17 Burst results for "Sandy Meisner"

"sandy meisner" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:57 min | 9 months ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"That I got to study in New York with some of the great acting teachers Lee Strasberg and sandy Meisner this way before your time but you might know the names and even became an acting teacher and so active with my entire life for for twenty years I I made a number of films and then I will win overseas to Rome to meet with a director who wanted me to start one of his films that didn't work out and as I was ready to come back to the U. S. very disappointed didn't work out there was a director in Italy who said that we like to the western hello I said well I've never done the west well that's okay you're American I don't even ride a horse is film and that's true for three months you can learn to ride a horse hello because what they really wanted then which is to have an American name so that they felt they could eventually should the film is Italy and then sell it to America because I have an American he so that was the beginning of my western career and after that I did about twenty spaghetti westerns hello and became a western on the sword and sandal star wish what I've never ridden a horse before there have new career but ends after a certain period of time ten years westerns began to go out of style and I began to be offered less and less work at I said the phone a coupon in the entertainment career I'd better do something else so I dropped acting and went into distribution in Italy and learned all about film distribution and then began to sell films of overseas and then I said to produce films and so.

New York Lee Strasberg sandy Meisner Rome director Italy America
"sandy meisner" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

07:56 min | 9 months ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on The Pulse

"Her husband later like wow. She's really having a hard our time about her body actors. Make US believe them. It's their job Marlon. Brando really is heartbroken yelling. Offer his wife. Aw Jack Nicholson is actually furious. Screaming down the prosecution. You want answers. I think I'm entitled to You. Can't handle the truth but all that happens on screen. How often could actors use those skills in the real world? Gregory Donaldson used his acting training on a New York City. Subway to stay safe. He was writing about gangs in the late eighties. I would have a bit of a sour look on my face and It's got to do with posture. If there were benasing teenagers on the train he wanted them to think five. Oh that's probably a cop. I would make eye contact with the kids. The Look I had in my face was one of that. I was somewhat board a bit amused. These little changes in posture or facial expression expression actors call them adjustments little tweaks that. Make you into a different person. These days Gregory teaches a theater criminal justice course at the John. Jay College of Criminal Middle Justice does little scenes with spiring cops decades ago. He studied under the famous Sandy Meisner. Who developed a type of method acting known simply as Meisner? Jeff Goldblum Diane Keaton and a bunch of other stars studied under him. Hallmark of the meisner method is repetition. You just keep saying and listening to the same line nine over and over and it begins become apparent to you as you're doing it that The words are meaningless That it's the feeling beneath the words words. He was in a scene in one class whereas wife comes home in the middle of the night his line was where were you and on the third or fourth or fifth. Where were you do? The anger was I was out of my chair and I was ready to throw the table across the room. He also tries to tap into what he calls his emotional memory to that reservoir of your real feelings real reactions your real emotions. So factors are good at tapping into their emotional memory. Can they just do it in everyday situations nations. Like for instance to lie even though he got away with his compact on the subway. Gregory tells me acting as an art not a deception. That great actors turns us some kind of truth to make an imaginary situation convincing I. I would argue. That good. Liars are pretty good actors most of the time but that that does not mean that good actors are necessarily good liars. Pamela Meyer has written extensively about lie detection and runs calibrate a company that offers I lie detection training. There's an overlap in the skills required to do both but they are actually separate disciplines. The skill that most overlaps between liars and actors is convincing an appropriate emotion. Remember how addy fainting insecurity got so emotional. She was actually crying. Bad Liars. Have what Pamela calls calls emotional gap. They're saying something really dramatic but they're not conveying an attitude that matches that oftentimes we see this with in murder cases. You'll see someone talking about a horrific crime but they're kind of devoid of emotions or maybe they convey the wrong emotion. What they think people expect instead of? What's real we associate surprised with the happy surprise party from when you had your sweet sixteen surprise party but the average person does not like to be surprised? It's a very unpleasant and experience. Notice that your next surprise party more often than not. It's horror that flashes across the birthday girls face for a quick moment before turning to smiles wiles but pulling off pitch perfect emotion is only one part of good. Live it when somebody's lying. oftentimes the cognitive load is so high on them. They're trying to think what to say. Composed appear spontaneous. What they do? Is they leak. These verbal and nonverbal indicators of deceit the cognitive load is so great Pamela says because liars have to constantly self monitor they have to know for instance that maybe they feel scared internally but they have to convey sadness to their mark they don't have a script to rely on lying is basically way more work than acting. You can be a good actor without necessarily being able to think quickly on your feet mentally. You know being being mentally agile. You can be a good actor without necessarily having an amazing working memory that allows you to hold two or three. We different ideas in at the same time. All the sounds a bit closer to Improv. And acting to me so I ask Pamela or Improv artists. The ones we should really be worried. What about I would agree with that? I think that a good improv artist. oftentimes bears more resemblance to a good liar. Then a good actor. Does I put all all this addy. The value of thinking on your feet cognitive load and it makes sense to her. She says even though on paper she's made more money as an actor. She considers is herself a comedian at heart. Her Theater Improv training and Sweden where she got the Forbidden Tattoo may have prepared her for the deception perfectly. There's no script just a scene and then you go for example. A scene where a patient is told they'll be turned into a chicken in four months. I don't WanNa be a chicken and you're like sobbing when you're crying and it's so funny applying real emotion to a given situation on the fly. It's impressive and pretty common. offstage addie tells me in her Improv of comedy circle of friends. They have to make a rule about it. When we're just hanging out offstage an offset? No bits stop doing your act. We'll say no bits like oilseed like bit block of Joe Bits. Like don't like not joking. Around this time I actually feel this way. Some of her friends are maybe too good at it dude. I can't tell if you're doing right now. We're not should I be worried about you. Eventually Addie dropped the insecure body image. Bit She had done with her mom she came clean so she said Commencer that day when I was covering my chest and I said yes and she said I was covering up a tattoo at I said you I aide said you made me feel so bad for even asking at first Ronnie was mad and I said yeah that that was really mean because I'm sorry but also she was. We're really impressed. I'm like I thought. How did you do that? Like Damn my daughter can act just objectively speaking. I was like she's good. She's really good. That was jets Lehman reporting. We're talking about movies. Think about your favorite love scene in a movie. Maybe it felt so real l.. That you saw the couple was actually together. If two people pretend to be in love on a movie said does that lead to real chemistry real feelings links and why do we get so obsessed with those romances. Alan you has more remember. The twenty nine thousand nine Oscars and Lady Gaga in a stunning lack trust and Bradley Cooper step onstage to perform shallow the smash hit from a star is born soon. They look at each other. The whole time off in in the end grabby KUPA sits down next to lady Gaga on the Piano Bench research. Their heads talk. Their eyes are closed and then it looks like they're going to kiss the air around them fused electric John.

Pamela Meyer Gregory Donaldson Sandy Meisner Lady Gaga Jack Nicholson US Brando Marlon Jeff Goldblum Diane Keaton New York City Jay College murder Joe Bits Lehman wiles Addie Alan Bradley Cooper Sweden Commencer
"sandy meisner" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

20:28 min | 1 year ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bull's to her a little bit about the distinctive methods of sanford meisner one one of the things that in in what is often called the meisner technique is kind of core practice. Is this thing called the repeating game <hes> can you can you describe describe what that is to me and what it is like to do <hes> yes. I'll let me try. I'd like to <hes> because it's there's some misunderstanding understanding around it. I wanted to understand that <hes> technique and craft from the inside out. I i taught it for a couple of decades. Whenever i wasn't working and and i i feel i have some understanding about it. <hes> it's an improvisation where you pretend <hes> try to pretend good <hes> or is he says living truthfully under maj circumstances and part of this pretending good is you you start learning a new kind vocabulary for interaction moment to moment so called <hes> whereby your so called working off of the other person and you're taking your attention off yourself in a very healthy way. That's ver- technologically very good crafty thing to do. It has many good aspects and you put it on the other person who's infinitely interesting and <hes> mysterious and you start to be present and do two things be open into them enough to pay attention so that you can repeat what they say if they utter something just like they say in marriage counseling or business <hes> training they say hey don't be thinking about what you're gonna. Say listen well enough intended attentively enough so that you can repeat back exactly what the other person said giving them psychological air so if they feel hey i've been listened to and then so you're open enough to say that then you you get more acute and you pay even more attention you say you you know. Here's exactly what you said and here's the way you said it. There's some other things that were not exactly in the words but from your body language and from the way your inflection you also meant this and this and this and that's the receiving end of what you're doing <hes>. That's a very healthy thing to do to be able able to do. When you act that's going to be useful in any scenic acting and then before we go on you may say let me and here's the output part of what you do. When you act act to let me tell you how i feel in word or deed about what you just said and how you may have said it or what you just did and then i'm i'm finding my voice and art and communicating in word or deed like i say it's something response and it goes like that moment to moment to moment to moment. It's a very good way to to begin interaction but all good actors are doing it. It's not esoteric as some people think <hes> once they study there it is all good actors are doing it. They're listening and they're answering and finally you're doing it in the game of acting which is i'm going to pretend that this thing that you've said is not just an acting utterance that you've made but but it's in real life that's a that's a leap of imagination that the actor has to do or if it's a line that's in a script. I'm gonna pretend that you didn't read it and that you made it up and that i've never heard it before so you're also practicing that and the thing that i have to say to you is spontaneous and comes out of and is triggered in me from what you just. I said that's a very healthy thing to do. It happens in real life and so you can craft <hes> the the depiction of it in <hes> by use of that and then that's like skating is to hockey then you learn to play the whole hockey game and do a whole do a whole situation but it's miss tot and it's misunderstood understood and it's over emphasized here and there and it's prolonged in its <hes> training anyway. It's a very good thing to do if you do it correctly and can lead to the ability to really improvise a- as i know for myself and make use of improvised in thor ragnarok and other movies movies and portland. I enjoy all pure improvisation where there's no d. You know a part of the tax <hes> in it and i like doing the anything but then you have to make sure these students who are learning this meisner method. Don't get just religiously devoted to that and don't do what the second year is which is really stella adler work which is making the show good. If you need to do the show in any one way or another maybe this explanation. Maybe there's not maybe you're doing david mamat or or wes anderson or the coen brothers and you've got to say every line just the way it is and make that seem as if you're improvising anyway. You got to learn the whole puzzle. That's a little bit of the the training course that i know about. I had a teacher who had studied at the neighborhood playhouse and while there were a lot of things in theater training that i did not connect with that was one thing that i dead and i found that as a person who you're going to be stunned to hear this giving them a public radio host but has has a tendency towards you know distance and over intellectualize ation <hes> i found that there was no acting there was no acting technique or practice or or drill that i did that was more helpful to me in <hes> being being president enough to to behave like a human being behaves yeah while performing it can be if it's taught right and practiced right it can be very very very <hes> healthy and useful yeah i think so too especially for the cerebral types and people not necessarily connected with their tummy and their impulses else's or somebody in the incoming whose not paying attention to <hes> you know what's around them <hes> he said miser said used what exists it means outside of of yourself make use of exactly the moment as it's presenting itself to and then everything that's inside include. It's all available for for <hes> inclusion and that's there's some good stuff in that one of if not the first screen credit on your our long list of screen credits is the film death wish. Was that the actual first movie part that you booked yeah. It was the first <hes> <hes> part that i ever did and the first edition i ever had agent to samuel. L. grunted coca-cola and said hey. We'll send you up for things. Sent me up for that that i auditioned with a bunch of other tough-looking guys for these bad guy parts and <hes> and they gave you the part yeah when you say a bunch of other tough looking guys you mean mean a bunch of other guys who were in contrast to you tough-looking well <hes> i tried to look tough and and you know wearing i watched the clip of year performance which is extraordinary. I mean it's really something else but you're you're literally wearing a. I guess i would call it. A jug head hat junket <hes> yeah. I don't know if that's the exact type of that's the name of that type of hat but to kind of had to jug head wears. All jerry rigged crown out of okay yeah where the debris has been cut to make it into it. That's right. I picked out you know <hes> and it is wild. I mean you you put it all. It's like i would play ahah clip from it and there's almost no talking your onscreen af- for pretty long time effort brutal seeing yeah with hope lang it's you and a couple of other toughs like gallivanting around a grocery store <unk> being upsetting to people yeah yeah we have said people and then we follow charles brunson's wife and daughter home to upper east side apartment and we kill them. It's brutal scene and <hes> yeah. I was all i i did some of the movie that i did sort of in the audition which is be very you you know jazzed-up as if on crystal meth or something. I don't know if i thought about that at the time but i'm all jazzed up whether i'm tougher not i i don't know but i'm st st <hes> disturbed you know and <hes> freakish show. The name of my character was freak number. One in fact we were all kind of freaked to three freaks and <hes> yeah that was the part. I was thrilled to get a pardon. Do be doing something about that is really kind of an extraordinary performance. You must have been in at least in part scared just to be on a set of a major film with famous people. I was scared and excited. I mean sanitizer said it takes twenty years before you can even call yourself an actor. The good part of that was that i set my calendar to <hes> <hes> you know to the long term which is sort of paid off. I think i took that to heart and i'm i still feel like a humble student and and i'm on the brink of my best and a better work but part of it also got in amongst me <hes> to say jeez you you are inadequate for the task you. You're not really an actor. Don't call yourself an actor yet and and <hes> because you probably don't know what you're doing. I think legitimately described me. I i didn't and as i look back on it. I could have done a lot better. I don't know what i did. That may have been in striking but but i was excited. I you know like i say i had this. <hes> fire in my belly from the start and so being on a set was like yeah. Let's let's go or something like that but jesus guy doing this scary. That's right and then michael winner. The british directory was known for being abusive and kind of a screamer sort he screen as i i did. My first camera rehearsal were skulking up some stairs back stairs to get to this <hes> <hes> apartment apartment door. He screams at me in front of everybody goldblum start acting now acting now yeah and i you know <hes> i so i got burned with shame and sort of anger but <hes> as a nice start acting as it turned out. It wasn't the worst direction in the world. There's not much more to say really start acting now and that's about it chasing. There's faster and slower also there's that you know but act start pretending and keep predicting. Was there a point in those early years of your career where you felt like you belonged and you're we're doing it right. Oh it started to well. You know i you know that movie did well. It was a kind of vigilante kind of <hes> <hes> movie that did hit hit a chord and and you know i guy looked at it and i guess as we i guess we did did okay there and that kind of work. I'd already been on broadway doing some stuff you know but better and then i got a big part in this <hes> in this ensemble movie with joan mccowan silver called between the lines and i was still sway you know needed to find my sea legs in many ways <hes> and things the grew and then we're now about seventy eight and and phil coffman a wonderful director. I was very lucky to work with did a wonderful movie called invasion of the body snatchers and it was during that movie that i started to trust myself. I self a little bit. I did a line one day to my wife. Nancy bell check played by veronica cartwright. She said why have we always thought they were gonna come. In metal ships and i said honey i've i've <hes> never thought they were gonna come. In metal ships you know something like that and fill the way he looked at me and and appreciation and sort of laughed a little bit and the way he saw me. <hes> made me see myself in a way hey i think i got something in me that without <unk> out over work or desperation are becoming too. You know outside myself. I think i can do something. That's a little bit <hes> just of me just just that i can contribute uniquely may be and do this thing that sandy meisner was talking about you know don't copy anybody and be yourself and <hes> anyway <hes> it went on from there and it's slowly and surely you know instill keeps creeping into my zone of enjoyment and the education <hes> let's hear seen from invasion of the body snatchers so basically if you haven't seen the film alien pod people have arrived. They're trying trying to wipe out humanity and my guest jeff goldblum is jack ballot. Check who is a writer in a bar owner in this scene is at the book party of of a doctor gibney who he believes to be a hack leonard nimoy yeah and and he's and he feels like <hes> he could just let everybody we know what he thinks and gotten finally here. These people drive me nuts. We can have dinner later right around jericho uh-huh elizabeth. The book is awful. Kintner's focus off his ideas or garbage kidneys. Ideas are pure garbage. Okay got about a man like hitler mustang about a man like kim there. I'm saying it about kidney that one of these things on every six months takes me six months to write one line sometimes because i picked each worried individually. That's why i wasn't even talk. We i remember being on the set. I'm talking talking to <hes> to donald sutherland. You know is an imposing figure. Phil coffman was guiding us. I remember us improvising a little bit. That wasn't exactly in there. I wasn't even talking to as i am not talking about a man like kid. I think i put some of that stuff in there and that part and the way. I'm sort sort of huff. Huffily unrecognized unacknowledged. You know that was that was. I knew something about that. I saw donald savvy in a movie called johanna. Look that bob. You won't know that movie but it was a british little art offering. I think it was maybe his first thing and so i did this movie with and then i saw mash of course and then did the altman felt part of the altman sc family a little little bit to having done those coupla movies and then so by the time. I did this and seventy eight. I said yes donald of like syria. Iran i ever told you this story. Donald about seeing you in joanna and et cetera et cetera you know so but it was <hes> yeah it was. I've been pretty pretty lucky jeez. I think that at this point in your career i'm going to stipulate relate that you have reached iconic status and you know being an icon is partly about you know your your career extraordinarily gifts. You know you're you're. You're the art that you've created. It's also in a way that could be difficult about like you know. Icons are simplified and i wonder like oh. I wonder what that's like for you as somebody who is in actual the human being well you know i don't take too seriously. It's all coming and going everything is fleeting and <hes> you know so this too shall pass we we didn't get too upset about one thing or another outta but this is all a lucky occurrence and <hes> <hes> i'm gonna cycle of current <hes> s- attention of you know from one place or another but and i know what you main and i've always you know ostensibly my posture has been and still is that i wanna do a variety of <hes> parts and and be able to breakout and be creative and and do all sorts of things but it's also true. I don't feel any the the the headline here. The upshot is that i don't feel any particular tension or or difficulty or burden by any of what i think you're referring to and part of that may be because the stuff that people seem to enjoy her. That's it's become you know repeated or whatever <hes> you you call. It has come out of my nothing. That's been calculated or has been designed to make an impression or to create some kind of cartoon figure or you know sketch of myself but it's it's come out out of something that i might call fantastic if i'm not breaking my arm in order to pat myself on the back to <hes> <hes> <hes> outrageously <hes> because i'm not really the i'm just saying that i'm enjoying myself and that i do stuff like this that become that that i think is something that people seem to enjoy and i do other stuff in this vein where i sort of you know prattle on with an incomplete pre and <hes> <hes> just sort of <hes> <hes> under unload upload the the extent of my <hes> <hes> pleasure of <hes> you so <hes> being <hes> you know doing whatever i do whether it's playing music is there's a lot of aspects that playing music which i like and playing with people i do have a genuine. I guess it comes from that. Original meisner technology to some of my animation comes from. I'm just letting myself alone really at least that's what i've tried to do ab- i think i've you know i've done it to one extent or another and and i put my hand got interested in other people <hes> sometimes or something outside myself and then there i go and i gives your eyes to whatever i seem to be doing in an uncalculated way. So whatever comes out of it is kind.

donald sutherland jeff goldblum Phil coffman hockey sandy meisner portland charles brunson president jericho bob sanitizer jerry L. Nancy bell lang david mamat wes anderson leonard nimoy michael joan mccowan
"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"What you go through as a family. It's cars you and went this is a whole your whole life, my since I'm twelve years different phases of it so hard, it's such a hard and that's why people run for the hills. And so maybe it made me more empathetic or whatever, you know, must be like they see that much raw emotion, and that type of, of human behavior has got to be somewhat like a powerful study of something. I mean, I think we learned this. Dynamics. Whether you're an actor comedian fighter, you know, within your between your parents and your siblings, and my parents, I saw that they were, you know, my father was like a very expressive unconscious, childlike man in some ways, but you could be scary. And my mother was very quick. And we seem to have a pretty well integrated. I mean you're not you're not saying he was abusive or anything yet his moments moments, but you're consistent. I wish forgiving of that. I mean, you know, you have to kind of making a list or do a mathematical equation. How much of it is it right now is it fifty fifty? Is it seventy five? You know, he'll be was in World War, Two self post, you know suffering from his nerves. Yeah. Was traumatic stress. He was indeed day, all that stuff. But, you know I in my parents and their interplay. Yeah. I saw. The, you know, this is going to sandy Meisner repeat exercise class. You know, they, they didn't let anything pass like, you know, my mother knew how to try to defuse things and, you know, she was just very, you know, she was a appear. She had a hard life, but she had a really optimistic spirit on. I think that, that really affected me full balance. Yeah, because I really felt like she was so talented of a prison and I feel like I wish I was as talented. She was, but I whatever opportunity, I have I really feel like my mother could have done so many things, but because she didn't get certain opportunities or whatever, and I. Left. We were very very. We had a very close friendship, very close friendship. And I was really. Took me which passed away. It was a huge I had a really kind of recalibrate. My however you. That was two thousand I don't know. Maybe I was late forties. Yeah. Yeah. So but I mean but we were just you know we had a. You know, she went through a lot of things. Yeah. It was really fun person like a person who I'm glad we're able to get the share. Yeah. And you know you are. And she got to see some of your success. Yeah. And she was, you know, she was that she would be honest, with me to allow you had no chemistry like that was a fake kiss. I saw that kiss. And if I had chemistry with someone would say, oh, you know, don't let your wife see that. She knew right away. I know you know, she was like, yeah. Yeah, what time I said, I used it in a movie romance and cigarettes like I was like, well, you know, taught to be married, and you look around, you know. And it's like, you know you go through these ups and downs mothers in the car with me. And she goes so all right. So you see you're gonna go you wanna go do something else. She goes, yeah, well, what do you think you're gonna find there? It's it's not like a machine where you put in like you get Eminem's and chips. It's the peanuts are gonna come out today. It's the same peanut bag. It comes out. Doc was dying. I said, I can't believe you said that I said, so, you know, I said, yeah, but there's different colored hair. She was like it's the same thing, you're not going to find anything. What do you think you're gonna find something new? She was just like she spoke from experience. You save your marriage. So that's a good lesson to learn. Yeah. I was like, wow. So in, in the training like with an undergrad I mean like you had good. Teachers had great teachers..

Doc sandy Meisner Eminem twelve years
"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Those guys those sort of the, you know, the the big guys of that time. Do they all have very specific styles like Yulia because I know I've talked to a couple a few directors. Some directors are very hands off. But I feel like somebody like your father was probably all over everybody. Well, if he didn't like what you were doing it was all right? If he liked what he what you were up to he'd leave you well enough alone. But my father had a way of coming in and saying just the right thing, and if an actor, you know, was talented and interpretive like Bill Hickey when he said to him Hickey was you're playing a reptile. Yeah. That I that I image of Bill Hickey shirts. Right that and and Bill hickeys kind of half asleep during the during the wedding, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Of of predeceased, and he opens his eyes. Suddenly like, a lizard shuts them again. And that was the direction. Yeah. He directed him in Wiesbaden to right. He was in wise. Bush has a yellow lab with him on wise blood. He just thought it was great. It's weird because he's not one of those guys you see a lot. But you know, he was a very prominent teacher right in New York forever. Yeah. I audited his class once when it's crazy. Yeah. Yeah. He he had the cigarette that just used to burn out all the way to his lips watch that ash drop onto his lap at. But he was he was unique. So you were studying a little bit when you were in New York before you can't I I had I also very good relationship with teacher here. Fantastic. Teacher changed my life called Peggy fury. And she was choose great. She was gave me all kinds of confidence. And. Yeah. Really change my whole game. And you were like, and you were also, you know, with Jack during all the he he did a lot of big movies during your time with him on off. And it was he at all like eighty 'cause I know he who was his teacher that he used to talk about what sandy Meisner. I know my Sner was big he he had a whole bunch of people. He'd worked with. But I think sandy Meisner had made a big difference for him. Because I remember the movie that you like in in preseason. Or like, I remember for me watching it when I was younger a kid. I was like a felt like the first time that he created a character. That was so not him. And you know, it was sort of daunting at first. But like he was doing the work. Yeah. And it worked out I think so. And also, I think initially he was really, you know, he was a bit afraid of that movie because dad was asking him to to play dumb, right and initially. I don't think jagged understood that it was a comedy really until he went out to talk to my dad about it. My dad was living out. On a stretch of deserted coast, lied past Puerto Vallarta in in in southern Mexico. And and what who does that? Nobody does that are. And check went out to see him, you know, under heavy pressure. The producer John foreman. I refused to go. 'cause I knew would be like hell on. So I just it out of the whole thing. Formulas saying come on. You wanna do this movie?.

Bill hickeys Bill Hickey Bush sandy Meisner Peggy fury Yulia New York Wiesbaden producer John foreman Puerto Vallarta Mexico Jack
"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"In college. I didn't grow up in this country right after college. And I say you have to have to do something in that world. I have to those seminal moments and experiences are just what kind of what what drives you to desperation. Yeah. A crisis in who do I want to be? And where do I wanna go again, get complicated? If I talk about this stuff, I'm really killing. No, I'm, but but that that would the moment though, you that's the crisis. You're you're you're doing your Lehman Brothers saying and you just saw the portal. We're what your life would look like. Yes. And you're like fuck it. I can't I didn't care enough about money. I want my life at the I don't want my sort of the culmination my life to be a number that didn't make sense to me. Yeah. No. I if feels I never thought that much about money. No, I need it. Yeah. I mean, it's weird. I I mean, I should've maybe, but I didn't. Well, what was I was never strategic either. I wasn't good at business. Like wasn't good. How terrible until we. We we. Built a business out of this thing. But neither me nor my producer and my business partner. We we didn't really know we weren't entrepreneurs. But you know, we we knew we had something. And no one really knew how to make money at it. So we kind of like built it with the with the medium itself as time went on. But it was never my drive. You're one of the best interviewers dub dub, David office saying that about you the other day, he said, he's in New York. But he said Merrin is one of the best interviewers period. Which is nice say, I also true. But yeah, no, it's nice. But I, you know, it doesn't I have a tense relationship at times has a tense relationship with himself. Yeah. One of my favorite people on the planet itself does dove went to therapy. And the therapists said, you you think you have a right to exist. And he does not really. I used to I. Used to bring him on stage at store. It was a mean, I I'd call them the thinking man's moron. I love it. No. I like him. I do like him. And I know he struggles. And I'm glad that he said nice thing about me. All right. So you have this crisis. This dark night of the soul that involved the Springsteen deniro and random thing you heard on MPR. That's right. And guys that was the crucible. That's where I made my choice was dark, man. That's what I resisted the temptation be ordinary and now I'm extraordinary broke myself from the cross online Christ. I mended my side. Yeah. There you go and my state motto right out into the street and started doing a mob job the jawbone of an asset. I slew the Romans. What did you do? Go and quick you quit your job. I went and joined the neighborhood playhouse. I studied with sandy Meisner for six weeks. The real voice box. From smoking. And so you were with Meisner the actual Meisner of the Mayes. And that's why I get my talent. Yeah. That's where I get my craft. And then I came to the two when I came to LA, I got mad TV. But what about Meisner how long were you there? I was there for two years notwithstanding Meisner only six weeks stay with him. But I was at his school for for two years. And that was that was the first training. Really? That was the first train and in my eyes nervous sort of like an offshoot of the method. It wasn't as method in a lot of ways he was about listening and answering and he was that ma'am, at school of acting Bush, by the way, I think is limited mammoth schools, the Atlantic school where you know, that that that that the idea of mammon is, you know, stick to the lines. And you know, the character will come simplifies it by saying, you, you you come to a scene, and, you know, an actor you you want something from the other person, right? And acting is doing and get what you want..

sandy Meisner Merrin Lehman Brothers Springsteen deniro Atlantic school LA David producer New York Mayes Bush partner six weeks two years
"sandy meisner" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on Amanpour

"It's uncommon that guy like me can work over the course of time like this. And I've tried to get better. I had a great teacher sandy Meisner, and I'm kind of a late bloomer in a humble student. I like to say, which is true. And I feel like I'm on the brink of my better stuff. But I'm I'm thrill. You know, I wanted to do it in the worst way. Like, I said, and I was thrilled to break into quick quickly. Slowly, get things that I could get better at and then worked with great people over the years, and was in some things that words that we're you know, that please people. Create. Persuade him not to cut you apart. Right. Is that story? I met him when I met him for the meeting. They'd said he wants to meet you for this part in the book that they're making into a movie, I read the Michael Crichton book read that character in Malcolm. And then by the time, we met he said, you know, I didn't want to cancel this meeting because I like you in this to you. He said, but there's a move afoot to excise that part out of the screenplay kind of make it part of this other character Allen GRA. And is, you know, remember if I think I did I said, Mr. spook, Stephen, I I don't know. I think that that could be a good character that I'm sure I didn't persuade but anyway, it came around. So that I got back into the movie and do you recognize this? What I like, this is this inflatable picture, viewpoint pictures statue thing. Misalignment? You wasn't inflated. What people said afterwards. I'd I knew nothing about that people send me on the day that it appeared at this is in as took me by surprise. I think they were promoting they're showing the movie after twenty five years, and but then I must say that I read the description of it. It's not wasn't a balloon. It was KAI. Be. Yes. No. I never saw. Show recently, they had decapitated it and they brought the head on. He's very good. Isn't he Graham Norton users? Good show, you see the lovely. In fact. He's the reason we have this album, and that I'm here talking to you right now because a year ago, Greg reporter, if you know him a wonderful singer. I'd run into an airport loved his music. He was the musical guest. Great cigarette. He was the musical guest. When I was promoting Thor ragnarok, and they said, hey, do you want to accompany him just on the piano playing Mona Lisa? He's saying Mona Lisa Mona Lisa and have Nate. Because he does this net. Can call record says I yes, we did it and then his label was deca Tom Lewis ner Becca Allen. And they said, hey, maybe we should do something with Jeff. And that's how the whole thing came about this big statue. So this became a guaranteed the most popular most important, most whatever they call. It used me on the internet and you've become a major millennial star. You're happening for the millennials. Really? Yes. Well, how about that? How does it feel? Oh, lovely. No. Because I ask you because you know, you sort of our young in that you're sixty six started to have kids for the first time at sixty two that's right over three and some months year old boy, and then a in nineteen month old river Joe, but you know, how it works. The the the traditional. It was a dad. I mean, you never wanted to have kids. How does it change your life? Oh, that's a good question. That's a big question. You have you have kids. I have a kid. Yeah. Eighteen well, it's life changing everybody says, and as I sit here and think about it right now. The tremendously changing, it's lovely of wonderful wife. Emily gymnasts is that right? She was for Khun for the Canadian Olympic team. Yeah. She was in the Olympics for rhythmic gymnastics, then she wanted to do aerial work and contortion and this and that she doubled Emma stone in LaLa land. So I read. Yeah. That's pretty amazing. Yeah..

Mona Lisa Mona Lisa Khun Malcolm sandy Meisner Stephen Jeff Michael Crichton Becca Allen Graham Norton Allen GRA Nate KAI reporter Emily Canadian Olympic team Mr. spook LaLa land Olympics Joe Emma stone
"sandy meisner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:43 min | 2 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sarah Silverman singing me and my shadow you'll find that on the debut album from Jeff Goldblum in the Mildred snits orchestra the capitol studio sessions. It reminded me of I think it was the second or third, Tom. Tom waits records where it was recorded in a studio, but you brought an audience into the studio why was it important for you to have a crowd around? Yeah. You know, somebody told me that yesterday, I turned me onto it. And I looked it up. I'd never heard before Nighthawks at the diner is that the name of boy, I love him and love I loved that record. And I thought. Yeah, this this maybe it's a little like ours. Well, it was all Larry Klein's idea, the producer. But we only played live really are banned our ever evolving band over the few decades. And and then of course, he also brought until bronner's. Speaking of guest artists on the trumpet, and our Joe bag on the organ joined us in our regulars Kenny Elliot on drums, and Alex Frank on bass and James king on saxophone and John story. But he he said, gee, he came in and heard are stuff that we do at this place called Rockwell by the. If you're ever or any of your listeners, come to Los Angeles. We play a weekly gig here on Wednesdays on doing tonight, in fact at Rockwell in Los feelers, and he heard it, and he said, gee, I love what you guys are doing jazz wise, it's sort of it's not cabaret. It's kind of there's some substance to it. I mean, the guys who are I play with terrific. And then you're playing, you know, Charles Manson's loneliest monk, and and which I really like, but but people come and they're having a good time. You make it accessible, and it's fun in a way that reminds me of other things and some many things of yesteryear that were social and and really intoxicating and fun. And let's let's do that. He says I want a recorded at the capital records building because I think that's a very fine and wonderful place anyway and a good place to get a good sound and will fill studio. A and b as we figured it out with the tables and make it like a club like you're doing here, and like you've been doing, and that's what we did. And so what you're. I heard there was kind of a spontaneous. It's all spontaneous. When we do it tonight. And these Wednesdays, it's I don't know what we're gonna I don't even know the set lists and they play and I kind of play along, and then I talk to the audience not really even an audience. We just kinda hang out together and play games together. And then share this music. And oftentimes we introduce some of this music to them because they're they've come for one reason or another, but it's we have a grand old time in any way. Larry climb said we should make the album try to catch that spirit and the album, I think going back to the two roads diverged sometimes I feel like in the in the history of jazz method. I'm any kind of expert in the history of jazz. But it feels like you can go two ways. There was degrade Showband tradition and people getting up and putting on a show for the audience. There is also I would say like, you know, the more more academic sitting down at the piano quietly everyone's staring at the floor focusing on their instruments. I do I do find something even though I don't want in any way imply that you're not all hotshot players. There is something sort of refreshing about hearing that show showmanship. Side of things have you imagine that must be good for you too. I do like it. I I guess I like the balance which which maybe we've hit between certainly these other guys have devoted their lives to playing and and are masterful at it. And and not so much. I mean, I always tried to make my acting a little. Being being private while in public. But I know what that means. Well, you know acting teachers will tell you have to achieve a state of aloneness solitude as if you're having the scene with this other person. That's not really meant for it being witnessed, and so the then the accidental audience when added feels like an eavesdropping is taking place. That's something. Like that. Is that what they phrases Wade being being a public solitude public solitude something like that? Anyway, when I play I don't know. I I, you know, I don't get out every night of the week. And I just enjoy it came out of my enjoyment or nothing intentional. Really? It just came out of my enjoyment. When I go out, and I like to see who's there, and I get to talking to them, and I like to share this music with and sort of make sure that everything we're doing or that I'm doing kind of is in communication with the other musicians. But it also is shared with them. That's just what's naturally fun for me. So maybe there's a nice balance. We we get a kick out of it. Jeff, I'm happy you brought it back name because it has been twenty five years since drastic park, by the way. Congratulations. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Yeah. What is it? Like the twenty five years later to see that film. You made you know, way back then before the war still has such importance to so many people before the war. Well, it's so sweet. I mean like, I really didn't want to be an actor. And I'm lucky that I've stayed. Let's active for all this time. And now, I feel like I'm on the humble student, and my great teachers, sandy Meisner said it takes twenty years of continual work before you even can call yourself, an actor, and then a lifetime if you're lucky of of progress, and I feel like I'm on the brink of my best stuff, and it's nice that I've been that. I've worked with great people and interesting people and creatively stimulating and educational people. And that it has somehow like when we were talking about with music reaches people, and they get some replacer out of it. And and it's sweet when they come up to me, and hey, they put that statue of me in London to commemorate the twenty fifth anniversary. Did you see about that shirtless in Malcolm shirtless? Jeff Goldblum after a dinosaur attack a statue made of you. How do you feel about that fantastic? Wonderful you've really embraced interacting with your friends online. Like you've embraced the. Memes about yourself. There's there's something about that. Well, it's taken me by surprise. I only got involved with social media a little bit ago, and I and I post on Instagram, but then I at the gig. I take pictures with people. And and then I see what they've if they've posted it the next day, but I like to see people's tattoos of million drawings of me, and I just get a kind of a kick out of it. You know, for one reason or another it's people are very very sweet actually before we go. I want to close off with a something that occurred to me while I was listening to it. And maybe I'm making too much of a leap here. But I feel like jazz from the music that I've made jazz is best made in close collaboration with those you trust like you create the right environment. And you're able to be spontaneous and creative and trust the people. You're you're being spontaneous. With are the parallels with good acting there as well. Yes. And of course, of course, you have to trust those people. But you know, I think the healthier you are could the more quickly you're able to trust and people if you sort of extend your trust, then their trustworthiness comes into play a little better. Sometimes I find I like a room full of people. I've never met before. And somehow, I don't know why at this point. I kind of fall into an immediate kind of intimacy. I don't know why. I mean, if you're playing music or boy, all sorts of barriers and paranoia, and insecurities and self conscious. Mrs drop away don't they and in the acting field to if you're playing a story, and and and acting out something poetic and meaningful. Well, then. Yeah, you know, oftentimes, I find like in the circus. I kind of you find yourself with people you've never met before. And sometimes you have to act out a love scene with them or some sort of, you know, it's interesting human challenging problem solving requiring intimacy and and full freewheeling interaction somehow, but you don't even know the people, but because you're working on this story that you extensively both care about everything gets opened up and with music too. That's a good answer. Isn't it? It's a solid answer. Jeff goldblum. It's been nice talking to you as nice talking to you mister power. It's lovely. I'll see you in person sometime. I hope we'll have you come to Toronto. You should come up and hang out. Well, I will. I love Toronto. I made the fly there. My wife is from Toronto I go and visit the there and her mom all the time. And I love all things. Canadian fantastic. Jeff what a joy wasn't talk to you. You're so sweet. Thanks, tom. Famous called caravan as originally performed by Duke Ellington, I think in nineteen thirty six and then one of my favorites. It was a first recorded by a group called Barney regard and his jazz Peters. But there it's performed by Jeff Goldblum and his group of caravan his debut album. Jeff Goldblum's comes out on November ninth. It's called the capitol studios. I'm Tom power is back right after..

Jeff Goldblum Tom power Toronto Larry Klein Sarah Silverman Rockwell Mildred snits orchestra bronner Los Angeles Charles Manson producer Duke Ellington Joe bag sandy Meisner Larry climb Kenny Elliot John story Showband Wade Alex Frank
"sandy meisner" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"For one year in arkansas and a guy saw me and a play there and he said you know you you should go new york you have something special and you should go new york and study and he will where would i go and he gave me this list of schools which i still have and his they're all great this one has a man that's the most extraordinary acting teacher in america name sandy meisner so but it's really hard to get into any check that one of the only one i've who was the guy who told you to go to my professor kenneth gillum and so when i won an oscar years later he's one of the people i think only wow you want an oscar for herald in mono melvin howard and howard yeah that was only like your third yeah my third fam and it was directed by the great jonathan demme who lost last year who i you know i i love that i did philadelphia with as well a great friend called a book club who directed that one bill haldeman directed that well because this is his first movie and he and erin sims produced it and rhoda and direct what it's like to work with the first time director diedhiou do direct him or do you think this guy has got to have to prove himself you put him through the through the paces you know i have a son.

arkansas new york sandy meisner kenneth gillum melvin howard jonathan demme philadelphia bill haldeman rhoda america professor oscar erin sims director one year
"sandy meisner" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"Is you you feel it when you're working with them and i felt that with all three of these women i felt both what deep respect for what great actors they are but also you know i was in all of them and to be honest i'm i'm proud of my work and i'm proud of who i am but i'm not i conic they're all three con so the fact that i got cast at all still kind of amazes me and i'm not being falsely modest that's true they're like each conic for reasons so i felt the pressure you're talking about was kind of me in my when i would be most insecure i would go what the hell are you even doing in this movie and after all these years imia needle your first big movie was seventy eight seventy seven seventy seven so so it was it wasn't my first big movie it was my first movie my first movie i was the lead in a movie opposite but i had studied in new york with sandy meisner and graduated from the neighbor playhouse and then i an waitress the whole time and done comedy improv for years in new york before that happened so i'd had held yard you've done the hard yard really good waitress really we're what restaurant they're all gone i'll tell you what they are there the when i was at the longest was called hudson hudson span on seventy sixth and second and twelve tables inside twelve tables outside and i could work by myself with the bus voi on sunday brunch and that was my money for the wing twenty four tables by myself with the busboy and a bartender and then then there was i also worked at a place called noah's ark and i worked when i got.

new york noah
"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"You got a thirty three and a third discount on your own books so every paycheck i had bought so many books i had no paycheck and so i was like it was not going to happen we're going to books where you're buying to like theater stuff or just afterwards tons of theater and i loved biographies and around a little bit later than not show gun show gun came out i remember like i was coach grow yeah and i i was co check laura lie dancehall and i would sit there reading yeah show then you were co coach girl for a while so much better to waitress but because you made so much more money well when did you go with how did you go find sandy meisner i got accepted into this school by some frigging miracle after you move there no no before i moved there that's why move you did a trip i did i flew to dallas where there was a regional representative of this school and i did i he didn't even ask me to addition he just asked me to talk to him about why wanted to do this sandy meisner about them and then i was so dumb that when i went to school i didn't even know which guys sandy meisner was like everybody that kind of popped up and spoke to us i must be him and then finally when i saw him i went on that's him got it yeah got it so that that didn't happen till you move to new york yeah that was in new york in nineteen seventy two so so that's like sort of peak meisner right elliot will i was the last class to study with meisner before he had his larynx removed because of his throat cancer from smoking yeah so i actually taught after that he taught with the whole method but but i i remember his voice i remember i can hear it i can hear it so clearly and i can hear his challenges to me and and then.

dallas representative new york meisner sandy meisner
"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I think he meant go someday when you graduate from college but i knew it was going to be tough for me to afford to keep going to college and and so somehow i got it in my head that maybe i could go to this acting school in new york and i could work there and i could somehow pull this this off and so which which acting school it was the neighborhood playhouse who was with the great sandy meisner who was who now kids study that study acting study the meisner method better i got to study with him so how did you know about him how did you get idea in little rock that you're gonna i so i still have the list the guy gave me liz who okay the mind professio gillam he gave me a list and i still have it and he said these are all the great schools in new york and he checked one and he said this one is the hardest one to get into but there is a great man they're named sandy meisner and so so i didn't i heard all of the other schools and i just lied that one because i think there was something there there was some sort of confidence that i was somehow going to be able to do this and i'm not sure where that came what that was i hadn't really earned that but i don't think if you if you i think what it is it's for people that know that they have to be something that they are something they're your brain doesn't have any other options that's exactly right i really didn't have a beep lambing right i told people a plan but i never believed that the b plan was i'm going to go learn to be a theater teacher and then come back to archer and teach theater and that was way less embarrassing than going i'm going to go to new york to be an actor rose we never met at we didn't know actors mike would you yeah i've been to like three plays in my life you know and and never been to broadway or any i am traveled you know i actors weren't real i mean when i tried to picture well sure they are a lot of yeah okay fair enough.

new york liz sandy meisner mike
"sandy meisner" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Exactly right yeah i was a dog i had to be a dog in that movie person a survivor of the concentration camps who will oppose character makes me act like a dog i was a world class entertainer clown mime in berlin prewar might they take my we get to the camps anyway he makes me act like a dog so for big part of this movie i have to become a dog so i worked with a person there was a lady i just worked at the old vic and i met her several times who's the expert who's the radios the real expert on animal behavior will work where she works with actors and works on animals and we did we did the a lot of things with about dogs did for that movie yes so that was kind of skew know what you think of is acting class kind of stuff but yes just to say a little worried about yeah i studied with sandy meisner and many other wonderful people bill burr and then i taught for a couple of decades whenever i wasn't working something based on that methods improvisation news i'm sure you've heard about and repeat exercise often misunderstood i think and miss todd and i wanted to really understand it from the inside out just for myself and i love kind of being in the giving chair you know it'd being the one not trying to cut the mustard but and put his best foot forward but try to actually inspire stimulating otherwise.

bill burr berlin todd
"sandy meisner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You want me had a breakdown of square tattered play an objective how to listen to the other actor you know how to work physically uh and spent so much time with me it you know out of the classroom to that title i had a bunch teachers they really care about me and the care about absorbed and i you know i'm still friends with i never cut off my relationship with those people it's interesting because i think about people who and it is kind of a latent learning i they say things to you when it comes back to even that layer later what they said to you know i remember i did a i had miroslava lord she the one the rest over was my teacher for a year she torn apart from that she bar from a friend of hers were by the old barneys but she was my teacher and she passed away a few years her she was ninety nine years old and we did a scene once on the forget this incredible lesson she gave me of not playing everything at the expense of the other actor right because you're a very warm and very generous actor you have of you have a great passion but you're not selfish there were guys we suggest by who they always we're going to but the lady andy when the scene rail even when they said they loved you there were like i love you america w it only were really the goal that tagged unit did you feel that you have that innately that colored generosity of spirit you have i i think i you know i was a pretty good listener but i i think our which i refined that when i studied the sandy meisner technique a carnegie hall with robert exmotor he really that's what it's all about listening and responding and letting your partner affect you and doing at of that and i thought that was very very good training and it's essential but witnesses then you decide to go to yale why did you die vinegar went to work.

robert exmotor partner andy yale ninety nine years
"sandy meisner" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"You know it poetry ah you know um i'm a kind of a craft geek i i i've always wanted to be an actor in the worst way like got to stay with somebody really good sandy meisner in ranking seventy right after high school and then went on to teach for a couple of decades something of his method show i was very interested in the nuts and bolts of it and made an experiment of what you're talking about a little but that aspect of it what you could best due to make your shove ready to do the best version of a xinhua's or the player at the moment are and over the years i've dive experiment with all different things in terms of preparation by current thinking although i don't have a formula and drum each puzzle needs its own solution i find but tom these days i was a little more shelf crushed for trying to get better as i go along i'm lucky to have kept getting chances i feel and i i feel like i'm on the threshold of getting during my better and better things and in my shelf crushed fullness now i'm enjoying lash less what you're talking about what are you call that kind of you know skits preparation i used to i see i've done lots of things and i'm not saying if not conscientious when i got apart i start working on i start working on a new movie onion a couple of days and i've been working on it every day in a certain way near lots of different things after fruit french and smoker pipe initial nourish manca pipe so i've been working on that a little bit and all kinds of different things will i'm reading a good book that is not literally.

"sandy meisner" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"And show i saw her in this car i was great to see her anyway shellshocked so sweden but seeing her act was really something and she's so powerful in this movie and joe alluring anna wonderful way and funny herself and rivard and germ spectacular kyle's cuba you'll preparation to do you have a routine before you started did you meditate do you play music to you can you know you you know um i'm a kind of a craft the guy i i i've always wanted to be an actor in the worst way by gut to stay with somebody really good sandy meisner in ranking seventy right after high school and then went on to teach for a couple of decades something of his method show i was very interested in the nuts and bolts of it and made an experiment of what you're talking about a little but that aspect of it what you could best due to make your shove ready to do the best version of a sheens or the player at the moment are and over the years i've dive experiment with all different things in terms of preparation my current thinking although i don't have a formula and drum each puzzle needs its own solution i find but tom these days i was a little more shelf crushed for trying to get better as i go along i'm lucky to have goo goo kept getting chances i feel and i i feel like i'm on the threshold of getting during my better faster and better things and in myself crushed fullness now.

kyle cuba shellshocked sweden joe
"sandy meisner" Discussed on Kevin Pollaks Chat Show

Kevin Pollaks Chat Show

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"sandy meisner" Discussed on Kevin Pollaks Chat Show

"Cut into the the training centres did you know anyone in chicago didn't know anyone i knew i knew the brother of a woman that i was taking classes with acting classes with and she had a rather she said look him up when you get to chicago basically okay you know business and what was he doing inch he was an actor's name is um jon karroll lynch who's who's in how we know juggernaut that he had been on this very now um and it was his uh sister nora and i also lived with his nora carol lynch nor lynch shirked there are they all the name of aero and dan caroline shot the older brother and so i live the two brothers for for wisla separately and that together and that our business ambiance with some of the things they're hillary tall side perry told so so you knew that second city was there from your stepfather s there's no new internet back then said there's no recon you can really know you show up with a couple of dollars in your pocket exactly and john caroline says you can stay with us yes while you figure shit out and and you use a mmediately apply for classes yacht get in for a less olympics olympic i did that to the prevalent pick the ieo in not sued for sang olympics they can't do that um so uh the ieo i i they would put up on stage almost right away basically you know money for classes they would but you upon stage and which was great because he failed tremendously and you have any improved training prior to the amine in acting classes i was doing was a lotta sandy meisner stuff so like we get up in unison to shoebox tissue bucks fisher bucked the fuck you fuck you always turned in the fuck you but um we were basically kind of improvise scenes but it wasn't comedic improv uh that took uh some getting used to and actually fail my addition to get into the classes um uh but i was working there at the time they felt bad for me so they they let me in.

chicago jon karroll lynch dan caroline perry nora hillary john caroline