35 Burst results for "Sanjay"

Micron nearly doubles earnings on strong memory demand

CNBC's Fast Money

00:46 sec | Last month

Micron nearly doubles earnings on strong memory demand

"So dumb. I did check in with one Micron Bull Mehdi Hosseini over at Susquehanna wanted his take his opinion Q.. One guidance actually implies that Micron is well navigating the pressure. We see in memory chip pricing right now still a bully told me most basically because he sees tight supply and strong demand by the spring in important and markets that Micron serves light cloud infrastructure and five G. phones on the call co Sanjay Maroteaux talking about end markets optimistic that demand is GonNa keep improving throughout twenty twenty one. But the short term outlook he said did weekend pandemic has taken a toll on the economy for example, enterprise demand has softened also. Restrictions on Weiwei Micron did halt shipments to that Chinese giant on September fourteenth while we does account for about ten percent of Micron sales

Micron Weiwei Micron Mehdi Hosseini Sanjay Maroteaux Susquehanna
Fauci says he was in surgery when task force discussed changing CDC testing guidelines

Atlanta's Morning News

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Fauci says he was in surgery when task force discussed changing CDC testing guidelines

"House Coronavirus task force and exchanges to CDC testing guidance, while infectious disease expert Dr Anthony found she's undergoing surgery. CNN's Dr Sanjay Gupta reveals that I was Sir. General anesthesia in the operating room last Thursday was not part of any discussion or deliberation. Regarding these new testing recommendation. Dr. Fauci also disagrees with them. The new guidance recommends no testing for people who are exposed, but do not show symptoms. Despite the risk of a symptomatic transmission. California, New York governor say they'll ignore the revised guidelines. President Trump frequently complains the US does too much testing and there would be fewer cases with fewer tests.

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr Anthony New York CNN CDC Donald Trump President Trump United States Dr. Fauci California
Fauci recovering after surgery to remove vocal cord polyp

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Fauci recovering after surgery to remove vocal cord polyp

"Found she loves to talk, and he's been an important voice in the battle against Corona virus, but we might not be hearing from him for a while. CNN medical reporter Dr Sanjay Gupta says found she has undergone surgery on a vocal cord. Dr. Fauci has been dealing with this polyp on his vocal court for some time. And that way we know this because he's been having some challenges with his voice. He wanted to have this polyp sort of taken care of for sometime he had AH flew. This is last year. It's sort of Costs and disruptions to his voice, But he's been waiting obviously is we're in the middle of co vitto have this procedure done. He just had it done. It was under general anesthesia. He texted me after you get out of the hospital, saying he's doing OK, but it was a a significant procedures by not going to be able to talk or talk much for a while. And, you know, hopefully get out of the hospital today or possibly tomorrow. Doctor found she will turn 80 on Christmas Eve. Fire

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr. Fauci Corona CNN Medical Reporter
Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

The Takeaway

12:36 min | 2 months ago

Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

"Threats for me and my family and harassing my daughters to the point where I have to get security is just I mean, it's amazing I wouldn't have imagined in my wildest dreams. That people who object to things that are pure public health principles are so set against it and don't like what you and I say it, namely in the word of science. That they actually threaten you. That's Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases, speaking to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, about threats he and his family have received because of his work. And Dr Fauci is not alone. Public health officials across the US are also receiving threats from people who are against the policies they put forth to combat the corona virus. Things like recommendations to wear masks and practice social distancing. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and she's been researching this exact topic. Michelle, Welcome to the show. Happy to be here. Shall you wrote an article about the attacks on public health officials during covert 19. What was it that prompted you to even look into this? Well, it happens that one of my bosses that Stanford is married to our Santa Clara County local health officer here in the Bay Area, So I do have a personal connection to somebody who's experienced these kind of attacks. Tell us a little bit about what kinds of attacks were talking about. All across the country. We've really seen a number of things that made your audience seem pretty shocking and are unusual even in the American context we have seen, you know the usual Internet trawling, but the attacks have taken on a highly personal and almost violent dimension. Across the country. We've seen health officer subject to dock, saying the exposure of their personal information like their addresses or loved ones, names on the Internet. Angry and sometimes armed protestors showing up at their private residences, vandalism of their offices and homes, lots of harassing telephone calls and even death threats to the point of having to have private security details assigned to their families. Michelle, one of the things that prompted me. I'd saw the research here and then saw that Dr Anthony Fauci has needed to get his own extra private security because I believed his family had been threatened. Are we primarily talking about high profile figures like that, Or are we talking about? Anyone who's sort of on the front lines dealing with Corona virus cases. In particular, we're talking about people who ordinarily are about his low profile. As you can get local public health is thean visible angel that keeps us all healthy. But most of us until this pandemic you never heard of or seen our local health officer. They have been in the news lately on television and newspaper a lot, so they're no longer such private figures. But these are not high profile figures. They're not national figures. In most cases, they're not. They don't have a political agenda. There are doctors trying to do their jobs. Who are making these threats. Well, it comes from a variety of quarters. Ah, leader in Catalyst in this movement has been the anti vaccination movement here in the U. S. That has all of a sudden pivoted from their usual agenda of attacking public figures who advocate vaccination to going after health officers who are advocating masking and the extension of state home or business closure orders, But it's not on ly these groups. They've been joined by thousands of people across the country who are just really disgruntled and incredibly stressed. By the long term economic impact and social isolation that has stemmed from public health orders during the pandemic. Medical professionals are take a Hippocratic oath to serve whoever it is that needs their help. So like this, this feels like doctors and nurses didn't necessarily sign up to be. In such a political battle, You know, it's interesting the politicization of first responders because those on the front lines were actually caring for covert patients have been politicized as heroes in this pandemic. But the same groups of individuals, doctors and nurses who are working in the public health sector have been demonised as villains. They're all working toward the same goals, and we need to understand that, although they execute their objectives in different ways, they're all working towards a single and so are we. So it's really striking to me that there's been this polarization and how folks have viewed First responders and public health doctor's Michelle. Stick with us. We'll be back in a moment. This is the take away. On the next. All of it, looking for a job thinking about switching to a new one will discuss how to navigate the remote workforce in our series, the future of work, and we meet the director of the new documentary Boy State, which goes inside the weeklong mock government exercise that gathers more than 1000 high schoolers to create their own state government. I'm Alison Stewart. Join me for all of it weekdays at noon. We're back and you're listening to the takeaway. I'm tansy. No Vega. Michelle Mellow is on the line with me. She's a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and we're talking about recent threats against public health officials all around the country. Michelle. Have we heard anything from the Trump Administration or other politicians at any level of government about this? Because recently in New Jersey, there was a federal judge whose family was attacked. Now there are talks of increasing protections for federal judges. And I'm wondering if this is now transferring over to medical professionals and health professionals. Well, yet we have to distinguish between medical professionals who are on the frontline response like the ones who are working in hospitals and the ones I'm talking about. Are those were working in public health departments. I'm not aware of specific problems involving the folks who are working in hospitals other than nobody wants to stand next to them at the grocery store. But the public health officials really have had to have protection stepped up. Unfortunately, most of our elected officials to the extent that they're speaking to this issue at all have been joining in the attacks. You know, there are folks who are making their name for themselves politically. By joining in the chorus of attacks against public health officials. In some cases, their own public health officers, you know, saying things like their anti Democratic their tyrannical when in reality, those same health officers are the only people in that state who can issue these orders. They're executing. Planning done by other elected officials, who then sort of hide behind this rhetoric, So it really is, in my view, despicable that instead of offering support to these hardworking, underpaid under attack health officers State and local officials. And in some cases, congressmen and the president have joined in the attacks, and the president himself has been the foam enter and chief here Retweeting such statements as everyone is lying. The CDC media Democrats are doctors, everyone we're told to trust That kind of statement fans the flames. Michelle did your research show whether or not there was a difference in health officers who are in red states versus blue states or our folks that work in these positions across the board, subject to this type of harassment. You know, we really have seen it in all kinds of communities. Certainly there is a red and blue divide in willingness to accept public health measures like masking and to the extent that you're leading a community that's more red than blue. You might have a larger segment of the population going after you. But some of the people who have been under attack are in heavily blue communities were actually most of the population really supports what they're doing. Polling is very much in their favor. But there is a vocal extreme of vocal minority that is dominating attention. Is there anything that public health officials Khun do to protect themselves? You know, to protect themselves. Many of them do need security details, and they need elected officials to stand up and indicate that when these actions crossed the line into illegal forms of harassment, they'll be subject to prosecution in terms of self defense strategies. You know, I think it may be late in the game for this, but there are some things that I think We know help to cultivate public trust and buy in to coerce of public health legal measures. Polling shows us that when people feel that they have a say in public health policy agendas when quote unquote people like me can influence agendas in public health policy, they're more likely to accept laws, even the ones that they don't love. So I think there are opportunities for some health officers to double down on the transparency and candor in their public communications. We do have examples of where this has been done Extraordinary. Well. I think it helps to humanize health officers to telegraph that they're really struggling with these decisions. They don't take them lightly, and also that they have the support of consultation of a number of other people. Well, they're not acting alone and imposing these orders. Do you know of any health officers who have decided to leave? Ah, the job as a result of this because it doesn't feel like you know, the virus is not going away. Assume as many of us would have liked, and people are going to have to make policies and an implement policies until we've got some clarity on where what the next phase of this is so have folks that you know, decided to leave their jobs as a result. Absolutely. I think the count is up near 30. Now, health officers who have either resigned or been forced out by their elected officials since the start of the disease pandemic because of the politicization of their orders. And that includes Oxiris Barbeau, who was the New York City health commissioner. It includes Nicole Quick, the health commissioner of Orange County are most affected County in California. In terms of covert cases it includes West Virginia health officer for the state had the slam so lots of folks who are dealing very, very difficult situation simply, it's just not reasonable to expect them to go on month after month. In this kind of climate, especially when they're not getting any support from other officials mentioned Oxygen's Barbeau and I know that was a big issue here in New York, particularly because she clashed with Mayor Bill de Blasio. Are we seeing a lot of that? A CZ? Well, just internally among Officers and public health officials, and also just, you know, the other officials that they're dealing with. It feels like I don't know if that was very specific to New York City politics or if that's also happening across the board. I think that is happening in a lot of communities. Yes, where you have a schism between elected branches of government that represent communities that have a particular ideological bent and help officers who have been serving you know for many, many administrations many many years and you are You're acting on the science a TTE this point of the pandemic. People are fed up with the science. They want a balance of between health concerns and economic and other concerns. And again. Some health officers have been very good at explaining how public health orders balanced. Those concerns and others who are maybe less transparent, really have been confronted by a lot of attacks from Ah, elsewhere in government. But, you know, responding to local political pressures themselves you mentioned earlier. We we are having to differentiate between threatening health officers and health officials and making and threatening frontline workers like doctors and nurses. But Our doctors and nurses subject to any type of politicization and threats right now, because of the role that they what they could possibly represent, or have they gotten off Have they sort of not been in the cross hairs? If you will. You know, I'm not aware of those kinds of attacks. I think it's more just that What we hear from them is the difficulty that they have in their personal lives Because people know they work with sick people. They don't want to be around him. They don't want to be around their kids. So it's the usual story in any pandemic, where You're the child of somebody who's working with an affected patient. Nobody wants their kid in school with you. I think that causes some difficulties for them, but it's a different quality and caliber of attack than what we've been talking about with public health officers. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law at Stanford Law School and a professor of medicine at Stanford University. School of Medicine. Michelle. Thanks so much, Thank you.

Michelle Mellow Officer Stanford University Dr Anthony Fauci Professor Of Law Professor Of Medicine United States Sanjay Gupta Bay Area CNN Santa Clara County Stanford New York Alison Stewart New Jersey CDC Social Isolation Vandalism
"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

02:47 min | 4 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"I should i. Didn't alleviated. That's really really funny. Psych. MIC drop. In terms of Emulating I think that there are there's there's so much. I mean I think. This answer won't do it justice but Long time ago, I read a book called feeling good. And the one of the psychology book by a guy named David Burns and one of the things that he wrote in the book is that. We need to treat the world as if we all have one unit of worth. Amount no matter who that person is no matter even if that person is your boss. That person is worth the same as you. You're worth the same as them. The person serving food the person you're serving food to we all have one unit of human worth. And I think Sunday has always got not at his at his deepest deepest level. No matter, no matter where he is what what he's doing Just this idea that we are all in this together you can say that but to believe it at your core to have that be what fuels you every single day I. Think is really special thing and he's always had that and always admired that and I want to. I want I want more of that genuinely. For me and for everybody I think I think the thing that I would alleviate. I think is is You don't Sunday night. Talk about this. Sometimes I think and I think that we've both evolved with this feeling of. Of Needing to leave a legacy. You Know I. think that there's always so much pressure of like what how the world remember you and I think You know if there's. If there's anything I, think we've kind of both realized together now, is that what we really have is our kids like those are the people who are going to be. Talking about us more than anything else as the stories that are going to be shared, those are the things that matter most us and and I in any pressure at all to leave a legacy. Is the thing that I feel like I would want to be eight. Whatever's left that? Love. That's awesome. Guys. Thank you so so. Sibling revelry is executive goose by Kate Hudson Oliver Hudson and Simpson supervising producers. Alison President Editor is Josh Windisch music by mark. Hudson Aka uncle..

David Burns Kate Hudson Hudson Oliver Hudson Editor Alison President executive mark Simpson
"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

08:25 min | 4 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"The body then is basically saying that's great getting serotonin elsewhere. I no longer need to make it. So when you stop taking the Serotonin or or Serotonin, reuptake inhibitor, which is what these medications are, then you crash, and you can have these horrible horrible sort of episodes and effects for whatever reason Silla Sivan seems to create a pattern and the brain where the body essentially is teaching itself to make the Serotonin to again the specific serotonin again. It's wild. Why would that happen? We don't know but I think this idea that we did. With these plants. No. I mean peop-, you know now I will say that the difference I guess a little bit between suicide and cannabis cannabis side, effect, profile, super, super low I mean nobody. Nobody's ever five really had significant problems. You know on cannabis and some people do with civil side, and you know, but and so I think you would need to be studied in terms of dosing it and whether microdosing makes sense, and all these various things that they're looking at but I think that this is another example of a plant of a naturally occurring thing being being ostracized for political reasons. You know it's for cultural reasons, not scientific. But it's shifting. At least it's shifting. We couldn't talk about these things at all I mean. When I I did the. We'd documentary and I wrote an OP. Ed, the I was worried, I? Think I've probably been called Sunil and said the I. Don't know what's going to happen tomorrow. When this thing gets published I you know I. Don't know how I still practice neurosurgery. Colleagues in the hospital are going to look at me or think about this. Are they going to think of me as some pothead? On My. Right exactly. But she favorite stories very stories from that time Sunday was at the. New York York CNN office and he was going out to lunch with like a few of the executives, getting suit types, and they're like on the street and York, walking down the street, and all of sudden like there's. A bunch of guys across the street. The like Yo Dr Sanjay Gupta you fucking rule. There were clearly high. Look at them and Kinda give you this look like this year. Your buds and I'm like. The documentaries a it's. Funny. It is, but it speaks volumes to expanding your demographic for real I mean that one better were the documentary boom. You have just expanded your demographic by at least twenty five million people. It's crazy right I. I know and you know one thing I'll say about that. Is that as you know as a lot of people who've been beating the drum on this issue? No, and they would rightfully say this is that so I've been saying this for twenty years. The other people would say that I've been saying. Saying this for twenty years, and then Sanjay Gupta gets on. Does this thing and all of a sudden? Well you know I. Would No way dismiss all the work that came ahead of time I I admitted it I wasn't listening to people. I dismiss them because I thought it was a just a ladder towards recreational. There wasn't any other motive in my mind. You know I I, so it did take a digging, but there are people who've been saying this for a long time. You know and and. We just got to amplify that message. Are you still practicing by the way I practice? Yeah, do you get people calling you like I want Gupta to do my surgery I just think he's a amazing. Found like this three. There's three types of patients. I realized that there is there. Is that type who they see you on television and they figure well. If he's on television, he must be good, which is ridiculous, no way to think about the world I think I'm good. Don't get me wrong but I. don't have any better because I'm on television. The second type I think is people who actually prefer that. You're not on television like hey, so just so we're clear you're thinking about nothing, but my brain during this time right, which is which is what I would do anyways, and then there was a significant population that just doesn't doesn't register doesn't clink. That somebody, tell them afterward or something like that. That'd be like. Wait what that guy so really, but yeah, you get patients who aren't aware that you're going to be doing their surgery and they're like Yeah, so Sanjiv Gupta will be doing your surgery and they're like what fucking little man! Well the the. We're doing like doing elective operations I'll go meet with the patient in the office and talk to them in the clinic and stuff like that, so we have that relationship already okay. Now we there will be trauma sometimes like I'll take care of trauma patients, and then after trauma, a car accident gunshot wound to the head or something like that I'll go talk to the family afterwards and the patient and. They'll be that that moment of sort of. Sight God. Like, doing great I mean that would be shocking. I would think that that family would that would be one of those shocking moments like Oh my God. Sanjay Gupta Save my life. You tell the story about about Jesus Hayes. Oh as Love this well. That's right so. I'll summarize because it's but when I was out in a rocky no covering a war as neurosurgeon Zeros a journalist, but the coverings neurosurgeon. There weren't neurosurgeons out there in the particular area. The battlefield I was and and I was embedded with a group of doctors called the devil docs and we were. Got Really tight you're in a war together, and you get really close and so there for weeks and one day. Somebody got shot in the head. a lieutenant was on patrol outside Baghdad, and they came to me, and I was again the only neurosurgeon. They're like, can you? Take off your journalist. Gavin put on your servants cap and take care of him. Which I? Which of course I wanted to to do and was honored to do, and and ended up operating on him and. decompressing his brain taken this bullet out of his brain in the desert. and which is a whole sort of you know? Life sort of moment but but. I didn't know how he was going to do. He he a significant injury of the sniper injury and months later I'm home and get a call from. From San Diego where he lived, and it was the the Rehab Center where they were taking care of him and I didn't even know that he had survived. There was no medical records in the desert. They call them. They think you know. Do you remember operating and Zeus? The Don over in Iraq and I'm like yeah operating on Jesus in the middle of the desert. How do you forget that right? and. I are. Has He? How's he doing in this? He's know he's got a little bit of left hand. Weakness ground that he's doing great. You should pay him a visit. Some time, which was so I was out in southern California. I I go to. Look them up goes housecall head of time. It wasn't a total surprise. He answered the door handsome marine. You know last I'd seen him. He was just beaten and battered on the desert floor, and you know, and he was great, and just kind of fall into it right Dr Talking. And we go inside his house. He's young guys with his parents and. His mom comes out a few minutes later, and she's so sweet, and she takes my hands, are you the guy that operated on my son said yes Ma'am I am, and she holds my hands. Thank you very much, you know, and then a couple minutes later. Dad comes out. DADS are different and he's like. The Guy that operated on my son. I, said yes, sir. I, am he goes and you're a journalist. The whole story. So. You know I tell you one other thing that reminded of this podcast. Is We we? We just sat down to talk zoos. His Mom and dad and I we just started talking. And I realized something, and this is months after the guy been shot in the head, almost died in the middle of a war zone outside of Baghdad went to Germany for Rehab, for I, went to Walter Reed ended up going back to southern California where he lived. And I realized after a few minutes of being there with them. They never really talked about it. I mean they SORTA talked about?.

Dr Sanjay Gupta cannabis Baghdad California Silla Sivan microdosing CNN Sunil Ed Iraq New York York San Diego Jesus Hayes Dr Talking Germany Rehab Center Gavin York Walter Reed
"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

07:16 min | 4 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Absolutely and we were the world leaders in that stuff I mean we, we are the. We originated smallpox. We're on the verge of radical polio. We came up with some of the most effective vaccines anywhere in the world. Yeah, we other other organizations in other countries. Call their organizations the CDC in deference to our CDC. We you know we. That was our. That was our bread and butter. Really in this country. You guys like Larry Brilliant. Who who is still alive and you know talks about things I'll say. He advocated smallpox eradication a disease. Know nobody gets to say that and and they knew how to do this even even before even anticipating that there wouldn't be a vaccine available for some time, so it's it's It's tough. I know people who've died of this disease and it's very tough to go out there and say you know. Their desks were preventable doesn't make the families feel any better. That's for sure makes them feel worse but you know there's going to be other ways to this and I'm sure. They talked about this as well so hopefully we'll learn. Some of these things going forward. We're going to have to apply these lessons right away. It's not like this. One Hundred Years from now. We need to apply these in the fall. Maybe in a couple of months. Because there's GonNa be a second wave. The virus out there. Is So so good at what he does, because he he he does this. I told them this flat out I. said You have this amazing ability to sort of slow roll the country into things we're GONNA. Do a fifteen day pause. We'll see how things go. Yeah, it was never going to be a fifteen day pause. He knew at that point. This was going to be months. Of having to slow the country down, but you can't say that. And then you know we'll have a vaccine. You know twelve eighteen months. We don't know. Maybe that's true, but he has this way of of of slow rolling things, so yes, if he told you. Maybe there'd be a second wave. There's going to be a second wave. Has Sanjay always been a person who was interested in like a little bit of everything you know to be to go? He goes to become a doctor, then he then he becomes journalist. And now you know you, you've a brother. That's like in Iraq and then he's in. Covering Bola, and then he's in Puerto, Rico, and all over the world putting themselves dangerous. Literally a front. You are a frontline journalist. All that making time for the air band which is. Going to be the headline, thank you very much. No but I mean have was. Was He always like that as a kid? Now you're right, I mean such as always the guy who's running as people running away from the Fire Sundays running into the fire, and that was true New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina earthquake. Haiti. Aska during the Bola life and I think that Y-. He's always been that way I. Mean He's always been. He's always been someone who is curious and. Interested in wants to wants to serve wants to wants to be useful in a one one of the pieces of advice Sunday gave me which is kind of related to this is like. Always want to be running towards something and not away from something. And you know I, think in the context that he came back. It was career. Advice know I was I was in a job at didn't like and I'm like I think I'm GonNa, go do something else, and he's a cool go. Do something else, but figure out what it is. You WanNa go do go do that run towards something rather than sort of saying I hate this job and I'm gonNA. Run away from it. And I think that that's Kinda you know how I how I've seen Sunday service. Lift his career as well. Life and career is is always kind of being willing to run towards something always always feeling like. Even if people are running away from it, I'll run towards it. Brel that's relevant. That's relevant advice right now in these last in this last nine days by the way. It's not easy to run towards the burning building, but you know it's it's a necessity at this point, even if it's uncomfortable and you know, you might get burned a little bit here and there, but it's important to run towards the problem and I'm learning that right now. You know what I mean. I'm going through these motions of men. What do I do? How do I? Do you know I? I need to move forward and not backwards. It's not time to treat, and I've never been someone honestly to run forward. I, kind of hang out in my spot. Watch things go by like that's my nature. Literally literally watched him do that I. Watched my career go by? No but you know. That's a relevant. Relevant? That's relevant information right now. It's a great great sort of I. Mean in, also you. I mean I'm just GonNa put myself in your shoes for a second where ten years older, which is a significant amount of time to be older and doing all of these really like amazing interesting selfless things in my mind I would wonder if that would affect how you would look your future. Like what am I gonNa, do am I going to become? You know and interestingly enough you become I mean what you're. You recalled like what the the great young innovator. That was what was the title like this? Always stay with you forever. The world's sexiest innovator. Innovation. Facing. If you ever want to ask yourself the question like what the Hell am I doing with my life? Right like have have Sunday your brother exactly. Like, you're always I'm always asking myself that question at the same time like he is, he is the guide. He prompts me to ask myself that question and that he guides me to the answer. So it's this, it's this sort of pushing poll, but it is funny like. Two Thousand Sixteen after the presidential election I moved back to Michigan to run for Congress, and and I I moved back here because I felt like our our community were did I grew up was one of the communities that decided to flip from blue to red that year and I really wanted to kind of run. Run, Fella, my brother's advice run run towards the problem. Figure out what I could do and ultimately that ended up. Being me running for office and it's funny because. It was the first time that you know in my own community in this congressional district, I walk around and people would would recognize me. When I wasn't walking with Sunday when I walk in with Sunday, they're coming up to us all the time. This is the first time people come up to me and you know like asking for like You know photo or something like that, so you know. I still remember the first time it happened. This guy comes up and he says hey, can I. Can I get a Selfie and I said? Yeah again. With, Jay not used to this alone, and the guy says yells to his buddy before he takes the shoddy else's basis. Brian, commended here getting this photo at Dr Sanjay Gupta's brother. Welcome to my world man, welcome to my world..

Dr Sanjay Gupta CDC Larry Brilliant New Orleans Haiti Bola Fella Hurricane Katrina Iraq Brel Rico Jay Brian Michigan Congress
"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

06:43 min | 4 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"She drives to Detroit and she basically finds a way to get herself in front of a hiring manager, but there's one big problem because this is the nineteen sixties while Ford Motor, company is like in its heyday. This is Ford versus Ferrari had just happened. Out The auto industry is doing really well. Four does not have a single woman working as an engineer. The Guy looks at her. This hiring manager and he says we don't have any bill engineers working here. You know my mom is at this point in time deflated. She gets up. She's she's up a person getting ready to walk out of the room. And then all of a sudden, she turns around. She looks at the guy and she says if you don't hire me, you may never have the benefit of having a woman worker as at engineer. And, so this guy ends up getting so inspired with this meeting with my mom. The two of them advocate in an August nineteen, sixty seven. She becomes Ford Motor Company's first female engineer. Gives me the. Movie is a story. Restore you know what a beautiful! That's amazing. It was the hidden figures story before hidden figures. You know there's and then there's all the stuff that's baked into that right. I! mean she was the first woman who attended an all male engineering college in India in there was a lot of just sexism and stuff that you had to endure doing that and. It's funny. I had this conversation with her the other day. That's obviously like the the more subjective obstacles that you you have to overcome, and and how do you like as a woman you know? How did you navigate that stuff? Did you do? Did you always push back on everything? Did you did you? Take great pride in the moment. Did you realize how significant was in the moment? The two are the first woman engineer. Am I think about that all the time like even historically now all the things that we're going through? Do. In the moment that something is so significant like in one thousand nine hundred. They know that one hundred years from now they would be talking about what happened with that flu pandemic, or was it just something? I think about that with mom all the time. I'll just tell you know so now. We're just talking among the other day. She told me this quick story. I'll tell you which I think in some ways encapsulates mom. I don't know if you've even heard. My Nani. WHO's my mom's mom? You know they think when you're living the life of a refugee there's. There's a lot of safe that you need to have and things. You've just got to believe that things are GonNa? Get better because he had no proof that it will. And so they they believe in certain things like like palm reading, and that was a big thing with my ninety, which was surprising, because she was a very objectively minded woman but you believe in palm reading and she wanted to take my mom who was a little kid at the time. To get her palm read to determine whether or not she was going to actually. Amount to something and they should invest in her all that stuff. Can you imagine all based on your palm? So my mom did not believe in that at all thought it was hocus-pocus, and and but she read to find out what they would be looking for. And she took a piece of glass and cut the line in our own palm that she knew would would reflect what the palmist would look for. Now obviously, they would know that that was cut, but it was just like the okay I. Don't believe in this at all, but you. WanNa play the game. I will cut my hand as an eight or nine year old girl to make you believe that I. Am that person that that's kind of who she? That's kind of issue. That you heard that before so new I had not heard that story and then Cresco many so many parts of the story about when I had not heard I know. I spending a lotta time talking to mom lately, which is weird because in the middle of a pandemic. I feel like in some ways. We've become a little bit more connected strange, but we will do facetime calls and she loves to do it, and usually she wants to talk to the girls and the girls get quickly. You know they're. They're very distracting. And so, but then I just sit there and I talked to spend these kind of amazing conversations about nothing. Of Off. If you heard this, but. The story of how their parents met is pretty amazing. Do you want to share that with us? Today you. You give the the story I'll add in some of my little detail I've just. Even beforehand just typically though was. There was arranged marriage, but that wasn't the case for them. For what reason right that part of it, okay? I'll just preface one thing say that the arranged marriages still happen. Yeah I mean that is still part of the culture and we're now. We're talking sick nineteen sixties some Yes so it kind of picks up where we left off. Mom is now Ford Motor Company's first. Female Engineer. Oh, Kate. You'll appreciate this. Her name at this point is dementia karate, just kind of a long name the Dirani, and so one of the one of the manager said you know we might, we might want to short. Not find find a nickname of some sort, and so she comes up with Ronnie as her. Yes I, get! Eights. I love. Like Oh my God, it means Queen and she was like she was like I. Love the idea of these white guys. Call Me Queen every day. My Name. You will call queen rest of. Ronnie mom is You know she is living alone. She's living in Dearborn area and again nineteen sixties, not not a lot of Indians. People in our community around up, but she had heard that in Ann Arbor. There were more there were more Indians hanging out, you know. People went there for the University of Michigan, and so she every once in a while, get in her car and drive from Dearborn and Arbor which was maybe about a forty minute drive and one day she does that and her car breaks down right on the outskirts of campus and and so she walks to local phone booth. Phone booths back in the day, and it had one of those wires connecting an actual phone book row the big. Books I remember she goes, she goes. flips to the as an. She thinks that the most common India name in the as that you can think of which is Agarwal. And Chicago Chicago's up. The First Agarwal in the phone book. Guy Answers the phone and she's like. Hi. This Mr Augur Wall and the Guy Says No. He's out of this his roommate. The Guy. Who answered? The phone was my father. Wow Isn't that amazing, and then He. He helped her with the car. Damn. And how did how? How did their parents react to their coming together? Was it something that was looked down upon because it wasn't arranged, or were they okay with it?.

engineer Ford Motor Company Ronnie mom India Detroit Dearborn Ferrari Engineer University of Michigan Ann Arbor Mr Augur Wall First Agarwal Chicago Cresco Kate Agarwal
Coronavirus task force holds first briefing in months as cases hit record high

Erin Burnett OutFront

07:51 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus task force holds first briefing in months as cases hit record high

"The United States about to hit forty thousand new corona virus cases today. The first time that we've had that many one day, the death toll in the United States closing in on one hundred twenty five thousand people, but if all you did was listened to the president and vice president today, you would be absolutely stunned here what I just said because this is what they said. Today? All fifty states and territories across this country are are opening up safely and responsibly. Well, that's incorrect. It's factually incorrect. They're not I mean eleven. States are currently on pause. Some of them are actually backtracking and closing some things down on plans to reopen Texas and Florida specifically. They are rolling back reopening plans governors of the other nine states. They are not moving forward with the next phase of reopening. So that was incorrect, and then the vice president went on to make this claim. The truth is we did slow the spread. We flattened the curve. So he says we flattened curve, so let me just show you America's curve. So you see, the surge right and then in in March and then you see the plateau. And then you see. The jump there at the end where we are now getting to fifty forty thousand cases today. That was a plateau, and it's on its way back up and I want you to compare the graph to these other graphs. These are countries around the world right? They have that surge at the beginning the UK Germany France Italy Japan South Korea European countries measured in thousands of cases Asian in hundreds, but look what happens at the bottom. They go all the way back down and stay that way. Ours never went down right, and now it's going back up currently with the same steepness of slope as it did at the beginning. And yet the vice president was taking a victory lap during today's briefing and he made sure to credit person number one. Under the leadership of President, trump is the president's made clear credit I believe to our president of the president made that decision. So, where was the president during this briefing while he was somewhere in the vicinity, but he was on twitter, talking about confederate statues, tweeting this image of people suspected of trying to vandalize statue of Andrew Jackson and what he was writing was that many people in custody with many others being sought for vandalisation of federal property in Lafayette Park Ten year prison sentences. It was hours later that the president did finally say something about the pandemic. That's amazing raging right now in the United States like nowhere else here he s. We have work to do that. We'll get it done. while. That's an understatement it. We are learning tonight that people traveling from the United States most likely will not be allowed to even enter the European Union. Banned, because the United States has gotten the virus under control Kaitlan Collins is out front. She's live outside. The White House Tonight Caitlyn. No briefings for eight weeks the White House. Felt like they had to do something here, but then they came out and said everything's opening you safely and responsibly opening fifty states. When that's just you know factually untrue. Yeah. It wasn't the message that some people were expecting the vice president to project from that briefing today after Wednesday's coronavirus task force briefing, and after you're seeing these numbers from this week including yesterday setting a record high of cases per day since the month of April, of course, which is the last time that they had these coronavirus briefings now you would that they would have. have taken more questions. The vice president instead of Aaron only took a handful of them, but before he started taking questions, you saw him arguing saying that he doesn't want the American people to think that because of these new surging infections that the United States where it was two months ago, even though the case numbers per day or mirroring that or beating it and. And of course, the vice president went on to talk about what precautions Americans should be taking. He ticked off a list of things that the CDC has recommended. But Aaron he notably left out wearing a mask when a reporter asked about the fact, that mask have become this political issue. He then only told people that they should be following local or state guidance ignoring the. The fact that the CDC a Federal Agency of course, has recommended that people wear masks when they are out in public, and within the vicinity of other people. He also defended those rallies that he and the president have been holding and encouraging their supporters to come to where thousands of people are put indoors with very little social distancing errand by saying that it was people's. People's right to the first amendment characterizing it more as a personal decision than something that they're organizing and urging people to come in to attend, but I do want to note to striking things that came out of that briefing today was the vice president offering a pretty rosy assessment of these numbers, and then Dr Falcon getting up there and having a very sobering warning. What's to? To come and personal responsibility and this, but also Aaron the vice president saying he believed it's an arguable that the reason that there are more cases in the united. States because there's more testing Dr. burks got up and she was going through these slides and one of the ones she pointed to was Texas where it showed in May as they were increasing testing their positive. Positive test rates were going down in the last two and a half weeks they continue to increase testing, but now those positive test rates Aaron are going up, and that completely refutes with the president and the vice president have been telling people and governors for the last several weeks. All right, thank you very much. CAITLIN absolutely makes the crucial point. Right the percent test rate. Rate is what they're looking at twenty percent of them. Positive that that's that's the relevant point. It's not the absolute number and Caitlyn I. Appreciate Your Time, so let me go now to Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Dr Jonathan Reiner. Who Advise the White House medical team under president? George W Bush currently in Cardiac Cath lab at Gw so so sanjay the vice president today. Came out and presented an alternate reality. he said all fifty states and territories. This country are opening up safely and responsibly. That is quote obviously the have double digit states halting stepping back. They're reopening all together big steps back. Yeah I mean. I. Don't even know where to begin with this particular briefing. You know you think two months. We haven't had a briefing. There's obviously some real trouble spots in the country and I'm. Saying that almost euphemistically I thought there was going to be an acknowledgement that look. We have some problems. Significant ones in here is our plan to address them. Here's what we're GonNa do we're convening the coronavirus task force to to address this? We didn't see that at all. I mean there's the last task force briefing. You can see what the numbers were at that point and obviously just see how the numbers have grown even over the last few weeks. Weeks, so it it it was it was a real concern, and there were a lot of things that were said that were just basically a whitewash of what's actually happening in the country, and that's what I think. Worries me. How are you GonNa fix the problem. If you don't even acknowledge it right well, that's the thing. If you're in complete denial about it, then you obviously don't have a plan to fix it because you don't believe it's their. Running when the president actually gave a nod to this this afternoon, his comment was making a lot of progress with the whole situation, but we have a lot of work to do but he did not attend the briefing instead he was treating about those confederate Mon. Monuments So, you know in the vice president. There was talking about all the encouraging news again. His words talking about Krona virus so. What do you make of this and I guess specifically the president's refusal to be there. Yeah the president. In a tweet about the monument seems to be more interested in protecting long dead confederate traitors. He is in protecting Americans right now. Yeah, I was really appalled. When the vice president today said well, we've all heard the encouraging news you encouraging news, really

Vice President President Trump United States Aaron Texas Caitlyn CDC White House Uk Germany France Italy Japan America Twitter Florida European Union Andrew Jackson George W Bush Dr. Sanjay Gupta Kaitlan Collins Caitlin
Roger Bennett (Men In Blazers) on the Return of the Premier League

ESPN Daily

06:41 min | 4 months ago

Roger Bennett (Men In Blazers) on the Return of the Premier League

"We Win Stadium you will be at home. I can promise you will feel you support. Stay safe. We are still with you and. You'll never walk alone. That was liberal F. C manager Jergen KLOPP in a message released yesterday. That will bring a tear, not just the eyes of his supporters. The dare I say anyone who cares about the most popular sports league in the world. That's right folks. After a three-month hiatus. The English Premier League is back today. Roger Bennett from men in blazers fills us in on these frantic few remaining weeks. So grab a pint and US as sub optimal tour of English soccer. I'm sorry, English football. I mean it comes. It's Wednesday. June seventeenth. This is ESPN daily. Presented by marathon. Roger! Kim's. Are you relieved? Your any skin daily and not my NFL pod, talking about your beloved quarterback Mitch Trubisky You Know God Love Mitch. trubisky is an incredible pressure to be knowing that your whole life is just destined to pan out to become the answer to a trivia question in about ten years, who was taken ahead of Deshaun Watson Patrick Mahomes. Roger Bennett is suffering bears fan. He's also the CO host of men in Blazers on the NBC. Sports Network and the men in Blazers podcast by just braced for him to end up with the green. Bay Packers, leading them on a fourth quarter drive two feet, my beloved Chicago Bears, and I can't wait for that movement. They'll probably deserve it. And we're not talking about bears football today. The wait is over the English premier league. The most Popular Sports League in the world is back after a one hundred day hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic Roger I'm sure you've been getting your fix from Bundesliga but I have to imagine the return of English. Soccer is hitting a little different for you. One hundred days feels like one hundred years to be candid. I've been staring at squirrels running up trees in the park, and feeling the adrenaline burst of a run through midfield, watching raindrops charge down my window and feeling just an incredible wing-play into play of missed from the primarily, but yes, it's back today with its global ratings I mean in Britain for much of Europe for much of the rest of the world outside of the United States, it's kind of a seismic as the NFL and the NBA rolled into with the Pantheon of heroes and villains to moments of glorious ecstasy, searing dispath fuse with dodgy haircuts snack tattoos. One hundred days off. When are going to have ninety two games scattered almost daily over the next couple of weeks. It's coming back because we love it because we miss it. It's coming back for. Hard news commercial reasons ultimately to an economic decision. It's going to come back and ghost game situation where it's fabulous. It's going to be different. The lack of an audience will have an impact on the football. We watched, but most importantly it is going to be good enough. It's GonNa. Be Great enough to connect us to a ruling global conversation and that's ultimately I think. Think we will miss about sports as our calling them. Ghost Games I hadn't heard that got left the Germans. They have a name for everything. Lay. They Call Them Guy Bela. And that is what they will be. Sam Darnold knows a thing or two about those back to English premier league, so we hit positive with most of the season done with exception of Liverpool they're. They're still to be decided. The top half of the table. Seven teams vying for five spots determine who will qualify for Champions League and Europa League which for those who don't know are the midseason European tournaments to be held next year. Roger Liverpool have clinched Champions League. Spot Manchester City has of course been banned from Champions League for Breaking Financial Fair play rules so that. That spot remains open despite city being second in the League. Right now. Arsenal wolves Chelsea Menu Lester Tottenham Sheffield all in the mix. What are you expecting to see from the top of the table? When the race for Champions League qualification, which is a bit like football's march madness, it's big tournament in which the best teams in the world. You're rail, Madrid, your boss Alana's. Para Sanjay Man's by Munich's compete all. Big English teams won't be in that for brand reasons for competitive reasons for commercial reasons and is. And completely wide open at the bottom of the table. All say English football has some Incorr- ellegation, which is if you watch game of thrones? It's a bit like the moon door. Teams get flung through that in baseball, the worst teams every year like the Orioles in the mall in which is flung out of the major leagues, the mooted, and in that place. We had the Tulsa drillers around rook. Rook Express and that is, it's a searing. It is a haunting. It is a savage palm of the global football tradition, and you have six teams at the bottom who are fighting to avoid what can be economically devastating their revenue roughly hauls flung out. The Premier League is savage for the fan base. One Minute. You are watching your team. Take to the glamorous fields, Manchester United and Arsenal the next. Round Brentford Luton Barnsley barring a miracle the Jewish using Norwich canaries will disappear, but there's five teams Aston. Villa Bouma th what furred and West Ham amongst them, two of which will go with them for the big story line. Meena is Liverpool Football Club. American owned little football. Club owned by the Boston Red SOx owners, F S J and their yearning. They're dreaming of a return to greatness that was once titletown by when I was a kid growing up in Liverpool. Just six points away from lending the title that they have dreamed of then. That is the great storyline of the season. On that note. This Sunday. The team that you root for I'm sorry. I'm getting a producer this side you support. Everton, we'll be squaring off against Liverpool. They are twenty five points clear off the other teams in the League, and there's possibility they can clinch the title at Goodison Park Against Your beloved Everton on Sunday

Football English Premier League League Champions League Roger Bennett Blazers We Win Stadium Soccer Liverpool NFL United States Liverpool Football Club Roger Liverpool Europa League Espn Roger Sports Network
"sanjay" Discussed on WIT CAST - the talking heads

WIT CAST - the talking heads

05:13 min | 4 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on WIT CAST - the talking heads

"Low and welcome to it. Cast I'm your host and under. We. Have on the podcast today Sunday Gender Shaker. Sanjay's lineages. Amazing. His father message and the shakers. One of India's finance guitarist WHO's known as get up in the song. Illini lab where you get the tuned by the mess through Larrachea. The concluding piece of the Sun with entirely. Lead by myself. Mr Bush. Was In just conducted and the glue that kept a huge number of instrumentalists. Union regarding Senate life shows he.

Mr Bush Sanjay Senate India Larrachea
Trump campaign plans to resume rallies in 2 weeks

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

Trump campaign plans to resume rallies in 2 weeks

"Well the president's team actually sees these protests is one of the reasons that they should launch their own campaign rallies they feel as though you see you know thousands and thousands of people shoulder to shoulder without much criticism from the general public even though some have raised alarms as to you know the safety of this because of the corona virus pandemic that these protests actually sped up their time line they were planning on starting rallies again until sometime in July and now they plan to announce rallies as soon as the next two weeks but to answer your question Bruce are your doctor Sanjay Gupta my colleague at C. N. N. he said yesterday that this is going to be a rescued so different than the rest that expendable testers as well they're both risks we don't won't know exactly you know just how damaging both of these rests will be for much later because we you know won't be able to see the data that comes as a result of it but chance your question it's a rest but at this point it's a rest the trump campaign's

President Trump Bruce Sanjay Gupta
Social Distancing in Summer

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

06:49 min | 5 months ago

Social Distancing in Summer

"Has the summer heats up. People all over the country are considering now. How much risk they are willing to take as they venture outside. Some are thinking about reuniting with friends and family for the first time. Others are trying to decide whether or not to take a road trip. What about physically distanced backyard barbecue? Just. How risky is it to make this summer? Feel like well summer. It is important to understand what the likelihood of contracting the corona virus is and transmitting it. So that you can make the right decisions for yourself and for your family. I'm Dr Sanjay. Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent. And this is corona, vice, fact versus fiction. So I have an eleven at neely eleven and thirteen year olds, and so the conversations were having now are about what else summa looks like. That's Aaron Judge, Professor, at UMASS DARTMOUTH and CNN contributor since his blog post about avoiding situations with a high risk of infection went viral. He's become a resource for many people. Some does look a little bit different, and there's been a lot of tears in this house over the last eight weeks, but We're trying to gain normalcy for our children as much as we can. The possibility of having a normal summer is not a lot of our minds. So I asked Erin about some of the questions. I've been hearing from you. Starting with pools is it safe to take a dip properly maintain to pull. Water will not be a source of spread of the virus. The chlorine that's in its will inactivate virus fairly quickly and the level of dilution that would happen in a pool or notional or lodge freshwater body would not lead to enough virus to establish an infection. But when you do this, you need to just make sure that we're maintaining an appropriate physical distance and create a little bit of extra space I. Don't know if you or your family members have been doing any hiking or going for long walks around your neighborhood. What precautions do do you think people should take if they just WANNA go for a walk or a hike? So, we have as a family, we each have three mosques We have a better quality one if we get into grocery stores or anywhere. We know there's going to be a lot of people. We have one win. We're just going to do a show. Than we have out general sort of mosque, which is a neck data that we use any time we go hiking or around the neighborhoods where we know that we are able to social distance the vast majority of time, but there are some times where the path my narrow and. while. The brief encounter is not as risky as the longer one. It's not no risk and you don't know the risk factors of the person that is walking past you and I tend to take mosques a little bit more altruistically. It is about me wearing them to protect us, and so when we get in that situation, we just literally pull up gate of mosques over our face. We do that about fifty feet out from the person or people. People so they can see what we're doing. And then we just run a little bit of a wider above as we possibly can. Games like soccer or basketball, would you? Would you be okay? People playing those? Yeah, I'm eat soccer coach and I really want to get my teams out on the fields, but not playing scrimmages yet were not sure enough especially with children about their role in infection and transmission, so no, I'm not yet there for. Those sports, but as long as it doesn't bring you in face to face contact. I think the the risk is low. A baseball of Frisbee is not right up there where I'm spending my anxiety. What about a road trip this summer for family? They want to go on a road trip and stay in either a hotel or an AIRBNB. Something like that. If it's your own family, I'm not to consent. Call head to the hotel. Will the YOU'RE GONNA? Stay at ask what they cleaning protocols are end what this Stafa wearing while they cleaning the room and if that comes into line with what your risk is for your. Your family then I would proceed a medium sized gathering like a birthday party or a wedding ceremony. Would you be okay with that? Weddings done outsides with appropriate spacing. Absolutely it can be done a birthday party again in a backyard outside can be done. I. Just encourage people to bring their own chairs while it's nice to stand up in chat, we find. People stopped to move closer and closer the more comfortable they feel, and if you've got a chair, you don't drift and that just maintains the safety while keeping the social aspect I. I really love your your practicality because you are thinking exactly how people probably behave. Disneyworld they're planning on opening up in July. What do you think about amusement parks? Yes, so amusement parks I mean if they they can institutionalize cleaning and. Keeping. Systems like lines organized better than almost anyone. We know they're in the business of doing that. But when we're bringing a lot of people together, we know the risks come up. My major concern comes with the rides that put people into slipstream. I don't know enough about aerodynamics and transmission on Roller coasters, but I can only imagine from being on them in the past that someone that screaming in front of you. Whatever's coming out of them as coming directly onto you in pretty intense. For a few minutes.

CNN Soccer Dr Sanjay Neely Airbnb Erin Aaron Judge Umass Professor Stafa Basketball
It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 5 months ago

It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

"It broke my heart. It was devastating. There are no words in the English language that will convey the despair that I felt watching that man life. Leave his body and him scream out for his mother. Here. Get Justice for my city. My city has been going through a lot of pain. This is not the first second or third time you see all this other than this is what we have to do to get hurt. All over the country, people are filling the streets to protest police brutality and the death of George Floyd a black man who died in Minneapolis while a police officer. Kneel down his neck. Disturbing video of this was seen all over the world. We are all seeing so much pain and anger and outrage. In this episode I spoke with the Mayor of Atlanta. Key Chalance bottoms about how she's dealing with the crisis as a leader. As a mother of four children. All unfolding against the backdrop of a global pandemic. Most of America caught sight of her recently, she gave an incredibly powerful press conference this past Friday. We are better than Nisus. We're better than this. As a city, we are better than this as a country. Go home. Go home. Born and raised in Atlanta Mayor Bottoms was a lawyer and a judge and has been in office since two thousand eighteen. She's only the second woman ever to hold the job. Heard. There were rumors about balanced protests in Atlanta. Idea with a mother would do I. Call My son and I said. Where are you? I said I cannot protect you in black. Boys shouldn't be out today. I spoke to her about this important moment in history as black and Brown America, disproportionately face to deadly threats. Police brutality, and they global pandemic. I'm Dr. Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent. And this is corona virus, fact versus fiction. Thank you again. Mayor Bottoms I very much been looking forward to this. Let me just ask. How are you? Are you doing over the last few days? You know I'm doing okay. I think I'm doing as well as all of America's doing right now. It's Um. It's very stressful in exhausting time for all of us but I'm doing okay. Thank you for asking. Have you been worried for your own safety for the safety of the people that you love it all over the last few days? In s Sunday. That's a good question, the one think. Carrying heaviest on my heart right now is my eighteen year old. Because he's, he's eighteen and he very much to be in the middle of everything. That's happening. Anna I know that they're so much. That can go wrong so much that we've been watching. Go wrong across I I want to ask you a couple of questions about protests in the midst of a pandemic I mean we are truly going through something that is unchartered here. We don't know the impact that these protests will have on the pandemic itself the spread of the virus. There were some powerful moments of solidarity. Though during the protests people came together. They sang a hugged. They were walking hand in hand. Those and the images. A lot of people will see. At a time when so many people are hurting like this? Are Those moments worth suspending the physical distancing mandates. Feel. This is just this convergence of where we are. Globally like I, don't we? Any of us will see again and our lifetime. Getting a covid nineteen tests today. Because everything that we've talked about over the past two months. just became secondary or has become secondary so. I just I just hope that people will get tested and will remember that we are really. We're still in the middle of Panton. Our communities are sick in their tired. In they're dying dying from covid nineteen, dying from poverty dime from police. Brutality! We're exploding. These forces seen unseen covid. Nineteen is the one that's that's unseen. Police brutality is the one that we can say. I I. DO Wonder How how did you navigate? the policies regarding the pandemic in Atlanta specifically, which at times seemed at odds with the governor, the data for example in the state of Georgia did not show a fourteen consecutive decline, which was one of the guiding criteria for reopening things. As a elected leader. How do you? How do you balance that on Friday governor? Kim Call in as asked me. What do we need in Atlanta in what he can do to help and he's provided the assistance from the state that we've needed. And I think you know when you're in leadership it. You can't take things personally. I didn't like the decisions made about covid. Nineteen and I'm sure the governor didn't like lab response. To the decisions he made. But it didn't stop him as a leader from coming to me asking me how we could help. How the state could help in I wouldn't too prideful to go to him and say we need your help. Your the mother of four children mayor, three sons and a daughter. You're having conversations with them. I'm sure as many parents are with their children across America right now. I heard you talking about conversations. You've had with your own mother back when you were a child. Historic Times back then, and it feels like these are historic times as well all. I feel like sometimes. You don't know how historic something is at the time you're going through it. Does the gravity does the importance of what's happening right now? Has it settled in with you and your family? In terms of the conversation you're having. I asked my husband the other day at What will this moment in time be call and I don't think any of us know the answer to that. I just know it something extraordinary that we're witnessing and I said. In my remarks a couple of days ago. What we say in happening across Atlanta. We didn't see when Dr King was assassinated. And so we know that this is this. Is something different? And not only is it happening across America will now see a having the globe. And the question will be what will be the difference on the other side of this moment. Will. We continue to see the disruption and all that we've been saying over the past few days or Or will truly be a revolutionary moment, and I think about the words of Audrey lowered quite a bit. Revolution is not a one time event. Do you remember the moment when you first

Atlanta America George Floyd Minneapolis Dr. Sanjay Gupta Cnn Brown America Dr King Officer Bottoms Panton Kim Call Anna Audrey Georgia
U.S. coronavirus deaths top 100,000 as country reopens

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:57 min | 5 months ago

U.S. coronavirus deaths top 100,000 as country reopens

"Joining us now. Our chief medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta and our chief political correspondent Dana Bash Sanjay cases of this virus. There clearly rising across the south. And there's new model predicts hospitalizations will actually take up up by mid June. Could we actually soon see certain areas of the country? Go the other direction. Shut back down. Yeah I mean I think that's a real concern wolf if you look at four of the five states that have had greater than a fifty percent increase in overall infections They're all states that have reopened early at the end of April or the beginning of May and we may be seen now the impact of that or people out more people getting exposed and more people will get sick as a result. So that. But that's GonNa be the real concern wolf which you're raising. We know there's going to be more infections as you start to reopen will surge and start to go into exponential growth in these places which would then require a possibly having to shut things down again will it keep it a sort of higher baseline level. We don't know yet but it is concerning that we're starting to see the correlation between early reopening now and this increase in infections and we do know. Sanjay that that Model that the White House coronavirus task force relies on from the University of Washington. Medical School is projecting. Yes one hundred and one thousand deaths so far over these past three months in the United States. But they're still projecting by early August and that's not very far down the road it could be more than one hundred forty thousand deaths in the United States. That's their assumption right now. That's their assumption and it constantly changes. I mean these models are tough. You know if you look at at one point that same model said there might be sixty thousand people who have died by the middle of August and obviously the number greatly surpassed. You gotta take these models with a little bit of grain of salt. I think the big question here wolf is that this isn't a bifurcated either. You're open or your shut in terms of these states Is almost like a policy issue versus a people issue. The policy is these states are reopening but if people are still being careful maintaining physical distance not having long interactions with people which is defined as around fifteen minutes Not Being in close spaces together not gathering emerged groups all those things that can make a significant difference. We now have evidence of that here in this country. There's evidence of it around the the world. So if opening doesn't mean pre March sixteenth could hopefully be a beneficial thing in terms of not letting these infections start to go into exponential growth. And these these new concerns come as the death toll clearly has now surpassed one hundred thousand one hundred one thousand right now but it took the president quite a while to make any comment at all on this very very grim and sad milestone. What does that tell you he? It's not who he is. He did eventually put out a tweet and say exactly what a president should say but it did take longer than perhaps it should have and he didn't come out and make a statement and that is kind of in keeping with the way that he and his administration but particularly he with his towards reelection or he hopes. Reelection is Doing this now. At a distance at an arm's length the time of him being on about this hour on a daily basis for sometimes ninety minutes to two hours. That seems like ancient. History now because backfired. He wanted to be a wartime president And for while he tried to do it. It didn't work Because it backfire because of this statement that he made and he never did it again but there is a middle ground and that is to be a leader let Americans here from the scientists and to not stoke cultural differences when it comes to masks and other things. But he's not dealing

United States Dr Sanjay Gupta President Trump Dana Bash Medical School University Of Washington White House
Together, We Grieve

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

03:57 min | 5 months ago

Together, We Grieve

"Yesterday. The number of people who died from covid nineteen in the United States surpassed. One hundred thousand doesn't even feel like I can say that number out loud without getting a pit in my stomach. I know you've probably heard this number by now. The please let that settle in for a minute too. Often we see numbers on the screen and we forget the real stories of people who are not here today because of this virus we have known at least for the last few weeks that this tragic milestone would come but it makes it no less painful. Everyone's going to try and contextualising comparing the tragic number of deaths to pass wars terrorist. Attacks Plane Crashes Natural Disasters But one way should not be described as is inevitable. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Six months ago most of the world had never even heard of this novel Coronavirus Cove Nineteen. It was a virus that would change their whole lives. Some people would develop a cough a fever and then have a sudden decline. Some would require a breathing machine. Some never even made it to the hospital most dying alone because of the brutal contagious -ness of this virus family members of the sick and dying could not even be there so here we are left with memories and sadness and sinking feeling that we could have done better. And that's perhaps the most painful part of this whole thing so many of these deaths could have been prevented. We saw countries around the world afflicted with the same disease around the same time and yet heavy miniscule fraction of the infections in debts of the United States. Yes South Korea. It is one seventh the size of the United States but they have had fewer than three hundred people die total not three thousand not thirty thousand but fewer than three hundred. They didn't have a new magical therapy or a vaccine. They had nothing we didn't have. It was that they acted early. And we now know it made an exponential difference in lives saved about one in seven Americans. Now know someone who has died. I'm the corona virus. I am one of them. My friend Doctor. James T goodrich a truly gifted neurosurgeon. We first met when I was just a resident it would be a couple of decades before I got a chance to operate side by side with him during a groundbreaking operation separating the McDonnell twins little baby boy's conjoined at the head. Doctor Goodrich was considered the most experienced neurosurgeon in the world when it came to doing that operation when he died due to Covid we lost. Someone truly irreplaceable. The memory. I'll always hold onto about. Him is his smiling eyes peeking out from his surgical mask doing the thing that he loved more than anything else. So let's honor the memory of the more than one hundred thousand lives lost by committing ourselves to taking this virus. Seriously I will go ahead and just say it. It sucks what is happening. Right now is awful. Our country in the world had become infected and now we are dealing with an illness so different than any illness ever experienced by someone living today. It is a once in a century illness. And it sucks. We don't know exactly why we were stricken with this illness at this time in our collective human history but that doesn't mean we can't act. We must act. There are lessons to be learned not only from the past but from countries who battled against the same virus with greater success.

Micron raises third-quarter revenue forecast

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Micron raises third-quarter revenue forecast

"Here micron technology raised its revenue forecast for the current quarter micron saying that sales will be five point two to five point four billion in the fiscal third quarter we get more here from Bloomberg's Ian king what's driving it really is what's been driving along which is the these massive data centers that the Google is the Facebook's family all night W. **** they're still building out a massive amount of capacity and then the CEO of micron today said look you know these guys are all doing on membership that's a great thing for us it was also a sideline as well and he basically said look we're still optimistic about smartphones and that that situation could improve the year goes on micron CEO Sanjay Mehrotra also saying that he's not concerned about the potential for bloated inventory thing only hallway technologies which is subject to U. S. trade sanctions may have accumulated unused supply of memory

Bloomberg Ian King Google Facebook CEO Micron Sanjay Mehrotra U. S.
"sanjay" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

11:18 min | 5 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

"Our medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta's at a hospital east of Baghdad. Sanjay tell us what's going on where you are. We're invite an operating room that's unusual in. That's from two thousand three when I was embedded with a group of medics during the Iraq war and still relatively new to CNN the anchor introducing me is probably a familiar voice. Many of my friend and colleague Wolf Blitzer. How are you holding up Sanjay? It's been difficult yet. These convoy rides will be you know much about Bacon. Be a very challenging bank wolf and I have both been at CNN for decades which is kind of surreal to say. We've been at the front lines of some of history's most life changing moments nine eleven. Hurricane Katrina the Bala crisis but this pandemic has had no precedent in our lifetime as host of CNN's. The Situation Room Wolf says this has been one of the most intense experiences of his career. He joins me today to talk about the challenges of covering tragedies the political is ation of facts and how he keeps going during this never ending new cycle. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Doing Hi Sandra. My got my clorox disinfecting wipes cleaned off his microphone. This little table here. and you would be very proud wolf. Thank you I've really been looking forward to this. Let me start off by asking. How long have we have? We known each other well. I've been with CNN for thirty years. And and I think you've been with CNN West for about twenty years. Is that right? Such young two thousand and one I started so nineteen years coming up on twenty years. That's amazing I I remember. Of course the first major story you and I covered Was in February march of two thousand three just before the war with Iraq and we were both in Kuwait You and me we're recovering. Anchoring my show from Kuwait City from a hotel balcony and all of a sudden the war started and the first Scuds came in and a few of them landed about a mile or so behind where I was reporting from And we see this huge plume of smoke. Go Up And the wind was blowing towards us and I said well let. Let's wait and see where the smoke goes And the next thing I knew is Dr Sanjay Gupta our chief. Medical correspondent was in a vehicle. You were heading to that high end mall where the Scuds landed and you were wearing your gas mask and you were getting ready to report the news right. Yeah that's exactly right. I I wanted to go over there and And see at the time it made total sense. Yes I will go exactly where that big plume of. Smoke is where that missile landed in the middle of a war where there's concerns about bio weapons. It made perfect sense. In retrospect I was thinking what am I doing? Let let me let me ask you wolf about this this particular time now covering this pandemic You've covered so many stories again These wars Oklahoma City nine eleven hurricane Katrina other outbreaks. How how is this? Been different than those well. This has been At least from my personal perspective. The most deadly You know as we speak more than ninety thousand Americans have been have died and hundreds of thousands have been you know had to suffer through corona virus and and so many more around the world and these are people. These are wonderful people. These are mothers and fathers sons and daughters brothers and sisters They're younger. They're middle aged. They're older they're wonderful people. Many of them were looking For the prime of their lives spending time with their families enjoying life The economy was good and all of a sudden. It's a disaster. We've got millions and millions of people who are unemployed applying for unemployment benefits Many of them can't even apply. What's so heartbreaking to see these long food lines people waiting to just get food to put on the table to feed their kids And themselves and who would have thought this was going to happen and even something as simple as wearing a face mask you go out and you see all. These people wearing face bests You see people all over the place. Who would have thought that was going to be happening here. So this has been so so intense so riveting so scary so crazy in many respects. It's just an awful awful situation and I and I would say it's it's certainly you know the the most intense period two months that we've been doing this in all the years of my journalism that this is the most intense while. I mean that's saying something given your career and yet you do a story like this and it's it's difficult nowadays seemingly wolf to disentangle anything from from politics and the more subjective nature of the story. The opinion part of story people weighing in From a Political Lens. Do you sense that as well is is? Is it truly impossible to disentangle just about any new story from politics nowadays? Well look. There's the political story. There's a political angle to what's going on and the country is deeply divided as you know I I will say this. Sanjay the article you wrote for CNN DOT COM On Your personal thoughts and I have it right here in front of me You know that it for the for the for a moment. Think of the United States as a human body at that and people haven't read that article they should go back and look it up And the last words you wrote and I have it right here in front of me. It's they were so powerful because I truly agree and I truly believe what you said is true. You said the country and the world are facing a serious illness but it is treatable. It is fixable. Let's do this together. You're absolutely right. We're we're going through HAL right now. This is an awful awful situation and it's going to get worse as these numbers get worse and and hopefully there won't be a second wave that comes in the fall or anything like that but I totally agree it is treatable. It is fixable. Let's do this together when you think about your your your tone. I mean do you think about your your tone? When you're delivering news stories Wolf. A lot of it nowadays has been you know frightening news to give. How do you balance being hopeful for an audience and being honest I do think about my tone And I try to. You know to be as objective as I possibly can be but sometimes you know the the story is so painful you you're gonna see that you know on my face you'll hear it in my tone you'll hear my words And you know I've been trying over these days To end the situation room with some images and pictures of a real people who unfortunately passed away from the corona virus and we tell those stories who these people are because it's one thing to say ninety thousand people have died. It's another thing to say. Look at this individual. Look at this woman. Look at this man. Look at this teacher this nurse look at this This a first responder And you put the face on these people. And it's sad. It's it's heartbreaking because you think of their families and so often their families they can't even say goodbye in a hospital or they see they can't even sometimes go to a funeral To say goodbye to their father mother or whatever and You know you gotTa have some emotion when you just feel that it's it's so powerful so so awful Science reporting in some ways I feel wolf is a luxury in that we can always rely on data and science and evidence facts to bolster up our reporting There's not a lot of opinion science reporting although sometimes you do have to offer up some thoughts on things but for you. In an era where alternative facts have become a term that people become familiar with. How do you think that that is affected the reporting on this pandemic the idea that the truth and the science? That's just another avenue of information. Here's here's another avenue. You could pay attention to the most important thing we can do. And you're part of our fact checking team Sanjay's went when we hear government. People including the president makes statements do a news conference and say all sorts of things I want to come out and say well. Let's let's check what we just heard? And we'll have you We'll have John King have Daniel. Dale our chief fact. Checker will have Gloria Borger Dana Bash But we'll have doctors And in addition to you who come on and say well what he said just not true. What he said is true And I think that's a real service that CNN does provide that. We're not just listening and reporting but Ross fact checking and making sure that the viewers get an honest understanding of what's going on not just propaganda from time to time. I think it's so important. Everything gets sort of polarized and and sometimes it gets minimized inappropriately. So I really do appreciate the sort of work that you do wolf. How about you? I mean even your site in the pandemic Wolf. I think you are known to the iron man at At CNN and in the media business. In general I mean you work hard weekend. Shows Weekday shows What what was the work life balance like for you well right now. I I love working and I've been working during this during this current pandemic seven days a week. I woke up this morning. You know I got a little routine. I got on a treadmill for an hour and I watched the news on television as I'm getting a good little sweat Excited because I know that you know in the situation room gets on the air. Five o'clock I'm going to be ready to report the news as fairly and as responsibly as accurately I as I possibly can and the viewers will be grateful. And I'll be grateful that it's not as if if I took a day or offer You know or a weekend off. I could go to. A restaurant can't do that. It's not as if I could go watch my Washington nationals. Play baseball game. I can't do that. It's not as if I can you know. Go see my family down in Miami. 'cause I'm not going to get on a plane right now and I'm not going to be able to do that and whenever I used to complain to my dad about how hard I was working he would always say listens on. There are harder ways to make a living what you do so. Just go ahead and enjoy your job. That's my attitude you know. It's my attitude to despite the long days and frantic research. I've always tried to follow wolves lead. I WanNa think wolf again. Not only for his hard work but also for being a constant source of inspiration for me and everyone else at the network. If you have questions please record voice memo and email them to ask. Sanjay at CNN dot com might include them in our next podcast. We'll be back tomorrow. Thanks for listening..

Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN Wolf Blitzer Iraq Hurricane Katrina Baghdad Kuwait City clorox Oklahoma Kuwait United States Washington nationals Sandra Political Lens baseball Gloria Borger Miami John King president
When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:25 min | 5 months ago

When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

"Corona virus versus fiction is sponsored by express. Vpn We've heard stories. Where survivors are saying. My relationship with emotionally abusive became physically abusive last night. We've heard stories from women whose partners were coming home and coughing on them and telling them that they were acting them with the coronavirus. That was Katie. Ray Jones the head of the national domestic violence hotline for most of us. Staying at home has been the safest way to protect ourselves from the krona virus but for others home can be a dangerous place worrying experts about what is happening behind closed doors. So what do we really know? And what can we do to help those? Who may be isolated and afraid? I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction in the past we've seen increases in domestic violence during times of crisis and stress. We've seen spikes in two thousand and eight during the Economic Crisis James Goggle. Yano is a former. Fbi agent and CNN's law enforcement analyst. He says this pandemic is putting victims in particularly vulnerable situation. We've seen spikes during national disasters like say Hurricane Katrina Hurricane. Sandy and we've also seen it during times of the Super Bowl major sporting events and look correlation doesn't always equal causation here. But there's a lot of factors at play in one of is. These victims are trapped in a cohabitation situation with the abuser. As stay at home orders went into effect in March. Several cities across the United States reported a steep increase in domestic violence calls as compared to last year. Cities like Seattle Portland and Boston have all reported increases in calls to hotlines or reports or arrests related to domestic violence in April Chicago. City officials told CNN the Illinois domestic violence hotline saw the highest daily call volume in. Its twenty year history. Meanwhile in other parts of the country calls to domestic abuse hotlines and reports to law enforcement have stayed flat or even declined experts. Worry that victim stuck at home with their abusers may not know how to get help one group that is working to assist victims of domestic. Violence is safe horizon based in New York City. They're one of the largest victim service organizations in the country. We work with victims of all crimes and abuse and that includes family. Violence Domestic Violence Child Abuse Sexual assault human trafficking elder abuse and we help people to heal and rebuild their lives areas weighing is the CEO of safe horizon. I started by asking her what she had been hearing for. People who need help during this pandemic when nobody's supposed to be out and about the choice to leave a situation or leave home is definitely complicated by concerns about getting. The virus others can include. Let's say the victim is someone? That had not been economically dependent on the Abuser. But now they've lost their job Maybe that's an economic dependence. That has now begun. Are there particular signs of an abusive situation? If that person doesn't seem to have the freedom to go where and when they want seems to have to account for every dollar or every place they go seems to be separated from loving relationships that used to be important to them in the relationship. You may experience all of those things and also threats and then of course every form of physical violence that people experience. But if someone is hurting you physically choking US spitting on you. You absolutely have a right to seek help into not expect that that behavior is normal. I imagine that the problem has worsened during this pandemic of both intimate partner. Violence Child Abuse. But I wonder do we know for sure I mean the because the reporting of this I imagine is is part of the challenge as well right. The story reporting is complicated in the first month of the stay at home orders. Here New York calls to our hotline. Were DOWN. That's for a couple of reasons. One people just prioritizing their Their health but another is an assumption. That help wasn't available and that is tragic because help is available. Are Hotline is functioning. The national domestic violence hotline is functioning. Police are responding to calls were able to provide a tremendous range of services. Virtually and as the word has gotten out about that our calls have increased child abuses a different because those reports come from teachers who are mandated reporters and doctors. Those reports are down by seventy five percent over. The prior period is heartbreaking and tragic because the abuse cannot be down by seventy five percent. It means that teachers that would normally see something and be concerned about. It are not able to see that over revolt learning. Let me ask you though. Short of opening up. Are there other things that can be done to to address this issue specifically with child abuse? We've done research over. The years about Bystanders to child abuse people who may suspect that there's something abusive happening in a family and overwhelmingly members of the public. Say I wouldn't want to report that because I might be wrong. What if I'm wrong and it's really none of my business and my response to that is what if you're not wrong. What if you're right and so I would say if anyone listening to this? Podcast has a nagging suspicion. That child is not being treated right in their home. Find out where in your state you can call it in it. Just strikes me from a pragmatic sense that it might be challenging. If you're in an apartment you know with people and you're you're trying to see cal. But you're worried about stigma even within your own living situation or privacy concerns. What do you recommend for someone who who says I want to get help but you know frankly? I got someone listening in the next room. Try and get on the call or seek help. I recommend chat can be much more private and there are many mental health services available over chat. A large part of what we do with victims of domestic. Violence is safety planning. What can that particular person? Due TO BE SAFER WITH. Sheltering at home that's become much more complicated because safety plans often would include something like I can spend the night at my mother's if I see certain signs of behavior that are worrisome. That sort of thing may not be option now but options. That can still work for this time. Might be a code word that your child does that. If I say a certain word the child should call nine one one. It might be something lake a neighbor when I put the shade in the bathroom Or put a plant in the window. The neighbor knows that you're in distress and to keep an ear out and to call the police as you pointed out it's about giving people help. Yes first and foremost if you imagine or think about what it might be like or what. It must be like to be a child or to be an adult trapped in a situation where you feel. Fear every minute of the day and you could help that person. Think of what that would mean victims of domestic abuse faced significant challenges leaving before the pandemic but wants people to know that organizations like safe horizon.

CNN Dr Sanjay Gupta Katie Hurricane Katrina Ray Jones Elder Abuse FBI United States New York City Yano Illinois Sandy Seattle Chicago Partner
The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 6 months ago

The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

"But of all the places we like to gather now shutdown by this pandemic restaurants are also some of the hardest hit so today. We're going to talk to people in the industry. The chefs the restaurant tours to find out what they're trying to do to survive for them for us for everyone. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction restaurants. Sort OF BOTTLE. The zeitgeist their community. And it's where people celebrate as not just about eating. That's David Chang. He's a chef and the founder of the momofuku group which has restaurants around the world. He's also the host of the Netflix show ugly delicious if food establishments were important. People wouldn't want it so badly. There's just somethin'. That is a connection to just being human besides tasting delicious foods. Chang calls restaurants quote cultural banks and worries about the erosion. This pandemic has had on all aspects of the dining experience. We literally take ninety percent of cash flowing. Give it back to everybody else. On top of trying to make delicious food and build organizations however small they might be no one gets in this business at least that. Iron Meyer so they can make a ton of money they do it because of the life and the positive impact you can have both on yourself and others around you and you that away that that. That's that's going to be pretty brutal closing. His restaurants in March was extremely difficult. He had to furlough around. Eight hundred workers in this week decided to close to of his restaurants reopening others. Maybe even harder. You have to reconfigure literally every decision of how you operate in a restaurant. It was hard enough to begin with. How do you taste food? How you order food. How do you sanitize now? How do you do contact with delivery? You even allowed transaction via credit cards anymore. So now you there's like all of these things now that are going to be expensive. Chang doesn't have the answers yet. But he thinks he knows what it's GonNa take. Define I just think that we're going to need some ingenuity and creativity to sort of align some mutual problems that we have in this country particularly in the food space and sort of reconfigure. How this whole works on his twitter feed. Chang has also been asking people to send him photos of reopened restaurants in cities like Taipei and Hong Kong. It's fascinating to look at them. Some of the photos show. Police Systems delivering coffee. Temperature checks at the door and customers. Even receiving full body disinfectant sprays. Don't worry with their clothes on too many. These measures may seem a little over the top. The common thread is we have to actually make impossible hap and that gives me optimism really genuinely does because these kinds of impossible tasks that sort of her. My brain are what I most attracted to. And we can't have anyone working off a different playbook everyone needs to be working the same playbook every restaurant every business in the absence of a so called restaurant playbook the National Restaurant Association which is a lobbying group is doing what it can to try and offer some guidelines for reopening obviously frequent hand washing some element of distancing some element of face covering certainly reduced interaction between the host. And the guest. That's Larry Lynch Senior Vice. President of Science and Industry at the National Restaurant Association Lynch said it's already begun. Restaurants are already testing out new methods. Everyone's looking visit different ways just this weekend. We saw one of the towns here in Florida. Closed down one of their street to the restaurant. Tours could pull the chairs out into the street. If you're used to going out as being a curated. Dining Experience Lynch describes the post pandemic world as sort of a safety focused obstacle. Course I would say what you're probably GonNa find is before you get there. You're going to look online and look what the instructions are in that particular restaurant what their expectations or. It may tell you to wait outside. May Ask you to place your order online. It may tell you that once you get outside. Send them attacks and let them know. You're outside wait once you're inside. You may wait a bit before the waiter or waitress actually comes up and greets you greeting maybe something as simple as confirming your order rather than taking your order. Once you die. You may find that your table is included as fasces. Wasn't it passed. It's going to be cleared all at once rather than sporadically during the dining experience. When you're dining probably won't see the manager come over to ask how your view was and whether or not you enjoyed yourself. Restaurants are going to have to tailor safety measures to suit their capabilities and it is possible. Not everyone can physically accommodate these recommendations for example Irene. Lee doesn't see her Boston. Restaurant may may hosting sin diners anytime soon. We're a small restaurant so we have about thirty six seats. Which means the possibility of socially distancing inside the building is basically none but Lee. Who was a finalist for this years? James Beard Rising Star Chef Award has still managed to find a silver lining. We are pretty much going to have to change our whole model which sounds scary but is also a really exciting opportunity. So how do we re imagine what a restaurant can be? Water restaurant can do what restaurant staff are capable of Lee in her employees are already starting to answer those questions. For example her restaurant may may is open for delivery and is also hosting virtual dumpling classes. The restaurant is delivering groceries to healthcare workers and selling pantry staples to the community like milk and eggs. The goal to help customers avoid the grocery store because I think supermarkets are going to feel unsafe for a lot of people for a long time and I just think like we have the ability to get almost any of those products probably at a better price at Mamie and so it would be kind of unconscionable to not try to use that to help keep people safer and to make their lives more. Convenient Lee is taking this time to rethink how a restaurant should operate. And she's hoping the industry is a whole does the same especially in the areas where it was struggling even before the pandemic. I think that this is a huge opportunity for us to keep talking about the biggest issue that our industry house which is Labor on the issue of jobs and low wages and like terrible workplace environments. That is always been the bane of this industry. I am hoping that the compensation model could be altered and cross training could become more prevalent. But that's the long term in the short term lease preoccupied with just keeping may may afloat even though she says. The survival of the restaurant isn't her biggest concern. If mamie doesn't exist in in five or ten years that's totally fine with me. I'm going to be really pissed off if there are no cool. Independently owned quirky restaurants to eat at like I cannot eat every day I refuse and so I think that for me. The question about Future is almost a little bit less important but for a lot of people in this industry is all we have one thing I've learned. Is that the restaurant. Industry is full of dedicated creative leaders and is someone who enjoys dining out. I'm optimistic. They're going to find ways to meet the challenges ahead and keep this important part of our culture alive. It's definitely GONNA be an uphill battle but I'm GonNa do what I can to support my favorite places with takeout orders and contributions to out of work employees. They could really use the help

National Restaurant Associatio David Chang LEE Mamie Dr Sanjay Gupta Netflix CNN Lynch Larry Lynch Senior Vice Founder Twitter Momofuku Group Iron Meyer James Beard Florida Police Systems Taipei Irene President Trump
Students and teachers struggle with remote education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:57 min | 6 months ago

Students and teachers struggle with remote education

"That's Jimmy Fallon on the tonight show earlier this week. I think voicing the thoughts of so many families. The song was a nod to national teacher appreciation. Week which ends today. But you'd probably go on all year long like schools across the country. The week looked very different compared to years past instead of apples on their desks or gift cards from parents teachers might have received an Apple Emoji or some on then mo. You know why. It's because forty seven states and the district of Columbia have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year. Teachers across the country have taken their lessons online to try and weather this pandemic so today will some of these teachers struggles and successes in navigating remote learning. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. We had really try to make everything work in the virtual world and that's challenging to do because most teachers like myself we don't sign up for that. We sign up for the interaction. We sign up for the collaboration and we sign up for those human moments that you can't really replicate online. That's Chris deer. Two Thousand Twenty Louisiana teacher of the year and a finalist for the two thousand twenty national teacher of the year. I teach at Shawmut High School in Louisiana right outside of New Orleans. Dear teaches world history to seniors and AP human geography to Freshman. I didn't know what that was. He said it's sort of like anthropology inspired to teach partly because of a formative personal experience. I was in high school when Hurricane Katrina hit. I was a senior. It was our second week. It disrupted the entire region down here. I was forced to Texas. I stayed in hotels in shelters in bounced around different schools. And I missed out on a lot of big events that a lot of people look forward to their senior year sound. Familiar deer has a pretty good idea of what is current students. Probably feel. It's a time when you're supposed to be celebrating all of your hard work your dedication. Your accomplishments When your family supposed to watch you walk across that stage cheer? So it's it's a time that you'll never get to Redo and you'll never get back and it's not just a loss for dear students. Some of them will be the first in their families to graduate from high school and the ceremony would have been meaningful to the relatives as well. Dear has students who are also dreamers undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children Andy has students. They're working essential jobs while they also balance online classes. Learning Online. Might seem easy enough if you're a student with the computer or the Internet but deer also has students who didn't have the luxury of these tools so a lot of students that originally didn't have Internet when this happened. We were Distributed work in packets in just literally papers out when we were distributing food but my district personally has been a given chromebooks out to students who need them and trying to collaborate with local organizations to get hot spots to get kids connected so I think teachers all across the country are doing everything they can to get kids online and to keep that that learning going as Peron's a community school in Phoenix Arizona has also handed out chromebooks in Wi fi to some of its students. But that's not all the school is providing. I think a lot of US forget how schools are to our communities. Even if you're not a student there Hannah Wysong teaches science and English at Esperanza mostly to low income students. She has helped distribute food boxes and gift. Cards to grocery stores. But as this pandemic drags on why song in her colleagues are looking ahead. To long-term challenges families might face food is available and a lot of schools in food. Banks is. This has gone on for a couple of months and parents are not working or working less The next set that working right now is to build a fund for rental assistance. And that's just the creative problem solving. Why Song has been a part of outside the classroom after students have been set up with food and Wi fi is when her real job and the real connection begins and these teachers have come up with all kinds of new ways to do that as well something that we normally at our school? This House monthly family nights with movies are dinner or games or whatever it may be and we were really mourning the loss of family nights and we decided to do it. Virtual dance parties so we got a local Dj from a radio station. And then we invited all of the families to get on zoom there. Were I think between forty five and fifty people on between families and staff and pretty cute to see a bunch of little squares of third graders? Dancing Chris Wyckoff who teaches American history to eleventh graders? North Carolina has taken advantage of our reliance on the Internet to send his students. Some encouragement been sending out digital cards. To let them know that I still see you. I still see your work. I still see you're working hard. Wyckoff has been proud of how well his students at the Johnston County career and technical leadership academy have taken online classes after all they could easily just turned the video off and go do something else online learning you know it has its it has its good and its bad. Even depending on the type of learner you are in a lot of our students are capable of making the adjustment at home all of those the social and emotional atmosphere of home versus the social emotional atmosphere at school all of those things combined to either create atmosphere for success or failure for for the students. Chris dineen this is another. Chris said there were hiccups using video-conferencing at first we had zoom bomb the first or second date but his middle school students at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico. Have come around. The students themselves had to adapt to a totally different style of teaching and they've actually had to become somewhat more accountable for their own behavior. Because of course we can't see them and monitor them in the ways that we normally do. Laurie Abrahams finds this challenging to. She's a special education teacher on Long Island and works with three to five year olds. Who have special needs during normal times? Work incredibly physical and requires personalized interactions with each student. These days she struggles to get her students to sit still in front of the camera. All kids do well with schedule. Especially the kids with special needs listening issues and attending issues. They really need that. They need that routine. And the you know it's very hard. It's very hard for them but like everyone else. Abrahams has come up with ways to make it work. In fact she borrowed one method of calming her students. Down from children's Yoga certification course. What I'm doing with my fingers touching my thumb to forefinger middle finger rain finger and pinkie and so you have them do that. So it's four touches and then you just say peace begins with me and they understand that peace means quiet and then we keep doing it at any time. You feel anxious or that. You need to calm down you can just you can. Just move your fingers like that. It's thoughtful it's innovative. It's what's necessary the teachers we spoke to said they've mostly worked out the kinks of remote learning and they feel optimistic about finishing the year apart from their students but in the long run. They're still not so sure. I think these kids are young enough. That if it's just four months in the scheme of along is this is not gonNa make the biggest difference because they didn't have four months of preschool. I think that in the fall if kids can't go back to school if they have to learn online. I think that's going to you know really impact this whole generation. This won't surprise you but Chris Dear Louisiana teacher whose own senior year was interrupted by Hurricane Katrina this pandemic once again highlights the need for more investment in education. I know a lot of times when the economy starts to Tank a bit. The first thing that gets cut is education and people might say well. Why do we need as much you know money for education budgets when they do things virtually and whatnot but at this time? I feel like we need more because we need more counselors. We need more. Social workers we need more therapists need smaller classes. And that's how we're going to get through this. These five teachers said the feedback. They've gotten from students and parents has mostly been positive but during the strange difficult national teacher appreciation. Week it's nice for them to hear that their efforts haven't gone unnoticed so since they can't hug their teachers in person this year we got some amazing shouts from students all over. Who want their teachers to know that their students are grateful? My Name is Dalton Davis. I am seven years old from flawless. Oregon. I want to say hi to my first grade teacher. Mrs and Mr Hello. My name is MIRA sing and I am in seventh grade. I would like to thank all of my amazing teachers. Hi My name is Leah. And I'm a fourth grader. I want to give a shot at to my awesome teacher Mr Festival. He is there every day with a smile. Hi My name is Cassie from Whittier California. And thank you to all the teachers especially my Fourth Grade Teacher Mrs Cutler and I'm Kassy's MOM Krista I also WanNa say on behalf of my fourteen year old David who has autism. We appreciate the Special Ed teachers like Mrs Gain. Thanks hi I'M AMELIA. Ham seven years old. I'm in second grade. I have the best teachers and I can't wait the virus to beautiful so I could go back to school.

Laurie Abrahams Hurricane Katrina Louisiana WI Chris Wyckoff Dr Sanjay Gupta Jimmy Fallon CNN Columbia Shawmut High School First Grade Teacher Chris Deer Thousand Twenty Louisiana Apple United States Long Island Texas Leah
The Latest on Testing

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:12 min | 6 months ago

The Latest on Testing

"When you were a kid. Did you ever make one of those pinhole cameras? Were you cut a little hole into a piece of cardboard and then look through it on some ways. That's kind of how we're looking at the corona virus nowadays through a tiny little window part of the reason. We haven't been able to get a bigger picture because this is a new corona virus and we're learning as we go along. We have also had inadequate testing across the nation so the inability to know the true extent of this outbreak becomes a major barrier in terms of getting the country back to work. We need clear vision and so far we haven't had that. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. There are currently only two types of corona virus tests available in the United States. Because I'm a healthcare worker. Who still takes care of patients in the hospital? I've had both of them. I'm GonNa give you a little poke over Uruguay. Don't okay. We're all done it. Okay early on there. Were some significant delays in testing and there was also the release of a flawed test. Which really put us far behind since then there have been a lot of unauthorized on validated tests. Which have flooded the market the most common and most accurate test we have is called a PR test. A polymerase chain reaction tests. Now that's the one that detects whether or not someone is currently infected with Kovic nineteen. It involves a saliva test in some cases or more commonly a nasal swab. Cnn's Brooke Baldwin referred to it as a brain Taylor so that gets sent off to a lab where the genetic material is extracted. And because there's such a small amount of genetic material it is then amplified. That's the polymerase chain reaction. If all goes well results usually come back within a few hours but it can take a few days if you have to send it to a lab somewhere then. There are the antibody tests. Those are the ones that can determine whether or not someone has had cove in nineteen in the past and might have some immunity to it now. Those involved collecting a small blood sample either through a needle in the vein or three blood spot sample. But here's the problem. Antibody tests have not been consistently accurate. There are a lot of bad tests out there and it's still unclear how much those antibodies might protect you from the virus in the future. When you're testing for the virus the biggest problem would be having a false negative. Why because you would think that you don't have the virus and then you might go back out into the community into a nursing home into a hospital and potentially infect people with the antibody test which you really hoping to avoid is a false positive. Then someone might feel that they have the antibodies thus feel that they are protected. Go out into the community to a hospital to a nursing home and spread the virus so with the diagnostic virus test. You really have to reduce false negatives with the antibody test you really have to reduce false positives. The promise of the immunology test to find out we have. The antibodies is huge. That's Kevin Delay on senior fellow at the University of Southern California's Schwarzenegger Institute for State in Global Policy. The institute supports test sites across Los Angeles. This can influence policymakers at the local state and federal level. That can actually inform us. When it comes to social distancing if I'm immune in scientifically I've been proven to be immune then I can re enter the workforce and I could play a bigger role and make sure we're safe for a company called Roche announced that it received emergency use authorization. Eu A for an antibody test it claims is more accurate than most Roe says. It has already started shipping. Its new test to leading labs around the world. Here's Rosillo Severin Schwan. It's really special. Because it is so accurate. It's it's almost perfect. Accuracy and allows us is to really reliably test whether a person has been infected by the corner virus or opt irrespective of whether you had symptoms or not now. There's another kind of tasks they could be useful here. It's called an antigen test again. The test for the virus is the PR or diagnostic tests. The test for the antibody is called a serology test. And now the antigen tests look for a protein on the surface of the virus. You may have already had one of these if you've ever had a test for strep throat or the flu. Here's the problem. A reliable antigen test for the corona virus isn't yet available in the United States. But the hope is that will soon have something that works kind of like an ad home pregnancy test. Were a test strip. Would change color detail if you might have the virus. Frederick Nolte is a pathology professor and the head of Corona virus testing at the Medical University of South Carolina. Antigen detection has been part of the diagnostic landscape for a number of years and it has a number of appeals. It can be done relatively quickly. it's inexpensive. It can be deployed in a number of clinical settings outside of the laboratory near the patients but the chief concern with it has been the sensitivity and they low sensitivity means a high false negative and with high false negatives people feel that they don't have the virus and they go back out in the community and potentially continue the spread so how available. Rpcr antibody tests to the general public is probably the question. I get more than any other as of Monday. Johns Hopkins University's Kovic Tracking Project was reporting over seven. Million people in the United States have been tested and they mean the diagnostic or PCR tests in this case but again the initial rollout of those tests was fraught with problems and that caused major delays in the country's early response to the pandemic. Those problems are being addressed now but there are still supply chain shortages the PR requires certain transport mediums reagents and yes nasal swabs and those things have been in short supply but just last week. The mayor of Los Angeles announced free diagnostic testing for all of the county's residents because we know the ten million residents county need that it's critical for US opening up in the future. That's Mayor Eric. Garcetti on CNN and we wanted to be the first big city in America to take the advice of doctors around the country saying you have to find the silence spreaders. This is a silent killer that people without symptoms who can spread. This are critical piece of knowledge in order to open up in the future and in New York City mayor. Bill de Blasio says the city will produce its own cove in nineteen tests kits in partnership with Three D. Printing Company. We realize we had to find another source. Global Market wasn't working. There weren't sources around this country that were reliable enough so we decided we would make our own and this has had been put together very quickly. So we're really an uncharted territory. Creating these tests kids in New York City again. It's these nasal swabs that have been in such short supply in so many places around the country. Now there are also plenty of antibody tests floating around that have not been reviewed or validated by the FDA. The agency said Monday that it was tightening. Its policy to keep unproven and even fraudulent tests from entering the market. It's been a big problem in one. Study of twelve antibody tests. Four were shown to deliver false positive results more than ten percent of the time. Remember if you're testing for. Antibodies and you get a false positive people may incorrectly. Assume they now have the antibodies and are protected and then go out into public and keep spreading. You really want to get that false positive rate under two percent as low as possible. Really the future could lie in at home. Testing Antigen tests would be the easiest to mass produce for home use but again like I said we don't yet have a reliable antigen test for Kovic Nineteen White House Corona Virus Task Force member. Dr Deborah Burke said this last month on. Nbc's Meet the press we have to have a breakthrough innovation and testing. We have to be able to detect antigen than constantly tried to detect the actual live virus or the viral particles itself and to really move into Antigen testing. If an antigen test is approved and mass produced it may serve as a valuable screening tool. But it's probably not going to replace the P. C. R. Saliva or swab tests when it comes to diagnosing Kovic nineteen the Antigen test in this case would be used to screen the PR test would still be the most accurate according to the Guardian scientists working for the US military have designed a PC test. That has the potential to detect the virus as early as twenty four hours after its contracted that could help stop infected people from spreading the virus before they even show symptoms and keep in mind. A lot of people never show symptoms but can still spread the virus. It's another promising maybe and remember this. Testing does need to go hand in hand with contact. Tracing once you find out who's infected that person needs to be isolated and then everyone who has had close contact with that person needs to be traced and sometimes those people need to be quarantined as well test trace and hopefully treat

United States Corona Virus Task Force Los Angeles CNN New York City Dr Sanjay Gupta Rosillo Severin Schwan Roche NBC Johns Hopkins University Brooke Baldwin Uruguay Bill De Blasio Dr Deborah Burke Medical University Of South Ca Guardian EU Kevin Delay
Reopening Georgia: First Steps

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

02:15 min | 6 months ago

Reopening Georgia: First Steps

"Georgia is one of several states. That are reopening in some form this week. But there's been a lot of debate surrounding those decisions and while many Georgia businesses reopen following rules of a new normal. There are still plenty of questions. We looked at the state board guidelines and tried to implement is needing of those things that was possible some like hair salon owner Shannon Stafford have cautiously decided to open their doors. But it's going to be difficult because we're so hands on so that's why I want to be kinda vital to making sure that we both wear mass arm. Hands ARE BEING CLEANED REGRET. Half fresh garments. We happened to put things like that in place Because eventually we're going to all be reopened. This is happening while others like CHEF. Ian Wins Laid. Still feel like it's too soon. There's lots of things that we can't get a hold of right now. Face masks or big problem Finding sanitizer is a big problem. And so we'd have to address all of those things before we can even considering opening. There's a lot for business owners to consider when thinking about reopening. Can you limit the number of customers? Make sure everyone is keeping a safe distance. Do you make everywhere mask. Not to mention how will each decision ultimately affects your bottom line joining me today to help address. Some of these concerns is Dr Carlos. Del Rio Dr del Rio is an infectious disease. Expert and a professor of medicine in global health at emory university. Where I am also on staff. His life's work is in HIV research. But he's now doing work on cove nineteen treatments and a vaccine politics aside. Carlos are we ready to reopen? You know I I don't think so but I would say sanjay that from a health standpoint. It's always too soon from a business standpoint. It's always too late. It's always such a hard decision in what I think we need to do. Is Find a place that we can have some business some economic development at the same time that we are doing it enough safe public health weight in the problem is we don't know the answer to that because we've never experienced this before. I'd like to send a couple of questions from these business owners to you and I'll preface by saying that everyone's situation is going to be a little different. How they approach. This is going to be how people assess risk is going to be different but I think there was a common sense that there's a lot of information out there. But maybe not enough clarity on what people should do. So this is a a question from Alex Bronstein. He's the owner of grind house killer Burgers in Atlanta. And he had this question right now. I mean six feet seems to be the standard. But you know if you're tables are six feet away sometimes. Somebody walks five inside of six feet or your server has come to your table. I mean how do you logistically make all this work? I don't know a couple of things unless you have somebody who US hyper spreader super spreader walking by somebody. Being close to somebody for just a few seconds may not transmit this. Maybe it's very different. If you're sitting at the table you know you and I have talked a lot about this article from China with the three tables people were sitting there. They didn't talk anything about the waiter. So the cooks it was people sitting at the table that were that got infected right. Is The people that were there for a long period of time so I think that's one thing to think about just to clarify for our listeners. Dr Del Rio is referring to a study. That recently came out of China in that study. They looked at how the virus had spread within a restaurant. There was one infected person who wasn't showing symptoms at the time and what they found. Is that this. One person seemed to have spread the virus to nine others both the person's table and surrounding tables it shows that the real risk there is that you're exposed for a prolonged period of time such as when you're sitting and eating the other thing is. I think that we have grossly underestimated. How much of this transmission is by phone mice by things you touch? So how do you make sure that when people walk in? They don't need to open the door the door so Ben. And what policies do we have in place from a human resource standpoint? That makes it easy for a waiter. If they're not feeling well do not come to work because they said no. I gotta go to work because otherwise I'm not going to get paid. Well that person is gonNA come to work and potentially can start a transmission so we really have to change a lot of things including HR policies. It's not just where we put our

United States Dr Carlos Alex Bronstein Georgia China Dr Del Rio Shannon Stafford Emory University Professor Of Medicine IAN Sanjay Atlanta
COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal

Science Talk

11:43 min | 6 months ago

COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal

"Gibbs reports on how pathologists are starting to get a much closer look at the damage that covert nineteen does to the body by carefully examining the lungs hearts kidneys and other organs of people who have died while infected with the novel Corona Virus. Wait spoke with experts at the Cleveland Clinic. And the University of Washington who have performed these high risk autopsies very few of which have been done so far in the United States. Covert nineteen is a new disease and doctors have been struggling to figure out how best to treat it putting people on ventilators as always a last resort for other diseases typically about half the patients who go onto a ventilator do not survive but Kobe nineteen patients seemed to do even worse on mechanical ventilation a study in the UK found that only about a third of corona virus patients survived that experience and in a report published on April Twenty second in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found even more alarming outcomes recently in New York City analyzing data from twelve large New York hospitals during March. They found that out of three hundred twenty patients on ventilators. Two hundred and eighty two died so only about one in nine survived mechanical ventilation. We know this. New Corona virus damages the lungs. But how exactly does it differ in important ways from influenza and other VIRAL INFECTIONS? Some experts have suggested that the virus can infect and damage the heart as well and maybe the kidneys or even the brain when people are seriously ill with Cova nineteen. They seem to be at higher. Risk of blood clots. But it's really hard to determine from lab tests and fuzzy medical images whether it's the virus damaging these other organs or whether the body's own immune system fouling up the works as it generates massive inflammatory response to combat the corona virus. Any kind of lung injury can result in acute respiratory distress syndromes. This is a disease process that we've known about for a long. It's a very typical pattern of injury that we see in the lungs when they're injured for many many different kinds of reasons. That's disarray Marshall. A pathologist at the University of Washington. She says that it's often the cascading organ failure triggered by acute respiratory distress syndrome or A. Rds The causes elderly people to die from influenza and firefighters to die from smoke inhalation and cancer patients to die from reactions to chemotherapy. The pressing question. We need to answer for Kobe. Nineteen is whether it's just a rds that makes the disease deadly or whether this new diseases different and even more complicated to treat them what doctors have seen before well if you watch TV you know what medical examiners do when they want to figure out what killed somebody. There's just no substitute for a thorough and detailed autopsy earlier this month researchers published the first English language autopsy results on people who died after becoming infected with the novel Corona Virus. The paper appeared in the American Journal of Clinical Pathology on April tenth. It describes to interesting cases both from Oklahoma case one was seventy seven year old man who had cycled between fever and chills for six days before finally calling for an ambulance on March twentieth. He had high blood pressure and some other health issues but no cough on the trip to the hospital. He was gasping for air and his heart stopped by the time they arrived at the emergency room. It was too late. The gentleman had not seen a doctor for his fever. He had not been tested for Kobe. Nineteen so it wasn't clear what had caused the heart attack taking his life. The Medical Examiner's team in Oklahoma City decided that it was important to find out they swabbed the man's nasal passages and also his lungs both swabs tested positive for the SARS. Kobe virus and chest xrays showed what they described as complete white out in. What would normally be dark empty lung? Cavities doing an autopsy on a Kobe. Positive body is risky but they had the special protective equipment and high containment room. They needed to do it and maybe they could learn something that would help save some of the hundreds of thousands of people around the world who will fight cove in nineteen for their lives in the months to come so they laid his body on the dissecting table and they opened them up. The team contacted a well-known lung pathologist at the Cleveland Clinic to help them interpret what they saw especially as they examined tissue samples from bears organs under the microscope. My name is Sanjay Mukhopadhyay. I'm director of pathology at the Cleveland Clinic. Autopsies give you another deeper look into tissue. That is actually several layers of resolution higher than what you can get from a history a physical examination routine laptops even the highest resolution CD. Scans none of them. Even approach the resolution that you can get from an autopsy. The medical examiner had noticed that. This man's lungs were two to three times heavier than usual. A Common Consequence of AIDS pathologist actually referred to that syndrome by a different name. One that describes the end result of the disease lung cells. They call it diffuse. Lv alert damage in that gentleman. We found diffuse Alveoli damage under the microscope. When you take a breath and it goes down your windpipe. The windpipe actually branches and to do and when goes into the left lung and one goes into the right and then those branches of the windpipe branch like the branches of a tree. You know they get smarter than sponsored smaller as you go. Further and further away and the end point of the branch is what we call an Lvn Louis or colloquially you can call it an air sac and what that is just a very tiny balloon. You need a microscope to see it. And they're just cows and thousands of those little balloons in the lung. That's what makes up the lamp so each time. You inhale you inflate thousands of microscopic Vealy as the ED enters into that little balloon with oxygen in it. The point of the balloon is to take that oxygen into the bloodstream. The wall of the balloon has little blood vessels in it so in the normal language. Dicap- breath the oxygen goes from the middle of the balloon into the one of the balloon. And that's where the arteries are and the oxygen goes into your blood cells. Red Blood Cells. We call them. And then that Dixit back to the heart and the heart center the oxygen to the rest of the body for this exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide to work properly. The thin lining of the air SAC has to be very close to the walls of the blood vessels. Now what happens in in actually in any severe viral infection is that the virus starts causing damage reading a digest. I which is the back of the throat and then all the way down so all the way down the windpipe down the branches to the smallest branches and then into the air sex and when it gets into the AIR SACS. Call that a viral pneumonia. What's happening is actually. The virus is damaging the walls of the those little webs of capillaries that surround the walls of the air. Sacs start to leak proteins fluids white blood cells and debris from destroyed lung seep into the air sacs the debris clogs the balloons. But maybe even more important it also thickens the walls of the air sacs. Literally it's making a barrier for the oxygen to go from the middle of the relates to the bloodstream and so this is the reason that oxygen levels are so low in these patients who are very sick from ovid. The researchers concluded that case won the seventy seven year old man had died from Kobe. Nineteen even though he had never been diagnosed with it. Mukhopadhyay said he was struck by similar. The pattern of organ damage was to what he's used to seeing from autopsies on people who died from other viral infections. It's actually very similar to what happens in influenza and at just to mention a few other examples. Sars you know the SARS from two thousand to two thousand three identical merced Middle Eastern disparaties syndrome identical findings. I did autopsies and deported them on H. One and one when that happened the swine flu identical findings and I give you one more example. You know the when the vaping thing happened just recently and many people were getting sick from the most sick patients but actually developing diffuse. Lbj damage case too was different. This man had to the hospital a day earlier on March nineteenth. He was only forty two but had myo tonic. Muscular dystrophy a hereditary disease that causes muscles to weaken or atrophy. Sometimes so much that food can back up from the stomach. Go down the wrong tube into the lungs where causes bacterial pneumonia? He felt sharp abdominal pains and went to the hospital where a cat scan showed fluid in his lungs just hours later his heart gave out any passed away although he was labelled as community acquired pneumonia and died and was found to be covert positive. The microscopic examination. This patient does not support the idea that he died of Gobert so there was no damage instead. They found food particles and bacterial infection in the airway clear signs of aspirational pneumonia. So case to died with cove in nineteen but he did not die of covert nineteen. Which makes it very interesting because it brings up the issue of. How often is this happening? How often are people who are PAS? Different went on a nasal swab dying of things other than Kobe. I put that question to Desert Marshall whom we heard from earlier. I'm the director of autopsy after De Services at the University of Washington Medical Center since early. March Marshall has performed more than a dozen autopsies of people who died after testing positive for corona virus infection. She says the results of those autopsies have been submitted to a Medical Journal for publication but are still undergoing peer review. Marshall says that the risk of infection that this fires poses has changed how they perform all autopsies regardless of whether the person was suspected to have covert nineteen. Or not so. We've actually started to swab all of our students and get those results before will perform an autopsy in our facility. That isn't the negative pressure sweet so his Marshall also found that like case to in Oklahoma some patients are dying of something else but turning out to have corona virus infection as well we have not. We have not had any unexpected positive results yet. It's still a limited number but of the probably fifteen that we've done. We have not had a positive comeback where we weren't expecting it. And what about the finding from case one in Oklahoma here in Washington are most of the Kobe? Nineteen patients dying from more or less standard AIDS or the autopsies revealing evidence of the virus infecting and damaging other organs as well hearing concerns of the clinicians and folks on the front lines there's the virus infecting the heart or is it just kind of secondary affects related to the critical illness. Is there excess? Clotting related to this disease. Different things like that. It looks like it's helping us to see that Cova did is actually causing typical acute respiratory distress syndrome. Initially there were thoughts that it was behaving a bit differently. But I think as we get more numbers of people and there's less of the individual variability the vast majority of these cases are showing the typical pathologic features of acute respiratory distress and Which we call a diffuse Alveoli damage. Pathology it does look like it. Is that phenomenon and there's not something Speaking out pathologically. That's different in a way that will inform them that you know. They should probably continue to use. The evidence based tried and true therapies for areas in particular marshal says. They aren't seeing an unusual number of small blockages and blood vessels. That would require treatment beyond the usual blood thinners such as Heparin nor has her group or other. She has heard from around. The country found the corona virus causing serious heart infections in the autopsies. They

Kobe Respiratory Distress Influenza Oklahoma Marshall Cleveland Clinic University Of Washington Sars Sanjay Mukhopadhyay Aids New York City Director Cova United States Pneumonia Gibbs
"sanjay" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:59 min | 7 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"We're going to have to <Speech_Male> run but I want to ask you <Speech_Male> before we go. <Speech_Male> Sanjay <Speech_Male> you talk about your frustrations. <Speech_Male> With how <Speech_Male> the policymakers <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> handle some <Speech_Male> of these sort <Speech_Male> of existential <Speech_Male> challenges. <Speech_Male> That we face. <Speech_Male> I know that <Speech_Male> you kind of plated <Speech_Male> becoming surgeon. <Speech_Male> General in <Speech_Male> two thousand and nine. <Speech_Male> Your <Speech_Male> brother ran for Congress <Speech_Male> in this last <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> year. You served <Speech_Male> in the White House <Speech_Male> you worked with <Speech_Male> Hillary Clinton on <Speech_Male> this healthcare <Speech_Male> issue. Not <Speech_Male> that you need more to <Speech_Male> do but <Speech_Male> do you ever <Speech_Male> think maybe <Speech_Male> I should try my hand <Speech_Male> at being <Speech_Male> inside <Speech_Male> influencing <Speech_Male> these decisions <Speech_Male> on a macro level <Speech_Male> rather than just commenting <Speech_Male> on them from <Speech_Male> my platform <SpeakerChange> at <Speech_Male> CNN. <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> absolutely <Speech_Male> For sure <Speech_Male> I mean I. There's a <Speech_Male> frustration as a journalist. <Speech_Male> And I've <Speech_Male> always been curious about <Speech_Male> your life because <Speech_Male> you've done both <Speech_Male> at very very <Speech_Male> high levels. <hes> <Speech_Male> obviously <Speech_Male> <hes> if there's a frustration <Speech_Male> of journalists <Speech_Male> is that you know. I think <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> we are such students <Speech_Male> and we dig so <Speech_Male> deep into things <Speech_Male> and and you <Speech_Male> know ninety nine <Speech_Male> percent of what I learned about <Speech_Male> a topic and never <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> makes it on air <Speech_Male> and I <Speech_Male> get to define <Speech_Male> problems but not <Speech_Male> really to execute <Speech_Male> solutions. <Speech_Male> That that's frustrating. <Speech_Male> I think for someone <Speech_Male> like me and maybe <Speech_Male> for a lot of other people as <Speech_Male> well I <Speech_Male> would i. <Speech_Male> I really <Speech_Male> enjoyed <Speech_Male> my time doing <Speech_Male> public service. <Speech_Male> I think the only <Speech_Male> reason <Speech_Male> that I didn't take the job <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> you know your your <Speech_Male> your boss <Speech_Male> was so kind to <Speech_Male> to offer. It was was <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> I didn't realize that it <Speech_Male> would no longer be able to practice <Speech_Male> surgery <Speech_Male> as surgeon general <Speech_Male> which. I found. Ironic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> know. I guess it's just you know <Speech_Male> I understand. Only <Speech_Male> generals is the job. <Speech_Male> You want to be committed to but <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> was. I really like <Speech_Male> practicing surgery <Speech_Male> if I left for four <Speech_Male> eight years. I'd probably <Speech_Male> have to train again <Speech_Male> and you know I just didn't <Speech_Male> seem like it. Was <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> the right life decision <Speech_Male> but I <Speech_Male> think that I would <Speech_Male> absolutely love <Speech_Male> to be in a position. <Speech_Male> I don't know that it would be <Speech_Male> electoral politics. <Speech_Male> But just in a position <Speech_Male> where <Speech_Male> I could <Speech_Male> I could <Speech_Male> have a voice that <Speech_Male> people <hes> <Speech_Male> would would <Speech_Male> would value away. That <Speech_Male> would actually lead to solutions. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> know because <Speech_Male> their solutions here <Speech_Male> I. <Speech_Male> I know that my right <Speech_Male> eye. I dream about <Speech_Male> them. I think about <Speech_Male> them all the time. <Speech_Male> I call my friends. <Speech_Male> Who are who are smarter <Speech_Male> than I am about <Speech_Male> these topics and say hey. <Speech_Male> Let me run this <Speech_Male> by you. Call me crazy. <Speech_Male> Talk me off a <Speech_Male> cliff. Where am I right here? <Speech_Male> You know and and <Speech_Male> that's what I'm constantly <Speech_Male> doing to be <Speech_Male> able to translate that <Speech_Male> into some some real <Speech_Male> action <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and what we <Speech_Male> hear for otherwise <Speech_Male> listened brother. <Speech_Male> I would like nothing <Speech_Male> better than to see <Speech_Male> you in a position to do <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> I think the country <Speech_Male> would benefit from <Speech_Male> it. But we're certainly <Speech_Male> benefiting from <Speech_Male> Your Voice <Speech_Male> Right now <Speech_Male> I've said it behind your <Speech_Male> back. I will say <Speech_Male> it to your face <Speech_Male> your national treasure. <Speech_Male> I'm so <Speech_Male> comforted <Speech_Male> to know <Speech_Male> that you're on the job <Speech_Male> here and <Speech_Male> I think I speak for <Speech_Male> a lot of Americans <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> Sanjay Gupta <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> always good <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be with you. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you for being with us. <Speech_Music_Male> An an honor for me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> David. Thank <SpeakerChange>

Sanjay Gupta Congress Hillary Clinton White House CNN.
"sanjay" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

14:44 min | 7 months ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"What a cool dude. Have you ever met a Monica? I want to? I've met him and he is lovely presented with he and his brother somewhere in the country music awards or something. Fantastic guy now so that means. I'm lucky enough to be zero degrees away from Kevin. Okay Kevin Bacon has a new podcast. It's a fictional comedy podcasts. From spotify an funnier dad called the last degree of Kevin Bacon. The premise of the show is that thirty six years ago. A guy named Randy. Best Low narrowly lost the starring role in footloose to Kevin Bacon and has been obsessed with him ever since so randy has finally hit his breaking point and vows to go to La kill his enemy and replace him in the universe. But things don't go quite as planned. Because what exactly do you do? When you're mortal enemy just wants to be his best friend. Last degree of Kevin Bacon Stars Kevin Bacon care. Sedgwick is also in it. Matt Walsh from Veep Plays Randy bedlow Lamar Morris Stars in the show as well and it features. Rob Reiner. Emily Chanel. Rhea Perlman Natalie Morales McCullough walk INS and Terry Gross. This is going to be hilarious. The last degree of Kevin Bacon is a spotify original podcast. And you can listen to it for free. Olen spotify one other question you have. I know you had you had a phone about food workers. We're going to get into some more practical and then I have one again. One last. Really provocative question. Yeah I have a just a selfish one. Well not selfish. I guess but we also want to keep the economy up as much as we possibly can. I WANNA be ordering food and I know everyone's saying you can do take out and delivery but there's a part of me that's like can you do take out and delivery because it's passing from hand to hand. Can it go on your food and then you eat it like all of this? Yeah well I'll tell you first of all we are as a family ordering takeout food. A fair amount okay. It was good enough for Sunjay. It's good enough for us. Yeah Yeah I mean I you know and and we went through the decision Matrix on this and sort of figured it out for ourselves. And and here's what made sense to me was first of all. I was really busy. I mean all the kids are at home right. They're not in school. So just pragmatically speaking and I'm working all the time so just from life decisions I'm trying to take pressure off of her and you know ordering takeout is helpful in that regard but what we decided to do was everything's done on your phone absolutely pay for it through that and personal usually leave it at the front porch or or wherever so you know you keep still the physical distance from anybody. We'll pick it up over there and usually leave the outer bags. Things that are most recently touched on the porch. Bring the containers into the House and the if it touches the counter you know. We're very careful about wiping counters down. And then obviously washing our hands. After we've touched all these things he keep in mind you touch something like that Surface that may be contaminated. And then you touch your eyes your nose your mouth. That's the concern here. He Wash your hands right after you touch those surfaces you can obviate that concern right. It's not transmitted in the food. Okay food borne virus. There are foodborne viruses. And they give you sort of stuff but this is a respiratory virus so You know if the good place that you order from that's hygenic otherwise your food should be fine. Just follow some basic precautions and you know. Look we're doing it as well. I think a lot of people are doing it in part to make things easier for us in the same reason you are Monica. We want to continue to support all the local restaurants and the people that are in our neighborhood sometimes order food for other people in our neighborhood my wife when our grocery shopping the other day we do have a lady who's older that lives down. The street called her up. Get you a few things from the grocery store so she doesn't have to go really appreciated it. So you know those kinds of things but again just being careful in terms of knowing how the virus is transmitted and trying to reduce those potential exposures was our biggest failure. This the fact that we didn't have tests and we weren't quick to go. Yeah let's get the test. Was that probably our biggest initial failure. Yeah Yeah I think that was the biggest initial failure really important because then you can have is on this as the CDC says they like these hunting metaphors we need is on this thing. It was interesting but I'll tell you what though what is concerned me. A little bit though is that that is become the metric of success now testing right and I think it's a little bit missing the point because we also knew when you look at some of those models again. Federal government models That they have access to that. We knew we were going to need a certain number of hospital bets that we're going to need a certain number of ICU. Beds a certain number of breathing machines. We knew this and when they bought time for us in China by instituting the largest quarantine in human history. I think it was the largest in recorded human history. And even you know what the president did bring that plane back from. Wuhan one hundred ninety five passengers and quarantining them here in the United States. That was a significant move. It did slow things down what he did and even in this country we hadn't had quarantine since smallpox sixty years ago so they were really really important. Strategic things that were done by the Chinese government and also by us to bias. Time wasn't saying. Hey we stopped this thing. Yeah never was. We knew we couldn't stop it but the buying of time should have allowed US over six weeks to months. Whatever it was to make sure we could have the capacity to handle the surge of patients that everyone knows is going to be coming. That's also for me. I think as Dr Probably even bigger failure because now you're dealing situation where we're healthcare workers don't have their personal protective equipment that could have been addressed. We may have patients who don't have breathing machines when they need them. That could have been addressed. Icu BEDS I mean. All these things could have been addressed. You have big public spaces. Where guys are in Southern California? That could have started to be retrofitted and modeled to be able to provide some surge capacity. That could have been done but we didn't do it. And of that's human nature we. I mean we don't most humans don't like to act until something is literally slapping us in the face. I mean with regard to our personal health or with regard to some big public health issue. Like this we kind of like to close our eyes. Pretend it doesn't exist and if we ignore it won't affect us but you know that's not the case here and so I think that I don't even WanNa use the word failure You know you can't disentangle anything from politics nowadays but the reality is we didn't act and we could have now. I think that was a mistake. Also very sympathetic to the role they have. Which is they have to try to prevent panic so I am sympathetic to this thing. They're juggling which is they. Don't want mass panic. You saw people hoary hoarding toilet paper which was so beyond me because these people have our hop in there and clean your but I don't know I mean of all the things you you can't there's a workaround for that but okay so my my my provocative question is this. I can see someone saying look. Everyone's going to get it. X amount of people are going to die that's tragic but why at on the huge economic apocalypse that will have its own deadly implications. Wouldn't it be better to just go about business as usual except the reality without adding a recession? I think it's a good question but I will tell you though that it is one of these things were when you look at what will happen. You GotTa game this out a little bit and you have to understand. The first of all people can get really sick from this. Even if they don't die we've been looking at this in just binary terms you know lived or died. That's too simplistic here. You can get really sick and it can affect you can affect your life and your function of your life later on but the other thing when you look at these mortality rates and you say okay in who bay province China. The mortality rate was around two point three two point four percent outside of that province mortality rates in China. Were actually underneath a percent point. Six point seven. So why is that right? Same virus why did it kill so many more people in who bay versus outside who bay and the answer really has to do with the fact that it strained the medical system There are a lot of people there who could have been saved the died because they didn't have enough medical capacity in the initial stages of this. Same thing's happening Italy right now. I mean every day again. The numbers change but the case fatality rate. There is five six percent so much higher. The virus didn't become suddenly that much deadlier. It's these strain on the medical system. What a great point. Even I have been trying to frame this in. How deadly is this virus? But you're right. It's in a context of how good is the medical system at treating the virus yes not an objective number that is standalone. It's in a context of a medical system. Yeah I mean. Let me give you this description. I been a lot of reading. And what this virus actually to the body and this is relevant to what we're talking about. But what does this virus due to the body okay? So virus gets into your body. It infects a cell. It uses that sells machinery to start replicating dividing and making more and more copies of itself. Ultimately it can overwhelm your body's immune system you can't fight anymore. Starts to cause organ failure all these sorts of things right. That's what you typically think of with an infection and that probably happens to some extent here as well but what I find fascinating. Is that this virus in particular also affects a particular enzyme in the lungs. That's responsible for the making of something known as surfactant. Okay so here's what I want you to think about. Surfactant your lungs you think about your lungs as these big squishy sponges contract and they expand. That's how you you breathe. You push carbon dioxide. You've taken oxygen. That's that's what's happening but you know like a dry sponge a sponge. It's been sitting out and dry. It's really hard right to the elasticity is Kinda get Sealaska. Cities gone no matter. How hard you just. It's a dry thing. What makes it become pliable again. Put a little detergent on it right now. All of a sudden it's nice and easy to squish again. Surfactant is the detergent. And what this virus is doing is taking away your surfactant turning your lungs into these hard sort of difficult to contract. Oregon's now now that's a really challenging problem to treat but it is treatable okay so if I had a patient like that there are strategies that we could use it. I know very confident. I mean not. Everybody obviously very confident that we could keep the patient alive. We could use high function ventilators. We could use something called ECM. Oh extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. They're great strategies. We have to try and keep a patient like that alive. My point is this that the viruses is a deadly virus but if we were running full throttle and I had everything at my disposal for every patient that came in. I think we could lower the fatality rate tremendously because it's really a reflection of whether or not these patients can get medical care the viruses bad. I mean I'm not I don't want to minimize that part of it. But the reason these fatality rates are so high is because of the strain on the medical system and we think you know in the United States. That couldn't you know that can't happen here but maybe it is happening here. Maybe that is why you know governor newsome is really worried that twenty five million people get this thing within the next eight weeks in California. That's going to be a problem. That's why Governor Cuomo essentially created the efforts that he did the pause New York efforts that he did today where he's saying only essential people need to be outside..

Kevin Bacon spotify Randy bedlow Lamar Morris United States China Monica Rob Reiner Sedgwick La Rhea Perlman Natalie Morales Matt Walsh Terry Gross Oregon Emily Chanel Sunjay president ICU Southern California
"sanjay" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Can what can you do for divorce because Sanjay on facebook.

Sanjay facebook
"sanjay" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"Like. What's this film because reasons be. I that that I've I've actually never been asked that question. I mean I would I would. I made the film as just a personal quest to understand what people could actually really get out of running. I saw people returning to the thirty one hundred mile race year after year after year. I wanted to know why like why were they getting take out of running than I was. I why were they enjoying this thing that looked to me as as brutal slightly skew like why would they smiling when they did it and you know. I had to go to these cultures around the world to get the answer that you know running his deep Komo most effective and simple way to make spiritual progress. If you look at running that way I mean people look at running for a number of things you can. You can run to get better body. You could run to like lower your blood pressure your and whatever your goal is running. Chances are you'll get that but I never looked at running as a spiritual practice and I realized that that wasn't outlandish and that if I learned to look at each day's he's run performance related or workout related or not as a pilgrimage and I learned what that actually meant to be conscious step by step of on my breath and try to find joy in those moments rather than just what the results even of a workout much less a race then I get get something out of running that I never really got before. Can you define. Can you define for us what you mean by like a spiritual purpose because you know they'll be people listening. Go what do you what do you mean. No you talking about. you know a Buddhist this philosophies are you talking about connecting with a god or gods. I talking about finding your own in a pacing Jason contentment when you define spirituality. What do you mean I even hate using the word spirituality. I have no other no other word but just imagine a recent run where you felt a moment don't of either deep emotion deep peace a real sense of fulfillment or a real sense ends of like identification just like the runner's high imagine your last runner's high and what a beautiful moment that was and then like. I was was told that that those types of blissful moments could be the reality of every moment in my run and rather than it just being for me in the past like a great feeling after a race or a great feeling after you know a great workout or a long run or a run in a beautiful place like how do I achieve that feeling no matter what I'm doing in Iran that that to me made running completely lately different in terms of possibilities and then so the question was like how do I do that and what I got from the characters in the movie. Was that that number one you have to be more conscious of the moments you know you have to unplug from your ideas of of your goals you have to unplug in in some cases from your iphones and and your music and you have to really understand the power and the emotion that's in your breath and that's not something that can really be explained. It's something that you practice I when you run. Can you listen to the rhythm of your feet on mother Earth. Can you really feel like you're breathing in the heavens breathing in the sky and I found that that simple simple exercise and kind of coming back to that state unlocked a lot more of that runner's high in a lot more of the mundane moments of runs than I expected possible and do you feel like you can so we hear that we with with meditation for example the you know the more you meditate the more you can meditate. You know so like you become in this sense. It's almost just like you learn. The process in running is has that been a similar experience for you find that you can attune to do those connections more readily when you through focusing on them when you're actually at running. That's that's a great way to put it and I've I've actually meditated since I was eighteen nineteen years old and for about twenty five years now and a lot of the experiences people talk about in Meditation Tation unless you've experienced them their foreign so someone will say you'd like you can achieve universal bliss. I mean that'd be great. They have no idea what that is but as runners we've we've all experienced moments regardless of the way we framed rein them. We've all we've all experienced moments of transcendence where we've really felt joy from having exceeded our capacities and some way or another either through running longer than we have running more time running faster or a combination and so the the question that was put to me in the making of this film was do you believe that that can be the baseline for your runs and if so can you imagine how much more running will bring to your life and traditional running cultures have thousand different sayings and again the one that sticks in my mind from the. Hopi culture is to find joy through exertion. I have I ever done that have ever enjoyed a race. Have I ever enjoyed a hard run. Not Not really I mean I'm looking at my watch. It more grunting through. It's more of a joy of your happy when you've done it but can that's. That's very valid but can you find joy in that process extreme exertion and so the traditional bunny cultures have given us dozens of exercises that we can use to totally expand our experience of running and it's the most natural the thing I've seen and I think it's a goal we as Western runners can all inspired to see I i. I think I would say I I I strive to do that and I do get enjoyment through endurance not like I don't mean I do. I enjoy it when it's enjoyed the uncomfortableness. Does that make sense it. Does I find though that for a lot of us we run away from that we run away and many aspects of our life from discomfort and although running helps us go beyond stages pages of discomfort no matter how many times somebody tells me like in running you only make progress through discomfort you know. I I I. I still don't relish the feeling I know it's GonNa come. I notes GonNa come in a race. I know it's going to come in a workout but you're a rare being being. I think in in that you anticipate and you aspire to those those types of experiences well. You'd be perfect the thirty one hundred no. I think my co host Tom. Because he loves the you know the the kind of repetitive nature of of doing the same thing so ran ran around whereas if you said Okay and I think it's a distance like is it a similar distance from Los Angeles to New York City so if I if you said right run from the sands eastern city and it was point to point and more process of journey in in a physical sense as well then I'd be like yeah I can get my head around that yeah but round around the block for half a mile then I understand the difference but here here you go and I think this is this is great fodder for the brutal lists in your audience from people. I know that have run across the US. You know after a few days you want to go to the bathroom. When you need to go to the bathroom you want food. You don't WanNa have to like when you finish your day drive forty miles to a hotel or campsite website and then drive back to your point to start the next morning you just WanNa run and you don't WanNa think and he don't WanNa be like worried about being clipped by a car mirror running on the side of a road or highway and you know it's like for the moments of beauty and the idea of running from point point to point you might have to endure seven hundred miles of a headwind rolling hills and just unpredictable stuff stuff that in a multiday race whether it's thirty one hundred or a six day you're on a one mile or selling it to me Sanjay. I'm not I'm not trying to people in in in your in your audience. That'll yeah I get it and it's like when you've got a blister. You don't one five miles on RV. You WanNa stop you. WanNa change your shoes. You want to have all those things and ten thousand calories a day in like that's another incredible feat and also I wonder how much of the way you do the same root over and over again the distractions don't become distractions. Does that make sense. I guess after you do it time and time again so so you're truly able to engage with the purpose of you being there which is to not be distracted by all of those things was that so there there's a there there was a great ultra runner from Israel Kobi Orrin who did the thirty one hundred in two thousand seventeen I believe and he was it was his first time and he was neck and neck with this Russian fellow Vasso Doozy Vasu Doozy Basu had completed the race. I think six times at that point and Kobe was racing for the first thousand miles and Kobe kind of had the realization that if he continued with that racing mentality where you count your laps you'd think about your splits you know first of all he wasn't sure if he'd be able to make it to the end of the race but the secondly he can you that he wouldn't be in a frame of mind to actually enjoy any aspect of the race because he's such an incredibly intense guy. It's like the focus that you might you and I might need to finish twenty six miles or one hundred miles. He was gonNA keep he was ready and willing and able to keep that focus through fifty two days but then he came to the realization realization that in order to actually really complete the distance and allow the race to give him an experience he needed to look at it as a pilgrimage and to him that meant stop stopping a worrying about the laps and the times and the splits and really looking at every aspect of that race ace as a ritual from tieing shoes to taking the aid to the interactions with people on the course and that from what I see what the other runners that takes away the monotony in that mental shift and finding a way for the race not to be suffer fest or tortuous that that shift and Mental State actually makes it enjoyable to the people doing it. I mean dare. I say it doesn't seem like it would ever be enjoyable but it is well well. If listening to Sanjay's inspired you to check in.

Meditation Tation Komo Doozy Basu Sanjay Kobe tieing Jason Iran US Kobi Orrin Los Angeles Israel Tom New York City eighteen nineteen years ten thousand calories twenty five years fifty two days
"sanjay" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"This. Week's marathon talk interview. We're joined by Sanjay. Sanjay is a filmmaker in the USA his first feature film with food chains and actually it was a failed all about farm workers in the US. I think tell us a little bit more by that particular tomato farm workers but his latest film is called three thousand one one hundred run and become an it's an incredible story of the South Transcendence three thousand one hundred mile race which takes place in Queens in New York City each summer and both wonderfully and weirdly. It's held around a appoint five six mile circuit and takes a bat fifty nine days and fifty nine miles a day and fifty two consecutive days to complete that three thousand one hundred miles around and around the block so sanjay welcome to marathon took. I'm I'm thrilled to be here. Thank you very much for having me on your show. So can I ask you a question. Iran around background like your first film in Two thousand awesome fourteen. How do you go from food chains to running. That's a great question. I got into documentary filmmaking a little late in my career I worked as a humanitarian consulted on human rights consultant for about fifteen or twenty years and spent time at about forty or fifty countries and just got really good at I guess documenting stuff that I was seeing and often times I was in conflict zones in places where there weren't other photographers I journalists and so I just started making things that had a personal connection to me my first film food chains which was produced by Eva Longoria and narrated by Forest Whitaker Kerr was about farm workers in southern Florida that rose up against some of the largest agricultural giants in the World Walmart and McDonalds places says that Bhai zillions of pounds of tomatoes each year but but my father was in the tomato industry and so that film was very very personal to me but my second film thirty one hundred run become which is available in in in the UK on Amazon itunes and we'll actually going to rush. You're GONNA be doing a theatrical run later in twenty nine hundred. Let's make sure we post links to that. That would be very kind of you. I was a track runner in in high school and in college and I moved to New York City in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven coincidentally in the same neighborhood that the self transcendence thirty thirty one hundred mile race is held in and I moved to that neighborhood the same year as the race was launched and it frightened the living daylights daylights out because I ran four hundred and eight hundred and was forced to do the mile and I hated running for laps around the track. It was just the most boring thing thing in the world and so two people spending all summer running loops around virtually half mile one kilometer circuit it it scared the living daylights daylights out of me but we see people doing ultra running you know and more and more personal challenges now all the time and one one of the things that we talk about on the show quite extensively is what is it that attracts people to do. You know the longer the further the harder hard more difficult. What do you think attracts people to do event like that one. So this is the heart part of the movie. It would have been the most boring movie in the world. If we just film People WanNa Block and we didn't interview experts or doctors or naysayers are journalists. We tried to make a case visually of why this race ultra running is the most natural thing in the world and to do that. We got dare. I say pretty much unprecedented access to to spend time in film with the marathon monks in Japan uh-huh with the Bushmen in Kalahari and with southwestern native Americans the Navajo who spiritually and culturally connected to the Tarahumara natives natives that people know about from born to run and our Navajo main character is a race director and champion Ultra marathoner but this is and how he frames running and this changed the way. I looked at running. He said running is a celebration of life running a teacher but runnings also a prayer when and we run our feet are praying to mother earth were breeding in. Father Sky were asking them and we're showing them that we're willing to work for their blessings and that's why we run Rina what spending time with the Kalahari Bushman it was clear to me that running was mankind and a woman kinds first first religion people say from the anthropological ethnological standpoint that our advantage on the Savannah was that we were bipedal so that we could breathe without having to couple breathing with our gate like a quadrupeds and the Bushman say that's nonsense. The bushmen say we didn't and become who we are because of some genetic you know superiority to other primates we became who we are because we had the yearning for consciousness and we ran to experience consciousness and they say we didn't run to catch animals. We ran to pray for for the power to catch animals that that refer friend with the way I looked at running because I through so many people's eyes running is is not is not a bad that they don't pass step is sections. That running isn't about that. You know certainly for me. When I first started routed running my my running had very strong performance lens but now it doesn't you know the Lens with which I run one is very much one that connects me with my environment. You know the I connect socially with friends bill community I'M A my door in in in space which makes me feel my Co.. Host will giggle at me. Echoes me a tree hugger for this you know but I like to feel at one with the space I'm running in and that very much some of what you've just said so had a how does running like fifty sixty miles a day around the block in New York like equate to that discovery almost of what you're referring to that spirit to -ality in that relationship between running and transcendent. How do you get that when you go round and round and round and round block well house. I I think that first of all running and transcendence is is something that you you learn through culture. the the Hopi natives natives native Americans in central Arizona they say find joy through exertion and it shows that that racing thing that running hard can be a real process of self discovery and that you shouldn't decouple effort with a feeling of inner peace and and when I ran with Sean Martin and our Nabo character I realized that as soon as he left his door he was open to the idea of his morning run being transformative experienced he ran performance but he also knew that if he had the right attitude running were transformed his life so that that's a the frame of saying saying that you know when people do multiday running in for your savvy audience people know that that's you know twenty four forty eight seventy two six day ten day and beyond in my own experience personally running from spending time but thirty one hundred mile runners. I liken it to the experience that people have when they're fasting where the first couple of days might be torture but then this genetic evolutionary physiological process that's in the body starts starts finding other ways to harness energy right call that Kito six now and I've seen with multiday races when you get past three four four five days after the body has acclimatized the pounding to the number of calories to the the heat in some cases. The body enters turns into a different state. You're not in a high aerobic thresholds. You're not killing your your heart and and your your organs but you enter into to a state where the mind shuts off and it's not about mind over matter. It's not about a suffer fest. You know you're not pushing it to the same degree the as you would be in the last six hours of one hundred miler for example you actually enter into a state where the mind is shut off and you begin to get in contact contact with very very deep parts of your being that you might get into contact for a second or two or a couple of minutes in a daily run but that feeling of bliss this becomes the norm. That's why people do the thirty one hundred in after they get through the first six or seven days all of a sudden the pain fades away a and they're in a realm. That's very very very hard to reach in day to day life. Do you think it's because for many people you know there's like the fields lie and I want to talk a little bit about the marathon monks that you mentioned but that feels both something quite meditative. Tiv- about this but also quite daunting that you think hang on a second really so in order the to reach that state you know that state of mind Is it essential that Iran thirty one hundred miles. You know in order to do that. Do you really need to be monk like about your running to achieve that state or is that AH necessary discipline in practice in order to truly find that state so people will have to you see the movie to really kind of get a sense of what this all means because we try to do it through through visuals through stories through combining finding these stories in such a way where it's all evident and it's not about you know like science or or even religion but but to answer your question. You know how many of us in our day to day training are actually running to be better. People look don't say I would say lows of people well I. I could say that you know you take that and you ask what you're doing moment by moment are we listening to music. Are we tuning out. Are we already thinking about what we're GonNa do after our workout are we obsessively looking at our watches is and generally most of us. I would say fall into that trap from time to time and racing and obviously you as as as a high performing athlete when you race. You actually have to simulate race day in your training. You can't just poor performance out of thin air. You have to get into that mindset understand that mindset and so when you're looking at trying to achieve something like a thirty one hundred mile race in much of that training is understanding understanding in the moments of your runs what our problems what aren't harness deeper parts like the spiritual hearts you know how to find real joy like if use of joy in the Mundane Act of taking step after step after step and so to your question the act of doing thirty one hundred isn't necessarily a proving ground most people kind of achieve the state of mind and the build up to thirty thirty one hundred because you can't tell the line a expecting a miracle to happen it already. It has to be just like any other race. You have to know what to expect. You know we'll have to know you have to know the challenges but more importantly you have to know the parts of your being that you have to access to go beyond the the the turmoil that that you might experience and do you think that it's possible to know those parts of your being before you start or that you discover discover them once you're going. It's a bit of both but you definitely have to know that part of your being you know most of the people that come to do the race ace have either a tremendous amount of experience in doing six day races ten-day racist thousand mile races or they they have like deeply contemporary practices and most have both so. It's it's not just that. This is a spiritual journey. I mean the thirty one hundred mile race is a race and it requires people understanding how to push their bodies past the limits. It's that people say. We have what it feels like to run. Five hundred six hundred a thousand miles you know what the issues that might come up are and how to minimize the impact of those issues on your performance. Can you give us some examples of those like so what what are some of the stories of the participants that the people that go through that process. It's a love the fact that it starts with a one minute meditation tation and then fifty two days later so I'll combine a couple of things we filmed with the with the marathon monks of mount he I am tired of Kyoto Japan and we were in almost pretty much the final year of aspirins journey to.

New York City Sanjay Iran USA bushmen Queens race director Kalahari Bushman Eva Longoria Japan Florida UK Walmart Kalahari Kito New York Father Sky Whitaker Kerr
"sanjay" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

13:48 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"But aid is sitting on a tree. He's incredibly tad some tastic tastic time line in his very smooth show hosts. You're not supposed to laugh supposed to love exposed to be good tell you I'm looking at here. We go okay. He's weighs twenty six t black t-shirt and he's always have bags by the side of him and yeah I just love it is a lovely photo and I just think he needs to bicials your next black. As a hundred on the Graham is is crystal. Palace National Sports Center says Great Day at the Southern Rhode Relays at the crumbling crystal the Palestinians and the water's Shame Crystal Palace's in the state that it is and I must admit a David Blackman it stunning to see you there the road relate on the track but you we do need a new marathon tool teasha that t shirt is on its way I it is. I'm going to give a shout out to Allen Pre but three unexpected seven from around port at Dubrovnik with ship in background and that he is shit is I have no idea how it goes onto that bridge it seems to it looks like it's been superimposed and yet he does slightly sweating in his blue blue arson. Talk Panicky Right. It's time to write you only need to do for Iran is public twitter about recent run. Give Him our cat ten. Use the Hashtag Rate Your Ron tag us at math and talk and we will know look way be running and how it's been going saying. I am a loving only Cockburn. Who says what a weekend hundred kilometers done at the equinox twenty four support from clubmates at multiple runners makes this a ten of ten? Olsen hundred K. didn't give a shout out to our very own Andy Andrews from allowed to say she's nine ten because she don't have fast continuous twenty minute run since I cough injury which was quite a while ago so taught mocks walks for Dana yelling and getting stringency when I finished one point loss facilities lack of sickness and yeah 'cause they're out. There may not may in Minorca doing some holiday holiday. Wow looking okay Let's keep going fifty. K. Says at the withy took me today day little warmer than comfortable water last five K. with the lady that had been throwing up a ten nice one. Terry out for the yelling will Taylor I. I'm trying the yelling classic six point three minutes of Ninety Second Session at lunchtime nice line in the sand for next time. There's a tiny bit more in the tank to wring out. I think nine out of ten in the cheesy little smile and finally this week Fiona Smith really struggled minus two after the need giving up after a very slow start six at ten to having a strong word myself and then listening to eighty s power ballads plus to eat the twix because it kept me going Hashtag right. You're well done fee owner Smith. Why should we talk about Elliott. Lieke show gay because I don't this is coincidence or just if it easy to beautiful coincidence or they're done purposefully. He selected faulty not too pacemakers two in a bid to break the two hour marathon of course his party India's one fifty nine challenge world record holder and Olympic marathon champion Elliott Kit Yoga with total forty two pacemakers as he seeks to run the marathon and the a two hours it taking place I think twelfth and Thirteenth possibly thirteenth October in Vienna in Austria a half the pacemakers tasked with kick show gay at live and train in Kenya all have roots from the country one of them Marius absurdum. Just one just ran two. Oh four Levin when he won the Rotterdam Marathon. I hope they picked forty two kilometers because it's one on per-kilometre and then he can be the last on his own which seems a bit crazy. 'cause we need it but it won't be that of course yeah. There's no yeah yeah I always ask because I'm saying that. Is there any explanation as to why it's not too and she won't game plan is on the other thing. Actually you just said about the day I didn't. That was the day of the shooting. Presumably we're going to be weather dependent and not going to do it if the weather is appalling something presumably that flexible I mean they are. There's a I think there's a window across those two weeks. I okay so if it's not right that we can then they can push it. Ah Push it forward to to the next weekend Incheon to see I'm interested to see the formations and yeah what's happening when they're out there in in Vienna. It's going to be an exciting. He's look at and I don't think he put himself on the line if everything was not in place for him to have a really good go hit yeah. It'd be exciting. Evolving terrier is a Berlin yes. I am reading about this. yesterday AAC so I'm Cheri athletics come Friday from Eldoret that she will pass off the chance to compete in what would have been her sick. Marathan Sushi Will Not League essentially department used as jam ups seek medical advice injury it is I love. This town is frustrating. After law training injury flared up again. It's been my waterloo throughout my my year and with my vast age I need to take time to heal a not running imbalance. Jerry said my say foster age old is she but she's actually sticks but I recipes that Voss desert if you've been six marathons but they talks about the minister yeah I found this actually yeah looking up some some interesting news and Dan and I saw that there was a it. It was act on instagram. She put it on Tina Casta. I hadn't realized that she was going to classic. Star majors metal in Berlin weekend and the the American marathon record holder Dino's excited training last six Abbott will make American metal at the Berlin marathon way because two weeks ago xylenes campaign field trip to Asia tripped up by a dog while she's running around the lake and Catherine Training on it and and she just got more and more pain and then she went to see the physio and then had an x-ray which revealed a fracture so she's really got it. Blah saying they more at she in post. I didn't realize it is that she's a real advocate of like positive thinking. She doesn't love positive mental visualization and stuff like that with her coach is enjoying the show you. You said she said sometimes you get close to go. You can taste it and yet in this moment. There is not a cell of self pity as practice posted to the air. It seemed seemed readily available when I need. It breaks my silver lining through all of this is. I guess I have something to chase for twenty twenty nine. You know really good sheepishly. The big thing is cast has been around a long time and I think she's probably got a reasonable sense of wisdom about the sport an particularly Olympic medalist in I think she's one Chicago and to maybe Monto nineteen yeah so I guess guess getting the the the six star about world math major medal at the Berlin would have been important but she is still be next year. I tell you what tripping over a dog whilst running the after have you ever chip desert palm your own usually probably do it on stopping for sniffer away a no but I have actually unfortunately ran into a cyclist on in Botham the canal they have lost bridges in Boston. It's quite dark and I was running onto that one day in the Gulf came the way and basically psych right into my front of my Shin and it was in quite a pain for the worst thing is I found out I actually knew her but she was also death so it was sort of both L. faults but Ashey was yeah. I take a couple of weeks because it's painful but no any dog incidents. I'd say yes she was fine. I'm very poetic. No see I felt hoping have any dog instance. I'm an we stopped to pet them usually the lead in it. That's the thing I wonder if tripped over the dog will lead and I think it was the league's yeah I if you're running with absent any doctors Allah but yeah I yeah I like. I like you're right about Dina. She's been doing this for a long time and putting much more relaxed about life however she still trading pretty hot. It's still a is still a bit of a pain. Isn't it but yeah. I'm sure she'd be like next year. Yeah I mean I don't even know how old she is now but good luck heavy at the well the world athletics championships kicks off in Doha aw shortly and on Friday the twenty seventh of September at twenty three fifty nine local time. What is that like ten o'clock. We'll go. UK Time should work that. I I'm not really sure the women's Samarra thin at the world championships in Doha with a little bit of conversation with Jillian Spence about this when we interviewed him but a midnight on day one so the World Champs kicks off on Friday the midnight about seventy women will be setting off under floodlit conditions additions on a loop course along the waterfront of though has Kuni switch connects Doha Bay in Doha City Center the temperature that this is what the main reason why that running the world marathon trump's at that time he's because it's expected the temperatures expected to have dropped robbed down below the predicted daytime range of thirty five degrees C and above so it's supposed to be a cooler but it's still going to be hard inch assumedly is going to be Dark Keno Wall. I've just it's just a cut to me. Actually I was there almost this as time in twenty ten that time of year because the ocean where they when they have the it was the holding Camphor the Commonwealth Games uh and we trained it basically doesn't change the temperature doesn't change is just dark so you don't have the some but it's it. It is horribly hall even in October that it is oh I hadn't even haven't eaten. I hadn't even seen this and it was going to be at that time so yeah. It's IT'S GONNA be tough. It's going to be really tough really tough. Rose to Lena from Kenya is back to defeat after defeat to defend her title She just wanted to favorites although say the WF will be worth watching watching all three of her teammates who have run super. Speedy Times really speed L. D. I think ruth to negate it has run to seventeen. O Eight budget cost.

Berlin Kenya Vienna Doha Fiona Smith Graham Palace National Sports Center Dubrovnik Rotterdam Marathon Southern Rhode Relays arson David Blackman twitter Andy Andrews Cockburn Minorca Elliott India Eldoret Iran
"sanjay" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"sanjay" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"So Sanjay one of the most important things for our audience is reading, and we're kind of curious what you would describe as the best investing book that you've ever read. And most importantly, what was it that you took away? What was the most important ideas that you took away from that reading failure isn't a book. Actually, it's something that is available for free. And you know, so set of irony that the best focal book odor is in my view, the letters of Warren Buffett, this is how I discovered idea of Ellen missing. And I always think that they're the best source of education for anybody who wants to learn anything about the world of business the world of investing the world of human behavior in corporate setup. There is no better place than to read those letters thoughtfully. I do have some suggestions about how to read those that as a lot of people read them in chronological order, which is fine. But I think it's much more interesting. If you were to, you know, can would have those letters in PD of documents and learn about a specific idea by searching for specific phrase, let's say back in how buffet thinking on buybacks has changed over the years, a profound lessons to be learned about this in in his earlier letters, for example, used to talk a lot about the importance of buybacks vaccine how badly can be created by buying back shares at a low valuation, how that's great capital allocation over the years, he has gradually mellowed down realize that it's zero sum game and how it's important to give the right signals to the market and let the partners who are trying who want to exit from the star have full information. So it's very fascinating. To learn about the idea of buybacks by just researching the context the term by back in the letters in the lettuce. Will not be at about a thousand pages. One trying to convey here is the idea that if you want to learn about by back school and download all the PDF's convert them into a single PDF search them by back without all the sections where buffer talked about by backs put them in a different document printed document, and then deep dive indoor and made notes, you will learn what about by maks or for that matter anything on dividends on executive compensation than than like fifty other things that you could research and learn about what Buffett or manga or anybody for that matter, the letters of Charlie Munger, I think feel important. So I think.

Warren Buffett Sanjay Charlie Munger executive Ellen
"sanjay" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"sanjay" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"I think every day they switch, they go counterclockwise one day clockwise the other day, but they have to do it. I don't remember the number of days that that the cutoff is. I think it's like fifty seven days or something like that. So they literally have to average about sixty miles a day to keep pace and get it done, which is insane. Yeah. Had you living in New York City at you ever heard of this race? I never heard of it. I had heard of it, but I think I just dismissed it as a pocketful like I couldn't believe that people actually did this, but it's been going on for decades. It's crazy. And so- Sanjay really goes behind the scenes of this race and and the people that participate in it. And then he goes off in the movie on these tangents where he explores other cultures that have historically used running as a method for expansion. We visit the Kalahari bushman and Africa. He goes to commune with the marathon monks of mount. He a in Japan ever heard of these people. No, I was crazy. It's in it's sect of Buddhism where they believe that enlightenment can be achieved through running. I don't wanna spoil it because the story that's Andrzej tells about this culture is totally amazing. I'm gonna have to start running more. It's pretty cool. I'm not running beard. Do that what you're wearing your odds. Right. I know, but it's hard. We'll go running together. I know I did that once with you and you're like, running up the hill. I'm like, come on k. we're gonna. We're going do it together. Any also visits the Navajos tried, which has a rich history and running as well, which I wasn't familiar with. So that's all pretty cool. So all of these cultures kind of the thesis of the movie is looking at this culture of running or these cultures where running his used as devotion where running is leverage. To as this vehicle to transcend to survive in running for enlightenment and running for.

Sanjay New York City Kalahari Japan Andrzej mount Africa fifty seven days one day
"sanjay" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"sanjay" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"See which special plans you qualify for. All right. Sanjay reward. What do I want to say about him? Well, I guess I would say up front Sanjay is an award winning documentary film director based in New York City. And before I get into his films, I think it's worth mentioning that he's got this really interesting background. This is a guy who graduated from Berkeley with a and molecular and cell biology and neurobiology. So he super smart. But instead of going into medicine or research like his parents would have would have preferred. He is going on this wild spiritual quest. You get super into meditation. He becomes a devote e of Shri Chinmoy Srichan Moyen do. Yeah. Actually had one of his books when I was younger, really at one of my friends gave it to me and I checked it out. What did it tell you? I don't two things. I remember one of them was you absorb all the principles of whatever you're eating and I remember was. The first time that I stopped eating eggs in meat for almost a week. Oh, you did? Yeah. How old were you? Twenty. Three. I'm look at where we're at. Right. It's interesting that you still remember that I, I remember that had an impact on the immediately. Yeah, it's cool. So so three Shenoy he since passed. But he was kind of this legendary grew in the Hindu tradition that lived in New York City, and there was something about him that really just captured sawn Jay's fascination. And he ends of moving to New York City to become a diva tea and professionally gets involved in human rights. Philanthropy, he ends up developing. I'm talking about song j. now developing projects in over forty nations, working with all kinds of people like luminaries heads of state, business leaders, celebrities, private equity funds, and they were all initiatives designed to make a measurable positive impact on the world. But then he flips the script. He turns the page and he becomes documentary filmmaker. And over the years, he's made a number of films including the ocean monk, a movie called challenging impossibility. That is about Shri Chinmoy. He made a movie called food chains. You might have seen and his newest film is called thirty one hundred run and become, and that's the focus of today's conversation. I met Sanjay through my friend, Tom, Scott, who you might remember from being on the podcast, he's the founder of the tuck it project, and Tom just thought that's on Jay, and I would hit it off and he sent me the trailer for this movie thirty one hundred running become and I loved it, and I knew right away before I even met Sanjay that or even seen the movie that that that he would make a great guests on the show. And I think my instincts were correct an intact because this really is an amazing conversation. We talk about Sanjay's incredible personal story I grew up in or was born, I should say Nigeria and living Colorado and Oakland, and and this search that he goes on to find his his own path and how that led him to meditation and spirituality and SRI Chinmoy. We talk about who that guy was, which is an amazing tale in its own right. And then we get in. To this movie thirty one hundred, which is a beautiful look, a beautiful journey into this nexus, this connection between running in its purest form and spiritual growth and intending that story. Sanjay explores a number of different subcultures, including the story behind all the personalities behind this crazy race called the SRI Shiwei self transcendence thirty one hundred which get this decay a thirty one hundred mile running race that takes place every summer in New York City where there was like about, I don't know somewhere between twelve and twenty every year show up to run circles around this one half mile loop in queens. It's basically just a very average city block around a high school in queens at the. Same distances running from New York to Los Angeles, right? So they just do it like they keep running in the circle..

Sanjay New York City Shri Chinmoy Srichan Moyen Shri Chinmoy Jay queens New York Berkeley director Tom Los Angeles founder Oakland Nigeria Colorado
"sanjay" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"sanjay" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Hey, everybody how you doing what's happening. This is rich role. I'm your host. This is my podcast, welcome or welcome back. Hope you guys are doing good. Got a great show for you guys today before we get into it. I wanted to say that the best in the easiest part of this whole podcast experience for me is having the conversations with guests. I love that comes very natural to me, but the hardest, the most awkward aspect of doing this is recording these intros. There's just something about me being by myself talking into a microphone that just feels natural. And I know that it comes off stiff and a little bit stilted. And so I thought it would mix things up today by doing something different today. I have a co host for the intros my man decay. David Kahn. Hello? How's it going? Man? It's good, highly. I like the way you do the intro, the show I don't. There's anything stiff. Any hills like just doesn't feel? I don't know. Like it just doesn't fly, doesn't feel natural or as like flowing, is this easier to talk to somebody else when somebody's sitting across? I get it because you have to do work and you have to write it out and you're trying to like, I get all up in my head. That's the thing. Now I get to look at you. We're going to try this out as an experiment will at the listeners decide. All right. How do you feel you feel rusher they should just be generous when they when they send you notes about decays performance today? Right? So de que for those of you who don't know is my main man. We've been friends for like twenty years, right? Yeah, and decay came on board the podcast to manage all the sponsor relationships, and he's doing a great job. Thank you. We're getting such great sponsors for the show all the sponsors that we have now are companies that I really believe in love products that use and just feels really good. Hey, man, it's your hard work, man. You do all the hard work. I do a little bit of work now. It's been good dude. So too. Today. We have great conversation for you guys. It's with a filmmaker documentary filmmaker called Sanjay wall, and he's a super interesting cat. This is a guy who's got a very diverse dynamic background. He started out in human rights philanthropy got into documentary filmmaking, and this is going to be a conversation about running predominantly but not running in the context that you might expect. This is about the spirituality of running the site of running as devotion running for enlightenment, running for spiritual growth, which is a topic, a theme that Sanjay explores in depth in his new documentary that he just directed called thirty one hundred run and become, which is a great film. Gosh, all see it. Why thirty one hundred. I'm gonna tell you guys in a minute, but first today's episode is brought to you by the good. People at on running decay. How do you feel about your on's? I love him. I'm wearing wearing them right now. I know you've been wearing them. I probably seen you almost every day for the last month and I have yet to encounter you wearing anything other, but then you're on when you get something new that just like makes you feel good when I put him on in the morning, when I tied the lace is everything about the shoe, just nice design yet. It's all dialed in. I love when aesthetics meet performance. That's what I think on has accomplished on a level that you just don't see. Typically, especially in running shoes, they they don't look like any other running shoe out there. They perform better than any shoe that I've warned and they look. Great. I'm sure people come up to you in there. Like, Where'd you get those? Never seen those before. Yeah, yeah. And they're light. They're light, which you notice everywhere to fill their minimal are not like appointed with like a million bells and whistles. They just do. They're supposed to do. They don't look or feel like any other shoe out there, which is why they've been exploding popularity and have become a favourite not only among elite athletes,.

Sanjay wall David Kahn Sanjay twenty years
"sanjay" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"sanjay" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"The more potential you have to chief happiness and speaks front peace of mind peace of mind so let's define happy happiness to me is peaceful and what's more spiritual than the pursuit of happiness the pursuit of peace of mind right and it's like if you can get there faster by including this great tool of the physical body like why wouldn't we yeah and i love that you're absolutely right sanjay set another way if you're broken or dis eased because you're out of balance health is homeless static balance if you're physically out of balance then just what your brain is going to be out of balance because your brain is and your brain is the executive agent of your mind your mind is how you experience perceive reality so if you're physically unfit then you're mentally unfit and if you stub your togo then you have a brain injury so to speak someone just had that conversation day was someone that was blowing me away but there's a lot of truth is conflicting a little bit too you know the objective materialistic around but to think that if i stubbed my toe or if i have if i have a physical injury or disease that's the same thing as an injury to the mind because it's my mind that's perceiving that injury and that limitation as that's preventing me from being a whole person in this moment in time to here's a question i had fascinating that i'm sure you answer over and over and over but like in the thirty one hundred mile race you could either look at it as a series of injuries going from blistered has trauma trauma and trauma how'd you transcend that how do you like what what do you need to do to be able to understand that none of these things are actually problems in my opinion this is the way i would do that type of thing is to recognize that none of that is real perception pain is perception injuries are temporary and the human capacity is we say twenty times more someone just told me that it's one hundred times more so we got up our game and so if you have purity of intent and a mission to accomplish because i'm not saying that the physical body could could perform forever and ever and.

sanjay executive