10 Burst results for "Sange Caca"

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:37 min | 4 months ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to clinic. I'm not sange caca. Leukemia is a cancer of the blood forming tissues including the bone. Marrow and the lymphatic system. There are many types of leukemia. Some affecting children while other forms most a current adults indeed approximately one and a half percent of men and women will be diagnosed with leukemia at some point during their lifetime. Joining us to discuss. Today is dr james foreign chair of the acute leukemia. Myeloid neoplasms disease group at the american cancer center. Welcome to the program to foreign. Thanks very much good morning. Thank you for speaking with me so you know. We hear about leukemia. and sort of cancer. the blood-forming tissues. Can you actually explain what happens. Yeah simplistically we break. Key down into acute leukemia and chronic virginia and in acute leukemia. It's it. I'm glad you use the word cancer. That can be confusing for people. It is a blood cancer. And it's the early bone marrow cells that are growing throughout your life. Other than my lloyd ones that we call acute myeloid leukemia or the lymphoid one that typically would turn into antibody producing cells or t. cells Some cases that for some reason become just regulated and behave as a cancer. Overgrowth the bone marrow. Still into the blood and doesn't really behaved like other cancers. It's not something where there's a stage necessarily you have it or you don't have it and increasingly common as a matter of fact the The chronic leukemia is our little bit different They're more process of accumulation of cells. That should be turning over dying. Normally they begin to accumulate lymphoid. Ones that we call. Cll or my loved ones. We call cml and the chronic ones take a different path. A usually Developer years as opposed to the ones that developed over months or sometimes shorter. So you mentioned About leukemia. Being a blood cancer when we think of cancer we think of growth and lumps and bumps does. Leukemia presented a similar.

Today dr james foreign approximately one and a half p myeloid leukemia Leukemia leukemia american cancer
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"Welcome to the clinic. CNA SANGE CACA across the world, one of the biggest changes forced by the COVID, nineteen pandemic was in the field of education. Really all programs were rapidly moved to a distance learning module, online and remote instruction has his own unique challenges, and that was certainly true here at Mayo Clinic joining us to discuss education that time of Covid Nineteen Dean for Student Affairs in the Mayo. Mayo Clinic Alex School of Medicine in Minnesota Dr, Atkins Andhra Spinner Welcome to the program Dr Spinner. Thank you very much. Dr Carr here so pre covid nineteen. Tell us about what medical school education was like. Interestingly, medical education has not changed very much over one hundred years of back in nineteen ten Dr, flex producer report described how medical education should be optimized so before that we thought of the? Apprenticeship model where medical students or other individuals who were trained to become doctors were essentially at the bedside of the patient together with the doctor, and so they learned through modeling and demonstration. But he determined that it was important to establish some foundational principles and so medical school from that point on became what it is currently today two years of. Scientific foundations so within the classroom anatomy dissections pathology. And just essentially the main sort of organ systems, and then the following two years, or actually at the bedside, so the clinical portion of the training where students are now learning really side by side with physicians, so traditionally She said this full years. How many medical students are actually involved in classroom? Education also hospital rotations. So within the Mayo Clinic we actually have a relatively small medical school as you know, we do have three campuses campus in Arizona and a campus in Florida is well the Florida campus is a two year campus, a clinical campus so years three and four. The Arizona. Campus is a full for your campus and he'll be graduating class in twenty twenty one so if you include a at all individuals within the school we. We have roughly one hundred, two hundred and eight medical students per year multiply that by four within the Minnesota campus. We have roughly fifty four students per year, and so years one and two one hundred and ten individuals in the classroom, and the same amount within clinical rotation, so either in the outpatient clinics or in the hospitals. Clearly, that's a lot of students across not just in in Rochester, Minnesota or across the country. And that takes a lot of organization to ensure their educational needs of met fast, and then march happened and so tell us what happened there to ensure air education was done safely quite early on the. C. Which is the Accrediting Association of Medical Colleges, which oversees medication United States and in Canada, essentially released some recommendations, and they felt that it was important. Dr Poll Medical Students from clinical rotations to essentially a optimize their safety in the setting of Colbert especially in a very fluid situation where issues such as P, P or becoming problematic. And, so we did in fact, follow suit, and so early on by about mid-march students were pulled from clinical rotations, and subsequently students who actually hold as well from the on campus, large classrooms, fifty plus individuals all huddled together setting because of the potential risks associated with that, it was quite incredible to see Zillions of our faculty of our students of our administrative staffing of everyone, our leadership in the medical school. We just sort of all pulled together, and made it happen, and so our dean of Academic Affairs Dr Darcy read quickly transitioned all of their learning. Virtually some explain what that meant. The first two years where most of the education is within the classroom setting essentially lectures were taught through blackboard or zoom, and our faculty really stepped up. They were extraordinary and so exams could be delivered obviously remotely that kind of thing for students who were in clinical rotations as I stated they were polled, and then it quickly what we What the the Academic Affairs Branch was able to do is develop virtual alternatives. So for example there was a model that was created regarding, Kobe, and so, what aspects of medical education were important a continent setting? Typically, those who are at the bedside were consistent to what we call hybrid rotations where they were going to do a portion virtually, and as soon as the clinics were opened, the rest was going to be completed at the bedside is one I wanNA make about. The. Majority of medical schools across the country to continue advancing the student, and their curriculum switched to all virtual learning, which meant that a large number of medical students really never may have had that clinical exposure to some core rotations, but we at the Mayo Clinic Alex Kroll of Medicine, the leadership disgusted and we felt that our priorities were twofold one was to really prepare students to be to be a well prepared physicians, so to make sure that we did not increase those. Those core educational opportunities to make very competent and second is to keep the students safe. We were happy to to to find out that extra students are returning to the clinic in June and so now having completed for example few weeks of psychiatry virtually, they're going to be going to the bedside. Currently we think that that will advantage them as well in our match up, but more importantly than it's preparing them to be competent physician a great point that you make. In terms of the hands on education is critical, not only for the students, but the patients themselves I think the patients really enjoy that and as a practice is opening up safely as we've seen as you said through June. The students will be back I think that's that's a welcome relief for them. But tell US education can be stressful and you know. Wellness is an important part of how a students go through their training, or what have you done in the medical school to ensure the wellness of our students? We built program a few years ago called the Thrive Program which essentially is an acronym that stands for training medical students to become a humanistic professional individuals who are resilient and healthy. WHO ARE INNOVATIVE DOT LEADERS And who also experienced individualized success to people casually excellent, and so we don't view our responsibility to end when they graduate responsibility is to launch them in their careers. I wish I had been taught self care when I was going through medical school and residency and fellowship, and so we feel that knowledge and procedures are important, but at concept of how do you balance South here so that you can actually be more effective as a physician and decrease the chances of of burnout, which we know is associated with inferior patient outcomes. Were lucky, because we already had a strong program in place, and so what we did is we just transitioned it to being virtual? So, we created opportunities for check INS on zoom for our students. We have a program called seawall student wellness activities where students can apply for two hundred fifty dollars to participate in wellness activities, and they've been very creative from baking, too. You Know Basketball tournaments to dragon racing up in the cities. Which I admit I had up. It's boat to raise I didn't know that was, but now they're doing it virtually, so they're buying online games that they can then engage with one another and check INS. Were they all order a cookbook and the recipe at the? The same time we also make sure to be interfacing with them, so we have virtual hours where they can connect with us. Town halls class meetings where everybody comes together. Because that's social support is so important, especially during covert people feel isolated, it's interesting you mention that about social distancing and things like that, but as you said everybody's innovated, and actually now the touch points in human connection through technology and virtual learning is actually probably enhance their education as opposed to previously where you're sort of all pigeonholed and doing several things.

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Alex School of Med Arizona United States Minnesota Accrediting Association of Med COVID Mayo Dr Carr Dr Spinner Florida Student Affairs Dr Darcy Basketball Academic Affairs Branch Rochester Alex Kroll producer
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Welcome to the clinic CNA SANGE CACA across the world. One of the biggest changes forced by the COVID, nineteen pandemic was in the field of education. Really all programs were rapidly moved to a distance learning module, online and remote instruction has his own unique challenges, and that was certainly true here at Mayo Clinic, joining us to discuss education that time of covid nineteen is the Dean for Student Affairs in the Mayo Clinic Alex. Alex School of Medicine in Minnesota, Dr, Atkins Andrea will key spinner welcome to the program Dr. Spinner thank you very much. Dr Car happy to be here so pre covid nineteen. Tell us about what medical school education was like. Interestingly Medical Education has not changed very much over one hundred years of back in nineteen ten Dr, flex producer. Report described how medical education should be optimized so before that we thought of the. Apprenticeship model where medical students or other individuals who were trained to become doctors were essentially at the bedside of the patient together with the doctor, and so they learned through modeling and demonstration. But he determined that it was important to establish some foundational principles and so medical school from that point on became what it is currently today two years of. Scientific foundations so within the classroom anatomy dissections pathology. And just essentially the main sort of organ systems, and then the following two years, or actually at the bedside, so the clinical of the training where students are now learning really side by side with physicians, so traditionally She said this full years. How many medical students are actually involved in classroom? Education also hospital rotations. So within the Mayo Clinic we actually have a relatively small medical school. As you know, we do have three campuses campus in Arizona and a campus in Florida is well the Florida campus. is a two year campus, a clinical campus so years three and four. The Arizona campus is a full for your campus and he'll be graduating class in twenty twenty one so if you include a at all individuals within the school we. We have roughly one hundred, two hundred and eight medical students per year multiply that by four within the Minnesota campus we have roughly fifty four students per year, and so.

Medical Education COVID Mayo Clinic covid Alex School of Medicine Minnesota Dr Car Dr. Spinner Arizona Atkins Andrea Florida Student Affairs producer
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"Clinic to Sange CACA. As Cova nineteen continues to spread the World Health Organization says more than one hundred seventeen million children. In thirty seven countries may be missing out on receiving lifesaving measles vaccine the World Health Organization has issued some guidelines to help countries sustain immunization activities during the covert nineteen pandemic. Hated discuss this is Mayo Clinic. Primary Care Physician Dr Tina Auden Trodden. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me so you know. It's an obvious question but I think it's important to to answer. Why is children immunisation vaccine so important I think the current situation with the Novocur honor virus just shows us how scary world can be when we have a disease that we can't treat or prevent so when we talk about childhood vaccines the whole concept is that we have vaccines that prevent serious illnesses that can be harmful even fatal for our children and so we don't want to lose that opportunity to stay on top of the things that we have control over right now. So there's some parents they have some concerns about vaccines for various reasons. What is your message to them. You know I have three kids. I'm a mom of three. My oldest is six four year old and I have a younger son. Who's fifteen months so I've gone through the vaccine process myself with my own children? I personally followed the same guidelines with the C- The American Academy of Pediatrics For my own family and I certainly understand right now being very thoughtful about taking your children outside the home for doctors visits and for vaccines I would encourage families who have concerns about what that feels like for them based on maybe where they live if that's hot spot with the current Kobe nineteen versus Hello there children are what vaccines are due for to have some conversations with their clinics in their pediatricians and family doctors about what the priorities are at this point in time. I mean there may be situations where we can wait a little bit too to have that well child visit and have that vaccine or maybe for that child. Getting that immunization is extremely important. We don't want to lose time to do that. And do it in a safe practice. So many of our clinics and hospitals have been weighing the risks and benefits of seeing our children in the outpatient setting making sure we have some good processes in place to make that a safest possible knowing how important vaccines are. Because as you said we don't want to bring people into the hospital are necessarily because of fears of exposure and so as you said I think it is important to contact your healthcare provider to discuss when and if they should have it and how it should be delivered so what are the. What are the most important vaccines for children? Well right now one of the vaccines that's really on. Our radar is the measles vaccine. So we know that there have been more outbreaks of measles even here in the United States and that is a potentially deadly illness that we want to prevent. So that's a vaccine. Of course we've had a lot of attention on for some time but we don't want to get off track with the timing of that vaccine I also think about protests. No that's another one that can be extremely harmful for our babies and our younger children and so making sure that we're staying on top of that scheduled for protests this as well my saying always be all vaccines are important but I definitely think about those two particular right now. What about when one.

Dr Tina Auden Trodden World Health Organization measles Sange CACA Mayo Clinic Cova American Academy of Pediatrics Kobe United States
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Clinic to Sange CACA. As Cova nineteen continues to spread the World Health Organization says more than one hundred seventeen million children. In thirty seven countries may be missing out on receiving lifesaving measles vaccine the World Health Organization had issued some guidelines to help countries sustain immunization activities during the covert nineteen pandemic. Hated discuss this is Mayo Clinic. Primary Care Physician Dr Tina Auden Trodden. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me so you know. It's an obvious question but I think it's important to to answer. Why is children immunisation vaccine so important I think the current situation with the Novocur honor virus just shows us how scary world can be when we have a disease that we can't treat or prevent so when we talk about childhood vaccines the whole concept is that we have vaccines that prevent serious illnesses that can be harmful even fatal for our children and so we don't want to lose that opportunity to stay on top of the things that we have control over right now. So there's some parents they have some concerns about vaccines for various reasons. What is your message to them. You know I have three kids. I'm a mom of three. My oldest is six four year old and I have a younger son. Who's fifteen months so I've gone through the vaccine process myself with my own children? I personally followed the same guidelines with the C- The American Academy of Pediatrics For my own family and I certainly understand right now being very thoughtful about taking your children outside the home for doctors visits and for vaccines I would encourage families who have concerns about what that feels like for them based on maybe where they live if that's hot spot with the current Kobe nineteen versus Hello there children are what vaccines are due for to have some conversations with their clinics in their pediatricians and family doctors about what the priorities are at this point in time. I mean there may be situations where we can wait a little bit too to have that well child visit and have that vaccine or maybe for that child. Getting that immunization is extremely important. We don't want to lose time to do that. And do it in a safe practice. So many of our clinics and hospitals have been weighing the risks and benefits of seeing our children in the outpatient setting making sure we have some good processes in place to make that a safest possible knowing how important vaccines are. Because as you said we don't want to bring people into the hospital are necessarily because of fears of exposure and so as you said I think it is important to contact your healthcare provider to discuss when and if they should have it and how it should be delivered so what are the. What are the most important vaccines for children? Well right now one of the vaccines that's really on. Our radar is the measles vaccine. So we know that there have been more outbreaks of measles even here in the United States and that is a potentially deadly illness that we want to prevent. So that's a vaccine. Of course we've had a lot of attention on for some time but we don't want to get off track with the timing of that vaccine I also think about protests. No that's another one that can be extremely harmful for our babies and our younger children and so making sure that we're staying on top of that scheduled for protests this as well my saying always be all vaccines are important but I definitely think about those two particular right now..

Dr Tina Auden Trodden World Health Organization measles Sange CACA Mayo Clinic Cova American Academy of Pediatrics United States Kobe
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Clinic to Sange CACA. As Cova nineteen continues to spread the World Health Organization says more than one hundred seventeen million children. In thirty seven countries may be missing out on receiving lifesaving measles vaccine the World Health Organization has issued some guidelines to help countries sustain immunization activities during the covert nineteen pandemic. Hated discuss this is Mayo Clinic. Primary Care Physician Dr Tina Auden Trodden. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me so you know. It's an obvious question but I think it's important to to answer. Why is children immunisation vaccine so important I think the current situation with the Novocur honor virus just shows us how scary world can be when we have a disease that we can't treat or prevent so when we talk about childhood vaccines the whole concept is that we have vaccines that prevent serious illnesses that can be harmful even fatal for our children and so we don't want to lose that opportunity to stay on top of the things that we have control over right now. So there's some parents they have some concerns about vaccines for various reasons. What is your message to them. You know I have three kids. I'm a mom of three. My oldest is six four year old and I have a younger son. Who's fifteen months so I've gone through the vaccine process myself with my own children? I personally followed the same guidelines with the C- The American Academy of Pediatrics For my own family and I certainly understand right now being very thoughtful about taking your children outside the home for doctors visits and for vaccines I would encourage families who have concerns about what that feels like for them based on maybe where they live if that's hot spot with the current Kobe nineteen versus Hello there children are what vaccines are due for to have some conversations with their clinics in their pediatricians and family doctors about what the priorities are at this point in time. I mean there may be situations where we can wait a little bit too to have that well child visit and have that vaccine or maybe for that child getting that immunization extremely important. We don't want to lose time to do that. And do it. In a safe practice so many of our clinics and hospitals have been weighing the risks and benefits of seeing our children in the outpatient setting. Making sure we have some good processes in place to make that a safest possible knowing how important vaccines are. Because as you said we don't want to bring people into the hospital are necessarily because of fears of exposure and so as you said. I think it is important to contact your healthcare provider to discuss when and if they should have it and how it should be delivered. So what are the? What are the most important vaccines for children? Well Right now. One of the vaccines. That's really on our radar. Is the measles vaccine so we know that there have been more outbreaks of measles even here in the United States and that is a potentially deadly illness that we want to prevent. So that's a vaccine. Of course we've had a lot of attention on for some time but we don't want to get off track with the timing of that vaccine I also think about protests. No that's another one that can be extremely harmful for our babies and our younger children and so making sure that we're staying on top of that scheduled for protests this as well my saying always be all vaccines are important but I definitely think about those two particular right now..

Dr Tina Auden Trodden World Health Organization Sange CACA Mayo Clinic Cova American Academy of Pediatrics United States Kobe
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

05:41 min | 3 years ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

"From the studios of the mayo clinic news network. This is Mayo Clinic Radio, exploring the latest developments, health and medicine, and what they need to. You welcome everyone to make radio dot to Sange caca and I'm Tracy McCray being told you need a transplant can send you and your loved ones on a challenging and uncertain journey. One with physical, financial, emotional hardships, the gift of life transplant house at mayo clinic aims to ease some of those burdens. The goal of this nonprofit organization is to provide a home that helps and heals for transplant. Patients on today's program will learn more from the director of the gift of life transplant house and a current resident also on the program. Dr Tom shives will join me as co host, and we'll hear about the latest treatments for erectile dysfunction few stories from flying the friendly skies. All that along with this week felt in medical news right after this. Welcome back to male Clinic Radio to Sange Kako and I'm Tracy McCray in nineteen Seventy-three. Ed pumping received the gift of life a kidney from his mother, no less Helen. As personal experience at mayo clinic led him to believe that the health and wellbeing of transplant patients and their families would be better if they could live in a home, like setting during their treatment. The goal was to provide mayoclinic transplant patients with high quality, affordable accommodations that could offer the support that transplant patients need in ninety four. That goal became a reality when the gift of life transplant house open. That's right gift of life. Now has two houses in Rochester on either side of second street. They provide services for solid organ bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients and their families. Patients of all ages come to mayo clinic from all over the world and gift of life offers transplant. Patients a home away from home inherited discuss is the director of the gift of life transplant house Mary wilder and joining her is the husband of a stem cell recipient. Jon Royce to share the experience of life at the transplant house. Welcome both of you to the program. Thank you so much for having us. We're just delighted to be here. It's going to be here. Fun show. Tell us first of all, Mary, how long have you been the director at the gift of life transplant high have not even been there a year yet. I started on may twenty second. I actually was a kidney donor from my father forty years ago, and I was so connected instantly to the mission and what I found gift of life transplant house. And that's what brought me here. Elvis deal passion is an infectious. When you walked in the dole, tell us about the culture what you noticed about the gift of life transplant house. The very first thing I noticed was the warmth that was they're very, very supportive feeling. It was just like walking into your own home and feeling that that the patients and the caregivers that were there were very welcoming with one another. You know, I expected to find situation where I would be incur. Urging individuals where I would be the one thing. Oh, it's going to be okay. We'll be praying for whatever it was instead. It's exactly the opposite. And that was from the very first air walked in that I was being encouraged. I was being inspired by the courage. I saw of guests who were dealing with very, very difficult situations and yet living in a home like environment where they could discuss all this with others, how many patients are families do you usually see each year? Well, with last year in two thousand seventeen. We were able to accommodate four thousand six hundred twenty five guests and caregivers the year before that it was right around four thousand. So we are continuing to grow and continuing to accommodate more and more. And of course the need is getting greater and greater as mail is expanding as well. How often does the patient usually stay? You know, the average stay is completely dependent on the type of transplant than an individual has. So our kidney recipients will be with us. Yes, for two to three weeks, whereas our stem cell patients can be with us for their whole one hundred day journey through getting that stem cell transplant and John. That's that's where you kind of come in because, yeah, your wife, Susan is in that position. Tell us her story. Two thousand eleven. Actually she had a stem cell transplant in September and went to Dr. She's a, we're gonna stay with said, well, we'll stay at a hotel someplace I've ever thought about the gift of life as what is that? She's what's the place where transplant people can still as well that the interesting over and took a tour which you must required to take one. And we saw the people just like Mary said, such a friendly, warm atmosphere, and we were in the older house on north side. I, we stayed there and the people were just great. And so that's began are stained gift of life house in what was her diagnosis. She was multiple myeloma, and so she was here. We are six weeks in September, two thousand eleven, and then she was on continuous chemo from that didn't really work that. But so she just completed the car T-cell transplant, which was five weeks ago. And so we're back here again. It's a first place. We wanna stay a gift of life house. So John going through a diagnosis like this can be emotional and trying when when you came to the gift of life house, tell us how that chain. Things for you, made it easier to adjust the treatment of Susan receive? You know, it's kind of like when I got drafted an army infantry during Vietnam, none of us wanted to be there, but we're all there and so we can make the best of it and that's kind of without was because everybody there had some issue that they're dealing with some major issue. And so you just stick together. People are saying how we pray for you, like Mary said, we'll help you. What can we do to help you? And we're on the same boats.

mayo clinic Mary wilder director Mayo Clinic Radio Tracy McCray Susan Dr Tom shives John Sange caca Sange Kako Rochester dole Jon Royce Ed pumping multiple myeloma Vietnam Elvis Helen
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

06:00 min | 3 years ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

"From the studios of the mayo clinic news network. This is Mayo Clinic Radio, exploring the latest developments, health and medicine, and what they need to. You welcome everyone to make radio dot to Sange caca and I'm Tracy McCray being told you need a transplant can send you and your loved ones on a challenging and uncertain journey. One with physical, financial, emotional hardships, the gift of life transplant house at mayo clinic aims to ease some of those burdens. The goal of this nonprofit organization is to provide a home that helps and heals for transplant. Patients on today's program will learn more from the director of the gift of life transplant house and a current resident also on the program. Dr Tom shives will join me as co host, and we'll hear about the latest treatments for erectile dysfunction few stories from flying the friendly skies. All that along with this week felt in medical news right after this. Welcome back to male Clinic Radio to Sange Kako and I'm Tracy McCray in nineteen Seventy-three. Ed pumping received the gift of life a kidney from his mother, no less Helen. As personal experience at mayo clinic led him to believe that the health and wellbeing of transplant patients and their families would be better if they could live in a home, like setting during their treatment. The goal was to provide mayoclinic transplant patients with high quality, affordable accommodations that could offer the support that transplant patients need in ninety four. That goal became a reality when the gift of life transplant house open. That's right gift of life. Now has two houses in Rochester on either side of second street. They provide services for solid organ bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients and their families. Patients of all ages come to mayo clinic from all over the world and gift of life offers transplant. Patients a home away from home inherited discuss is the director of the gift of life transplant house Mary wilder and joining her is the husband of a stem cell recipient. Jon Royce to share the experience of life at the transplant house. Welcome both of you to the program. Thank you so much for having us. We're just delighted to be here. It's going to be here. Fun show. Tell us first of all, Mary, how long have you been the director at the gift of life transplant high have not even been there a year yet. I started on may twenty second. I actually was a kidney donor from my father forty years ago, and I was so connected instantly to the mission and what I found gift of life transplant house. And that's what brought me here. Elvis deal passion is an infectious. When you walked in the dole, tell us about the culture what you noticed about the gift of life transplant house. The very first thing I noticed was the warmth that was they're very, very supportive feeling. It was just like walking into your own home and feeling that that the patients and the caregivers that were there were very welcoming with one another. You know, I expected to find situation where I would be incur. Urging individuals where I would be the one thing. Oh, it's going to be okay. We'll be praying for whatever it was instead. It's exactly the opposite. And that was from the very first air walked in that I was being encouraged. I was being inspired by the courage. I saw of guests who were dealing with very, very difficult situations and yet living in a home like environment where they could discuss all this with others, how many patients are families do you usually see each year? Well, with last year in two thousand seventeen. We were able to accommodate four thousand six hundred twenty five guests and caregivers the year before that it was right around four thousand. So we are continuing to grow and continuing to accommodate more and more. And of course the need is getting greater and greater as mail is expanding as well. How often does the patient usually stay? You know, the average stay is completely dependent on the type of transplant than an individual has. So our kidney recipients will be with us. Yes, for two to three weeks, whereas our stem cell patients can be with us for their whole one hundred day journey through getting that stem cell transplant and John. That's that's where you kind of come in because, yeah, your wife, Susan is in that position. Tell us her story. Two thousand eleven. Actually she had a stem cell transplant in September and went to Dr. She's a, we're gonna stay with said, well, we'll stay at a hotel someplace I've ever thought about the gift of life as what is that? She's what's the place where transplant people can still as well that the interesting over and took a tour which you must required to take one. And we saw the people just like Mary said, such a friendly, warm atmosphere, and we were in the older house on north side. I, we stayed there and the people were just great. And so that's began are stained gift of life house in what was her diagnosis. She was multiple myeloma, and so she was here. We are six weeks in September, two thousand eleven, and then she was on continuous chemo from that didn't really work that. But so she just completed the car T-cell transplant, which was five weeks ago. And so we're back here again. It's a first place. We wanna stay a gift of life house. So John going through a diagnosis like this can be emotional and trying when when you came to the gift of life house, tell us how that chain. Things for you, made it easier to adjust the treatment of Susan receive? You know, it's kind of like when I got drafted an army infantry during Vietnam, none of us wanted to be there, but we're all there and so we can make the best of it and that's kind of without was because everybody there had some issue that they're dealing with some major issue. And so you just stick together. People are saying how we pray for you, like Mary said, we'll help you. What can we do to help you? And we're on the same boats. We find out their diagnosis and what they're doing. We encourage one another, which is so good. What is cartesian cartel. It's a clinical trial that they're doing their good FDA approval for a mile. I'm sorry, some forms of them foam in some forms of Kimia, but they do not from open my Loma. So they take your t

mayo clinic Mary wilder director Mayo Clinic Radio Tracy McCray Susan Dr Tom shives Sange caca John Rochester Sange Kako FDA Jon Royce Ed pumping multiple myeloma dole Elvis Helen
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

10:18 min | 3 years ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

"From the studios of the mayo clinic news network. This is Mayo Clinic Radio, exploring the latest developments in health and medicine, and what day mean to you? Welcome everyone to make Linnet radio. I'm up to Sange caca and I'm Tracy McCray. In two thirds of stroke cases, someone other than the patient makes an incision to seek treatment. Do you know the warning signs of stroke or when you should call nine one one may is American Stroke month a campaign to help us become aware of signs of joke and others, and to know Horton steps we can take to prevent stroke from happening in the first place on today's program will discuss stroke, awareness and prevention with American expert. Also on the program. Dr.. Tom shives will join me as co host will learn how pain rehabilitation centers can help those struggling with chronic pain, and we'll learn about treatment and therapy that's necessary offer an amputation all that along with this week and medical news right after this. Welcome back to mayor Clinic Radio. I'm Dr. Sanjay Kako and I'm Tracy McCray according to the American Stroke Association stroke is the nation's number five killer and a leading cause of serious long-term disability. On average, someone in the US has a stroke every forty seconds and every four minutes somebody dies from one a stroke occurs. When the blood supply to part of your brain is interrupted or reduced depriving brain tissue oxygen and nutrients within minutes brain cells. Begin today and prompt treatment is crucial to minimize brain damage and potential complications may is American Stroke month and here to discuss as mayo clinic neurologist and stroke expert. Dr. Robert Brown, junior, welcome back to the program, Dr. Brown. It's great to see you again. Thank you for inviting me back. Great to be here. I think when I'm saying may as American Stroke month, I don't even know how many times you have been here to talk about stroke, but yet it is still so critically important that it gets its own month. Yes. Well, I think I've been. Hear about twenty times. No, actually in the field of stroke has changed so much over those years, but it's great to be here and raise awareness regarding stroke. We'll get to what has changed in a moment. But first explain to us the two different types of strokes and how are they different from each other will the most common type of stroke is an schemic stroke in which there's a lack of blood supply to the brain due to a blockage in the arteries the arteries carry the oxygen carrying blood cells up to the brain tissue. But when a blockage occurs, an schemic stroke can occur that's about eighty five percent of strokes. The other strokes are hemorrhagic strokes are bleeding strokes in which there's a rupture of an artery or an aneurysm or some other abnormality in the brain leading to blood to spill into the brain tissue. And that's a hemorrhagic stroke to Brown described two types of strokes of the coz -ation similar between the two great question. Some of the. Risk factors that is factors that increase the risk of schemic stroke or hemorragic stroke. Some of those are the same. However, the overall clauses of each type of stroke differs. So in terms of schemic stroke, what are the risk factors for that? Well, for scheming stroke, the risk factors. And again, this ties into some strokes being preventable show the risk factors include high blood pressure cigarette smoking diabetes and elevated cholesterol. So that sounds like the same risk factors for heart attack. Very similar since one heart attack is an Amnon, melody, an artery of the heart muscle. Some of the risk factors are in fact the same. Okay. And then you talked about schemic stroke. What about a hemorrhagic stroke when you bleed until brain? What are the risk factors for that? Depends on the cause, but for him or stroke, high blood pressure is a key risk factor. There are other causes though of hemorragic stroke that don't have some of those same risk factors. A brain aneurysm, which is a little bubble or balloon like out pouching off of an artery that has respect which include high blood pressure and cigarette smoking. So you can sense. There's a similar theme here with all of the types of stroke I should mention as well when it comes to an schemic stroke, a lack of blood supply stroke there. Many different potential causes. For example, some heart conditions like an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation that can put a person at risk of stroke. And so it's more complex than just the risk factors that I just mentioned. And it leads into there being so many different potential options for stroke prevention. So let's talk about spells TA's is what I have learned over the years from you, but my relatives all call them spells. And what is that? What transient schemic attack is eight temporary. Lack of blood flow to the brain leading to temporary symptoms and those symptoms. We should step back and talk about shadows a bit, the symptoms that lead to diagnosis of or stroking clued. The sudden onset of difficulty doing something sudden weakness in the face armor leg sudden difficulty speaking, son, difficulty seeing sudden difficulty walking meaning significant gate, unsteadiness sudden numbness in the face arm or leg or sudden severe headache, unlike anything a person has had before these are all potential symptoms of stroke. So when it comes to Tracy, TI are transient symptoms. They come on oftentimes quite abruptly, and then they last several minutes, two hours and then they go away. But the importance is even though they're transient, those symptoms should not be ignored because TIAA is a significant predictor of a str-. Nope, that's going to occur in the hours or days or weeks ahead before you came onto the show Tracey and I would talking about the sudden onset of the worst headache possible Tracy, tell us about that. Oh, yeah, we'll Dr. Brown knows this, but the listener may never have heard at one of the pastimes that you were on a few years ago, a month or so after you were on someone called up and said the words, the worst headache that you've ever had where ringing in his ears. When the next day after listening to our program, he had the worst headache he'd ever had went to the emergency room and indeed was having a stroke. So hearing things like that. And as we were mentioning decker CAC, are you knew someone who is having difficulty speaking? And it turned out that was a TI that was happening. Do you continue to have these TIA's? And then eventually you do have a stroke that what happens that that can happen in certainly mentioned moment ago at TI means that a, there's a relatively high risk of stroke in the. Weeks and months ahead. Some TI's will occur once and never occur again. However, because it is a risk factor, Fru future stroke, what we encourage patients to do if they have such a symptom, even if it's transient to seek emergency medical care because there may well be something that could be done to prevent that stroke. And certainly the best treatment for stroke is to prevent a stroke. And as we said, many times when you've been on unlike my relatives who would say it was just a spell, I'm fine now and then just continue on with life, but now we know better. That's what they should have been doing was going in and telling their physician about it. That's exactly right. And human nature makes it such. To something this transient, please don't do that. So that Brown, we talked about the transient ischemic attack. Other any other warning signs that maybe leading you down to that Parkway of developing stroke in terms of warning signs at TI is really the key factor. Now that said, we will sometimes detect a narrowing in an artery in the neck. For example, the karate arteries are the arteries in the neck that supply the eye and supply a good part of the brain in terms of its blood supply. Now, sometimes they will be in a narrowing that will develop in that artery due to Athar grosses or plaque. And we'll sometimes treat that narrowing in the artery before any stroke related symptoms have occurred. And likewise, the irregular heartbeat that I mentioned, atrial fibrillation will use certain blood-thinning medicines to try to prevent a stroke in that setting as well. What about younger people that have strokes? You hear the. The strange a thirty five year old. How to stroke is that the same thing that's happening with someone who's advanced in years? It's a great question, and we do sometimes see strokes occur in young people and of no to ather. Grosses or plaque can occur even people in their thirties and forties in these tend to be people who are smokers sometimes or diabetic. Maybe they've had an elevated cholesterol that they're not aware of. And so family history can play a role as well, but young people can sometimes develop a stroke. There are other causes of stroke though that differ in younger people as an example, Tracy, what is called a dissection, which is a tear in the artery, supplying the brain tissue that can sometimes occur and younger people. And as a little bit less common older people, we talked to about some of the factors, how does stress play a role? Great. Great. Question stress is relation to high blood pressure. As an example. To sleep that is not as good as it should be. And there are some studies that suggest that prominent stress in one's life can be a risk factor for heart attack and stroke, even apart from high blood pressure. But oftentimes there's a connection to some other risk factors for stroke. We've been talking about stroke awareness month with urologist to rub it Brown. We're going to take a short break. When we come back, we're going to find out how stroke meat treated and what's new in the world of stroke. And Mithra matter of back recovery from stroke only happens during the first few months after a stroke, is that a myth or a fact VO find out listening to Mayo Clinic Radio and the mayo clinic news network.

American Stroke Association Tracy McCray Dr. Robert Brown mayo clinic Mayo Clinic Radio difficulty speaking mayor Clinic Radio Sange caca headache Tom shives Linnet US Horton Dr. Sanjay Kako difficulty walking unsteadiness
"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

10:18 min | 3 years ago

"sange caca" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

"From the studios of the mayo clinic news network. This is Mayo Clinic Radio, exploring the latest developments in health and medicine, and what day mean to you? Welcome everyone to make Linnet radio. I'm up to Sange caca and I'm Tracy McCray. In two thirds of stroke cases, someone other than the patient makes an incision to seek treatment. Do you know the warning signs of stroke or when you should call nine one one may is American Stroke month a campaign to help us become aware of signs of joke and others, and to know Horton steps we can take to prevent stroke from happening in the first place on today's program will discuss stroke, awareness and prevention with American expert. Also on the program. Dr.. Tom shives will join me as co host will learn how pain rehabilitation centers can help those struggling with chronic pain, and we'll learn about treatment and therapy that's necessary offer an amputation all that along with this week and medical news right after this. Welcome back to mayor Clinic Radio. I'm Dr. Sanjay Kako and I'm Tracy McCray according to the American Stroke Association stroke is the nation's number five killer and a leading cause of serious long-term disability. On average, someone in the US has a stroke every forty seconds and every four minutes somebody dies from one a stroke occurs. When the blood supply to part of your brain is interrupted or reduced depriving brain tissue oxygen and nutrients within minutes brain cells. Begin today and prompt treatment is crucial to minimize brain damage and potential complications may is American Stroke month and here to discuss as mayo clinic neurologist and stroke expert. Dr. Robert Brown, junior, welcome back to the program, Dr. Brown. It's great to see you again. Thank you for inviting me back. Great to be here. I think when I'm saying may as American Stroke month, I don't even know how many times you have been here to talk about stroke, but yet it is still so critically important that it gets its own month. Yes. Well, I think I've been. Hear about twenty times. No, actually in the field of stroke has changed so much over those years, but it's great to be here and raise awareness regarding stroke. We'll get to what has changed in a moment. But first explain to us the two different types of strokes and how are they different from each other will the most common type of stroke is an schemic stroke in which there's a lack of blood supply to the brain due to a blockage in the arteries the arteries carry the oxygen carrying blood cells up to the brain tissue. But when a blockage occurs, an schemic stroke can occur that's about eighty five percent of strokes. The other strokes are hemorrhagic strokes are bleeding strokes in which there's a rupture of an artery or an aneurysm or some other abnormality in the brain leading to blood to spill into the brain tissue. And that's a hemorrhagic stroke to Brown described two types of strokes of the coz -ation similar between the two great question. Some of the. Risk factors that is factors that increase the risk of schemic stroke or hemorragic stroke. Some of those are the same. However, the overall clauses of each type of stroke differs. So in terms of schemic stroke, what are the risk factors for that? Well, for scheming stroke, the risk factors. And again, this ties into some strokes being preventable show the risk factors include high blood pressure cigarette smoking diabetes and elevated cholesterol. So that sounds like the same risk factors for heart attack. Very similar since one heart attack is an Amnon, melody, an artery of the heart muscle. Some of the risk factors are in fact the same. Okay. And then you talked about schemic stroke. What about a hemorrhagic stroke when you bleed until brain? What are the risk factors for that? Depends on the cause, but for him or stroke, high blood pressure is a key risk factor. There are other causes though of hemorragic stroke that don't have some of those same risk factors. A brain aneurysm, which is a little bubble or balloon like out pouching off of an artery that has respect which include high blood pressure and cigarette smoking. So you can sense. There's a similar theme here with all of the types of stroke I should mention as well when it comes to an schemic stroke, a lack of blood supply stroke there. Many different potential causes. For example, some heart conditions like an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation that can put a person at risk of stroke. And so it's more complex than just the risk factors that I just mentioned. And it leads into there being so many different potential options for stroke prevention. So let's talk about spells TA's is what I have learned over the years from you, but my relatives all call them spells. And what is that? What transient schemic attack is eight temporary. Lack of blood flow to the brain leading to temporary symptoms and those symptoms. We should step back and talk about shadows a bit, the symptoms that lead to diagnosis of or stroking clued. The sudden onset of difficulty doing something sudden weakness in the face armor leg sudden difficulty speaking, son, difficulty seeing sudden difficulty walking meaning significant gate, unsteadiness sudden numbness in the face arm or leg or sudden severe headache, unlike anything a person has had before these are all potential symptoms of stroke. So when it comes to Tracy, TI are transient symptoms. They come on oftentimes quite abruptly, and then they last several minutes, two hours and then they go away. But the importance is even though they're transient, those symptoms should not be ignored because TIAA is a significant predictor of a str-. Nope, that's going to occur in the hours or days or weeks ahead before you came onto the show Tracey and I would talking about the sudden onset of the worst headache possible Tracy, tell us about that. Oh, yeah, we'll Dr. Brown knows this, but the listener may never have heard at one of the pastimes that you were on a few years ago, a month or so after you were on someone called up and said the words, the worst headache that you've ever had where ringing in his ears. When the next day after listening to our program, he had the worst headache he'd ever had went to the emergency room and indeed was having a stroke. So hearing things like that. And as we were mentioning decker CAC, are you knew someone who is having difficulty speaking? And it turned out that was a TI that was happening. Do you continue to have these TIA's? And then eventually you do have a stroke that what happens that that can happen in certainly mentioned moment ago at TI means that a, there's a relatively high risk of stroke in the. Weeks and months ahead. Some TI's will occur once and never occur again. However, because it is a risk factor, Fru future stroke, what we encourage patients to do if they have such a symptom, even if it's transient to seek emergency medical care because there may well be something that could be done to prevent that stroke. And certainly the best treatment for stroke is to prevent a stroke. And as we said, many times when you've been on unlike my relatives who would say it was just a spell, I'm fine now and then just continue on with life, but now we know better. That's what they should have been doing was going in and telling their physician about it. That's exactly right. And human nature makes it such. To something this transient, please don't do that. So that Brown, we talked about the transient ischemic attack. Other any other warning signs that maybe leading you down to that Parkway of developing stroke in terms of warning signs at TI is really the key factor. Now that said, we will sometimes detect a narrowing in an artery in the neck. For example, the karate arteries are the arteries in the neck that supply the eye and supply a good part of the brain in terms of its blood supply. Now, sometimes they will be in a narrowing that will develop in that artery due to Athar grosses or plaque. And we'll sometimes treat that narrowing in the artery before any stroke related symptoms have occurred. And likewise, the irregular heartbeat that I mentioned, atrial fibrillation will use certain blood-thinning medicines to try to prevent a stroke in that setting as well. What about younger people that have strokes? You hear the. The strange a thirty five year old. How to stroke is that the same thing that's happening with someone who's advanced in years? It's a great question, and we do sometimes see strokes occur in young people and of no to ather. Grosses or plaque can occur even people in their thirties and forties in these tend to be people who are smokers sometimes or diabetic. Maybe they've had an elevated cholesterol that they're not aware of. And so family history can play a role as well, but young people can sometimes develop a stroke. There are other causes of stroke though that differ in younger people as an example, Tracy, what is called a dissection, which is a tear in the artery, supplying the brain tissue that can sometimes occur and younger people. And as a little bit less common older people, we talked to about some of the factors, how does stress play a role? Great. Great. Question stress is relation to high blood pressure. As an example. To sleep that is not as good as it should be. And there are some studies that suggest that prominent stress in one's life can be a risk factor for heart attack and stroke, even apart from high blood pressure. But oftentimes there's a connection to some other risk factors for stroke. We've been talking about stroke awareness month with urologist to rub it Brown. We're going to take a short break. When we come back, we're going to find out how stroke meat treated and what's new in the world of stroke. And Mithra matter of back recovery from stroke only happens during the first few months after a stroke, is that a myth or a fact VO find out listening to Mayo Clinic Radio and the mayo clinic news network.

American Stroke Association Tracy McCray Dr. Robert Brown mayo clinic Mayo Clinic Radio difficulty speaking mayor Clinic Radio Sange caca headache Tom shives Linnet US Horton Dr. Sanjay Kako difficulty walking unsteadiness