4 Burst results for "Sandra Horning"

"sandra horning" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:01 min | 6 months ago

"sandra horning" Discussed on KTOK

"Ago. Tell us about how she found out that Kendra Horn. The current occupant of the fifth Congressional District seat doesn't really have a permanent residence in the district. She only has a A an apartment or a condo, and that's not unusual for congressional seats. To claim that as the primary residence yet have residences elsewhere. And I don't blame her from a standpoint of okay. I want to run for this office. So let me get some property in that office or Lisa. I mean, that's what that's how that's how Hillary Clinton got to be a senator from New York. She's not from New York. They bought a house in New York or leased a house in New York claimed it as their residents and therefore she could claim that she lived in the district and therefore what's running for that seat. There's no law against it. But is it sleazy? Oh, yeah, it isthe. So that's another thing that Stephanie Bice has going for her. She does actually live in The fifth Congressional District. Tab, writes Lee. What is required sometimes is tough Love. You were talking the other day about how many in our government like Joe Biden. Want the government to take care of everyone and be the benefactor of everyone like a Benevolence Society. You, on the other hand, kept using the word sagacity and that it is all up to each of us to use our own resource is toe live our life the way we see fit and for the government to stay out of the way. That requires tough love. It's hard to practice. It's even mohr difficult not to on second thought. We'll see. Come. Election time. Your thoughts, Tam. I agree. I believe in tough love. Sometimes I believe that you have to go through the darkness before you, Khun, get to the light. Now I'm not saying that we should let starving people starve to death and sick people die. I'm not saying that. What I am saying is that for those of us who have capabilities and wish to apply them to our own benefit should be allowed to do that without guilt without guile, and without a government coming in and saying You're racist. You're wrong your homophobia for wanting to do that. And that to me is the biggest difference between the two sides that were voting upon on November. 3rd NewsRadio 1000. Katie. Okay, chosen Guthrie. Thank you for hanging on. Yeah. Riley. Hey, I found found out something strange looking in my NRA voting guide, and I looked up. Oklahoma House of Representatives Still water district. Ah, district 33 representative John Calley. Okay with an F rating with the NRA. Ah, I don't know the guy and I don't know his record. Our good friend down the Baptist usually keeps very good track of all that. Well, he beat out Greg Benik, who I understand is the father of constitutional Carrie, who used to have that That district? Yeah, and actually, he ran. Greg Dominic ran against Carly tally. The Democratic the time and I understand Carly Tally, and John Calley, who is running as a a Republican, are married. Well, doesn't politics when I look into that makes strange bedfellow and he has f operating with the NRA, which I'm sure that Greg Dominic has a plus. Yes. Yes, I guess the old gal's still got it. All six right in the 10 ring. Thanks for the information. Jo on NewsRadio. 1000 Katie. Okay. A for a 1000 Leigh Matthews, Katie okay dot com. Scott writes Ali. I wanted to show you this fifth Congressional District rating on immigration. The grid below shows a comparison of the candidates on a variety of immigration issues. Thought you might find it interesting. And I do. Scott. Thanks for sharing. It's a put out by the is it the visit of Is it fair? Foundation for American immigration reform anyway. That compares Kendra Horn and Stephanie vice in the upcoming race. On the implement of Ah, well, first of all, opposing amnesty. Kendra Horn is wavering on it. Stephanie bys opposes it. Implementation of interior enforcement. Kendra Horn opposes it. Stephanie vice is for it. Securing the border. Sandra Horn opposes it. Stephanie Bice. Endorses it and the limit of unnecessary worker visas. Kendra Horn is ambivalent on it. And Stephanie Bys doesn't have an opinion on it. At least a ce faras. This is concerned, but I will tell you and I didn't have to look at this to know it. Stephanie Vice does indeed have a better immigration policy and more in agreement with what my feelings about immigration. Our news radio 1000, Katie, Okay, Hi. You are on the air. Hello. Me? Yes. Go. Okay? And I want to know about Stephanie Vice. The commercials. Because I don't know It's true that she I'm not going to vote for tender horn anyway, that that Stephanie by voted against teacher pay raises, she voted for the pay raise. She voted for the pay raise I have today. I know this is very naive Hack and they get on there. And so I step that isn't true. I don't understand. Because once upon a time, there may have been a bill that had a small pay raise, innit? That Stephanie Vice didn't vote for because there was something else in the bill. What we call pork. But she didn't want to pass right? But when the big pay raise came through the big 40% pay raise that was designed to keep the teachers from walking off. The job came through. Stephanie Vice voted for it. And one of the teachers do to say thank you. They walked off the job Anyway..

Kendra Horn Stephanie Vice Stephanie Bice Stephanie Katie Stephanie Bys New York Stephanie vice NRA Congressional District Greg Dominic Sandra Horn congressional Scott Hillary Clinton John Calley Carly tally Joe Biden Oklahoma House of Representati Lisa
"sandra horning" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

Health Care Rounds

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"sandra horning" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

"Things have gotten faster in the last couple of years but. You know the last paper I read on this still the average was like eight to nine years. and. So if you're for example small biotech. You are burning through incredible amounts of cash to pay for your staff, the clinical trials, etc.. into the faster, you get that up and running and completed the better and so. The Anderson's and Danafarber Casey see they're still very important in the KHL trial infrastructure. But there are other alternatives that drug companies farm are looking at not including Sarah. Cannon. But also outside of the United States. There are other entities now outside the United States that are also doing these kinds of clinical trials. Now, you know the FDA singer their mandate is is that you know long as the data's good right and it's it's been audited and vetted appears good. They're not going to necessarily disapprove a drug because it's not done it in the Enersen caring right? They just WanNa, make sure that the right protocols have been followed in all the essentials of running clinical trial is done properly is essentially. So you're all in competition with each other for those those clinical trials. Right I mean ideally, we should. We shouldn't be in competition, right ideally, we should all be working together towards You know getting these trials up and running and completed for cancer patients but there is some level of competition I would really academic competition but also trying to get slots for patients who are at your institution. I wanted to pick up where we left off on our discussion of Pharma and the cost to bring a drug to market I think you throw to figure something like two billion dollars. That's the number that I've seen something around that, and we're talking offline about the decisions that Pharma companies need to make whether to even enter clinical trials or move from phase one to two. To, three bringing drug markets on every stage of the every step of the way in stages decision needs to be made it go no go decision what are your thoughts on that process and the the issues that people think about when making those decisions? Yeah. That's a really excellent question. So I had that same question to my colleagues in Pharma, and so I actually pitched A. A Educational Session on this very topic and we titled at the art and Science of go no go decisions in oncology drug development. And the reason we titled that is, is because I, it's not a science scientific process, right? There are many different factors that make a decision about whether a drug will move into not only into the clinic but from each step in the process and there were three kind of industry veterans who are part of that educational session. If some of your audience were at a CR, they can log onto the website and actually it was recorded. Nancy Cole, who is was kind of the head biologist or head she scientific officer blueprint biology. She's now consulted for a number of companies institutions. The second person was David fell quite who is the head of early drug development at ems the last person was Sandra Horning who's chief medical officer at Genentech. And so I posed this question to all three of them who how do you make these decisions in each step from the preclinical to the early and late? Nancy. Obviously shared there are a number of key decisions. Is there activity in certain models? Can you actually create a molecule that will have the right stability and characteristics in a clear environment that we can? Can you scale it? Right? Can you make enough drugs so that you can get this into the clinic and what in the context of all of this you know what are your competitors out there? What drugs already in that space Dave had a really interesting perspective. He's a huge fan of economists. Named diversity, who was a behavioral economists? Who won the Nobel Prize in the and and really believed that in complex decision processes you really need clear try to make as much objective decisions as possible outside of your own personal kind of agenda has I think we're all whether it since to some extent in science, but also in complex decision process such as drug development in your all we all have biases right for and Dave has tried at least in his processes still eliminate that by looking at certain. He's actually got an algorithm where he looks at the characteristics of that molecule in clinic. So I in early trials. So does this is their activity is there does inhibit what we think it does in biomarkers a both what's called proximal biomarkers and distant biomarkers, and what level of activity are we seeing is safe for less toxic and human beings all these criteria he kinda posed and he uses somewhat of an algorithm to make to help their team make decisions. Sandra was much more broad and she posed a number of challenges. I think that the industry is facing and that is you know we have gone from this period of scarcity where we had very few drugs and entries can into a clinic now with a huge abundance of new trials and new molecules what's challenging for somebody like Santa? Horning is there is a lot of competition out there. Right? There are at least there's already five approved pd one or Pedia one inhibitors. There's another ten in the in in the space. Where do you go right? There are multiple agents in every single class. How do you proceed? and. So She just post a lot of questions and for them I think how do you navigate the process? In the context of the larger challenges such as patient enrollment research cost. How much is this GONNA cost us to eventually get an approval. I would argue the regulatory framework she brought up the regulatory framework which has has really changed over the last several years and I I give credit to..

Sandra Horning Nancy Cole United States Dave KHL Sarah FDA Nobel Prize Enersen Anderson Genentech Danafarber Casey officer medical officer David Santa
"sandra horning" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

Health Care Rounds

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"sandra horning" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

"The. Welcome to healthcare rounds the podcast serving the ins and outs of health policy and business topics as well as our take on the rapidly evolving healthcare delivery ecosystem, I'm your host, John Murcia CO Darmon research group and faculty associate at the WB Carey school of business and the college of health solutions at Arizona State University. This week part two of my conversation with Dr David s Hong deputy sheriff investigational cancer therapeutics. At the university of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr Hong did is undergrad at Yale University and earned his medical degree from Albert Einstein. College of medicine he completed an internship in residency at Thomas Jefferson university hospital and medical oncology fellowship at MD Anderson during which time he was appointed chief medical oncology, fellow in two thousand five he joined the Anderson's faculty. Dr Hong is the recipient of many awards, including two thousand four young investigator award from the American society of Clinical Oncology, he has published more than two hundred seventy articles in pure viewed journals. I wanted to pick up where we left off on our discussion of pharma and the cost to bring a drug to market. I think you throw to figure something like two billion dollars. That's the number that I've seen something around that. And we're talking about the decisions that farm companies need to make whether to even enter clinical trials or to move from phase one two to three bringing drug to market. So on every stage of every step of the way in those stages decision. These made it go no go decision. What are your thoughts on that process? And the the issues that people think about when making those decisions. Yeah, that's a really excellent question. So I I had that same question to my colleagues in pharma. And so I actually pitched a a educational session on this very topic. And we titled it the art and science. Of go. No, go decisions in oncology, drug development. And the reason we titled that is because it's not a science scientific process. Right. There are many different factors that make a decision about whether a drug will move into not only into the clinic. But from each step in the process, and there were three kind of industry veterans who were part of that educational session. If some of your audience were at ace Yar they can log onto the as your website. And actually it was recorded Nancy Cole who is was kind of the head biologist or head. She signed to author a blueprint biology. She's now consulted for a number of companies institutions. The second person was David fell Kwait who is the head of early drug development at B M S. The last person was Sandra Horning, who's chief medical officer at Genentech and so. So, you know, I pose this question to all three of them will how do you make these decisions in each step from the preclinical to the early and late Nancy, you know, obviously shared there are number of key decisions is their activity in certain models. Can you actually create a molecule that will have the right stability and characteristics in a clear environment that we can can you scale it? Right. Can you make enough drug? So that you can get this into the clinic. And what in the context of all of this? You know, what are your competitors out there? What drugs already in that space? Dave had a really interesting perspective. He's a huge fan of this. Economists named diversity who was a behavioral economists who won the Nobel prize in the eye, and in really believe that in complex decision processes, you really need clear try to make as much object. Tive decisions as possible outside of your own personal and of agendas. I think we're all whether it's since to some extent science but also in conflict decision process such as drug development. You're all we all have biases. Right. Sure. And Dave has tried at least in his processes still eliminate that by looking at certain he's actually got an algorithm where he looks at the characteristics of that molecule in clinic. So I in early trials so does this is their activity is or does inhibit what we think it does in biomarkers of both what's called proximal biomarkers and distant biomarkers, and what level of activity. Are. We seeing is this safe for less, toxic and human beings all these criteria. He kinda posed and he uses. Somewhat of an algorithm to make to help the their team make decisions Sandra was much more broad. And you know, she posed a number of challenges. I think that industry is facing. And that is you know, we have gone from this period of scarcity where we had very few drugs entering into clinic. Now with a huge abundance of new trials and new molecules what's challenging for somebody. Like Santa Horning is there is a lot of competition out there. Right. There are at least there's already five approved PD one or pedia one inhibitors. There's another ten in the in the space, where do you go, right? There are multiple agents in every single class. How do you proceed, and so she just post a lot of questions for them? I think how do you navigate the process in the context of? The larger challenges such as patient enrollment research cost how much is this gonna cost us eventually get an approval, I would argue the regulatory framework and she brought up the regulatory framework, which has has really changed over the last several years in I give credit to our colleagues at the FDA. They've really tried to look at alternative ways to get drugs approved way that we hadn't seen before things. Like the breakthrough indication histology agnostic trials

Sandra Horning Dr David Dr Hong American society of Clinical O Dave Nancy Cole MD Anderson university of Texas John Murcia CO Darmon Anderson Cancer Center WB Carey school of business College of medicine Yale University Albert Einstein Arizona State University ace Yar Nobel prize Anderson Thomas Jefferson university ho
"sandra horning" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"sandra horning" Discussed on Novel Targets

"Would many interviews vignettes company. Scientists and clinical researches, I'm Sandra Horning. I'm the chief medical officer and global head of product development at Genentech. What's it like being president of SEO? I suspect it's a much bigger achievement to be president Lasko in twenty seventeen when I was in the two thousand five to two thousand six era. I often say that I really wish I knew then what I know now Durham's of leadership and management. However, it is a journey, and I would say that they ask oh experience and the presidency in in particular was a really important stop on that journey for me that helped me really understand what leadership can be and how to bring people together. I think the power of getting people to focus on a specific problem and to. Bring that into a priority situation with a clear goal and time line as an end point was a very powerful experience for me from taking something that was kind of grumble or a problem all the way through to a solution and a solution. And I'm very proud to say that I think served the organization well over the next decade is is very warning to me, and I just enjoyed so much working with incredibly talented people and sensually working shoulders shoulder in problem solving. So looking back on your career in your experiences. What advice would you give to young researchers young daughters starting out kind of put my thoughts together around three elements, which I think are extremely important. The first is passion, you could probably tell I have a lot of passion for for patients and putting that passion to a purpose really makes it easy. Or easier to make decisions around your career where you will.

president Sandra Horning Genentech Lasko Durham medical officer global head product development