35 Burst results for "Sanger"

"sanger" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

Lymphedema Podcast

05:30 min | Last month

"sanger" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

"Punter dave run team. it's so i won like usual just as parents in dave. You're you're unique in the situation But what would you guys like to tell others. That might be considering camp as a family of more than because not everybody had the opportunity to bring both new so you know what would you say to that. And then also just like wanting her Would you have for some parents that are thinking about coming to another session. The are really blessed that we were able to have both of us go to camp. We were in the position to do that. But i think as parents there's so much information that just one person getting it you know. It really helped to talk over things with dave or you know to say like what did you hear this. He's like oh an eicher this or you know. We both had different experiences that we were able to talk about. You know when we go back to the room or when we were together I think that was super helpful. Just to have someone to bounce ideas off of or experienced experiences of But you know as far as the camp. David needed to go but at the same time were a family. Were the super sanger's we do it together. You know I felt like he was very important for office. Three of us to go and it was never really a question of one or the other it was all all three of us are gonna go I would say you know if you can bring your spouse bring your partner Because it is like you said earlier. The reference to the fire hose. That's how it feels. We knew. I taught me new not everything there was to know about. Lifted him out. But i thought we knew a good amount when we got there i was like i don't feel anything where whereas before i felt like we knew we.

dave run dave sanger David
Wikipedia Co-Founder Jimmy Wales Warns Communists Ruined Platform

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 2 months ago

Wikipedia Co-Founder Jimmy Wales Warns Communists Ruined Platform

"Founder or co founder of Wikipedia. As a warning for all of you. The Daily Mail has reporting. This rest of the media could give a damn Nobody should trust Wikipedia, he says. It's co founder warns Larry Sanger says The site has been taken over by left wing volunteers, quote unquote who write off sources that don't fit their agendas. Fake news They have utterly Destroyed the truth about me on Wikipedia. By their lies by either cherry picking and all the rest. My Children wouldn't recognize me on Wikipedia. It is a pig slop over there. And these volunteers are a bunch of, uh Boot kickers. With their brownshirts. Did he say brown insurance? Should I say pink shirts, either one that's fine by me. Wikipedia can no longer be trusted as a source unbiased information. Since the online encyclopedias left leaning volunteers. They're not left leaning there. Khamis can't on any news that doesn't fit their agenda, according to the sites co founder Larry Sanger 53 co founded Wikipedia in 2001, along with Jimmy Wales. Said the crowd sourcing project has betrayed its original mission. Reflecting the views of the establishment.

Larry Sanger Wikipedia The Daily Mail Khamis Brown Jimmy Wales
Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

Ordinary Equality

05:40 min | 6 months ago

Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

"Welcome back to ordinary equality. I'm jimmy wilson a writer editor and feminist activist. And i'm kate. Kelly human rights attorney and feminist activist. Today we're talking about an issue that has been undercurrent of a lot of what we've covered so far reproductive justice it's a framework created by black women to center our needs in the midst of a movement that has ignored us for far too long. This episode we're going to discuss some of the reproductive injustice. That continued post emancipation. And how it spurred the founding of a movement bill to address the inequity and the mistrust caused by centuries of reproductive oppression at the end of the episode will learn white folks myself included can do to better center marginalized and underrepresented voices in this conversation. And what organizations are doing on the ground to ensure reproductive justice the slave breeding industry we discussed in episode three left a painful and persistent legacy in this country. Professor jennifer morgan talked about how the historic commodification of black bodies set the stage for ongoing mistreatment of folks embedding generational trauma that persists today that shamas sits beneath much more recent oppression of reproductive rights throughout most of the twentieth century. Eugenics campaigns flourished in the united states quickly becoming the dominant scientific view. The goal was to exterminate all so-called undesirable qualities in society through often-forced selective breeding and sterilization mental illnesses criminal records unwanted racial traits low intelligence levels and even poverty were considered undesirable indicators leading scientists. Believed that all these traits could and should be selectively bred out of the human population by any means necessary as we now know all of these ideas have since been proven to be as false as they are immoral. Time and time again. In the heyday of eugenics thirty-three states allowed involuntary sterilization on groups lawmakers claimed were unfit have children in california mental institutions. Alone about twenty thousand for sterilizations between nineteen o nine and nineteen seventy-nine unsurprisingly. People of color in immigrants were far more likely to be selected as an undesirable group worthy for sterilization mainstream. Scientists pushed these views. As fact margaret sanger the founder of planned. Parenthood got involved in the eugenics movement as she tried to promote reproductive rights. On october sixteenth. Nine hundred sixteen sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the united states. In order to push the idea of birth control rights forward. She consorted with leaders in the ever growing eugenics movement. She even personally advocated for selective breeding herself in one thousand nine hundred ninety one article. She wrote quote. The most urgent problem. Today is how to limit and discourage the over fertility of the mentally and physically defective as damning as that is. There's more to the story. Here's loretta ross. A professor at smith college and former national coordinator of sister song women of color reproductive justice collective on sanger's legacy her involvement in movement. But i also contextualized wbz devos was vaulted with the jenex movement. And so because it was a popular pseudoscience at that time a lot of people were involved in it. And so to single out margaret sanger as the demon is trying to eliminate the black race is just bad historical research because in fact. She was far ahead of her time. Even i called in a sectional list one day because in nineteen teams retired nineteen sixteen. She about poverty. She wrote about racism she wrote about all the inner sexual issues. We're talking about now. One hundred years later she was so ahead of her time and so she was an accident. Early intersection analyst. Who made some mistakes. But then everybody i know. Who's a human being makes. Mistakes if i wanted to do an analysis of everything dr martin luther king junior it wrong. It's an attention. But maybe they demonize him as they do margaret sanger. Many anti-choice advocates claim. That singer sought to eliminate black people from america altogether. That couldn't be less true. She focused the spread of birth control on poor communities many of which were largely populated with people of color. But it's because they were more likely to be susceptible to unwanted pregnancies and she wrote in one thousand nine fourteen enforced. Motherhood is the most complete denial of women's right to life and liberty. It's definitely disturbing to read about many of sanger's eugenic spaced beliefs. Today though she later repudiated everything. About the idea of selective breeding we still have to contend with the damage her involvement in the movement when a well known figure participates in such a harmful ideology it may provide others the justification to do the same. Her language may also have sowed increased wariness and communities of color after atrocities committed by nazi germany on earth. The terror born from the disgusting ideology of eugenics the vocal public support for the movement fizzled and most sleep died in the united states. But for sterilization continued behind the scenes for decades and still takes place today as we'll discuss later in the

Jimmy Wilson Jennifer Morgan Shamas Margaret Sanger Sanger Loretta Ross America Sister Song Women Of Color Rep Wbz Devos Kate Kelly Dr Martin Luther King Smith College California Germany
Surrogacy on the Stand

HISTORY This Week

02:29 min | 6 months ago

Surrogacy on the Stand

"When carol sanger started teaching at columbia law school in nineteen ninety-four surrogacy was really uncommon. In fact it barely existed. There wasn't the technology for it. And i remember that i made of a question with surrogacy in it on an exam but it was like hypothetical because there was no such thing. One of sanger's academic specialties. Is she puts it odd issues. In family law family law covers things like marriage divorce adoption custody and unin exam. She's trying to push students to think about some situation that they've never even considered something that sounds familiar but actually anything they've ever seen before. Wow and you're you're sort of craziest hypothetical you could think of surrogacy that people could create a baby as they call them then in a test tube and implanted in the mother who gave the ads and then all sorts of questions arise from that. And then you you end up watching as that sort of most obscure difficult legal question becomes this real legal question. Yes the first formal surrogacy contract in the us was drawn up in nineteen seventy six the same year carol sanger got her law degree and it was for an arrangement known as traditional surrogacy. They there's a couple that wants to have a baby. But maybe a woman in the couple is infertile or being pregnant would-be medically dangerous for this couple so they decide to use a surrogate that surrogate agrees to be artificially inseminated but the egg belongs to her so genetically. She's the mother she gets pregnant carries a child to term and then gives it to the other couple today. Most surrogacy doesn't happen this way. Lots of couples now use. What's called justitia surrogacy where the surrogate is not genetically related to the baby inside couples can use egg and sperm from themselves. And or from donors the ed guts. Fertilized in the lab and the embryo gets implanted in the surrogate through in vitro fertilization. Back in nineteen seventy six. That technology did not exist so that i nineteen seventy-six because he contract was for a traditional surrogacy arrangement and it was put together by a man named knoll keen. He was from michigan. He was a lawyer and he became known as the father of surrogacy

Carol Sanger Columbia Law School Sanger United States Michigan
Men Testifying In Hearing All Say U.S. Capitol Attack Was Premeditated

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:43 min | 7 months ago

Men Testifying In Hearing All Say U.S. Capitol Attack Was Premeditated

"Month. The washington post reported that three days before the insurrection and internal capital police alert warned that congress could be the target of a violent attack but according to three now resigned officials. Capitol police chief stevens. Son how sergeant. At arms polar ving senate sergeant at arms michael stagger. That warning never made it to any of the top officials who were charged with securing our capital. I actually just in the last twenty four hours. was informed by the department that they actually had received that report. It was re received by what we call. It's one of our sworn members that's assigned to the joint terrorism task force which is a task force with the fbi. They received did the evening of the fifth reviewed. It and then ford it. Over to an official at the intelligence division over at you scaffold police headquarters into you hadn't seen it yourself. No ma'am mr sanger. Did you get the report. Okay mr irving. I did not today. The post reports another warning about violent extremists calling for an assault on congress was sent to a dc police email inbox and to a member of the capitol police. The officials who testified today all agreed the one six attack was planned and that involves white supremacist and extremist groups. We plan for an increased level of violence at the capitol and that some participants may be armed what we got was a military style. Coordinated assault eyewitness insurgents beating police officers with fists pipes sticks bats metal barricades and flagpoles.

Michael Stagger Capitol Police The Washington Post Mr Sanger Congress Joint Terrorism Task Force Mr Irving Stevens Intelligence Division Senate FBI Ford The Post DC
The Population Control Movement

Behind the Bastards

04:35 min | 9 months ago

The Population Control Movement

"The negro project was very popular with black community leaders at the time and it would be unfair to frame it as an act of genocide. Sanger wrote repeatedly of the importance of bringing in black doctor stating at one point. I do not believe that this project should be directed a run by white medical men which is good. If you're going to do a healthcare project like focused on the black community like that. That shows like she. She was like she was capable of understanding what was necessary in order to actually reach people in nineteen thirty nine now so that i guess yeah. Yeah in one thousand nine hundred nine. She argued in a letter. That black ministers needed to be heavily involved in the project in order to gain the trust of their communities. We do not want to go out that we want to exterminate the negro population in the minister is the man who could straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members again sue problematic language there but also there's no evidence she was actually going for genocide because she was again doing the same thing with white people. She was a birth control across the board advocate right. She wanted everyone to have more access to contraceptives. There are people on the right. Like denise souza who will spread wildly untrue claims about sanger like that. She called black people human weeds in a minister civilization. And there is no evidence of this sanger's own legacy contains enough problematic facts without making up lies. She was a eugenicist and she wrote in nineteen twenty-three that birth control does not mean contraception indiscriminately practiced. It means the release in cultivation of the better elements in our society and the gradual suppression elimination and eventual extinction of defective stocks. Those human weeds who threaten the blooming of the finest flowers of american civilization. So she did call people human weeds. But she wasn't referring to black people. She was referring more to mentally challenged people more to people with like who are prone to diseases. And that's bad that's really bad. But she was not like a four exterminating everything but white people. She was four exterminating people. She considered unhealthy or at least exterminating them from the gene pool. Which is again bad. But let's be accurate about the kind of bad it is. You know we don't need to make it anymore. Yeah criminal. I don't say because it's not flowery. It's already bad. Didn't wanna make better by wiping out black people. She wanted to make black people and white people better by wiping out folks who had what she considered to be like bad qualities through selective breeding and. That's really terrible for herself. What does back. Yeah these are yes. Yes thanks at up. Yeah that is bad but like it's not the kind of bad luck again because they tried to. I like the progressives always been trying to wipe out black like. That's not what she was doing. We don't need to add information. She was just a she was a. Here's plenty that's bad about her. Yeah let's let's be intellectually honest when we can dennis someone. She also stated during another speech. I believe now immediately. There should be national sterilization for certain this genetic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out where the government not feeding them. You know that's bad but again it's the kind of like part of why they like to try to frame her. Badness is something different is because if you're accurate about it you can find a fuck load of republicans who say the. The poor should starve right. Like the people who can't work on their own by jordan peterson. Talking about like how terrifying it is that. Some people aren't intelligent enough to be in the military and like say like because. What do we do with those people like. That's a really. Like what margaret sanger was. Saying back then is still common today. Apple dress it up a little bit more. I mean kind of relate to the copay things like that's fine. They're already they're already probably die. So it's the run productive. Yeah they're in productive there on the government dole. Exactly yeah she just. She was bad she just was not the kind of bad people. Like desouza liked painter. As and in fact a lot of progressive black leaders at the time like margaret sanger. And what she was trying to do in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine letter to dr. cj gamble of proctor and gamble fame. She urged him to get over his resistance to hiring a fulltime negro physician. Ask quote the colored. Negroes can get closer to their own members and more or less lay their cards on the table which means they're ignorant superstitions in doubt again. She's also she's number one saying that black people are ignorant and superstitious which is bad but also saying that like no you get educated black people to talk to them about birth control so again. She's a problematic person but not painters

Sanger Denise Souza Jordan Peterson Margaret Sanger Dennis Desouza Cj Gamble Apple
Volatile tech stocks expose growing vulnerability in US market

CNBC's Fast Money

04:10 min | 11 months ago

Volatile tech stocks expose growing vulnerability in US market

"Next guest warned. There could be bigger pullback looming for some of the hottest names in this space. Let's go off the charts with the legendary louisiana mata louisi- mata technical research advisors louise. It is a pleasure as an honor for free to join us. We quote you many times on this show. So i'm really really curious to hear what you have to say about tech. You're you're climb melissa. Well we've had a volatile three or four months and technology has really been enough more or less going sideways for the fang stocks in particular. And we've got a little concerned that the most important thing would be support levels and recognizing the since two thousand when there were next we have earnings that these stocks but they could be off twenty percent and still be within an uptrend. Some of them are already off. When percent question is during a break. The support of these sideways consolidation. Will they be able to lift. Google of course has already lifted so we have. We have three stocks. Here today amazon. I think gives the first one I'm not seeing it. It may be coming up. But i'm not seeing any of that. Is you can see the sideways action. We have negative momentum on that on that chart and it's already been down eighteen percent so as long as it holds above twenty. Nine hundred is critical support than maybe just simply continues to consolidate further. Maybe we'll see a resolution on the upside that the point is that more or less been warning about support levels in suggesting we let the upside take care of itself. The next chart. I believe you have is microsoft and support. There's one ninety five but you can see also it's been going sideways for quite some time with lower highs and it's been down fifteen percent I think the most vulnerable of these stocks is net flicks which has not only a negative momentum on a weekly basis but also a negative divergence on a monthly so support for netflix's four seventy already off twenty percent and keeps bouncing and going down another twenty percent within the sideways consolidation so That's our concern here today. I must say was impressive. Day and not all tech stocks are looking vulnerable but these ones that we have been concerned about louis. At what point do you say. They're consolidating and building a base as opposed to threaten to break the support. That would be breaking out through the upper level of these consolidations so basically these are critical support levels as long as they hold. We continue to define that as a consolidation. And if at some point down the road they lift up through the entire consolidation than we. We've become more constructive once again. Google for instances one of them has already broken out to the upside. Netflix's looks a little bit more vulnerable to me. Last question lewis. Because we quote you and i. I think that we misquote you. But the sentiment is there when it comes to your saying the longer the base the higher in space is that is that the sanger. We're getting that right. Yes absolutely the bigger. The base that aaron space the because atop the bigger the drought and the bigger the drops a longer the need for repair. And i think what we're seeing as we're getting excited about some of the underlying broadening that's taking place is that may be the repair processes beginning for some of these other stocks that have been in bear markets. I could throw a triple this one. That's looking interesting but you have a few industrial center. Starting to break out in that heart warming. We felt that the market has been a little bit mixed up itself and not sure you know as a discount mechanism. What's coming six months. Maybe these vaccines we have a better

Louisiana Mata Louisi Louise Melissa Netflix Tech Google Amazon Microsoft Louis Sanger Lewis Aaron
"sanger" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

04:11 min | 11 months ago

"sanger" Discussed on The CyberWire

"As you said, you send rick a note and say send David Sanger. You know a thousand Bitcoin to this account. I still haven't seen that that. Is and. If you do that maybe I'll unlock your your system for you. But. He won't and. What happened Some of these cities decided like Baltimore, we're not going to pay the ransom. Some in Florida decided, we are going to pay the ransom because it will cost us less to pay the ransom than rebuild our systems. Some in Texas didn't know what to do remember when these little towns we're being. Were being hit. So As this played out people the Department of Homeland Security said. Cheese supposing these were used against. The systems and e poll books and all that on election day so far none of them have been. They were actually aimed at just gumming up the works for paying parking tickets and getting building permits and. Records of landowners and Stuff. But if you turn that to the registration system, so rick, you went to go vote in Virginia they said. She we have you having moved to California six months ago. Or. When you go to vote, they say, Oh, didn't we get a paper ballot in your name when you didn't send one in Right, there's all kinds of mischief you can do. and. That actually worries people more than going after the voting machines. Voting machines are largely off-line every state. Does it differently sometimes within states it's done differently. So that's all a big mess right and it's not at all clear. That you could get into the voting machines, but you could will use ransomware to mess up the rest of the system and you don't need to do would say in every precinct in Wisconsin. Or everyone in Pennsylvania or name your battleground state. If you can do it in two or three places two or three districts, you can create the impression that you've done it in many more. Yeah. That's my biggest fear I'm with you I don't I'm not too worried about the voting machines. That's. Not how I would do it anyway but too much work to way too much work right. But if you can convince people what's doesn't see Mike, that's hard to do these days that the voting system is corrupt somehow that could do huge damage to the entire nation and have long ranging implications, and that's what I'm most afraid of Yeah Yep I think that's about right. So you publish the book in Two Thousand Eighteen The documentary is coming out just over two years after. Is there anything between the two that's kind of crystallize in your mind or fundamentally changed we have we have updated. To reflect monetarily, there's a big section on perception acts which is what you do when you do ransomware and one or two places to make it look like much warfare we brought it to the up to date. You'll see. A lot of different people talking about what it's like to have been on the receiving end of this and the sort of fog of war. You've got everyone in this documentary from Hillary Clinton and John Podesta. Who sat down to talk about the twenty sixteen? Election. To Seth Rogan who was the star of, of course, the interview and he is very funny. I do have to say and. You'll see people like our Rosenbach co-director, Harvard Belfer Center but was the chief of Staff Dash Parter at the Pentagon when he was. Secretary of Defense talking about the calculus that you make as your cyber attack or if you're trying to think about what the US can do. So the idea is to bring you in a very human level to the kind of decisions that have to be made when you're on the receiving him and when you're on the offense..

rick Seth Rogan Department of Homeland Securit David Sanger Baltimore Rosenbach Staff Dash Parter Hillary Clinton California Wisconsin US Harvard Belfer Center Florida Texas Secretary Pennsylvania co-director Mike Pentagon
HBO's New Documentary Warns Of The Dangers Of Cyberwarfare

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:20 min | 1 year ago

HBO's New Documentary Warns Of The Dangers Of Cyberwarfare

"The perfect weapon now on HBO is a documentary about a danger. We've all heard a lot about, but don't really know new and frightening warning from the FBI on hackers using malicious software to launch a cyber attack against us. It's based on the best selling book by New York Times National Security correspondent David He, Sanger. About a new form of conflict that is global, inexpensive, invisible and supremely available to small groups, not just large powers. Jon Mateos, the director of the perfect weapon, and he joins us now from Brooklyn. Thank you so much for being with us. Thanks for having me, Scott. You know, I'm going to ask you plenty of questions about the dangers that cyber warfare poses to the US, But I have to ask you first. Did we fire the first shots across the bow? It appears as if we did Scott because when we attacked the Iranian nuclear program in 2007, the code that we put into the plant was released and everyone knew about it. Now there were plenty of covert kind of operations that go on, probably things we'll never know about. But that one was let out of the box. And because of that, it appears as if we fire the first shot, and we've been paying for it ever since. Let me ask you about a few attacks. We know about 2013 cyber attack. On Las Vegas that was done in response to something of casino owners. That's right. Well, he wasn't just any casino owner was Sheldon Adelson, a well connected casino that's correct on he had gone online. He was part of the symposium where he talked about actually setting off a nuclear weapon. Against Iran as a way to stop their nuclear program, and that video went onto YouTube. It went viral and the Iranians found out about it, and they planned, very powerful, destructive cyber attack of his sands casino operation to demonstrate something to him or to the United States. Oh, that's the thing about these sorts of attacks. You know, they're short of war attacks. They're not necessarily attacking our Our critical infrastructure all the time. But it sends a message. That destructive attack is easy for a country like Iran. It's it's an asymmetrical attack, and it made a very strong point. Once it was let out. I mean, the Sands Corporation did everything I could to hide the fact that they've lost $40 million in their technology, But it was let out and incentive, frightening message And, as David Sanger says in the film What happened in Vegas didn't stay in Vegas 2014 cyberattack essentially brought down a Seth Rogan James Franco film the interview, which in fact does raise serious questions about freedom of expression. On also of you know, a major film corporation Sony. Yeah, that was that was the one that really got so much notice because it became suddenly an international incident. And I have to say it's one of the big issues in the film that I think people will recognizes that that the US is uniquely vulnerable to these kinds of attacks because of our open this because of our First Amendment because of the public square. Our weapons against authoritarians regimes don't necessarily have the same effect happened. Dump attacks, like what happened at Sony are not as effective to countries like Iran and Russia.

Iran Sheldon Adelson United States Scott Jon Mateos Las Vegas HBO FBI New York Times Sanger David He Sony Sands Corporation Youtube Seth Rogan James Franco David Sanger Director
Students for Life activists arrested for defacing Black Lives Matter mural

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Students for Life activists arrested for defacing Black Lives Matter mural

"Joining us right now, Kristen Hawkins, who is president of students for life. Of America and Kristin to ofyour activists were arrested this past weekend. Right here in Washington. D C. Good morning. Why were they arrested? Good morning. Thanks for having me today. Yeah, we What? Out Saturday. It was national pro life generation sidewalks. So we had students across the country going to Planned Parenthood. Another abortion, silly, praying counsel women. Our team went out there to paint the street to say black, pre born lives matter. We had written the mayor sensor there had painted the streets of the seed black lives matter and allow the group of asked for this. Add on her paintings to say deep on the police, and she allowed him to do that, with how the formal on to do with permanently we had written, the mayor asked her to allow us the same light as she allowed the other activists. We have spoken with them done on that perm it the police called us NASA's issues. Temporary paint, which we complied with. We've got out there for him on Saturday and had six squad cars waiting for threatening the rest. If you are To attempt to put anything on the street. So being activists we have a backup plan it sidewalk chalk with us. We do this all the time. One of our team members Warner, who actually counted upon the pregnancy there every Saturday and sidewalk chalk every single Saturday. Began to sidewalk chalk, black reborn lives matter in front of the planned Parenthood on the sidewalk. Not on the street. Ah, one with one eye open university, Erica Catelyn, and the police arrested them for simply sidewalk, chalking and I want to make sure I understand this correctly. You did ask for a Permit. It sounds like it was granted you then here to what they told you to do, which is used temporary paint, and it sounds based on you applying for that permit that the police knew in advance when you were going to be there, And when you plan to paint this is that how they knew you were going to be there and with it already predetermined. Do you think by the police that they plan to arrest you? If you did anything to the sidewalk, including writing black black lives matter, even if it was done in shock. Umm Yeah, we had written their advance of getting the permit telling her, you know, we we know you have opened the streets up now to public expression. You can't discriminate based on you know what messages painted in the streets. We would like you to extend us the same rights and we gave her deadline and we said we're going to be out there Saturday. All his first and father planned parent heart. If you do not respond, we will take that as acceptance that you know what we're doing. And in fact, her office the mayor's office, I contacted D C special events office who then contacted our team. We got a permit to assemble because you have to have a permit. We had to have a committee. Cirio assemble. 50 people are under wearing masks, social distancing. We've got that permit. The police officers called us asked us to please use temporary paint, which we complied with. But that's how they knew where we could be out there on and we got pretty loud and clear the mayor's answers when she had six Claude cars leading for us, and when we asked the police officers on the scene You know who they were Reporting to who? Their boss wise thie officer in charge directly responded the mayor. Amazing. Amazing, So they just used your attempts to be good citizens as in as a road map to find you and then to eventually arrest your activists in all of this, Kristen, you know, One thing that really sticks out to me is the disparate treatment that your group has received, as when it comes to free expression in the district. So you mentioned it before. But it bears repeating right next to the mural that Miria ll Bowser authorized, which was defunded mystery, which was black Lives matter. She's put it right in front of the White House in giant letters, activist Black lives matter. Activists came in and added, defund the police of their own accord. They they did that without a permit. They just put it right next to the black lives matter, and they put it in permanent paint on the ground immediately in front of the White House. Rather than punish those people. Miriam Bastard gave them the OK after it was over. Those words are still painted on the ground right now in front of the White House and have been for the last month or two. Meanwhile, you're activists used shock on the sidewalk and were arrested. It's starting to sound like you have grounds for a lawsuit. Are you going to file one? Absolutely. This is clear viewpoint discrimination. Our team has been flooded with requests for legal aid groups have been coming in saying We will help you sue the city because this is a slam dunk. Constitutional First Amendment case, and we believe it is so we we have our own in house legal counsel that we work with. We were hiring criminal defense attorneys for morning Erica the two individuals who were arrested for sidewalk talking, and then we're also bringing on a team of lawyers who will be handling our First Amendment federal lawsuit against the city and the mayor. And Chris and I also want to ask about the message that you were sending out the message that was chalked, which is Moon black. Pre boy born lives matter. How has that message been received by people when you point out the fact that so many black Children are aborted in our country that I mean that's what's so sad. If you think about this case, while Warner and Erica are being arrested and being processed and book to Metro police Planned Parenthood on Saturday across the nation ended alive of 360 black Children. That is what they dio every single day for out of five Planned Parenthood locations are in walking distance from minority dense population. The abortion rate for black women is five times higher than white women. It is very clear that not only does planned Parenthood and now their own employees are admitting that Planned Parenthood has a racist past with their founder, Margaret Sanger, who was a genesis to believe that birth control and sterilization was a solution to a limiting what people she called human leads, but they also have a racist. Present and it needs to be addressed right now. This is an important conversation happening within our nation, and we want to add to that conversation would say absolutely black lives matter. The one you say black lives matter. We also mean lives that had not only been born, but lives are in the wounds are freeborn minds their lives that are about to be born, you know, or Children that are about to be born. You've got Kanye West in recent days talking about this is well, he tweeted just a couple days ago. Over 22,500,000 black babies have been aborted over the past 50 years. I'm not sure of his numbers are right, but he definitely is getting to a real issue on DH. He also tweeted I cried at the thought of a boarding my firstborn and everyone was so concerned about me. I'm concerned for the world that feels you shouldn't cry about this subject. What's your reaction to seeing Kanye West to come along and say, Yeah, this is a real issue. Yeah. I mean, I think this is a very raw and emotional issue for so many Americans. I think it is so sad to see. So I watched, you know, Campaign speech in South Carolina. He broke down, crying, talking about how he himself was almost aborted by his mother on then how this discussion happened with his firstborn child, whether or not to abort her and end her life. I think that resonated with millions of Americans. I mean, I meet people all the time you say I was on the operating table and I gotta walk out. I don't know why I do I You know, I didn't have the money. I was scared to death. But I just knew I couldn't have the abortion. And no day goes by that. I'm not grateful for making that. Choice for life, so I think what it was so well. It was so emotional. I think it regulated with so many Americans. Why do you think it's very sad? I was really something in Hollywood. You know articles about what car long with Connie West? Yes, Conquest is crazy and one I think we need to be very careful about how we label people crazy. This mental health in a very real concern in our names, and we shouldn't be labeling people who may have been, you know. Late diagnosis by Paul Alors crazy and it's okay. And it's okay to admit that some people have it. Thank you, Cristian. Sorry. Just cause we're out of time. But it is okay to stay. Some people have it right on some issues and wrong on others. He's completely right on the issue of

White House Erica Catelyn Kristen Hawkins Warner Kanye West Washington Black Black Children America Nasa President Trump Ofyour Miria Ll Bowser Kristin South Carolina Connie West Miriam Bastard Paul Alors Claude
"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Gala for live action with Lila Rose Lila a very touching tribute to Mike on Twitter and you know he was talking about all kinds three or four different aspects of his future, and it's just hard. How does someone go from talking about that too losing that sort of hope it doesn't make sense, but it's a brutal place to do the sort of thing that might did and. There's a lot of people that'll talk badly about some of the things that might did and I may not have agreed with everything. But he's one of those guys that if he did not have the courage to stand up in all the ways and all the places that he did the, we'd be a lot further away from religious freedom right now particularly on campus, he inspired students to be pro-life on campus is stand up for that. He inspired other professors even inspired professors within go on and be way more outspoken on things that were true and good and Mike Accomplished a lot and he touched a lot of. People and yeah he'll be deeply missed. I want to honor him and his legacy which lives on in a whole lot of students that he worked with a mentor. I will say this chain one of the interesting things is as much as people celebrated his death and it was awful I told my daughters that they weren't allowed to look up this story and to get anywhere near it on twitter or facebook or anything because it just got so wicked but I will say this tribute page. for Mike I just read through that earlier this evening, and there are so many students who said, you know I'm a liberal I'm not a conservative like Mike, but he was a good man. He was a good professor. He treated my views as if they mattered, he took me seriously and he wasn't what everyone is saying one reflection in particular a girl who ended up disagreeing with Mike if he thinks she said she was a feminist and a secularist, but he countered her through A..

professor Lila Rose Lila Mike twitter facebook
"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Is that women need liberating from their reproductive capacity and that children are what's holding them back and you see it all throughout Sanger's movement in the early days and. That's one of the things that's actually much more troubling to me than the fact that she attended one women's KKK rally of some sort and was sort of uncomfortable and awkward about it. I'm much more concerned about the fact that she thought a the we should be eliminating unfit people from society through selective breeding and be that women should be liberated from the shackles of their natural. Bondage to childbearing and the of course, with that is the attendant views of the family and all that's come with planned parenthood. I'll tell you what Jonathan Margaret Sanger I have no wish to defend Margaret Sanger but I will say that the some of the stuff I've heard from more recent planned parenthood executives and presidents has been more ghoulish than anything I've ever read from market sanger. Because it's an open and bold celebration of abortion in a way that she never really did that she didn't want to do. Yeah. You're talking about the center for medical progress that he has. But what you brought a second ago goes worth I think reiterating in that is that on both of those levels, the views of that certain segments of the population shouldn't reproduce and that women. Should be separated from the reproductive capacity. These get to the heart of two questions that Chuck Colson us to talk about we're kind of indicative of or maybe the best questions to really get to the heart of worldviews, and that's what's wrong with the world and what's the solution right. So think about that what's wrong with the world or complete segments of the population that was inherent. To the EUGENICS movement what's wrong with the world is a woman's reproductive system. In other words, it's not a good part of her design. It's a complete rejection of creation. It's a problem that needs to be solved. Angela Franks talks about this Dr Franks talks about this and such I think brilliant ways that basically that this whole movement sees the life giving capacity that God gave women. Wrong to define them down to just that. But to see that as the problem that needs to be solved is a just a dramatically dangerous reading of the world and so that also informs the solution. I think that's those are two very important points you brought up Shane that that could help people really understand this, and again, we can stop being fixated on this kind of this language of. Hatred or being mean as being the only thing that makes somebody wrong like the ideas themselves can have the greatest purist and best intentions and be just devastatingly bad and what we've seen by the way is that planned parenthood execs have other intentions like to get lamborghinis. Referring again back to the center for medical progress videos from Delta. Well, you're listening to break point this week we're GonNa take a quick break. We'll be right back after this to talk about more of.

Jonathan Margaret Sanger Sanger sanger Chuck Colson Angela Franks Delta Shane
"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"The unfit as well as other racial ethnic minorities, as well as other impoverished people. She also saw poverty by the way. As being a product of one's basically badly day bed breeding. Yeah. That's right. So anyway to some all this up, and this is I think really important the stats are still stunning planned parenthood targets, ethnic minority neighborhoods, and the results are a population that's I think about thirteen percent of the population African Americans have forty percent of the abortions and it's their marketed to right. It's a marketing thing in terms of both access to facilities, as well as a member of other things, and that's what we mean by structural racism I. Don't know that there's a better example. Shane of structural racism in America. Then planned parenthood. And Margaret Sanger Organization has these practically racist outcomes and that's why you're making the charge structural racism and I think it's a good charge. The forty percent statistic is absolutely damning planned parenthood. You know all the different reasons that planned parenthood executives and leaders believe they're doing this whether it's to help women to liberate them from the oppression of the home or or of continual childbearing. However, they expressive the practical result is that they're killing off an enormous percentage of the next generation of black children, and that is classically structurally racist as I can imagine you're depriving a whole generation of existence in the name of helping these communities, but they're not they're preying. On these communities and I know it's a supply and demand thing. But let's not what planned. Parenthood is a merchant of merchant of murder. Their primary business model is based on something that sanger admittedly viewed as distasteful, which is abortion, and they claim that there's all kinds of other things they do and it's just not true. It's been debunked again, and again, abortion is the flagship product of planned parenthood. It's it's the it's the financial driver. There's no question about it. So but the other thing too to think about it and I I wanna say this really carefully 'cause you brought up the idea of outcomes or outputs the organization if we look at that. The greater danger to the African American community by far. More than the KKK more than white supremacy even though we've seen this kind of alarm across the board if you look at outcomes in terms of the long term impact on the African American community, those organizations all of them together don't come close to planned parenthood's destruction of that community and on a number of levels and I think that that's a really hard thing to say that's the sort of thing you canceled for. Kind of for saying out loud but you start doing the stats and it's done I'm not talking about intent. I'm not talking about there is an intent going into it like there's a hatred that one feels because they work at planned parenthood for ethnic minorities like there is a hatred that legitimately exists among members of the outright community of the KKK all different forms of white supremacy. Groups but this goes underscores something that we think it's important for people understand about worldview ideas have consequences bad ideas have victims, ideas have consequences intentions don't always have consequences sometimes they do ideas always have consequences ideas, grab those grow feed and walk into the world, and so it's these ideas about what gives value about that the ideas that shape Margaret Sanger's work that then was structurally. Embedded into her organization. All this stuff is the ideas that have this sort of consequences in the sort of victims that we see and the central idea work in planned parenthood and the abortion industry as a whole John..

Margaret Sanger Organization African American community Margaret Sanger sanger murder Shane America
"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"sanger" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Of Sterilization of the unfit and of course, we have some legendary things that came out of the supreme, court, buck versus bell for example, where Supreme Court chief justice said, Oliver Wonder Home said, you know three generations of imbeciles are enough speaking of an African American woman whose mother and grandmother had not had a particularly high IQ. So based on the Iq, he basically ruled the court ruled and he wrote the opinion that the state of Virginia could forcibly sterilized this woman. Now, this is all part of the EUGENICS projects. When we talk about the JENEX project, this is what we're. Talking about it and people want to read more on this. There's a couple of places you can go. There is a documentary cough twenty one that has been on Youtube and other places for quite some time I also, and this is a source that I quoted extensively in the breakpoint on this topic this past week a book by Jona Goldberg called Liberal Fascism, and by the way, if you've never seen that book, you just gotTa Google it just so you can see the covers got one of the coolest covers get one of those yellows Walmart Smiley face with a little Hitler. Mustache. Yeah. It's really remarkable thing. Not a trigger at all. So he talks about there is just this kind of D- pistol now I also WanNa do Shane is make sure that we link our listeners to a presentation and a description that my friend Angela Franks gave Dr Angela Franks I call her a friend were colleagues as part of evangelicals and Catholics together. She's a Catholic theologian and a remarkable thinker and probably the one that I know of who is the expert that I know of on Margaret Sanger and her legacy and she draws that distinction between kind of being consciously racist and being a eugenicist now obviously eugenics though is form of structural racism it's. An intent to create racial disparity on a structural level. So we have done a lot of things here over the last couple of weeks on why there is such thing structural racism. That's not the same thing as saying that it's. Everything that people say structural racism is the distinction we've made pretty carefully. But this is an example of that because as we cited in the stats here are stunning this. Initial vision that Sanger had in something called the Negro project where literally African, American pastors were paid one hundred bucks per sermon to preach birth control and sterilization to African American congregations because she deemed them among.

Margaret Sanger Dr Angela Franks Supreme Court Oliver Wonder Youtube Jona Goldberg Virginia buck Shane
"sanger" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"sanger" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"I'm Bob Schieffer and I'm Andrea Schwartz of the Center for Strategic and International Studies and this is the truth of the matter. This, is the podcast where we break down the policy issues the days since the politicians are having their say, we will excuse them with respect and bring in the experts many of them from CSIS. People who have been working these issues for years no spin, no bombast, no finger-pointing, just informed discussion. Today's episode of the truth of the matter were replaying an episode from our Coronavirus Crisis Update series from the take directed podcast, my co host, Steve Morrison and I interviewed David. Sanger.

Bob Schieffer Center for Strategic and Inter Andrea Schwartz CSIS Steve Morrison Sanger David
Lori Loughlin, Mossimo Giannulli to plead guilty in Boston court in college admissions scam

WBZ Morning News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Lori Loughlin, Mossimo Giannulli to plead guilty in Boston court in college admissions scam

"On Becky cuts a deal actress Lori Loughlin Loughlin and and her her husband husband fashion fashion designer designer Mossimo Mossimo G. G. and and Italy Italy will will formally formally plead plead guilty guilty in in the the college college admissions admissions cheating cheating scandal scandal today today has has been been realized realized they they were were getting getting that Kate Smith ABC news legal analyst Dan Abrams they're the Hollywood do spent months defending their decision to pay half a million dollars to Rick Sanger depose their teenage daughters as crew recruits just to get them in the door at the university of southern California another pair will face jail time and will pay a fine the sentencing in Boston federal court today Lachlan Angie and Willie will appear via video conference

Lori Loughlin Loughlin Mossimo Mossimo G. G. Italy Italy Analyst Dan Abrams Hollywood Rick Sanger Lachlan Angie Willie Kate Smith University Of Southern Califor Boston
Scientists reveal the most extensive genetic map of cancers ever made

BBC Newshour

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Scientists reveal the most extensive genetic map of cancers ever made

"Are an international team of scientists has revealed how different cancers of formed and crucially how that can differ from person to person one thousand three hundred scientists in thirty seven countries of pool that research to unveil the genetic fingerprints of dozens of humus it is the most comprehensive study of its kind and it's published in the journal nature talk to Peter Campbell said of cancer the welcome Sanger institute here in the U. K. and one of those involved he's been team tell me more about the findings since about ten years since the first in the cancer genome was published in the next ten years we've managed to accumulate more data from more than two and a half thousand patients and what we've done is we've dissected each of these patients cancers in minute detail looking to every nook and cranny of the genome now we know that cancer is caused by the accumulation of genetic changes in the DNA of about cells as we go through life on the vast majority of those changes a totally unrelated to the biology of the council but a small handful probably five to ten also really drives the the cima I'm the cancer genomes are they the same and everybody no that's one of the remarkable things about the study I mean you know you it in many ways when I was treating patients we was one of the sort of remarkable puzzles that you would have a patient who had a cancer that looks the same down the microscope and you give at the two people the same treatment and then one person would I'm full she succumbed to the disease and the other person would be to it we never really understood why there was this very ability in clinical outcomes for what looks like the same cancer what we can see as we gather these kinds of genomes together is that really the answer is Risin in the gene are everybody's cancer genome is is different from everybody else's and that introduces a huge complexity in that sort of passions that image what was interesting is that when you have two and a half thousand of these can since some passions and recurring themes begin to emerge from all affect tales and we can begin to identify what are the common genes that are driving particular cima times we can begin to Matt window the first changes in cancers begin when they first occurred during life and which ones of the the earliest ones and they look at one of the processes that Cole was there's mutations to accumulate and is it right talking about those patterns that there are similarities between cancers in different types of tissue yes that's right Sir we went to traditionally classify achievement testing by which all give it grows and secondly what it looks like down the microscope what I think is emerging from this study is that we can also classified she missed by what the genetic changes are so you're there are some genes that that that are quite frequently mutated and different cancers and I'm bay drive kind of similar biology even though they're entirely different cell types and how will this information help treat people with cancer in the future do you think there are three main areas where I think that this will have impact the most immediately as in diagnostic sorry at the moment we classify achievement by what it looks like on the microscope will hold it cries and but we will now be able to diagnose and classify that she was based on the genetic changes in that promises to get more accurate diagnoses for patients also to identify what that she the type is for that one to five percent of patients with a conventional methods fail to diagnose the talk of Gina and ultimately what we'd like to be able to do is then to identify for each patient what are the specific genetic changes that are driving that person's cancer and then choose the therapy that's best going to target that specific suite of driving you

Nick McCarvel on covering tennis in new ways

The Tennis.com Podcast

10:00 min | 2 years ago

Nick McCarvel on covering tennis in new ways

"Guest today is nick mccarville he is seen and heard all over the world according as well as on-court emceeing and he got his start as a writer nick mccarville joins us in New York City which is where he lives and we talk about everything from how he got his Argentina's reporting and how he made the switch from writing to being on camera we also go over his schedule and how he manages traveling all over the world as well as his memories that include interviews with Roger Fetter of course who else let's jump right into that interview with Nick mccarville thank you for joining us thanks for having me like our makeshift midtown studio fancy podcast stuff happening or in New York and we caught neck on his way to fly because what else would you be doing it's actually funny because When I was an intern at tennis magazine actually to get an internship at tennis magazine I brought a suitcase into the lobby to go apply as I was of as headed out of town in New York I was there here visiting friends for Thanksgiving and literally twelve years later here I am back at Tennis Channel Tennessee com with a suitcase things have changed but we're still in New York City with our suitcases dragging around makeshift studio so yeah life is good life is good tell us a little bit about post. US Open Life what he's been up to Yeah I post US Open had some time off which was great and then it to Geneva to Labor Cup which is really cool I'd never been to Switzerland which was awesome and it was pretty cool to see that whole set up with I mean is essentially the Roger Federer Copen the Roger Cup In Geneva the fans were so into Federer in Switzerland and I think that when they have that first iteration of Labor Cup they wanted to have it in Switzerland very soon after it started and so to see all of that fanfare for Federer for Labor Cup in Geneva was really cool and I did that social media hosting and some stuff with tennis Australia team that was there and I've been hanging out just like catching on a lot of work stuff that I had during the summer that kind of built up okay so nick I have to ask I am like super huge fetter fan and you know people think that if you're in your home country like they'll probably leave you alone if you're such a big deal but like can he even walk around without being bothered like I've always wondered that Yeah I don't have a clear answer it's a good question but I saw a couple of times we did events within the city and there were like active crowds arounds ederer and obviously you know they opening ceremonies sort of thing at the government building that was really cool and there's a huge amount of fans there I think most of them for Roger and then a couple times we're leaving the hotel he was staying at and there were definitely people gathered around to take pictures and stuff but I did see miracle at one point the kids in the minivan I don't know where they were going but like she was driving which I was like a little bit surprised by was like Oh America's driving the kids around Switzerland which makes sense Ah I we didn't follow respecting America's privacy because I know it's good for me yes I mean that's like a half answer but I think that obviously people everywhere in Switzerland know him know who he is but I think he can still lead somewhat of a normal life esh you get nervous interviewing him because you've done It alive my my most memorable standout Nick Macabre moment is you interviewing Roger Federer in the twitter Blue Room in Australia after he won you also have been Serena select course everyone got to go through the twitter blue room but is there a bit of a different level when you're talking to him or you kind of your professional your cool I mean I'm never professional or cool I always attempt to be both and I fail but no I mean Raj at Labor Cup is so chill because it is his vance right and so he was so easy work with Joe I mean he's always easy to work with but especially in Geneva like I pulled him in for a few things kind of last minute because social media's always on the bottom of the totem pole after the you like TV's and newspapers and that kind of thing so the one that's still gets me a little bit as Rafa like I feel like sometimes rough does or doesn't want to do stuff so I try to be that'd be calculated when I actually asked Ross to do something because I feel like sometimes he's not in the mood to do things I agree I get that vibe and you're not alone there they get that vibe to I'm not even work with them now nowhere near as much as you have but Roger makes things Kinda feel comfortable especially Labor which is what you said it's like he's way more relaxed but ofo makes me feel anxious and kind of makes everyone feel anxious and it's no knock on Rafa either like he is just kind of his personality also comes into a room and he'll shake everyone's hand and say hello and be you know very cordial but I think he's they just have to do so much that I try to be a little more like on my game whereas Roger may be makes you feel relaxed like that's kind of his approach do you do they recognize you does he like South Nick No yeah I actually don't know I I mean I always say hey roger how are you introduce myself every time but I've kind of gotten past the point of carrying if the players know my name I used to like I used to be a thing where I was the player to know my name and I'm just like okay I'm as long as we have a good interview and they feel comfortable and I'm asking somewhat interesting questions than I'm pretty that'd be lovely okay so you've been to all the grand slams so you were at Labor Cup I mean what kind of energy was that like how different from Grand Slam to Labor Cup I mean what are the major differences that you found being there well it's just a completely different event overall fan energy was really awesome and I did Chicago last year as well when it was here which is really cool and the energy in that stadium I the one thing I always sort of given example of Labor Cup because they're still those people out there that are kind of like what is this event and it's so funny it's flooding I mean I I agree with you like we've got to figure out what it is and I think hopefully in the next few years it will but last year in Chicago the entire United Center getting rowdy for Diego Schwartzman that to me is like a pit of misers layup sort of its power but Irene I think it's just a different event overall than a Grand Slam I mean you know it's particular sessions the matches are shorter there's fewer matches it's only three days but the energy is big and the team aspect like people buy into more the demoralized vs Europe thing than I thought they would which is really cool when you're in the venue and it feels like Europe definitely felt like the home team in Geneva which school I love it I was in Chicago last year so I know you talking about is a different different five and as someone working at you feel a lot more comfortable oh I think because there are more comfortable and laid back so I totally get what you're saying but I want to ask a little bit about your star you know I know you started more the writing side than being in front of the era so let's go through the timeline of Nick mccarville tennis reporting career was God because I know a little bit about it but it's it's good you can't see every night and the podcast but she just yawned as you ask that question so I had to call you I'm not I'm sorry I just had a rough night asleep it's funny I know that I shouldn't be ups come on Tell Jet Lag oscillators real so much more annoying than Australia jetlag don't like what is going on I'm so sorry did not could not be worse No it actually I mean I I kind of a little anecdote at the start but I literally was here being friends in two thousand six when I was in college and was like I really want an internship at tennis magazine that was like the big thing for me and I was flying out that Monday after Thanksgiving wing and rolled my suitcase into the office and went up to the front desk manager and was like hey can can I apply for an internship and that summer I interned at tennis magazine we're just cool it was like kind of my first foray into tennis journalism I didn't tennis blogging college and then like they're soon after once I came to New York I was still doing a little bit but kind of my like big break within tennis journalism was in two thousand nine I had been in New York for a year and the New York Times I just started like a whole family of blogs and one of those blogs was called straight-sets which was the tennis blog for the New York Times so I started writing for them most of an unpaid they paid a little bit for certain blogs that they would end up using on the website in different sections but that was kind of my I like breakthrough and then from there I worked on some side projects and got my first writing job with them. MSNBC DOT COM in two thousand and ten the next year and then slowly started making my way into the tennis world that's like way way back I remember for some reason the first memory our first thing I came across was USA. Today I mean so I I worked so I was with at Msnbc and then the daily beast which is a news website and then in the summer of two thousand twelve I got offered to do NBC Olympics coverage for their website as well as work on the US Open APP I was like the APP copywriter so I did all of the copy for the US Open Up in twenty twelve which is it's so funny like how different apps work now like I was specifically hired just for that but those two gigs basically spurred me to start doing the tournament work as Irena Sanger Donald at the Grand Slams and that got me into like writing for tournament websites social media helping people manage their websites overall like digital content and then in two thousand fifteen USA Today hired me as their tennis reporter so I did that for ears Twenty fifteen and sixteen and did that cool feature about Irena in Paris and her

Nick Mccarville New York City Tennis Magazine Tennis United States Roger Federer Roger Fetter Msnbc Switzerland Irena Sanger Donald Emceeing Tennessee Argentina Writer Intern NBC Paris Usa Today
"sanger" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Hi it's Margaret Sanger it's exactly what it is this is planned this is Margaret Sanger and eugenics this is the original purpose of Planned Parenthood which was to get repaired the of people who are not white. and who did not pass a certain IQ level it's exactly what this is. so the next question Anderson Cooper ask crazy Bernie would people in coastal communities whoever house right on the beach what they have to move to stop and think about this. go back two thousand eight two thousand nine a woman in the White House Mr present asco bonnet Mister president my my mother is ninety seven and she wants to live what we should be able to get medical care under about now will give her a pill and just make her comfortable. get a citizen asking a present can my mother continue to live one she reaches one hundred now we got somebody asking crazy Bernie are if I live on the beach or you're gonna make me more I don't think it makes a lot of sense to rebuild that house so that it is you know knocked down again in the next storm all in ways that happen is president well yeah all of the well you do your best to carrots and sticks at the federal level but I you know if people want to rebuild in an area which will be devastated by the next storm they're certainly not gonna get any federal assistance for my administration to do that so there check that if you want to be stupid enough he just totally Obama's. you you you you you're gonna live where you could get wiped out you're not usually help for me. this is are these people are. now look I'm out of time there there is something to be said you know we take the risk people want to live on the ocean people want to live on the beach your your you realize that a hurricane to come your way everybody lives there knows it takes the risk gets the insurance whatever necessary it's their life they make up their minds to do it but these people want to come along and take your house away and make you move and make those areas off limits is none of their damn.

Margaret Sanger Anderson Cooper Bernie president Obama White House
US military official says he's not concerned about Iran missile test

All Things Considered

03:46 min | 2 years ago

US military official says he's not concerned about Iran missile test

"Let's look now reports that Iran has test launched a medium range missile this happened on Wednesday US officials say the missiles not a threat to any US presence in the region it does of course come as tensions between the US and Iran are running fine to talk about this I'm joined now by David Sanger he tracks national security and all things nuclear for The New York Times today great to be with the Merrill is what we know about this lunch all this is a test launch of a missile that is not new to the Iranians that was first put together in nineteen ninety eight it actually is a variant of a north Korean missile called the no down and the north Koreans and the Iranians work together a lot in their missile programs it's always left the mystery about whether they're doing the same on the nuclear side they've test launch these before so as the Pentagon indicated the big issue is not the test itself it didn't land any place that would be a danger to anyone no it stayed inside around the whole time is not right yes it stayed inside Iran and the big issue here is that they launched it at a whole you'll remember that in the two thousand and fifteen nuclear agreement between the Obama administration and pteron it covered nuclear but it did not cover missile tests and this is been one of the big complaints that the trump administration has had about the agreement one of the reasons the president cited when he withdrew from the agreement last year there are however U. N. resolutions that at least discourage Iran from doing this and say that they cannot test a missile that could be armed with a nuclear weapon well this one clearly could be it's big enough to be armed with a nuclear weapon but the Iranians say they're not violation because they have no intention of building nuclear weapons so do we know what they are up to here why are they launching this missile and and why now I think this was a political statement mostly to the Europeans your member that what's been going on in the past couple of weeks is that the Iranians have said we are going to age are way out of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement produce more nuclear material than is allowed under the agreement producer that higher enrichment levels that is allowed in less you Europe get serious and makes up for the money lost to American led sanctions and I think the Iranians are just testing a missile that can reach the age of Europe to just make a point that the Europeans have an interest in keeping all this together the US reaction to this has been pretty muted I think it's fair to characterize it that way in your store you quote anonymous US military official who again says Hey this pose no threat to any US bases in the US people in the region is it surprising the U. S. given how high tensions up and running did not react with more force it is a little surprising and I'm I'm don't know why that is one possibility is that there are aging their way toward trying to figure out how to conduct some negotiations and concluded that in the end this doesn't make that big a strategic difference the other possibility is that they reacted very mildly this of north Korean Tess the other day and of course the president will let North Korea get away with an awful lot of things because he's always says I've got a great relationship with Kim Jong un he can't say that about the supreme leader with the president of a wrong with whom he's barely ever communicated so I think they were concerned a bit that if they said something very strong about the Iranian test people turn around and say what we write ins are doing anything the north Koreans having just done you could live with that thank you David thank you it's David Sanger of The New York

Iran United States
"sanger" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on American Innovations

"She promises check will be forthcoming in the next week every day, Pinkus rushes to the mailbox cigarette dangling from his mouth to go through the mail on day. Seven it arrives, he rips open the envelope. Sanger's familiar cursive, and looks at the check. This can't be right two thousand dollars. He shakes the envelope, but nothing else spills out he was assuming that Sanger would come through with enough funds to move the project forward two thousand dollars would barely get them through a few more weeks. Pinkas calls her right away. Margaret. I thank you for the two thousand dollars. He has dates Sanger is nothing if not for miserable. I say this, what the utmost respect the the amount? The amount is ludicrous is the word that comes to mind. It's prohibitive. We can't continue like this. Please tell me there's more coming. I'm sorry, Gregory. There's, there's no more money, little of my own to give in my organization is getting cold feet. We're gonna have to get creative. Sanger's influence with the organization. She co founded has been waning for years, even as an elderly woman, she continued to represent the radical wing of the birth control.

Sanger Pinkus Pinkas Gregory two thousand dollars
"sanger" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on American Innovations

"When Margaret Sanger opened the doors to her birth control clinic nineteen sixteen. She knew she was breaking the wall, but she didn't care Sanger was a nurse by trade and as such she'd sworn to devote herself to the welfare those in her care, and in the early nineteen hundreds that meant doing something about the public health crisis caused by unplanned, pregnancies. At the turn of the century many women were having babies with no break in between pregnancies, put them at risk for Nimia and uterine rupture. It's miscarriages were common of.

Margaret Sanger uterine rupture Nimia
"sanger" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Doesn't occur in Indiana. But does occur in China? I don't know and Clarence Thomas doesn't tell us. But then. After sort of justifying the purpose for this Bill by by virtue of reference to international law, which, again, I just wanna point out that if glee literally made a career out of mocking supreme court decisions that did this particularly on capital, punishment after that we then get to the most offensive and degrade just part of, of this twenty page screed, which is. Eight decades after Sanger's negro project abortion, in the United States is marked by considerable, racial disparity and then goes through, and this is the gravity of the attack. And this is the part that is one hundred percent false. Okay. The idea is that Margaret Sanger was a eugenicist not true. She, she did express views that were sympathetic to eugenics at a time in which everybody expressed views that were sympathetic to eugenics. It's not something about, which we should be proud. And it is something. I again, the word irony does does not apply, but the only supreme court decision that is cited in the middle of this concurrence is buck versus bell, which is the infamous decision, upholding mandatory sterilization that, that, that. Conclude with a line three generations of imbeciles is enough that is very clearly a low point in our nation's history. But it makes the opposite point that Clarence Thomas thinks that it makes right? Which is to say in the first twenty five to thirty years of the twentieth, century. The even the supreme court endorsed eugenics, right? So finding out that somebody in the early nineteen hundreds said, a couple of sentences that are pro eugenics is not surprising, some of the most celebrated jurists in American history said those sorts of things. Right. That does not make it correct. I, I don't think we need to do an opening arguments on why eugenics is bad. You know philosophically legally, you know in every conceivable, right? Like we know that, but, but that is the historical context at a time in which eugenics. Was part of the public discussion, but not in, but not with the racial connotation that, that this pernicious lie has attached to it. So I'm going to attach in the show notes two separate articles. One is a published peer review journal article in published by the, the journal of the national institutes of health, which argues very convincingly that Margaret Sanger was not a eugenicist and was not a racist. She indeed gave voice to eugenicist voices, but here, I'm gonna read from a little bit of the abstract, the basic concept of the jenex movements in the twenties. And thirties, was that a better breed of humans could be created if the fifth had more children and the unfit had fewer this concept influenced broad spectrum of thought, but there was little consensus on the definitions of fit and unfit in theory. The movement was not racist. It's message intended to cross race barriers for the overall advancement of mankind. Most you Genesis agreed that birth control would be a detriment to the, to the human race and were opposed to it charges that. Sanger's motives for promoting birth control were eugenic are not supported in, in her most important work pivot of civilization. Sanger's dissent from eugenics was made clear by examining extracts from her books, the author refutes, the notion that Sanger was a eugenicist k by the way, Clarence Thomas selectively quotes from pivot of civilization. But he only quotes the parts that have been previously quoted by David Barton, and the like I would wager any amount of money that Clarence Thomas has not read pivot of civilization, any amount of money now next. What about the notion? What about the negro project, right? The quote negro project was indeed a project undertaken by Margaret Sanger to provide birth control and later access to abortion to low income predominantly African American communities. I should point out the reason for this was Margaret Sanger. Opened her first birth control clinic in Brooklyn in nineteen sixteen. That was the white area of Brooklyn in nineteen sixteen it predominantly served white immigrant women in nineteen thirty. She was then approached by prominent African American activists including WBZ bullies..

Margaret Sanger Clarence Thomas Indiana Brooklyn China national institutes of health WBZ United States David Barton one hundred percent Eight decades thirty years
"sanger" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Thomas also cited a report called birth control, in the negro, and which Sanger, enter co-authors identify blacks, as the great problem of the south, the group of the greatest economic health and social problems and developed a birth control program geared toward this population, and she later emphasized, that black ministers should be involved in the program, noting. We don't want word to go out that we want to exterminate the negro population and the ministers, the man who could straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members unquote. And it goes on and on and on and on and on. Sanger condemned abortion, as a disgrace to civilization and eugenicist support legalizing abortion and many abortion advocates endorsed using abortion for you genyk reasons, including most notably future plan. Put president elegant Bacher as I said before. Planned Parenthood its roots is a racist organization that you know this much like the democrat party. Now, every single person you heard in the first hour who I played on a clip lose, people, commenters so forth. Support Planned Parenthood every single one every single one of them is either a democrat or supports the democrat party openly. Right behind the scenes. Every single one. And yet, it's Trump. Who they paint as they are. I'll be right back. Lovin.

democrat party Sanger Bacher Thomas president
Trump, Margot Sanger And President discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

05:01 min | 2 years ago

Trump, Margot Sanger And President discussed on PBS NewsHour

"For many years, both political parties have agreed to exempt some health care workers from providing care and performing certain procedures. They object to on religious or moral grounds that can include abortions and sterilizations, but his own vase tells us, President Trump has gone further than his predecessors by issuing a complex and more comprehensive rule allowing for these exemptions Judy the president announced the new rule tied to the national day of prayer. Conservative groups welcomed what they call conscience protections, but women's groups LGBTQ advocates and others are warning the rule could reduce services and lead to discrimination against transgender patients and others if providers refuse to deliver certain care or treat people under the new rule hospitals clinics and other institutions must comply with twenty five laws that are part of this in order to receive funding from federal programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. Margot Sanger cats writes about healthcare for the. New York Times, and she joins me here. Welcome to the news hour. So you've described this to my colleagues as an expansion of existing rules both the category of workers. But also the ways in which they can object. Explain that to me. Yes, there have always been rules that have protected health care practitioners from having to participate in certain kinds of services that they might have religious or conscience objections to and I think the classic example is a healthcare provider who objects to performing an abortion say, but with this rule does it really widens the category of person who could have this kind of junction to include even say the schedule or a medical office who might not want to schedule a patient for a certain procedure. I'm all the way up through the board of directors of a hospital, then might say this hospital will not perform certain services will not offer them to our patients. So the kind of groups of people who can object to things on conscious basis have grown, and the other thing that this rule does is that it provides more enforcement kind of processes and more punishment. So if a hospital fails to protect the rights. Of its religious worker than it could be punished pretty substantially potentially losing a lot of it's federal funding. So obviously critics of the rule of Ponant to it say that this just means a lot of ways that people can actually discriminate against certain categories of communities where some of these examples that they cited as places where people can come in contact with the healthcare system and be denied services. They should get. So I think there are a lot of concerns. We don't exactly how this is going to play out on the ground. But the worry is that certain kind of patients navy tonight care because they're the healthcare workers who are treating them have religious convictions that inter that disagree with certain aspects of their lifestyle. So there's a concern, for example, that perhaps a doctor would not wanna treat the child of a gay couple because they have a religious objection to gay marriage, for example, or there are a lot of concerns that transgender patients may have difficulties accessing services the rule itself. Make reference to some very old laws from the nineteen seventies that protect workers who don't wanna participate in sterilization, it seems to suggest. That certain services that transgender patients receive might be treated as sterilization, which transgender rights advocates say is really a stretch of what that law was originally intended to do you mentioned the enforcement that what if there's a conflict what if protecting someone's religious freedom. They don't want to perform a service means that then they're discriminating against another group. How do you resolve that conflict? I think it's a really interesting question that's raised by this rule because these are both civil rights questions. Right. There are civil rights that are supposed to protect patients and prevent them from being the subject of discrimination because of their status because of their sex or their other aspects of their person. But then there's also this concern about the civil rights of these health care workers who shouldn't be forced to do things that interfere with their religious convictions. And I think the Trump administration through this action through series of other actions has really signaled that they're much more worried about the civil rights of the religious person in a healthcare setting than they are about the civil rights of the patient being denied care. The details of how this would work out at any individual. Case I think we are going to have to see, and you could imagine for example, a situation in which both parties might have a legal case to bring forward about the way that their healthcare institution results. This speaking of legal cases, we should note that San Francisco immediately sued the Trump administration the rule is scheduled to go into effect sixty days after it's published in the Federal Register less than a minute left. When we expect to happen next is just get caught up in a legal battle and never actually implemented. I think it's very possible that it will. There are a number of healthcare institutions and also states municipalities like San Francisco that are worried about this rule potentially interfering with some of their practices, and it could be stopped before it even goes into effect. We've seen that with other related Trump administration actions, including one having to do with family planning grants were they were trying to prevent certain healthcare providers that provide abortion from getting these family planning grant. So this is all part of the regulatory agenda that may well get caught up in the courts before we really see it happening on the ground one to follow for sure. Margaret Sanger cats of New York. Times thanks for being here. Thank you for

Donald Trump Margot Sanger President Trump New York Times Margaret Sanger Medicare San Francisco Judy Medicaid New York Sixty Days
Bribery, Rick Sanger And Director discussed on Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Bribery, Rick Sanger And Director discussed on Rush Limbaugh

"A dozen people accused in the nation's biggest college admissions bribery case doing Boston federal court today. They include six college, athletic coaches, and associate athletic director to SAT ACT test administrators and two people accused of working with alleged ringleader. Rick Sanger, Sanger's accused of orchestrating the cheating and bribery scandal and is pleading

Bribery Rick Sanger Director Boston
How to keep your cool during stock market chaos

CNBC's Fast Money

01:22 min | 3 years ago

How to keep your cool during stock market chaos

"Sock. Seeing red today as five hundred falling back into correction territory erasing, all of its games this year, nearly half the index is now in a bear market down twenty percent or more from their highs as a Sophist gotten brutal over the last couple of months guy. Here has taught us how to spot a bottom. How to know if it's going to get worse. How to keep your cool. Amidst the chaos, but if you've been burned by the markets, he's got a new lesson on went to surrender to the selling. A second me call the more, you know, guy, take it away. Everybody high mouth. Now you saying you're sitting at home and you saying yourself. Yeah. You tell me this now Margaret Sanger thousand points in the last two days, thanks for nothin' guy. Okay. But you know, what things are going to happen again. And so these are the things you should be looking for next time around. Let's take a look bells number one stock doesn't rally on good news. Give me an example guy. I'll give you a great example, the first example over the last month or so what's Netflix recall? They reported a ridiculous. Strong quarter. The stock went from about three hundred and thirty dollars to three sixty. We talked about it that night said it better build on this. Otherwise, some bad things could be in store, and here, we are one hundred dollars later, you say, that's just one example. Yeah, it is a give you another one look at Macy's and look at WalMart. Same type of thing. Number two company. Throws you a curve ball in the business. We call that Tim and uncle Charlie. Oh, thank you. Yeah.

Margaret Sanger Macy Uncle Charlie Netflix Walmart TIM One Hundred Dollars Thirty Dollars Twenty Percent Two Days
Blaze Interview with Ethan Hawke and Ben Dickey

Talk Nerdy to Me

04:22 min | 3 years ago

Blaze Interview with Ethan Hawke and Ben Dickey

"Object, lots joy, Sanger. And here this with the pastoral post. We have some esteemed guests with us various team, Ethan Dickey of the film that's coming out here. You need to check it out over at the Alamo draft house. It's called for the second showing, I think are also without a third showing. That one is. Off the rails, but full of wisdom. I christian. So just. Some nice cuisine. Jay last night. Yeah, we're going. I don't even know. People have thrown the water. Saturday here before. Hu's trip here for sure. Got to go to high miss hut. Three. It's a Mexican restaurant, open three till twenty four hours. That you're sitting everybody, we talk, scary drive everybody interviews till. There are so many good ones. Fort worth. Yeah. Got the news about the interview yesterday with you guys. Trae shoots me tax. He says, got got eaten in Ben coming up tomorrow. Don't wear take. And as one does for interview you brush up, you know, you look at Google. You know, we competed last ditch effort, but the. I'm looking up and then just Bartik with this news about and we host a geeky talk show called talk nerdy to me. So this is a little apropos ears. Throw it out there. I'm not even put an context into context. Yeah, even hawk aid superhero. Logan socked. Here's the thing. I had no idea how sensitive superheroes were. If I did, I would have been a lot. Let me correct the record. Okay. The reason I was talking about Logan is because I love it. I love superhero movies. I like every kind of movie. I don't think there's a difference between high art and low art. There are movies that people put their heart into in their movies that people try to cash in on in the ones I like are the ones that people put their heart into, and you can feel it in a superior movie or you can feel it in horror movie or you can feel it in some art house movie. What I was talking about is that there is so much money being spent commercially making it so that that's all we see in. There aren't rooms for the movies that I grew up on. One of the Kuku snus I'm day those type of movies would now be art house movies in their made to feel fringe in their made to feel small. You know, I was making the joke that if if Logan dark Knight and Dr. Strange are great art films. What is fanny? Alexander do nothing. Theater today. The most of my, those are my favorite superhero movies. Doctor strange, Logan, darva this great films, but they're not. The only thing there is in young people grow up today. Thinking that's not a real movie. Was. A green screen not involved, and it's not. It's not a real. Our country turns everything into a competition. They wanna tell you what's score on rotten tomatoes. What's how much box office did it make in when it was going up to things didn't exist, and you could just absorb movie for how it meant to you? It doesn't. There's no game to win. You know, that's not what artists he said. With music film women. Elevator out to pay. Let's see what that's all about. So let's talk about the stock about blaze here of the film that he directed Ethan the road and. Stars here. And when the most interesting things about this Bill also the Genesis of how this came to be you guys known each other, what fifteen years and cut me from road. You guys were jamming out to to blaze and what happens slower than that. The truth is how well we are girl friends or best friends right since like the second third grade. And so we would go on vacations together in those two gap all night long. And we a friendship happened. I grew to love Benz, music Benz in a band called the blood feathers and Philly that I loved

Jonathan Winters Robin Williams Robin Zero Jack Nicholson BEN Graham Norton Nike KIM San Antonio Denko Ethan Swoosh Blaze Foley Robinson Twenty Year
This woman helped a stranger short on cash at Wawa. Then she found out it was actually Keith Urban.

Deminski and Doyle

00:39 sec | 3 years ago

This woman helped a stranger short on cash at Wawa. Then she found out it was actually Keith Urban.

"Thomas Rhett will be helping out Kelly Clarkson and Keith urban will advise Blake. Shelton's Sanger's per season fifteen this fall on NBC speaking of Keith urban he made a wa wa run while in jersey a woman in Medford. Beta forward with the country star and husband of. Nicole Kidman when he was scrounging for some cash at the register the former American idol judge then took a photo. With the woman that's gone viral urban and Kelsey Ballerini played in. Camden last week it's been a star studded summer four jersey with Al Pacino pizza run in ocean. City and Ramona's annual LB vacation last month poor pink the pop star is being treated for a gastric virus after being. Hospitalized for dehydration Popstars fallen ill while on, a grilling tour scheduled in stralia where she's. Been.

Keith Urban Kelsey Ballerini Thomas Rhett Nicole Kidman Kelly Clarkson WA Al Pacino NBC Shelton Medford Sanger Ramona Blake Camden Stralia
Parents of disabled daughter consider divorce to qualify for Medicaid, report says

Chris Krok

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Parents of disabled daughter consider divorce to qualify for Medicaid, report says

"Texas family from sanger married with two kids one is two two year old girl and a six year old girl the six year old girl is profoundly disabled and because they have insurance but because of a profound disability they're having to come up with fifteen thousand dollars a year out of pocket and they say it's gotten so bad they don't qualify for medicaid because he makes about forty thousand dollars a year and so they actually say that they're now being torn between having health care or divorce because they say they'll if they divorce apparently that's their plan according to wfan tv channel eight to divorce because then she'll be a single mother single jobless mother of two and qualify for medicaid here is the audio from this story from wfan tv channel eight when you have a newborn everything gets really and you have to really adapt to somebody needing twenty four seven all the time we've had a newborn verse six and a half years so yes six and a half years they've had this profoundly disabled child sin nice she says eat twenty four seven two you can't be off i do agree with her on that hard ten percent i have friends who have children who are profoundly disabled and others who have children who are disabled with down syndrome for example and always i it's it's a very special thing and it's an amazing thing because god gives us different types of precious children for different reasons and i've always wanted stuff i talked to one of my friends who's got a profoundly disabled daughter and i said you know she sleep through the night because i'm curious about things like i mean is it is it an every night thing like oh my gosh you know what i mean and you know these are things to think about with our friends who have children it's a very special situation and we need support and pray for these folks but let me let me continue on with the audio from the wfan tv channel eight story as to get things opening the mail because i was scared of what would calm or what bill would come or what denial government so you guys are considering something extreme yes tell me what that is it would just be to get a divorce it would be to not be together to get our child.

Sanger Texas Wfan Six Year Fifteen Thousand Dollars Forty Thousand Dollars Two Two Year Ten Percent
"sanger" Discussed on No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

"The redhead guy who's a beautiful writer guy sharon sharon great sanger there's so many strong sanger's england oh oh was that dogs can toll joint talks can tall joint key craving dr not she's not she's not darker than everybody else that i realized she is leading love she's she's mixed bre but she's docking everybody else i might labral i made to me i believe that she is a little bit darker than than georgia she still comes up she looks closer to nicole shares than she was onto a wall she's welsh half welsh half guy this factly she still bad though that's crazy that's don't yeah but they but this thing is that you know quite salad kind of them on the end of them it's been niger in yet when that's down comes we will you you guys us kurdish that i have thing which one tile cruise like a star yeah it's high of cruise tire yeah that's true that's true but there's there's a lot of them out there and i don't know what's in the water like they gum rainy days will make your saying everything girl on my own about right inside my world the song or something like that i don't remember i was great i won't keep your day job but that was great man oh this dwi oh do i owe is british eight wyo is you're about to she did that song with a naked called sexual guy i think i did not know that like to be sexual yeah she's a do dial she's by misdee bella she didn't lot of coal writing for wiley back back in the day.

sanger georgia writer sharon sharon nicole niger
"sanger" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on Triangulation

"Legal stuff get out of the way used legalzoom whether you want to take your business to the next level or take control of your family's future with an estate plan legalzoom plugs right into your life so you can take care of the things that matter most they are not aloft firm but they have resources that keep you on the right path including advice from their network of independent attorneys get off to a strong start in twenty 18 at legalzoomcom he can do that today and you'll get special savings when you enter triangulation at checkout that's triangulation for special savings at legal zoom dot com legalzoom where life meets legal i am talking to dr larry sanger who was the cofounder of wicked pedia an is the seat i o of ever a pedia and ever a pedia is using block chain to catalogue the world's knowledge uh tell us about how ever a pedia works but her pedia is a so i've i loved us a site and i i wouldn't be part of it if i didn't um um the huge difference between ever pedia does actually two of them between ever pedia and wikipedia the first is it's truly the encyclopedia of everything you can make articles if he wanted to about every city street every business every person in the world um i made an article about my left thumb um just to show that i could um and so there is no no to bility policy on every pedia at the consequences of that are uh surprisingly profound actually a really changes the nature of what is going on and i wouldn't guest this at first but i think it changes it for the better i don't think it's anything that would that we ever really seriously considered enrique pedia in it i don't think we ever really really seriously considered the idea of just letting people make articles about anything as long as they were encyclopedia articles they have to be encyclopedia articles but they literally the top because open um and um it it basically means that that you can go in and and a cata.

enrique pedia dr larry sanger
"sanger" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on Triangulation

"Liam kassian love from people you trust this is tweets bandwidth for triangulation is brought to you by cash fly at sea a c h e f l y dot com this is triangulation episode three twenty eight recorded january fifth 2018 larry sanger this episode of triangulation is brought to you by legalzoom get your dream business up and running or take control of your family's future with legalzoom for special savings visit legalzoomcom and enter triangulation at checkout welcomed the triangulation this is the show we talk to the most interesting people in technology today my guest is dr larry sanger he is the see i o of ever a pedia and the cofounder of wicket wicket pedia who is also the founder of citizens the m and a that is a tool that uses block chained to catalogue the world's best knowledge welcome to the show dr singer thank you for having me so let's start at the beginning wicket pedia you were one of the co cofounders tell us a little bit about a what inspired you i know new pedia came little bit before that you were the editor in chief of new pedia talk a little bit about uh the the beginnings of what the pedia sure roll basically i was wrapping up a website that i had been working on about the millennium bulletin bug feet be y two k problem um um and uh i was c'mon brief purpose that um and i sent out a little uh proposal two different acquaintances and friends of mine what a firm was jimmy wales and he replied i'm totally out of the blue saying don't work on that why don't you come in work on this new website that i wanna start recalling it new pedia and you pedia and um it will basically use open source principles are applying it to content development and sort of software development and real will create the world's first free encyclopedia and i thought that sounded awesome and you know not being married at the time i could just like pick up and go across the country and i did that same like within a couple of weeks.

Liam kassian larry sanger founder jimmy wales software development editor in chief two k
"sanger" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"Isn't that the name have no idea what the hell utah and you can you beach zammar some crapper saying like oh as a thing okay now it's a thing i assure you're not talking about the seventy superhero on cbs saturday now this is not the show had alkhour hour with she's ham now but there's a you know will meet them sanger's does more around that name now which is why the dollar value of the purchase might be so high right it's not just an app anymore there's more stuff that i would i think it's weird suzanne as an app that i remember when it first came out i thought it was the most magical thing i've ever ones there was a there was a white paper on at that was like amazing to even read because nobody thought that that was even possible to you know it was so it was wiped out in the described how it's like the should sam led to content id on youtube as well and it sucks but a negative i'm just saying like they created this thing this idea that you could somehow fingerprint audio from any energy easily search against at night which is which is what it was right because it had to happen near instantly from the time it's the sound sample when you got the answer back a seconds now and it wasn't just and now i can't tell you the last time eva valid open up she it wasn't just had it wasn't just a fingerprint it was a fingerprint that you could use any small portion of and still tell that it was the thing ranked that means they kept was right like syria has disintegrate into i think google assistant has its saving you just say look on the new pixel lines like you could have your you can't have your personal to europe to excell sitting on the table and it will oil automatically identify the song playing with are you asking in without hitting internet if.

utah cbs sanger white paper youtube syria google europe
"sanger" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"sanger" Discussed on Risky Business

"From david sanger years ago that that the nsa had planted had implants all or iran and was ready to shut down running infrastructure in the in the events of a nuclear crisis which of nose to almost to be expected i would think especially when you were wrong ready taken a step of destroying their physical infrastructure was stuxnet in targeted ways on site on your you don't necessarily think that that that reporting captures the full history shall we say right now i and i i wouldn't be surprised if an a we do as a reporter in the piece and i think a lot of people knew if they're paying attention the same group sand worm that had turned off the power in ukraine in 2015 us seems to have the black energy and on the networks of american utilities in 2014 so it seems like russia has been trying to do this to the us already but it that you know that alone wouldn't be that interesting if they haven't ever crossed the lion actually done it somewhere ends that's the difference i mean i i guess i do expect liz you said that powerful countries will lay the groundwork to do this to each other and to less powerful countries and anyone they feel like doing it too but it's it's the it's the brazen this of the putin regime that makes me think it that's what's different is that they cross the line may it like a we i i don't know if we've ever i i may be putting my foot in my mouth but i don't think we i don't know of a time when the us has use actual hacking to meddle in someone's election.

stuxnet reporter ukraine russia us liz david sanger iran shut down putin