures to suit their capabilities and it is possible. Not everyone can physically accommodate these recommendations for example Irene. Lee doesn't see her Boston. Restaurant may may hosting sin diners anytime soon. We're a small restaurant so we have about thirty six seats. Which means the possibility of socially distancing inside the building is basically none but Lee. Who was a finalist for this years? James Beard Rising Star Chef Award has still managed to find a silver lining. We are pretty much going to have to change our whole model which sounds scary but is also a really exciting opportunity. So how do we re imagine what a restaurant can be? Water restaurant can do what restaurant staff are capable of Lee in her employees are already starting to answer those questions. For example her restaurant may may is open for delivery and is also hosting virtual dumpling classes. The restaurant is delivering groceries to healthcare workers and selling pantry staples to the community like milk and eggs. The goal to help customers avoid the grocery store because I think supermarkets are going to feel unsafe for a lot of people for a long time and I just think like we have the ability to get almost any of those products probably at a better price at Mamie and so it would be kind of unconscionable to not try to use that to help keep people safer and to make their lives more. Convenient Lee is taking this time to rethink how a restaurant should operate. And she's hoping the industry is a whole does the same especially in the areas where it was struggling even before the pandemic. I think that this is a huge opportunity for us to keep talking about the biggest issue that our industry house which is Labor on the issue of jobs and low wages and like terrible workplace environments. That is always been the bane of this industry. I am hoping that the compensation model could be altered and cross training could become more prevalent. But that's the long term in the short term lease preoccupied with just keeping may may afloat even though she says. The survival of the restaurant isn't her biggest concern. If mamie doesn't exist in in five or ten years that's totally fine with me. I'm going to be really pissed off if there are no cool. Independently owned quirky restaurants to eat at like I cannot eat every day I refuse and so I think that for me. The question about Future is almost a little bit less important but for a lot of people in this industry is all we have one thing I've learned. Is that the restaurant. Industry is full of dedicated creative leaders and is someone who enjoys dining out. I'm optimistic. They're going to find ways to meet the challenges ahead and keep this important part of our culture alive. It's definitely GONNA be an uphill battle but I'm GonNa do what I can to support my favorite places with takeout orders and contributions to out of work employees. They could really use the help

National Restaurant Associatio David Chang LEE Mamie Dr Sanjay Gupta Netflix CNN Lynch Larry Lynch Senior Vice Founder Twitter Momofuku Group Iron Meyer James Beard Florida Police Systems Taipei Irene President Trump
Students and teachers struggle with remote education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:57 min | 4 months ago

Students and teachers struggle with remote education

"That's Jimmy Fallon on the tonight show earlier this week. I think voicing the thoughts of so many families. The song was a nod to national teacher appreciation. Week which ends today. But you'd probably go on all year long like schools across the country. The week looked very different compared to years past instead of apples on their desks or gift cards from parents teachers might have received an Apple Emoji or some on then mo. You know why. It's because forty seven states and the district of Columbia have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year. Teachers across the country have taken their lessons online to try and weather this pandemic so today will some of these teachers struggles and successes in navigating remote learning. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. We had really try to make everything work in the virtual world and that's challenging to do because most teachers like myself we don't sign up for that. We sign up for the interaction. We sign up for the collaboration and we sign up for those human moments that you can't really replicate online. That's Chris deer. Two Thousand Twenty Louisiana teacher of the year and a finalist for the two thousand twenty national teacher of the year. I teach at Shawmut High School in Louisiana right outside of New Orleans. Dear teaches world history to seniors and AP human geography to Freshman. I didn't know what that was. He said it's sort of like anthropology inspired to teach partly because of a formative personal experience. I was in high school when Hurricane Katrina hit. I was a senior. It was our second week. It disrupted the entire region down here. I was forced to Texas. I stayed in hotels in shelters in bounced around different schools. And I missed out on a lot of big events that a lot of people look forward to their senior year sound. Familiar deer has a pretty good idea of what is current students. Probably feel. It's a time when you're supposed to be celebrating all of your hard work your dedication. Your accomplishments When your family supposed to watch you walk across that stage cheer? So it's it's a time that you'll never get to Redo and you'll never get back and it's not just a loss for dear students. Some of them will be the first in their families to graduate from high school and the ceremony would have been meaningful to the relatives as well. Dear has students who are also dreamers undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children Andy has students. They're working essential jobs while they also balance online classes. Learning Online. Might seem easy enough if you're a student with the computer or the Internet but deer also has students who didn't have the luxury of these tools so a lot of students that originally didn't have Internet when this happened. We were Distributed work in packets in just literally papers out when we were distributing food but my district personally has been a given chromebooks out to students who need them and trying to collaborate with local organizations to get hot spots to get kids connected so I think teachers all across the country are doing everything they can to get kids online and to keep that that learning going as Peron's a community school in Phoenix Arizona has also handed out chromebooks in Wi fi to some of its students. But that's not all the school is providing. I think a lot of US forget how schools are to our communities. Even if you're not a student there Hannah Wysong teaches science and English at Esperanza mostly to low income students. She has helped distribute food boxes and gift. Cards to grocery stores. But as this pandemic drags on why song in her colleagues are looking ahead. To long-term challenges families might face food is available and a lot of schools in food. Banks is. This has gone on for a couple of months and parents are not working or working less The next set that working right now is to build a fund for rental assistance. And that's just the creative problem solving. Why Song has been a part of outside the classroom after students have been set up with food and Wi fi is when her real job and the real connection begins and these teachers have come up with all kinds of new ways to do that as well something that we normally at our school? This House monthly family nights with movies are dinner or games or whatever it may be and we were really mourning the loss of family nights and we decided to do it. Virtual dance parties so we got a local Dj from a radio station. And then we invited all of the families to get on zoom there. Were I think between forty five and fifty people on between families and staff and pretty cute to see a bunch of little squares of third graders? Dancing Chris Wyckoff who teaches American history to eleventh graders? North Carolina has taken advantage of our reliance on the Internet to send his students. Some encouragement been sending out digital cards. To let them know that I still see you. I still see your work. I still see you're working hard. Wyckoff has been proud of how well his students at the Johnston County career and technical leadership academy have taken online classes after all they could easily just turned the video off and go do something else online learning you know it has its it has its good and its bad. Even depending on the type of learner you are in a lot of our students are capable of making the adjustment at home all of those the social and emotional atmosphere of home versus the social emotional atmosphere at school all of those things combined to either create atmosphere for success or failure for for the students. Chris dineen this is another. Chris said there were hiccups using video-conferencing at first we had zoom bomb the first or second date but his middle school students at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico. Have come around. The students themselves had to adapt to a totally different style of teaching and they've actually had to become somewhat more accountable for their own behavior. Because of course we can't see them and monitor them in the ways that we normally do. Laurie Abrahams finds this challenging to. She's a special education teacher on Long Island and works with three to five year olds. Who have special needs during normal times? Work incredibly physical and requires personalized interactions with each student. These days she struggles to get her students to sit still in front of the camera. All kids do well with schedule. Especially the kids with special needs listening issues and attending issues. They really need that. They need that routine. And the you know it's very hard. It's very hard for them but like everyone else. Abrahams has come up with ways to make it work. In fact she borrowed one method of calming her students. Down from children's Yoga certification course. What I'm doing with my fingers touching my thumb to forefinger middle finger rain finger and pinkie and so you have them do that. So it's four touches and then you just say peace begins with me and they understand that peace means quiet and then we keep doing it at any time. You feel anxious or that. You need to calm down you can just you can. Just move your fingers like that. It's thoughtful it's innovative. It's what's necessary the teachers we spoke to said they've mostly worked out the kinks of remote learning and they feel optimistic about finishing the year apart from their students but in the long run. They're still not so sure. I think these kids are young enough. That if it's just four months in the scheme of along is this is not gonNa make the biggest difference because they didn't have four months of preschool. I think that in the fall if kids can't go back to school if they have to learn online. I think that's going to you know really impact this whole generation. This won't surprise you but Chris Dear Louisiana teacher whose own senior year was interrupted by Hurricane Katrina this pandemic once again highlights the need for more investment in education. I know a lot of times when the economy starts to Tank a bit. The first thing that gets cut is education and people might say well. Why do we need as much you know money for education budgets when they do things virtually and whatnot but at this time? I feel like we need more because we need more counselors. We need more. Social workers we need more therapists need smaller classes. And that's how we're going to get through this. These five teachers said the feedback. They've gotten from students and parents has mostly been positive but during the strange difficult national teacher appreciation. Week it's nice for them to hear that their efforts haven't gone unnoticed so since they can't hug their teachers in person this year we got some amazing shouts from students all over. Who want their teachers to know that their students are grateful? My Name is Dalton Davis. I am seven years old from flawless. Oregon. I want to say hi to my first grade teacher. Mrs and Mr Hello. My name is MIRA sing and I am in seventh grade. I would like to thank all of my amazing teachers. Hi My name is Leah. And I'm a fourth grader. I want to give a shot at to my awesome teacher Mr Festival. He is there every day with a smile. Hi My name is Cassie from Whittier California. And thank you to all the teachers especially my Fourth Grade Teacher Mrs Cutler and I'm Kassy's MOM Krista I also WanNa say on behalf of my fourteen year old David who has autism. We appreciate the Special Ed teachers like Mrs Gain. Thanks hi I'M AMELIA. Ham seven years old. I'm in second grade. I have the best teachers and I can't wait the virus to beautiful so I could go back to school.

Laurie Abrahams Hurricane Katrina Louisiana WI Chris Wyckoff Dr Sanjay Gupta Jimmy Fallon CNN Columbia Shawmut High School First Grade Teacher Chris Deer Thousand Twenty Louisiana Apple United States Long Island Texas Leah
The Latest on Testing

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:12 min | 5 months ago

The Latest on Testing

"When you were a kid. Did you ever make one of those pinhole cameras? Were you cut a little hole into a piece of cardboard and then look through it on some ways. That's kind of how we're looking at the corona virus nowadays through a tiny little window part of the reason. We haven't been able to get a bigger picture because this is a new corona virus and we're learning as we go along. We have also had inadequate testing across the nation so the inability to know the true extent of this outbreak becomes a major barrier in terms of getting the country back to work. We need clear vision and so far we haven't had that. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. There are currently only two types of corona virus tests available in the United States. Because I'm a healthcare worker. Who still takes care of patients in the hospital? I've had both of them. I'm GonNa give you a little poke over Uruguay. Don't okay. We're all done it. Okay early on there. Were some significant delays in testing and there was also the release of a flawed test. Which really put us far behind since then there have been a lot of unauthorized on validated tests. Which have flooded the market the most common and most accurate test we have is called a PR test. A polymerase chain reaction tests. Now that's the one that detects whether or not someone is currently infected with Kovic nineteen. It involves a saliva test in some cases or more commonly a nasal swab. Cnn's Brooke Baldwin referred to it as a brain Taylor so that gets sent off to a lab where the genetic material is extracted. And because there's such a small amount of genetic material it is then amplified. That's the polymerase chain reaction. If all goes well results usually come back within a few hours but it can take a few days if you have to send it to a lab somewhere then. There are the antibody tests. Those are the ones that can determine whether or not someone has had cove in nineteen in the past and might have some immunity to it now. Those involved collecting a small blood sample either through a needle in the vein or three blood spot sample. But here's the problem. Antibody tests have not been consistently accurate. There are a lot of bad tests out there and it's still unclear how much those antibodies might protect you from the virus in the future. When you're testing for the virus the biggest problem would be having a false negative. Why because you would think that you don't have the virus and then you might go back out into the community into a nursing home into a hospital and potentially infect people with the antibody test which you really hoping to avoid is a false positive. Then someone might feel that they have the antibodies thus feel that they are protected. Go out into the community to a hospital to a nursing home and spread the virus so with the diagnostic virus test. You really have to reduce false negatives with the antibody test you really have to reduce false positives. The promise of the immunology test to find out we have. The antibodies is huge. That's Kevin Delay on senior fellow at the University of Southern California's Schwarzenegger Institute for State in Global Policy. The institute supports test sites across Los Angeles. This can influence policymakers at the local state and federal level. That can actually inform us. When it comes to social distancing if I'm immune in scientifically I've been proven to be immune then I can re enter the workforce and I could play a bigger role and make sure we're safe for a company called Roche announced that it received emergency use authorization. Eu A for an antibody test it claims is more accurate than most Roe says. It has already started shipping. Its new test to leading labs around the world. Here's Rosillo Severin Schwan. It's really special. Because it is so accurate. It's it's almost perfect. Accuracy and allows us is to really reliably test whether a person has been infected by the corner virus or opt irrespective of whether you had symptoms or not now. There's another kind of tasks they could be useful here. It's called an antigen test again. The test for the virus is the PR or diagnostic tests. The test for the antibody is called a serology test. And now the antigen tests look for a protein on the surface of the virus. You may have already had one of these if you've ever had a test for strep throat or the flu. Here's the problem. A reliable antigen test for the corona virus isn't yet available in the United States. But the hope is that will soon have something that works kind of like an ad home pregnancy test. Were a test strip. Would change color detail if you might have the virus. Frederick Nolte is a pathology professor and the head of Corona virus testing at the Medical University of South Carolina. Antigen detection has been part of the diagnostic landscape for a number of years and it has a number of appeals. It can be done relatively quickly. it's inexpensive. It can be deployed in a number of clinical settings outside of the laboratory near the patients but the chief concern with it has been the sensitivity and they low sensitivity means a high false negative and with high false negatives people feel that they don't have the virus and they go back out in the community and potentially continue the spread so how available. Rpcr antibody tests to the general public is probably the question. I get more than any other as of Monday. Johns Hopkins University's Kovic Tracking Project was reporting over seven. Million people in the United States have been tested and they mean the diagnostic or PCR tests in this case but again the initial rollout of those tests was fraught with problems and that caused major delays in the country's early response to the pandemic. Those problems are being addressed now but there are still supply chain shortages the PR requires certain transport mediums reagents and yes nasal swabs and those things have been in short supply but just last week. The mayor of Los Angeles announced free diagnostic testing for all of the county's residents because we know the ten million residents county need that it's critical for US opening up in the future. That's Mayor Eric. Garcetti on CNN and we wanted to be the first big city in America to take the advice of doctors around the country saying you have to find the silence spreaders. This is a silent killer that people without symptoms who can spread. This are critical piece of knowledge in order to open up in the future and in New York City mayor. Bill de Blasio says the city will produce its own cove in nineteen tests kits in partnership with Three D. Printing Company. We realize we had to find another source. Global Market wasn't working. There weren't sources around this country that were reliable enough so we decided we would make our own and this has had been put together very quickly. So we're really an uncharted territory. Creating these tests kids in New York City again. It's these nasal swabs that have been in such short supply in so many places around the country. Now there are also plenty of antibody tests floating around that have not been reviewed or validated by the FDA. The agency said Monday that it was tightening. Its policy to keep unproven and even fraudulent tests from entering the market. It's been a big problem in one. Study of twelve antibody tests. Four were shown to deliver false positive results more than ten percent of the time. Remember if you're testing for. Antibodies and you get a false positive people may incorrectly. Assume they now have the antibodies and are protected and then go out into public and keep spreading. You really want to get that false positive rate under two percent as low as possible. Really the future could lie in at home. Testing Antigen tests would be the easiest to mass produce for home use but again like I said we don't yet have a reliable antigen test for Kovic Nineteen White House Corona Virus Task Force member. Dr Deborah Burke said this last month on. Nbc's Meet the press we have to have a breakthrough innovation and testing. We have to be able to detect antigen than constantly tried to detect the actual live virus or the viral particles itself and to really move into Antigen testing. If an antigen test is approved and mass produced it may serve as a valuable screening tool. But it's probably not going to replace the P. C. R. Saliva or swab tests when it comes to diagnosing Kovic nineteen the Antigen test in this case would be used to screen the PR test would still be the most accurate according to the Guardian scientists working for the US military have designed a PC test. That has the potential to detect the virus as early as twenty four hours after its contracted that could help stop infected people from spreading the virus before they even show symptoms and keep in mind. A lot of people never show symptoms but can still spread the virus. It's another promising maybe and remember this. Testing does need to go hand in hand with contact. Tracing once you find out who's infected that person needs to be isolated and then everyone who has had close contact with that person needs to be traced and sometimes those people need to be quarantined as well test trace and hopefully treat

United States Corona Virus Task Force Los Angeles CNN New York City Dr Sanjay Gupta Rosillo Severin Schwan Roche NBC Johns Hopkins University Brooke Baldwin Uruguay Bill De Blasio Dr Deborah Burke Medical University Of South Ca Guardian EU Kevin Delay
Doctors reject Trump's dangerous suggestion to use disinfectant

Mac and Gaydos

03:06 min | 5 months ago

Doctors reject Trump's dangerous suggestion to use disinfectant

"When I see the disinfectant Fort Knox in a minute four minutes and is there a way we can do something like that five injection instead of how much the cleaning because you see this in the lungs and it does a tremendous number will also be interesting to check here well that was yesterday it's called the trump teeny one part bleach one part disinfectant one tide pod can you take it with your morning coffee and it's guaranteed to cure coronavirus here's lots of things so puts hair on your head after died so the president saying that yesterday it was said to me not reckless like a lot of people say it was to me hilarious and it was stupid and silly and he showed up Saturday and it's not the end of the world but my goodness was it funny and you've got people taking it either not my way they're taking it one way or the other so you have the far left saying what well the far left is saying this is serious he really believes this the he's gonna get people killed and they're attacking you know that the far right are doing everything they can to say he didn't say that you guys he was just joking but everybody's so pending in the wind wind to fit the narrative that makes it work for them so what really happened so I mean I guess everybody's got you know their take on this and it's it's such an outlandish thing to say I'm but you know I just think it it was amusing because as soon as I heard it yesterday you know you and I looked at each other did he know it yeah he didn't really say and what some people are saying is you know what's gonna happen he was gonna happen people are actually going to do this people are gonna like people are gonna like they're gonna want some kind of pure L. drip you know going into their veins and I'll just say this if there's somebody out there that actually wants to take out trump up on this and go do it that's your problem it's not trump's problem that's your problem if you really want to listen to every single thing that he says and you want to do everything he says then you know what you're going to die you're going to die from putting some type of disinfectant inside of your body that's your problem so I'm sorry but I'm just taking this as I am amused by it and I don't need to put like a doctor on every five seconds like CNN and they're saying do you think this doctor do you think that this is is something that could end up harming people do you think that do you think maybe that could could happen do you think so let's ask Anderson Cooper and Dr Sanjay Gupta bleach and other disinfectants used to kill viruses on surfaces in your kitchen doing anything with that internally it's just doctors what we make and they also said it you know it needs to be studied actually it doesn't we know the answer to this one and there's a lot of things out there that we don't know the answers to we need to investigate but the idea that we would do a trial of some sort and inject some people with disinfectant and some people not then see what happens I think everybody would know that that would be

Fort Knox
Chris Cuomo on Covid-19 Recovery

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

05:44 min | 5 months ago

Chris Cuomo on Covid-19 Recovery

"I tested positive scare. Yes as you might imagine. So let's focus. Let's use this example of me having as proof that you can get it to God forbid we do everything we can to avoid being sick. We have to do it for ourselves. Families are for those on the front lines. Were saving lives of people like me and many of you if you couldn't tell by now that CNN anchor. Chris Cuomo Kristen. I have been friends for a long time and last month. He was diagnosed with cove in nineteen and ever since then. He has been broadcasting as nightly show from his basement. It took weeks but he was eventually cleared to emerge from self isolation. It's been a journey for Chris. No doubt and we've been discussing that journey a lot on his show and on our own like a lot of people. I was worried about him even giving him some advice as a doctor and a friend. Dr Sanjay Gupta. Our chief is back. My brother North Star for many of us are during this time. You were right when you told me that. I would see a different side of this once. The virus took root Chris a warrior. But you're allowed to take a day off. You know we love you. We think about you and it's okay to take a day off totally right. You gotTa Take Care of yourself. I you can't take care of anybody else. Since his initial diagnosis Chris's wife Christina. And his son. Mario have also been diagnosed with Kovic nineteen. Now that he's through the worst of it I wanted to catch up and ask him about his experience with the virus and also find out how he and his family are now doing. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Let me ask you about you. What what are your days like nowadays you know. Tell me everything. When when are you waking up? What are you doing? How do you spend your time? Well it's changing. This has been a transformative event for me. I've never been knocked at my ass like this before headline disease. I was diagnosed with. Ptsd they put me on the pediatric doses select. So you don't have to work through a wire was having these dreams and all that stuff but nothing like this. You know a shivering mess for days where I was forced to be isolated and take stock in a way that I never had in my adult life so I went from doing nothing all day except preparing to do that. One Hour of television after which I be sweaty mess and fall down on the couch and basically lay there for like six hours and then get into some weird sleep cycle now. I am in the recovery phase which I didn't know existed and I am trying to be highly structured so I wake up early. I write and I read. Then I'm trying to start upping my activity curve. I can do very little exercise if I do too much. I heat up and I start to get a wave of almost like kind of a mild nausea and now that I don't have to be isolated. I'm waking the kids up in the morning for school Doing Breakfast Christina is needs to sleep it hits her hard at night her symptoms. She gets really bad. Sinus pressure at night and there are no great answers and I am still warm and they say I may be four weeks but I have a little bit more energy. Feel about forty eight percent myself. I can see you. Obviously the people who are listening to this. Podcast cannot but you you look a lot better. I mean we talk a Lot. I see you a lot You know obviously just via screen like this but You better one thing I do want to say. Is that when we first talked about this about you? Having a positive result on that on that test I gotTa tell you I was. I was worried in in in these. Aren't things that I told you while you were still dealing with this because I was modulating myself even so the conversation I'm having with you now is a different conversation? Because I've been reading stories about young people who had really no pre existing illness or anything and them getting really sick. Chris and even dying now. Am I going to share that with you on television? You know as you're dealing with this no I'm not now. I don't think that that's not being honest. I think it's it's it's modulating how I present things a little bit but I gotTa tell you I was. I was worried about you and there were times when you had these declines in your in your nights were terrible and your pulse symmetry your oxygenation was a little lower than I would have liked and I knew that you couldn't necessarily get to the hospital right away so I was worried and I guess the question is were you. Did you ever think that this was going to go sideways you I? There's so much of an unknown right and what You keep. Relying on is perspective that it's not supposed to be. It's not supposed to be me. I was having those funky dreams. A Lotta people have and I take a lot of comfort in new coverted community the I got patched into through this of people. It's so comforting Sanjay. When somebody's had the same that you had the commiseration things real you know. You got those crazy shakes. You Bruges leg yet. You know banging your legs into each other. Yeah I got that Bruce.

Chris Cuomo Kristen Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN Christina Nausea Mario Bruges Coverted Bruce
Testing "critical" amid concern of virus second wave

Dana Loesch

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Testing "critical" amid concern of virus second wave

"Forward health experts warned that there may be a second wave of the virus headed our way Dr Sanjay Gupta says that there's a concern that it might show up during the next flu season are they gonna be enough hospital beds are they gonna be enough ventilators is going to be enough P. P. no more than forty five thousand people in the U. S. have died from the virus that's according to the Johns Hopkins

Dr Sanjay Gupta P. P. Johns Hopkins FLU
More deaths, no benefit from malaria drug in VA virus study

Mitch Albom

00:28 sec | 5 months ago

More deaths, no benefit from malaria drug in VA virus study

"The malaria drug widely touted by president trump for treating the new corona virus show no benefit in a large analysis of its use in U. S. veterans hospitals medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta says other nature's nations that have studied hydroxyl clerk when haven't given the drug positive reviews seems similar data now out of Brazil are France and out of Sweden where in Sweden they actually reckon they gave guidance to the entire country's hospitals to stop using this

Donald Trump Dr Sanjay Gupta Brazil France Sweden Malaria President Trump U. S.
Malaria Drug Helps Coronavirus Patients Improve, in Small Study

Ben Shapiro

03:00 min | 6 months ago

Malaria Drug Helps Coronavirus Patients Improve, in Small Study

"We're starting to see some promise shown in various drugs that are being used to treat corona virus in your times reported that the malaria drug the president trump had been promoting hydroxy chloroquine not detecting cleaner you idiots hydroxy chloroquine and that that is actually been effective according to The New York Times no Larry address address the floor clean up to speed the recovery of a small number of patients mildly ill from the coronavirus according to doctors in China William Shatner infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt that is going to spend it send a ripple of excitement out through the trading community that's what it was small and limited to patients were mildly or moderately ill not severe cases but we're starting to see some evidence emerge Dr oz actually talk about this and he said yeah that we're seeing some we're seeing some news that the hydroxy floor cleaners is actually effective all the patients had the mall near when they started over the course of the five day treatment with the hydrochloric when a fifty five percent of the control population where they just got to normal therapy there's that wasn't resolved the resolution of the pneumonia eighty one percent of the patients on that record when there was improvement in the logs images in addition and that was small those by the way I everything I've said is that physically significant even at sixty two patients despite being small they still got the measures that we like to see that is very good news Dr Sanjay Gupta of course comments over at CNN is their chief medical correspondent he just would rather still unproven treatments for cover nineteen a number of trials are in the works we don't know if any of them will show effectiveness against the novel coronavirus here if you might have heard of these I dropped the floor clean and clear clean these related drugs are used to treat conditions like malaria and autoimmune diseases there's limited evidence partially from studies on human cells it could have anti viral effects when I process is being that they could make it harder for coronavirus enter human cells thank you said the evidence isn't there history should make us cautious in the past chloroquine showed promise in vitro against influenza but ultimately can prevent infection in humans he says the danger isn't just false hope we see shortages of these drugs which people need for unrelated conditions now as you read this severe which is one of a number of anti viral treatments doctors are looking into now they work by blocking the virus ability to replicate says this was developed by Gilead sciences previously Gilead sciences previously tested against people and mirrors it is not been approved as a treatment yes other anti retroviral drugs are also being tested like a combination of HIV drugs a randomized trial published this month found they did not improve seriously ill patients compared to standard care alone and then there's convalescent plasma which is taking a component of blood from people very recovered and hoping that their antibodies could mitigate the effects and people were exposed or infected he said we tested this with the ball up to get this up and running we need to ramp up antibody testing a blood test different from the nasal swab we've been hearing about he says the list isn't exhaustive nothing has been proven to work so far he says right now again don't rely on all this but we're we're seeing some promising treatments but we just don't have enough evidence to say that this is definitely the the be all end all at this

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:59 min | 6 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"We're going to have to <Speech_Male> run but I want to ask you <Speech_Male> before we go. <Speech_Male> Sanjay <Speech_Male> you talk about your frustrations. <Speech_Male> With how <Speech_Male> the policymakers <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> handle some <Speech_Male> of these sort <Speech_Male> of existential <Speech_Male> challenges. <Speech_Male> That we face. <Speech_Male> I know that <Speech_Male> you kind of plated <Speech_Male> becoming surgeon. <Speech_Male> General in <Speech_Male> two thousand and nine. <Speech_Male> Your <Speech_Male> brother ran for Congress <Speech_Male> in this last <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> year. You served <Speech_Male> in the White House <Speech_Male> you worked with <Speech_Male> Hillary Clinton on <Speech_Male> this healthcare <Speech_Male> issue. Not <Speech_Male> that you need more to <Speech_Male> do but <Speech_Male> do you ever <Speech_Male> think maybe <Speech_Male> I should try my hand <Speech_Male> at being <Speech_Male> inside <Speech_Male> influencing <Speech_Male> these decisions <Speech_Male> on a macro level <Speech_Male> rather than just commenting <Speech_Male> on them from <Speech_Male> my platform <SpeakerChange> at <Speech_Male> CNN. <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> absolutely <Speech_Male> For sure <Speech_Male> I mean I. There's a <Speech_Male> frustration as a journalist. <Speech_Male> And I've <Speech_Male> always been curious about <Speech_Male> your life because <Speech_Male> you've done both <Speech_Male> at very very <Speech_Male> high levels. <hes> <Speech_Male> obviously <Speech_Male> <hes> if there's a frustration <Speech_Male> of journalists <Speech_Male> is that you know. I think <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> we are such students <Speech_Male> and we dig so <Speech_Male> deep into things <Speech_Male> and and you <Speech_Male> know ninety nine <Speech_Male> percent of what I learned about <Speech_Male> a topic and never <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> makes it on air <Speech_Male> and I <Speech_Male> get to define <Speech_Male> problems but not <Speech_Male> really to execute <Speech_Male> solutions. <Speech_Male> That that's frustrating. <Speech_Male> I think for someone <Speech_Male> like me and maybe <Speech_Male> for a lot of other people as <Speech_Male> well I <Speech_Male> would i. <Speech_Male> I really <Speech_Male> enjoyed <Speech_Male> my time doing <Speech_Male> public service. <Speech_Male> I think the only <Speech_Male> reason <Speech_Male> that I didn't take the job <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> you know your your <Speech_Male> your boss <Speech_Male> was so kind to <Speech_Male> to offer. It was was <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> I didn't realize that it <Speech_Male> would no longer be able to practice <Speech_Male> surgery <Speech_Male> as surgeon general <Speech_Male> which. I found. Ironic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> know. I guess it's just you know <Speech_Male> I understand. Only <Speech_Male> generals is the job. <Speech_Male> You want to be committed to but <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> was. I really like <Speech_Male> practicing surgery <Speech_Male> if I left for four <Speech_Male> eight years. I'd probably <Speech_Male> have to train again <Speech_Male> and you know I just didn't <Speech_Male> seem like it. Was <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> the right life decision <Speech_Male> but I <Speech_Male> think that I would <Speech_Male> absolutely love <Speech_Male> to be in a position. <Speech_Male> I don't know that it would be <Speech_Male> electoral politics. <Speech_Male> But just in a position <Speech_Male> where <Speech_Male> I could <Speech_Male> I could <Speech_Male> have a voice that <Speech_Male> people <hes> <Speech_Male> would would <Speech_Male> would value away. That <Speech_Male> would actually lead to solutions. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> know because <Speech_Male> their solutions here <Speech_Male> I. <Speech_Male> I know that my right <Speech_Male> eye. I dream about <Speech_Male> them. I think about <Speech_Male> them all the time. <Speech_Male> I call my friends. <Speech_Male> Who are who are smarter <Speech_Male> than I am about <Speech_Male> these topics and say hey. <Speech_Male> Let me run this <Speech_Male> by you. Call me crazy. <Speech_Male> Talk me off a <Speech_Male> cliff. Where am I right here? <Speech_Male> You know and and <Speech_Male> that's what I'm constantly <Speech_Male> doing to be <Speech_Male> able to translate that <Speech_Male> into some some real <Speech_Male> action <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and what we <Speech_Male> hear for otherwise <Speech_Male> listened brother. <Speech_Male> I would like nothing <Speech_Male> better than to see <Speech_Male> you in a position to do <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> I think the country <Speech_Male> would benefit from <Speech_Male> it. But we're certainly <Speech_Male> benefiting from <Speech_Male> Your Voice <Speech_Male> Right now <Speech_Male> I've said it behind your <Speech_Male> back. I will say <Speech_Male> it to your face <Speech_Male> your national treasure. <Speech_Male> I'm so <Speech_Male> comforted <Speech_Male> to know <Speech_Male> that you're on the job <Speech_Male> here and <Speech_Male> I think I speak for <Speech_Male> a lot of Americans <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> Sanjay Gupta <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> always good <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be with you. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you for being with us. <Speech_Music_Male> An an honor for me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> David. Thank <SpeakerChange>

Sanjay Gupta Congress Hillary Clinton White House CNN.
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

12:20 min | 6 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Yesterday About the crisis. We're going through. But also about his remarkable personal journey and body of work to great conversation. Let me share it with you now. Sanjay Gupta so so good to be with you. I so appreciate you carving time out. I don't actually understand how you are making the time to do everything that you're doing. You're like comforting and sobering presence in our homes Morning noon and night. And so I feel like I should start by asking you how you're doing. Well thank you David. I'm doing fine. I'm tired I think like a lot of people are I think since the beginning of January. Yeah I can remember exactly when it was. It was three days before the first patient was was confirmed to have the krona virus infection here in the United States January seventh for me. I you know we. We've been at this nonstop you know and every day every weekend three to four hours sleep a night so it's tiring but but I'm healthy. I feel fine. Otherwise are you. I know you're famed fitness freak. You're very devoted to it. Are you able to do that or you're able to keep up on that? Yeah you know. I've I've really sort of made a point of that David so you know the it's mostly inside like I'll jump on a stationary bike or I'll jump on a treadmill of these something I have to do it I feel like every day because I think just having a little bit of control like that it just you know besides physical part of it I think emotionally mentally. I feel like I have a little bit of control over my day if I've been able to work out I don't know if that makes sense but I also you know it. It's important to me to exercise. I do you know if it's a nice day I'll go try and get a run outside as well so there's usually an hour or so in the day I'm waking up around four four fifteen Doing the doing my reading for a good hour and a half and then start doing a little bit of the television stuff until around noon twelve thirty or so and then I usually can find an hour Before you know the afternoon shows into the evening starts but it's constantly reading in between as well that that is important and takes a lot of time and I wanNA talk to you like everybody does about the crisis that were in but I also want to give people a sense of exactly who you are because you have become. You're the guy who who comforts us. Who who's gives us the sobering news. You have been from the beginning. You're like Paul Revere. At the beginning of this thing warning people about the magnitude of it would that. Some of the policymakers taken that more seriously from the beginning. But how you describe your day. I suspect your days are not exactly relaxed even in the best of timeshare neurosurgeon practicing neurosurgeon. I assume you're not practicing now right. Yeah you know. It's sort of been interesting. We have had all the electives sort of operations. have been stopped at hospitals You know most hospitals now around the country so it is sort of a strange confluence of events. Because I do. I do still practice. I you know Go see patients still because I still have patients that I'm following and sometimes concerts that people want me to weigh in on But the the active operating which I was doing up until the last few weeks because of the hospitals have changed. That's sort of stopped at at this point I don't know how long but it's giving me a little bit of time. You know I will tell you that. It's it's it's it's funny because you know my closest friends are people that I that I trained with and that I work with in the hospital because it's just such a galvanizing thing to to be with these people as I have been for you know decades now I joke around with them just just this morning. That people say oh you're surgical residency must have prepared you well for this and I joke around and say you know back then. At least we got every other night off you know now. We're not even even getting that so I still spend a lot of time with the folks in hospitals and and Both on the clinical side but also trying to understand what their lives are really like you know just the nuance of their lives. Now that's different because of what's happening it's it's it's significant. I think people sort of generally get this but but you know when you're dealing with a virus that we're still learning about and there's a lot of humility here you know usually when you're going on television or reporting something. I'm saying you know based on ten years worth of data based on twenty years worth of data here. We can't even say that number in weeks sometimes not even days so you have to have humility here but for the healthcare workers in a lot of my friends they work. They protect themselves. The best they can But it's like you know I I really did. I pinch the nose tight enough on the ninety five to make sure I mean. We always thought about that but never with the diligence I think now and then did I take it off. In a way that I did not contaminate my hand and if I did contaminate my hand how many things that I touch before I could get over to the scrub sink in. Wash my hand and then I'm GONNA get in my car and should I wear gloves when I touch the steering wheel because my wife's going to be driving tomorrow my husband is GonNa be driving tomorrow and then God forbid I think the biggest thing is that you go home and you. You unintentionally infects your family. You know there's people living in their garages. There's people who are living in their basements. I've pretty much been in the basement. you know for the last several weeks now. I go upstairs occasionally but I feel like I have to be as diligent as I can about not affecting my family given all the things that I'm still doing. I know that this in the last few days has become a lot more personal for you and less clinical. Because you have lost a friend and colleague Dr James Goodrich who you actually did a documentary about in two thousand sixteen when he performed this extraordinary surgery to separate conjoined twins. The first successful surgery of its kind of our colleague. Chris Cuomo has now presented with corona virus. I saw you last night talking with him and showing the concern that a friend and a doctor would for his state which didn't look good so all of this must be impacting on you. Dr Goodrich you know He. He's see I could talk about him forever. David but you know I saw it. You know you report on this As as as as much as we have. But I hadn't really known somebody personally up until I found out that that Jim was diagnosed. And and even then I think when I first heard it I I didn't quite know what to make of it. I guess I assumed that he would that he'd be okay that he'd get sick but that he'd be okay. I just you know statistically that's that's I think from where you operate in your in your own brain in your mind and and he was one of these guys that you know I've known since I was a resident. He's the Kinda guy that I think. All inspired US young neurosurgeons he. He was the most interesting man in the world traveled all over the world to to go and operate on little kids in in all these far flung places established many modern practices of neurosurgery I sat with him for twenty seven hours when he was separating. These these twins these little babies who were born conjoined. And you really just get to know somebody and so you know. I mean like I said I could go on and on about the guy but you know it was a reminder a that probably a lot of GONNA know somebody. Who's affected by this? Hopefully that doesn't die. But even that may be the case for for many of us and you know it doesn't discriminate. David I mean even. It doesn't matter what you do or who you are and Even somebody who who spent his life saving so many people lost his life due to this virus and I guess I guess people know this Sort of you know from from hearing the news reports but it was pretty poignant I think and then with Chris Cuomo he 'em like you said he's sick he's he. You know Chris. Christie is a young healthy guy. I mean he he. He took in the extreme as he likes to talk about his health. Quite a bit and And we've bonded over that over the years but he But he You know he is sick. I call them last night after the show because He was telling me things on live television that I had not known About how sick. He was and I checked in autumn again this morning. How's how's he doing you know he he's doing he's doing. Ok. Okay but he but he is sick. And when I when I say that Give you a couple of examples and and I am sure he would share this with you but you you you get these. These shivers. They're called. They're called riders in in medical terms where they are the intense sort of shaking. David where you just you can't you can't even sort of keep up with it in your whole body is shaking to the point where your muscles really hurt and your teeth are chattering it to the point where you could chip a tooth. You know which Chris Actually did last night. You know. So it's it's significant and and because of the overload on hospitals right now You know what what he would here and I understand why but he calls. The hospital causes doctor and they say look a mess. It is something very very acute. You GotTa ride this out at home. We don't want you come into the hospital so he's writing it out on home which I understand. That's not a criticism by any means but it's just it's just one of these things where You know he's going to have a miserable few days knowing him. He may still try to show and things like that. But it's GONNA be miserable for a few days. Yeah Yeah so as to you I want to get to Europe. Just remarkable story and this Predator natural drive and disciplined that you have which is an inherited trait. I'm a first generation American. A father was a refugee. I know you're a first generation American. Tell me about your folks and their story. Yeah I it something that I that I feel like. I was very fortunate to be to be born into their their the the the kind of people that they they have Instructed my brother and I to to be. They are immigrants to this country They both came here in the mid sixties. They met in this country which was very unusual actually for for Indians. Usually it was arranged marriages. My parents actually met in the United States. Well let's not let this moment go by before you explain exactly how they met which is quite a story. I. It's it's an amazing story and it's I think in many ways shaped Our lives and also a lot of our communities lives because they look to my parents. At that time. There weren't a lot of Indians in this country but my mom she came to the United States wanted to be an automotive engineer. She had read a book about Henry Ford and she had heard a a talk once from Jarl Nehru who was Prime Minister of India at the time where he basically said look here. Here's where India is going to either win or lose it's going to be around manufacturing and in we're hearing about automotive manufacturing and I think we need to really lean into this and I'm not just talking to the boys out there I'm also talking to the girls and my mom was a young kid at the time and and basically resolved that she was going to do that which was kind of laughable because she was born in what is now Pakistan and You know was part of that. Large human migration during the partition of forty seven. And like your parents David. She was a refugee for the first fourteen years of her life..

David US Chris Cuomo Dr James Goodrich Sanjay Gupta Paul Revere Chris Actually India Europe Pakistan Chris Jim Henry Ford Christie Jarl Nehru Prime Minister of India engineer
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

14:44 min | 6 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"What a cool dude. Have you ever met a Monica? I want to? I've met him and he is lovely presented with he and his brother somewhere in the country music awards or something. Fantastic guy now so that means. I'm lucky enough to be zero degrees away from Kevin. Okay Kevin Bacon has a new podcast. It's a fictional comedy podcasts. From spotify an funnier dad called the last degree of Kevin Bacon. The premise of the show is that thirty six years ago. A guy named Randy. Best Low narrowly lost the starring role in footloose to Kevin Bacon and has been obsessed with him ever since so randy has finally hit his breaking point and vows to go to La kill his enemy and replace him in the universe. But things don't go quite as planned. Because what exactly do you do? When you're mortal enemy just wants to be his best friend. Last degree of Kevin Bacon Stars Kevin Bacon care. Sedgwick is also in it. Matt Walsh from Veep Plays Randy bedlow Lamar Morris Stars in the show as well and it features. Rob Reiner. Emily Chanel. Rhea Perlman Natalie Morales McCullough walk INS and Terry Gross. This is going to be hilarious. The last degree of Kevin Bacon is a spotify original podcast. And you can listen to it for free. Olen spotify one other question you have. I know you had you had a phone about food workers. We're going to get into some more practical and then I have one again. One last. Really provocative question. Yeah I have a just a selfish one. Well not selfish. I guess but we also want to keep the economy up as much as we possibly can. I WANNA be ordering food and I know everyone's saying you can do take out and delivery but there's a part of me that's like can you do take out and delivery because it's passing from hand to hand. Can it go on your food and then you eat it like all of this? Yeah well I'll tell you first of all we are as a family ordering takeout food. A fair amount okay. It was good enough for Sunjay. It's good enough for us. Yeah Yeah I mean I you know and and we went through the decision Matrix on this and sort of figured it out for ourselves. And and here's what made sense to me was first of all. I was really busy. I mean all the kids are at home right. They're not in school. So just pragmatically speaking and I'm working all the time so just from life decisions I'm trying to take pressure off of her and you know ordering takeout is helpful in that regard but what we decided to do was everything's done on your phone absolutely pay for it through that and personal usually leave it at the front porch or or wherever so you know you keep still the physical distance from anybody. We'll pick it up over there and usually leave the outer bags. Things that are most recently touched on the porch. Bring the containers into the House and the if it touches the counter you know. We're very careful about wiping counters down. And then obviously washing our hands. After we've touched all these things he keep in mind you touch something like that Surface that may be contaminated. And then you touch your eyes your nose your mouth. That's the concern here. He Wash your hands right after you touch those surfaces you can obviate that concern right. It's not transmitted in the food. Okay food borne virus. There are foodborne viruses. And they give you sort of stuff but this is a respiratory virus so You know if the good place that you order from that's hygenic otherwise your food should be fine. Just follow some basic precautions and you know. Look we're doing it as well. I think a lot of people are doing it in part to make things easier for us in the same reason you are Monica. We want to continue to support all the local restaurants and the people that are in our neighborhood sometimes order food for other people in our neighborhood my wife when our grocery shopping the other day we do have a lady who's older that lives down. The street called her up. Get you a few things from the grocery store so she doesn't have to go really appreciated it. So you know those kinds of things but again just being careful in terms of knowing how the virus is transmitted and trying to reduce those potential exposures was our biggest failure. This the fact that we didn't have tests and we weren't quick to go. Yeah let's get the test. Was that probably our biggest initial failure. Yeah Yeah I think that was the biggest initial failure really important because then you can have is on this as the CDC says they like these hunting metaphors we need is on this thing. It was interesting but I'll tell you what though what is concerned me. A little bit though is that that is become the metric of success now testing right and I think it's a little bit missing the point because we also knew when you look at some of those models again. Federal government models That they have access to that. We knew we were going to need a certain number of hospital bets that we're going to need a certain number of ICU. Beds a certain number of breathing machines. We knew this and when they bought time for us in China by instituting the largest quarantine in human history. I think it was the largest in recorded human history. And even you know what the president did bring that plane back from. Wuhan one hundred ninety five passengers and quarantining them here in the United States. That was a significant move. It did slow things down what he did and even in this country we hadn't had quarantine since smallpox sixty years ago so they were really really important. Strategic things that were done by the Chinese government and also by us to bias. Time wasn't saying. Hey we stopped this thing. Yeah never was. We knew we couldn't stop it but the buying of time should have allowed US over six weeks to months. Whatever it was to make sure we could have the capacity to handle the surge of patients that everyone knows is going to be coming. That's also for me. I think as Dr Probably even bigger failure because now you're dealing situation where we're healthcare workers don't have their personal protective equipment that could have been addressed. We may have patients who don't have breathing machines when they need them. That could have been addressed. Icu BEDS I mean. All these things could have been addressed. You have big public spaces. Where guys are in Southern California? That could have started to be retrofitted and modeled to be able to provide some surge capacity. That could have been done but we didn't do it. And of that's human nature we. I mean we don't most humans don't like to act until something is literally slapping us in the face. I mean with regard to our personal health or with regard to some big public health issue. Like this we kind of like to close our eyes. Pretend it doesn't exist and if we ignore it won't affect us but you know that's not the case here and so I think that I don't even WanNa use the word failure You know you can't disentangle anything from politics nowadays but the reality is we didn't act and we could have now. I think that was a mistake. Also very sympathetic to the role they have. Which is they have to try to prevent panic so I am sympathetic to this thing. They're juggling which is they. Don't want mass panic. You saw people hoary hoarding toilet paper which was so beyond me because these people have our hop in there and clean your but I don't know I mean of all the things you you can't there's a workaround for that but okay so my my my provocative question is this. I can see someone saying look. Everyone's going to get it. X amount of people are going to die that's tragic but why at on the huge economic apocalypse that will have its own deadly implications. Wouldn't it be better to just go about business as usual except the reality without adding a recession? I think it's a good question but I will tell you though that it is one of these things were when you look at what will happen. You GotTa game this out a little bit and you have to understand. The first of all people can get really sick from this. Even if they don't die we've been looking at this in just binary terms you know lived or died. That's too simplistic here. You can get really sick and it can affect you can affect your life and your function of your life later on but the other thing when you look at these mortality rates and you say okay in who bay province China. The mortality rate was around two point three two point four percent outside of that province mortality rates in China. Were actually underneath a percent point. Six point seven. So why is that right? Same virus why did it kill so many more people in who bay versus outside who bay and the answer really has to do with the fact that it strained the medical system There are a lot of people there who could have been saved the died because they didn't have enough medical capacity in the initial stages of this. Same thing's happening Italy right now. I mean every day again. The numbers change but the case fatality rate. There is five six percent so much higher. The virus didn't become suddenly that much deadlier. It's these strain on the medical system. What a great point. Even I have been trying to frame this in. How deadly is this virus? But you're right. It's in a context of how good is the medical system at treating the virus yes not an objective number that is standalone. It's in a context of a medical system. Yeah I mean. Let me give you this description. I been a lot of reading. And what this virus actually to the body and this is relevant to what we're talking about. But what does this virus due to the body okay? So virus gets into your body. It infects a cell. It uses that sells machinery to start replicating dividing and making more and more copies of itself. Ultimately it can overwhelm your body's immune system you can't fight anymore. Starts to cause organ failure all these sorts of things right. That's what you typically think of with an infection and that probably happens to some extent here as well but what I find fascinating. Is that this virus in particular also affects a particular enzyme in the lungs. That's responsible for the making of something known as surfactant. Okay so here's what I want you to think about. Surfactant your lungs you think about your lungs as these big squishy sponges contract and they expand. That's how you you breathe. You push carbon dioxide. You've taken oxygen. That's that's what's happening but you know like a dry sponge a sponge. It's been sitting out and dry. It's really hard right to the elasticity is Kinda get Sealaska. Cities gone no matter. How hard you just. It's a dry thing. What makes it become pliable again. Put a little detergent on it right now. All of a sudden it's nice and easy to squish again. Surfactant is the detergent. And what this virus is doing is taking away your surfactant turning your lungs into these hard sort of difficult to contract. Oregon's now now that's a really challenging problem to treat but it is treatable okay so if I had a patient like that there are strategies that we could use it. I know very confident. I mean not. Everybody obviously very confident that we could keep the patient alive. We could use high function ventilators. We could use something called ECM. Oh extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. They're great strategies. We have to try and keep a patient like that alive. My point is this that the viruses is a deadly virus but if we were running full throttle and I had everything at my disposal for every patient that came in. I think we could lower the fatality rate tremendously because it's really a reflection of whether or not these patients can get medical care the viruses bad. I mean I'm not I don't want to minimize that part of it. But the reason these fatality rates are so high is because of the strain on the medical system and we think you know in the United States. That couldn't you know that can't happen here but maybe it is happening here. Maybe that is why you know governor newsome is really worried that twenty five million people get this thing within the next eight weeks in California. That's going to be a problem. That's why Governor Cuomo essentially created the efforts that he did the pause New York efforts that he did today where he's saying only essential people need to be outside..

Kevin Bacon spotify Randy bedlow Lamar Morris United States China Monica Rob Reiner Sedgwick La Rhea Perlman Natalie Morales Matt Walsh Terry Gross Oregon Emily Chanel Sunjay president ICU Southern California
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:30 min | 6 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Keep looking at stay tuned.

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:14 min | 6 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

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"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

06:59 min | 6 months ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"A. ended through January everyone. I knew everyone sitting in this room had an illness. That included fevers cough. That just would not go away and fatigue and we all had it forever and it was never named and my thought was. Is it possible that this Cova nineteen did not originate in Wuhan and that has already been around in that? We simply weren't looking for it and once we were able to detect it then we started testing for and now it seems like it's new but that may be it's been around for awhile. Do we know that originated in Wuhan? Is there any way to do epiphany meteorologists can they trace the origin of a virus? At some point will that be known? Well they can trace it to a certain extent but even given that. I think you're scenario could still be correct. Just give you a little background which I found fascinating. Is that this new novel. Corona virus was actually discovered in bats sometime ago. There's these virus hunters who basically they're looking at animals and they're trying to figure out are these animals carrying pathogens. That could possibly make a jump. Demon Beings That's their surveillance and they'll find these bats and they'll basically sacrifice the bat and find all the pathogens and then look and say well that one looks suspicious. That one looks like it could make a jump to humans and they'll classify it in. This particular virus was classified sometime ago. How long ago? Years ago or months ago knows a few years ago I think it was in within the last decade and they made note of it and it was similar to SARS which was back in two thousand and three and similar to mayors which was more recent but they just made note of it and then at some point the first person that was diagnosed came in sort of similar to what you were describing Dax. They checked for flew they check for known viruses like rhinovirus nothing sort of clicked and then they isolated this other virus at that point in this first patient and again. We don't know that that was the first patient the first patient in whom this virus was isolated and at that point when they said okay. We've never seen this virus before in humans. That's an alert that goes out to everyone in the in the medical and public health world in. It's always a red flag. A novel virus detected in human so it could have been already circulating. People had symptoms. They weren't bad enough to go to the doctor or the hospital. Never got tested but they had been carrying. What was interesting about? This guy was that everyone talked about this animal market. If you remember in Wuhan being the source of this turns out the first patient diagnosed officially had never had any contact with that animal market. So it's a good chance. It was already spreading in the community and he had already acquired it so yeah we don't really know we know from where it came. Animals almost all of our pathogens come from animals there zoonotic diseases but we don't know for sure how long it had been out there. It could have been out there a lot longer. And my guess is that it was in fact if you look at a lot of flu cases in this country now and maybe even some of the flu deaths in if you go back and look at their their actual what the actual virus was Amanda that they were Corona Virus. Even even going back some time. That's great that leads to another question. Which is is there a way to test people who've already died I guess in haven't been autopsied or something. Yeah because here's my theory so before we were really aware of it. I gotTA assume that the many people that died in January in the US of say pneumonia. Or what would have looked like pneumonia? If they were an old person in a convalescent home in the they had respiratory issues and they died. I can imagine that they would chalk that up to pneumonia. It's not like they're gonNA launch an investigation right they're not going to send the sample to the CDC because it's an old person did what a high percentage of all people do which is die of respiratory illness. They wouldn't even know to be curious. You're absolutely right. I mean you know people do die of respiratory diseases all the time. There's not value in spending the time to do testing. You can do some testing when the viruses and somebody. The person is considered the host. If the host dies the virus dies is well not in all cases like Ebola was different for example could survive after the host died. Which is why there was such a concern about funerals for example but with this in most the flu viruses and this corona virus. You need the host what you can check if you really wanted to investigate. This is to see if the body mounted a response to this particular virus an antibody response and go back and see did the antibodies that the person made in their body fit with this novel Corona Virus. And if they did that would be your answer. But we haven't been doing that at all. We haven't gotten to that point. We can barely test for the virus itself. Which has been? It's been really hard to develop a plan or strategy because we just don't know how widespread this is. Here's my fear about saying well. I already had it because I don't WanNa Bunch of people saying like yeah. I was sick in January so I probably had it. I had a cough and so I'm fine now. I have some sort of immunity to it. Did you hear my precursor before? I said no matter what everyone should do every single day. Now I did hear that but I think not. Everyone is taking it as seriously also. Do we have any more information on that like? Can you get it again? Do we know we don't know. This is one of those things where you know the the humility has to come in. I mean I spent a lot of time with Dr Fouled. She who knows amazing. Everyone knows this guy's name. Now I think he's seventy nine years old by the way. I don't know if you knew that. Wow that guy he should be president. He is sharp as it gets. I mean unbelievable. He's still he's a marathoner he's seventy nine years old. I was at a press conference with him and the President and he's on the fly fact checking things and you know. I think he's maybe the hardest job in America right now when it comes to that but I asked him this question Monica and what he basically said is that you probably do have immunity. Once you've been exposed to this virus and recover your body does build up these antibodies. It's like getting a vaccine. That's what the vaccine does the vaccine is giving you a bit of the virus and then teaches your body how to fight that virus overseas it again. Same thing happens when you get infected thing we don't know is. How long does that immunity last? That's the big question mark. So He's pretty confident that you do have some immunity and that's a good thing that ultimately is how these things burn out. Is that enough people sort of get immunized to it that's called the herd. The HERD IMMUNITY STARTS TO TAKE PLACE. And you get enough. People who are in the heard and the virus has a hard time sort of penetrating through population. Then so that's what you want ultimately but again because of no testing. We have no idea.

Wuhan pneumonia flu fevers president Cova SARS HERD cough US CDC Ebola Dax Dr Fouled Amanda America Monica
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"With Dr Sanjay Gupta are you a morning person or more of a night out Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent new research out of the U. K. finds women who like to rise with the sun have a lower incidence of breast cancer in women who prefer to stay up late the study also found sleeping more than the recommended seventy eight hours a night was linked to an increased risk of breast cancer as well now one of the researchers said it's important to note that these data do not necessarily suggest that modifying sleep habits could actually lead to a decrease in the risk of breast cancer what they suggest is it appears at the risk of breast cancer is associated with the genetic trait that in and of itself is associate the morning or night preference so what are the most important risk factors that you can control your weight how much you exercise and not drinking too much alcohol and don't forget your mammograms I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life on Westwood One podcast network I had an incredibly naive view of what his addiction was like I thought oh well he's going to re and he's getting out like that means he's fine he's checked in everything's fine this is the last day a new podcast from women on a media about the things that are killing us and I'm your host stuff anyone else wax first top listen and subscribe to lasting wherever you get your podcasts visit.

Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN seventy eight hours
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:27 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Well, gummed armchair expert. Experts on expert. We have a very fun. Exciting guest today. Dr Sanjay Gupta. You probably recognize on Jay from his work on CNN. He is their in house medical expert. He covers an array of topics for them. He's won an EMMY doing that, you know that Monica. And now that but I'm not surprised at all. He also does cool specials and an impact he's here to talk about a docu series that he's doing on who is crushing it around the globe with different health aspects. There are people that are doing it. Well, and we would be wise to model ourselves after them chasing life chasing life with Dr Sanjay Gupta on CNN. It's going to be a fantastic program now in all honesty. We had a small window as on Jay and then traffic intervened, and it cut that down even shorter. So just know this was a thrilling fifty minute interview for us that. We wanted to go on for two three hours. And I'm going to I'm going to be the first to say he's coming back. Yeah. Our apologies for being too short. And because you are definitely going to be wanting more we juicy. Yeah. He's great. He's really fantastic. So please enjoy Sanjay Gupta. Also, just a reminder tomorrow. Tickets for our live show in Seattle, go on sale at ten AM Pacific time. If time good our website, there'll be a link there to get tickets, armchair expert, pod dot com. Please enjoy that. Good doctor. We are brought to you by bless this mess. Oh, so exciting to be reading an ad for my own show will not my own show at your show show. I'm on with lake bell who created it with. Liz, Mary weather, if you love new girl, which everyone does L Liz Meriwether created that show and ran it, and she graded with like this show. I myself daydream about the premise of this show. Which is to just go move to a farm and have a simple, calm, quiet, peaceful existence, and my wife, and I like bell decide to move to Nebraska. And we think the house is beautiful, but it's a dump it's like money pit in the new fund Greenacres all in one. So funny. It is. So so funny Dave characters on it Lennon, Parham Zahn it. Ed Begley Kinnear. Plays a crazy man who lives in our house. It's super funny. What I like about it too is it's super physical comedy bene- beating on your friend act shepherd. But oh, it's been worth. It. Blesses must premiers in five days on April sixteenth on ABC Tuesday night. We follow American housewife the kids are alright and black is so it's wall to wall Tuesday night comedy, our show starts at nine thirty eight thirty central on ABC in guys. It's so funny and lake is so good and everyone so good watch it. He's not. Sanjay. Welcome to armchair expert. Pay experts on experts you fall into the experts category, which is very distinguished. I'm honored by that. Yeah. Yeah. You as you should be. I think of it like that. So what was so fun for me? Is that your folks in one thousand nine hundred sixty move from India to love Bonia where in Livonia, did you live right by the wonderland mall? Okay. There was an arby's there. So Harrison row. Yes. That's right. Then Opondo Rosa across the street by K mart. You really knows the BNB little drugstore. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. You went down that street. That was that's where our house was now. It's interesting. They moved to just outside of Dearborn. I worked at Ford. Right. They're both engineers. Yeah. Both both of them. That's that's really unique in cool yet. My mom was a mechanical my, dad, electrical. And and my mom was the first woman ever hired as an engineer really or Motor Company. Hasn't that some? Yes, it's pretty it's pretty cool. Yeah. And she was she was a partition child than in India, so nineteen forty seven. There's this gigantic partition India is broken up into Indian Pakistan. He's four or five years old flees from what is now Pakistan to India and twelve years lives as a refugee lives in refugee camps gets into a cargo. Right exacts a cargo ship. Yep. To India because down to Karachi, and it's you know, it's funny when you live this life with her, and it's just so part of your your thing. And you'd never really talk about. And then I hear someone like you actually know the story. That's all bonkers. Right. It's bonkers. Yeah. Because it's just such a part of our life. But yeah. So she then then decides she wants to be an engineer one day, which is out. What what do you know, what car she worked in particular was she is signed to a platform or anything? Yes. She did a bunch of the they had various cars, so the Taurus and the Taurus chassis. What was the big one shared with by with the sable the same say boy? Uh-huh. Uh-huh. No your cars. Yes. That they had a very exciting addition called the show the show Torres which had a Yamaha super high output. Yes, marinas. Yeah. And every now, and then she'd get to bring these cars home just as test thing. Yeah. And I was you know, turned in about fifteen sixteen at the time. So it was it was fantastic. I similarly we had a stepdad for a few years who was the ride and handling engineer in the corvette group. So he not only brought a home corvettes before they came out, but they also owned all these competitive vehicles. So he would have Lotus esprit Harari Guinea Coon Tosh at school. Yeah. The was it worth it in the end. But it was very cool. But no so lavonia now, my so my grandparents lived at on off American between five and six, and I spent all my summers there it my grandma taught at Stevenson high. But you didn't go there. You went to vi-. I went to Nova. I we moved at at some point in their eighth grade indicates grade we moved a few times because it was Dearborn. We were in Livonia, and even with lavonia, we moved a couple of times. And it's funny because I still go back, and I'm no family there anymore, my parents left, but but I still go back and and check out the old neighborhood. And. Yeah, wild to go back. It really is. Right. Yeah. First of all there is such a specific atmospheric feeling in Michigan, especially if you're there like late spring early summer. There's just a quality to the air for me that is so nostalgic, and I just I I find it intoxicating. So I to go back just to get that kind of high of that late spring early summer field. Saying I totally know what you mean. It's funny because people talk about the mid west than they, you know, the values, and it's just a good place. And all that. And you can you can talk about all that. But but you're right. There's something that's less less easily defined. Yes. Mallets the feel of the place, and there's something visceral there for me. Yeah. No, no, my I not a ton of diversity. I can't imagine that you had a ton of. I think I was the only Indian kid I think I may have been the only kid any color my skin at all shar when I was going to school. They're interesting. I have a brother is ten years younger than me Heald's and went to school there. And and it had started to change at that point. Yeah. But yeah, I mean, and it's funny. When you're when you're the only person who's person of color, you then are ascribed every ethnicity absolute Hughes fill in for all of them. Is sure Indian polio. A huge IRA pup population in Detroit. So I thought you were killed in sometimes sums exactly it was all that. And it was a good school. I had a good experience. But I think no matter what when you're the only guy that's different. There's I don't know what I would call it. I guess it's more xenophobia because it's not even like racism would would would imply that they somehow even knew what my race was. And then felt superior to that you've raised this. This was more. Like, he's another yet other. Yes, you know. And so I'm gonna have a fear of others. And so there was a little bit of that. And then, you know, everything so it's your name. It's type of food you eat. It's your religion herons names. You know, it's it's weird while Monica as well as first generation, I know in a half and her mother did grow up in savannah, but dad from India getcha, she's Indian your mom. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. When she was sick. So she really grew up. Oh, Monica's one hundred percent pure. We we did that Twenty-three in me. And she's as pure as against and nothing else. They're proud of it. But she's similarly grew up in in Atlanta, Georgia, and so she very much wanted to be white day. Oh, yeah. Did everything I could to be as wide as positive to fit in. I mean, I I assume I mean, I it happened. So early that I wouldn't really be able to pinpoint like, oh, I'm doing this now. But I'm sure it was just wanting to fit in with everybody else and being accepted. How did your parents have how did those conversations go with them about that? Or do. They did you even have if I could say from as an outsider the very progressive, not not as traditional you would imagine. Oh, they're not traditional at all. But I mean, of course, when I would come home and say like, I wish I had blonde hair. Like, my mom would just roll our eyes at most of those comments. But she wouldn't really should. We didn't really have many big conversations about it. I mean, I wish we had. She probably could have said like why that was wrong. But she was just like just just watch friends. You all the white girl stuff, but we had another. We had a guest on here. Rush, MMA, kinda similar dynamics Monica. And then went the other way. So it's kinda like you can either really assimilate or you can attempt to assimilate, and it doesn't work. So then you find your tribe in Russia's case. She ended up hanging out with other southeast Asian folks that she assembled kind of crew of some Asian kids. And you know, so what was your method? Well, so it's interesting. I don't know how old you were when you wanted to be white. But when I was a kid. Thirty one. I

India Dr Sanjay Gupta engineer Monica Dearborn CNN EMMY Jay Livonia Liz Meriwether Pakistan ABC Seattle arby lake bell Ed Begley Kinnear Nebraska Opondo Rosa
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

13:24 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

"Amazing. Three pounds of meat with no identity of its own. And yet it conjures up everything including yourself. Hold that thought and tried to picture a green actually holding it while we take a moment. This sort of infinite potential is brought to you by parachute sleep is one of the biggest secrets to a long and healthy life. So having the right sheets that make you feel happy and comfortable can go a long way. That's why parachute uses only the highest quality materials like hundred percent long staple Egyptian cotton and pure European flax to make their sheets. Plus, they never use harmful chemicals are toxic synthetics. So you can feel good about using the natural linens in your home. Parachute makes very comfortable. Home essentials like sheets pillows robes towels and all things soft and wonderful. I have enjoyed my own parachute. Cheats, very much visit parachute home dot com slash infinite for free shipping. And returns on parachutes premium quality, comfortable home, essentials that Spanish shoot home dot com slash infinite for free shipping and returns on Berisha's premium quality, comfortable home essentials. They offer a ninety day trial. So if you don't love your new stuff just ended back. Good health starts with a great night's sleep. I'm talking with Dr Sanjay Gupta about the brain. And the mind maybe it's long experience as a TV journalist, but that kind of get the feeling that he's interviewing me. Is their free will pre will as dominated philosophical discourse thousands of years, and nobody still agrees on that. And I've struggled with it or not so soon as you're born your parents told you you're of Indian origin, but you're American your mail. Okay. This is your background. This is your identity, and then for the rest of your life, you reinforce that conditioned mind based on cultural history based on all kinds of history. You know, you're you're basically a product of culture religion of economics of race of migratory habits through eons of time. But if you become self aware, and you can observe your mind and realized. That I'm the observer of the mind. Now, you can choose consciously. And that's where the Indian traditions biz DM are very valuable because they have a word for this. They call it freedom, Malaysia in sunscreen, which means freedom and the freedom of is from the prison of your own conditioning, which is also loosely coiled Kerma. So karma, the condition mine that is very predictable. Very predictable. You meet somebody on the street. You say, you're you're idiot. Your asshole you see the blood pressure rise. You said no, you're the best person in the world. But you see a different response. So you're at the mercy of every stranger on the street. So that is how malleable consciousnesses, but it has to still work to the human Bain. So right now, I can imagine my brain having this experience with you right now and our frontal cortex being activated. But I also imagine the frontal cortex people were listening to us wherever they are. So we right now are influencing the frontal cortex of not only each other. But everybody else across the world who's listening? If we are all such individuals with all of our own background and history and all the things that make us your lated unique. What would explain? Mm them based on the theory. You know, this this curtain may not be it's not blue. It's these photons are activating certain parts of what would make it that we have such shared experiences. What is the likelihood that you, and I would both look at this and describe it in the same way. If it's all basically, just a individualized perception. Of of what's happening in our case. It's the hypnosis of social conditioning using human nervous system. This is not a shared experience for pirates of birds or honeybees honeybee goes to grow comes back to the Kaif. And does a few seconds of what is called a wagon dance and all the other anyways. No executive go to get their Honey for that flavor. What is that language the Wagle dance? It's beyond my comprehension. Okay. What is the world that honeybees experiencing is beyond my knowing our shared experience is a result of the hypnosis of recycled conditioning. And now, it's a reality as humans, not what is the advantage of knowing this once I get rid of all constructs and undescended magical lies then. I have the freedom now to create new constructs. Do you think that the hard question about consciousness can never be answered? How can you answer something where where the basis upon interpreting it this potentially faulty we never know what realities wound ino- what perceptions of reality? And these are human perceptions is is their reality only as potential that's including this series. I set you up. There is a reality. There is a reality. That reality is the consciousness with conjures up every possible experience. We've now come up with the idea that there are two trillion galaxies. That us seven hundred sixty million stars uncountable trillions of planets that are little planet is a speck of dust in an infinite reality that if you looked at planet earth as a grain of sand and all the beaches of the would be an exaggeration. Then you look at human beings on top of that. Then you're not even visible of there. And yet, you can conjure up all these contracts. I always feel I mean, this honest feel so good when I talk to, you know, despite the fact that you tell me that I'm smaller than a grain of sand, and that my entire life has been one of conditioned responses. Totally predictable devoid of free will. What am I doing here? What is my life mean? This is the big question who am I? What am I doing? What is the purpose of if what do I want? When you start to ask these questions. It opens the window to a different reality. If the premises that, I'm I'm very small and as hard as I may try to step outside of my own mind to observe it to make myself, not someone just full of conditioned responses. What is the mean, though, what difference? Does it make a huge difference? Because all the things that we're doing right now to a wood. In a war terrorism EKO destruction extinction of species climate change internet hacking. This is all coming from the condition. So if I could step back and say, if this is all the condition main that is no risking human extinction and life on this earth. Can I step back and create collectively and identity that is based on relationship and inseparability of all existence? What people feel when they feel love is an actual experience. Right. And that's inseparability. So what is love? It's just seeing yourself in another person. What is beauty seeing yourself in object. This coffee Cup is beautiful when you realized it's a perceptual creativity in the same way as your body the body and this coffee Cup and the brain they go together, but they are actually me. Hi, I'm experiencing brain body mind and Cup all as a unified activity within myself, and this me is not physical. So don't have to worry. Whether it's going to be born or dying. I don't feel like I think about it very much. And I've thought about not thinking about it death. That is at some point everybody thinks about when you grow when news facing debt or somebody dies in your family or somebody gets terminal illness. You will think about it. You know, I was six years old living in Bombay now called Mumbai with my grandfather. My father was a cardiologists training in England and one day. We gotta telegram from England that my father had boss all his exams. He was a member of Royal College of another big deal. Those. Issur cardiologists. My grandfather was so excited. He was an oil massage and took us to the rooftop. Fired some rounds from his rifle into the sky, and he took us to movie anew baba and the forty and any to to carnival and then in the middle of the night. You must have been so excited. He died. So the next thing I know is he's being taken to the commission grants. And what I knew my grandfather who took us to the movies the day before is knowing the bottle and a bunch of ashes which could be up my fist and an uncle of mine said so what is life yesterday was taking the kids to this carnival? And today's a bunch of ashes that triggered in six years old, my quest for what Israel since we sort of understand this at a fairly young age that as much as we'd like to believe no matter what we are going to die one day. That is a certainty. Right. Yes. I mean, no one thinks I'm not going to die. I mean when you get older and age, or if you're dealing with some sort of illness, you're thinking about probably nonstop. But it it struck me. I thought maybe I was unusual that I didn't. Think about it. Really? I you know, it wasn't and it's a protective respond. So I'm protect protecting myself. And if you were thinking about it all the time, you would be living in exile. So is it different for you every night at practice conscious debt? And this is what I do. I sit in my bed. I start with what is existence, and I'm not being metaphysical about it existence is anything that exists right now. Okay. This hind exists. This body exists this furniture exist. This color exists like. Then what I do is that close mice. No Sunday, one aspect of existence has gone. What am I experiencing with my eyes closed? If I pay attention to it. I'm experiencing sensations. Sounds and thoughts. That's it. And then if I should my attention from sound only into sensation, that's all expenses sensation. If my ex shift my tension from what is having this experience of sensation. I come to the conclusion I am. So right now, my experience of existence is only sound and Titian talk. As I slip into the dream state. And then into the deep state all of that discipline. But I am still without having an experience. In deep sleep is the mystery of existence.

England Berisha Dr Sanjay Gupta Malaysia Titian executive Bain Kaif Israel Kerma Royal College baba Bombay Mumbai six years
"sanjay gupta" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"sanjay gupta" Discussed on KOIL

"The fake dr sanjay gupta sanjay gupta uh was hillary clinton's personal medical adviser while she was first lady sanjay gupta was barack obama's first pick to become his surgeon general because he had a tv show he turned it down because the pay differential was not appealing brooke baldwin yesterday trump can't be as healthy as that dr says his by a glowing review by the white house position renew questions being asked about whether president trump has heart disease are chief medical correspondent ways there there are new questions the new questions come from their own fake reporter fake doctor i know people in the neurosurgery business they advised that you stay entirely clear of sanjay gupta if somebody has to open your skull and do some repair work and then they so so there there are new questions she's nearing the whole way through the introduction near new question there are no not new crushes the only questions have been raised by sanjay gupta who's a cnn reporter then they go to the cnn reporter who is a doctor but i hope he doesn't practice the president has heart disease those numbers qualify him for having heart disease and it clearly needs a plan to try and prevent some sort of heart problem down the road clearly he's got hurt disease his oh doctors says that's not the case but that's a hey cnn's yet the countdown clock i've been waiting for it there it is that cnn has their countdown to government shut the thirty six hours 19 minutes nineteen seconds they're counting down to the government shutdown and they've already blamed the republicans so the democrats now have a clear running room here to shut down the government because they know the other guy gets the blame so they'll shut it down in order to protect illegal activity they swear to protect and defend the laws of the united states they violate their oth they lie all the time yes they are uh let's jump ahead a little bit let me go to actually let's go to uh uh hanging on hold off on jimi hendrix for a.

hillary clinton sanjay gupta barack obama brooke baldwin trump reporter president cnn united states jimi hendrix white house shut down nineteen seconds thirty six hours 19 minutes