29 Burst results for "Sandra Day O'connor"

22 State AGs Send Letter to U.S. Senate Urging Prompt Confirmation of Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett

Hope in the Night

00:25 sec | 9 months ago

22 State AGs Send Letter to U.S. Senate Urging Prompt Confirmation of Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett

"States have signed a letter urging quick confirmation for Amy Cockney Barrett to the U. S. Supreme Court. The letter comes from 22 Republican State attorneys general and claims there's plenty of time to confirm Barrett before the November election. The ages note. The Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself was confirmed in a span of 42 days. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in 33. It also makes the point that since 1900 Six justices have been confirmed during election years, but your reporting

Amy Cockney Barrett Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S. Supreme Court Sandra Day
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

03:32 min | 9 months ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

"I was going to do one on the first oldest profession. But who wants to sit around reading a book on Agriculture My definition of success is probably a different than most people. To me if knowing just knowing when you're thin enough. Knowing when you're rich enough knowing when you're happy enough. And knowing when you're fulfilled enough just to sit back and enjoy it. And I see an awful lot of people who get there to success and you know what the sad part is. The sad part is they don't they don't know they're there. And that's what I find is is so sad. I hope all of you find your dreams I. I don't want you to be surprises. Success takes another form. I I think what you're seeing with this parade of people here are people who Who are on some kind of level that you aspire to? And that's not necessarily success either I'm not talking about United States senators. I'm not talking about Olympic runners and Nobel Prize winners I'm talking about the humanity that is here in this room. And don't you ever underrate it? Just think about this some of you out there are going to be heroes or heroines to somebody. Many of you. That scratched the men on this but many of you will give birth. To something and that's pretty terrific. Some of you will conquer an illness or handicap in your lifetime, and that's no small thing. and. Some of you if you're not already are going to be the best friend. That, another person ever had. And that's pretty special. And I think most of you.

Nobel Prize United States
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

04:08 min | 9 months ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

"I wanted to be able to to leave home without my American. Express card. I wanted an alligator to wear shirt with my face on his pocket. And then I began to think about something I thought you know. Maybe maybe being ordinary wasn't asset. Was it possible? If I can translate my imperfect kids and my predictable have been. And my run of the mill life onto paper would there be anyone else out there who could possibly identify with it. And I probably stumbled into my little part time job is I know it today. It's something called honesty. Because with no I, don't think there's any other profession that you're asked to give. So much of yourself. Every rider gives away a part of their very personal life. I. Don't care if it's a straight news store you give away something some clue to what you're all about I think with every sentence that you write. You. Probably. Think. The great trick to. To to writing. There really aren't aren't aren't too many tricks. You probably think there's a lot of things that that you went to school for that. You have absolutely no use whatsoever for I mean, why am I wasting my time doing this? A lot of dumb things like diagramming sentences. And when you think about it, you know I mean I thought the same thing. How how many times my going to walk down the street in some say. You. Know you suppose we could go diagram a sentence somewhere It never happened. I remember taking four years. Spanish, I. Have Never used the term yet. What time is the bullfights never in my life? And you get to thinking about that. You think who cares what am I gonNA use all this stuff. Well. I'll tell you where you're GONNA use it. I write for nine hundred newspapers I write for books and I write for television and I have used every single scrap. Every experience I've ever had in my entire life and I have drawn from every individual. I have ever met in my lifetime at at some time I've drawn from a character I have known. Only two pieces of advice of on riding and this is lethal you should never do this. I I want to tell you. There's no such thing as writer's block. Really. It's like North Dakota it doesn't exist. I know. North Dakota here in. And I never saw anything. That got into the line of print. Without first putting it down on paper and what I'm trying to stay in a very nice way is that stop talking about it and sit down and do it or It's never going to happen. I love these people come to your parties and I said I had this this book in my head. It's been rounding around here for ten years and it's just wonderful. You're never gonNA read it. My remarks very brief. You have to know that I do love what I do. At the age of fifty six I've done things I never thought were possible. From singing two weeks ago on the stage of grand old opry with many Pearl. To. Speaking at the White House. And for six years, I.

North Dakota Pearl White House writer
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

06:58 min | 9 months ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

"Hillary swanks latest project is a new netflix series called away in it. She plays an astronaut commander who leaves behind her husband and daughter for three year mission to Mars. It's very emotional and serious and stirring. But you know would amid a joke if she were alive today at of taking a long break from her husband and children. ERMA bombeck. That's. Hermit bombeck is our last speaker. This episode we turn to her for some comic relief of course, but also for more evidence of how truly extraordinary ordinary can be. Well. You're sitting out there this morning. Listening to a speaker. Not only looks like your mother. For the first eleven, years of her married life had the distinction of being the only one in the house who could change the toilet tissue spindle. Erma bombeck was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, and raised in a working class family in Dayton. Ohio just days before she died in nineteen ninety-six she was working on her newspaper columns. It was a column She'd written for over thirty years that was printed in nine hundred papers. And was read by thirty million people, her com chronicle, the life of a suburban midwestern housewife with payphones and honesty, and most of all humor in many funny ways Erma bombeck ended the myth of the happy homemaker. She. Also wrote fifteen books just as witty. Most of them bestsellers. She gave this talk to students at the Academy of Achievement Summit in San Diego in nineteen eighty three. You're looking at a woman who married right out of college because her mother panicked. Despite the fact that she was. Too, short for pregnancy. She gave birth to three children. And at the age of thirty, seven years of age. Finally realized that visiting her meet in the food locker. With, a little less than a religious experience. So, at that stage I turned to writing a newspaper column. Your speaker at this moment subsequently produced a six book and one of them. The grass is always greener over the septic tank. Was Made into a movie starring Carol Brunette. Yes. I. Know Your Grandmother died yesterday. She. Also died last Tuesday and a week ago Saturday I'm not buying it Debbie I am up to my fireside girls motto and Cookies the critic for Time magazine said the only thing good about it was that Erma bombeck did not star in it. In Nineteen, seventy four, she produced a comedy album for Warner Brothers call the family that plays together gets on each other's nerves. Looking back marriage. I realize now that I'm married young. But when you're thirty four and love can tell you. That album. Sold two copies at JC Penney store in Beirut. Two years ago she produced a situation comedy for ABC called Maggie. down. I can even get into some of the things I wore in high school really like what? My graduation gown. In the ratings, it was listed Jeff Below Marlin Perkins, viewing the dental records of a white rhino. That's IT folks I just I feel like Bob Massey. I didn't want all of you to go home thinking that none of us are failed because that's probably the one thing that this big long procession here has in common going for us today whether it be physicist or or a sports figures or whatever. We've all failed and we failed real big. I think it was the pope who wants said. Or maybe it was woody. Allen. Probably. Anyway, if you're not failing, you're not trying anything new. And I think the important thing. Is that we may have failed at something but I don't think that any. Of US considered ourselves failure, we just picked it up. Did it all over again? There's There isn't a lot that's really very unique about me. IPAD my by all the time because it is miserable. My Dad. Had A fourth grade education and he married my mother when she was fourteen years old I came along when she was sixteen. I was the first one in my entire total family and there were about twenty six grandchildren. The first one, the family deliver finish high school. Let alone go to college. And I took that as a sign from God. I remember my my counselor in college said. Irma, what do you do with your life? What is it? You WanNa you WanNa you WANNA get married. You want to have children. You want to be a writer, you want to write a syndicated column. Maybe, you want to be a best selling. Maybe one appear on television shows and I said yes. That's what I WANNA do and he said which one all of them. Well after eleven years. Putting a pair of socks in the washing machine and only getting one back. I looked in the mirror. One morning I realized something about myself something really pretty important. I was ordinary. Just. Think about it. What a shock that was to me I was a Ohio. Midwest bauge Barry Manilow in pantyhose ordinary. that. I had in mind for me. I wanted success. I wanted I want to be one of those people who appeared on the Carson show and blue jeans and left early..

ERMA bombeck US Ohio netflix Hillary commander Academy of Achievement Summit Barry Manilow JC Penney Carol Brunette Time magazine Warner Brothers Bob Massey ABC Carson Dayton physicist Debbie
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

07:02 min | 9 months ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

"You know I've had a handful a couple handfuls. Now of wonderful people who believed in me and without them I would not be where I am today. I know many of you know the saying. The definition of luck is when preparation meets with. Opportunity. And my mom also instilled in me a wonderful work ethic so that when I go and I would audition. I would be prepared. I wanted to be prepared whenever my opportunity. Arose. Now I also didn't knock any opportunities I didn't think I just want to be in big movies and I don't want to do television or I don't WanNa do this little TV show or this little play I. always looked at every opportunity as an opportunity to grow and learn. My craft. And I started out auditioning and doing a lot of television. Now, I did a lot of comedy believe it or not. In the beginning of my career every single year I would do I was doing all these half hour shows and. I wanted to start doing drama I. Got a role in Beverly Hills Ninety two and when it was in its eight season and no one watched it anymore. But still it was a big deal for me and. I started auditioning for other dramas and I had a lot of people say to me. You know you're you're just two half hour just to comedic. You're not. You're not dramatic in this isn't GonNa work for you. So my point of saying that is that I've had a lot of obstacles in my career I choose to. Take in the constructive criticism even though sometimes it hurts and I don't really want to hear it and other things that people will say your lips are too big your forehead it's too big. What kind of name is swank aw you know all these things and say OK okay. That's your opinion. Of course, it stings no one wants to hear your foreheads to and your lips or too big or whatever other things. I don't WanNA share with you all right now. So I chose to put those things on the side but the point is I always look ever every opportunity that I have in which to grow from and learn from it and take something from it because I know that every single day that I wake up and get to do what I love that I'm grateful and I want to continue doing what I love, which means I have to continue learning about my business and whatever way shape or form that is. and. You know when I was told, I was to our own wasn't going to be able to do drama four months. Later I got boys don't cry and in that moment I was given the opportunity to do drama. and. I won the best dramatic of award for best actress that year it just happened like that and all of a sudden I was doing drama. Ben One I wanted to start doing comedy again everyone was like, but you're a dramatic actress. So again, I just I stand just to let you know that. With all the success that I've had in my life I continued today to fight for the things I want to fight for the things that I believe in nothing is handed to me. I thought after my First Academy Award everything was going to change I thought Oh. My Gosh you know I'm going to get all these opportunities to do all these other things and I'm gonNA have so many scripts coming in. So many offers the work with the people that I love this. Great. Well, what hit me was that my first role that people saw me and my first impression was that of a boy. And I had to deal with that and I had to realize this is a business too, and that for all these people were supposed to be the most creative people in the world they weren't so creative they were mostly business-minded but I could choose to be bitter about that and be angry and go. How can they not see me as a girl a girl Instead I took my meetings I went out and I did my work because I have a choice every single day to grow or not grow a choice of rest on my laurels or choice to continue define roles that challenge me and and helped me. Learn more about myself in the human condition. Hilary Swank took questions at the end of your talk. The I was from a graduate student in the audience named Michael Motto I. I saw Boys Don't cry when I was in college at Yale and We didn't speak for about ten minutes after seeing the film and people caught that issue like seeing seeing the world in color versus black and white. My question is about the relationship between art and politics. And how what you do and what art does can humanize stories in ways that can really affect social change. It's a great great question and. I have to tell you that when I'm asked to speak at things like this, where these these people who? Changed the world in. Health and and President Clinton last night and I'm like I'm an actor. How do I belong here? You know that Sesame Street name one thing is not like the other. I just keep thinking that they're gonNA Siemian like go won't you don't belong here But and what I do realize. Because I experienced it. The one wonderful thing about my job is that I get to see life on a very deep and profound level from a lot of different ways I would have never known what it felt like to be a person with a sexual identity crisis had I not cut my hair off and passes a boy for four weeks the feel the injustice of what these people feel when they are not. Able to be defined by people. It's it's a I work with these kids now to who are lesbian transgendered and questioning youth and gay and every day of their life every day they are abused either physically or mentally it's part of their life just because they can't be define. And it's just interesting. The whole psychological aspect of someone not being able to figure out who someone is and how that challenges them as a person. Learn about these things in a very deep and profound level, and because of that, go around and talk about it and just raise awareness. In different aspects and different areas I just. Had A movie out called Freedom Writers and it was a wonderful wonderful reminder that. Even in this day and age when we're so advanced, how people are still so prejudice. Judge people by how they look or how they act. And these kids at the story was about as a true story they were thrown out. They were thrown in the trash told that they were never going to amount to anything that they were going to be nothing. Well, if you're toll pet your whole life. Where's your? You don't have anything to pull from, and of course, you're going to join gangs and most of these kids were in gangs and it took that one person to believe in them and say you have just as much. Of A place in the world is anybody else and you need to look within and find what it is. You want and go after it. So yes, it's a wonderful wonderful part of my job that I get to go around and.

Hilary Swank Beverly Hills Ninety President Clinton First Academy Ben graduate student Freedom Writers Yale Michael Motto
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

06:17 min | 9 months ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

"Can can achieve your dream. Hilary Swank was born in Nebraska in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four. She had some early success getting roles on TV. And in film but the movie that earned her her first Oscar and set her apart as one of the greatest actors of her generation was boys don't cry. It was a true story set in Nebraska about a young transgender man named Brandon Teena who was raped and murdered when his birth identity was revealed it it sounds a lot more confident than it is are. Do you have any water because. I'm really always Dry. On Tina brand. Was He ran is not quite a he? Boys don't cry came out in Nineteen, ninety nine and was one of the first movies to give voice to a transgender person. The Rule Changed Hillary swanks life. You know a lot of people ask how did I start in the business? What's what's my story? Why did I want to become an actor? and. I. I grew up in a lower income family I. I grew up in a trailer park and a lot of people here that and they think, Oh, a trailer park comes with a lot of baggage But for me as a kid I didn't know any different and it I had a roof over my head and I had food and it was no big deal but I'm. Also had didn't mean anything to my friends but to their parents, it meant a lot and that's where I learned classism. That's why I learned that it was maybe not okay to be poor. That's where I learned that I was maybe different somehow. And in that moment. I felt like an outsider. Now, that's not unique to me. I think everybody has felt like an outsider in their life at one point or another. I'm sure everyone here has and everyone knows what that moment was. But in that moment for me. I felt just lonely and I turned to books and movies and I remember the bookmobile would come to our my trailer park. and. I remember getting lost in books and I. Remember Loving these books and I remember feeling like I belonged I. Remember Reading about characters who were going through something that I was going through. and. I. Just I felt like I had a connection they were my friends and the same thing with movies. Some of the first movies I remember watching were the wizard of Oz, the elephant man in the miracle worker, all stories about people who are going through things that I felt like I understood or I learned from. You know the wizard of Oz still touches me day because it was people who wanted a brain a heart and they went for the man behind the curtain to give them those things only to realize that there was no man behind the curtain that they had to look within. It was seventy seven years old when I saw that movie. And a couple of years later, I had a teacher a wonderful teacher when I was in fifth grade who had us write a skit and then perform it in front of the class and I remember in that moment. Something happening I didn't know it at the time. Now I can define it as when I realized my calling it was something that I knew made me feel the most alive that I'd ever felt so I started auditioning for school plays. And I had a mother who to this day gave me the most important. Gift, you can ever give anyone which was the gift of believing in me. My Mom told me from a very young age that I could do anything in my life as long as I worked hard enough and I had perseverance and I never gave up. So. My mom gave me the the the understanding of how to deal with obstacles when they arose and to this day, my mom is still advocate in my life. I started auditioning for school plays and then I started doing. Repertory theatre in my local hometown. My Mom came to a crossroads in her life. When I was a about halfway through my fifteenth year and she said. You. Know Your father and I are separated and If you really WANNA pursue this when to go to Hollywood. So this was a wonderful thing for me to hear and I said, let's go mom. So with seventy five dollars to our name and a gas credit card, my mom and I drove down to Los Angeles we didn't have anywhere to go. That is one of the wonderful things about my mom she taught me a sense of adventure as well. my mom did all the worrying for for us. A lot of people say, wow, you know you lived out of your car and wasn't that hard? No To me. It wasn't to me. I was living adventure. I was living my dream I was going to pursue my dream. It was nothing but a wonderful wonderful moment in my life. My mom I remember would stand with roller quarters and shoot cold call agents say my daughter's really pretty and really talented I. Think you should meet her. And they would say, okay, we'll send a resume a picture and we'll think about that. Well, I didn't have resume and I certainly didn't have a picture. So that was a little bit a difficult and one day my mom just got A. An agent who has happened to have cold cold calls and said, yes, we're looking for talent and want you come in Wednesday at two I, remember like it was yesterday I went in and I remember reading this McDonald's commercial. And the Woman Bonnie leaky saying that was great. I'd like to be your agent and I went out and my mom was sitting there nervous equal and I said, mom, I have an agent that woman was my agent for five years and until I became an adult and she worked with only children and I got my my. Adult. Agent..

Nebraska Oz Hilary Swank Brandon Teena Oscar classism Bonnie leaky Hillary Tina Los Angeles McDonald Hollywood
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

08:12 min | 9 months ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on What It Takes

"This is Alice we were. So move last week by the courage and the Moxie that defined with Beta. Ginsberg's life that we felt inspired to listen to recordings of other women in the Academy of Achievements Audio Archives Women who were also born into humble circumstances but grew up to break ground for the rest of us. I chose the word Moxie by the way because it came into use right around the time justice Ginsburg was born as if anticipating the force of her character and Moxie is what the three women will hear from today have in spades. Three very different women. Justice Sandra Day O'connor the first woman on the Supreme Court Erma bombeck the Hilarious and massively popular syndicated columnist and Hilary Swank the actor who delivered devastating performances in boys don't cry and million dollar baby. It may seem like an unusual combination of women granted but I think you'll hear the thread that runs through what they had to say no interviews this episode just straight inspirational talk. This is what it takes a podcast about passion vision and perseverance from the Academy of Achievement. I'm Alice Winkler at. This child is it. and. I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it, you may never have another child it. All was clear. It was just like the picture started to form itself. which ally could prevail over the truth darkness light there over life every day I wake up and decide. Today I'm going to love my life. Decide. Decide If they're going break your leg or it's when you go in play, stay out of there. And then along companies differential experiences but you don't look for you don't plan for. The boy you better not miss him. We start. Sandra Day O'connor former Supreme Court justice of the United States she grew up in. Arizona in the nineteen thirties a cowgirl on a ranch. There was no running water and no electricity in her house. But there were plenty of cattle and plenty of horses before I wrote occasionally on the roundup it had been on all male domain changing to accommodate a female was probably my first initiation into joining an all men's club something I did more than once in my life. After the cowboys understood that a girl could hold up her end. It was much easier for my sister, my niece and the other girls and young women who followed to be accepted in that rough and tumble world. That's justice. O'Conner, reading from her Memoir Lazy Be and here she is speaking at the Academy of Achievement Summit in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven in Scottsdale Arizona to young scholars. About half of you students here today are young women and I. Hope You don't mind if I address some preliminary remarks primarily to both young women. Because, in than one generation conditions for women in the United States, have changed dramatically. And I blacked on how rapidly things have changed for women. In this country, I can cite my own experiences which you heard in my introduction. And if we look back just to the last century. They'll want many opportunities open to women seeking careers in any field. Married women had no legal control over their property. Their wages are their children. Women didn't have the right to vote or practice medicine or law. And these laws weren't aberrations. They reflected widely held perceptions in those days that. Lacked the capacity for leadership whether within the community or her family. Now today. You young women students will have not one but countless opportunity and different roads open to follow on your journey through life. And your challenges are not going to come so much in breaking new paths as your mother's May have had to do. And as perhaps I have done but in deciding which of the many paths now open to you, you should choose and knowing how you should travel along those tab. But all US students here today male and female will go on to obtain one or more university degrees, and you'll be able to pursue careers to narrate to have families or. All. Up, doubles. As a woman combining career and family is not easy, but it's certainly possible. Now, how are you going to deal with these opportunities then your lives? Education is an important part of the answer, but don't think that your education takes place only during your time and high school or in college in Graduate School. At Peter Ustinov that education is the process by which a person begins to learn how to learn and you will be learning all your lives. You should take some comfort in that because even though your problems may sometimes same a man. You have time to learn to deal with them. But education is only part of the answer. Your values are another critical part. John Gardner Express. One of the points I want to make when he said you have to build meaning into your life. And you build it through your commitment. Whether through your religion to an ethical order as you conceive it. To your life work a loved one or to your fellow human. Each other should become involved in the community in which we find ourselves. We can participate directly in fully as volunteer workers as elected or appointed representatives, and some community agency or institution, or simply as citizens working to persuade others to take needed action, and it is the end of visual can and does make a difference even in this increasingly populous complex world of ours. If you take nothing else away from York various this weekend, it ought to be back because you are thing parade of individuals. From all feels who have done absolutely remarkable things and who a narrow way have helped change society. Now secondly, even us must make it a habit to do our best. Task you're assigned to the best of your ability and God, will take care of them. Presumably many of you plan. Hope to reach the point where you have interesting and important work to do and you're paid as much or. More than you're worth for doing it. But if you're a career path is at all like mine and who knows. For one or more you what may well be right down to the last detail you won't be starting at the top of the ladder. After I graduated from law school. I started my own private practice sharing a small off with another lawyer and a shopping center in Maryvale Arizona. Other people who had offices and the same shopping mall repaired television claimed clothes loaned money. It was not a high rent district I got walk in business. People came to see me about grocery bills. They couldn't black landlord tenant problem and other everyday matters not usually considered by the United States Supreme Court. But I always did the best with what I had. When I applied to the tone attorney general's Office for work they didn't have a place for me.

United States Supreme Court United States Sandra Day Alice Winkler Arizona Academy of Achievement Moxie Hilary Swank Ginsburg Academy of Achievements Ginsberg Peter Ustinov Academy of Achievement Summit Maryvale Arizona cowboys O'Conner York private practice Graduate School
Sen. Mitch McConnell says Senate will vote on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Tim Conway Jr.

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

Sen. Mitch McConnell says Senate will vote on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Nominee for this vacancy will receive a vote. On the floor of the Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will vote this year on President Trump's nominee to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The Senate has more than sufficient time. The process. A nomination. History and president make that perfectly clear. McConnell did not say whether the vote will happen before after the elections. But he says justice is John Paul Stevens in Sandra Day O'Connor, where each confirmed and fewer than 43 days. Democrats say the the next next president president should should pick pick the the nominee. nominee. President President Trump Trump says says he's he's obligated obligated to to nominate nominate a a replacement. replacement.

President Trump Trump President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Senate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Senate Majority Sandra Day O'connor John Paul Stevens
'Notorious RBG:' Ginsburg transcended the court to become a pop culture icon

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

01:50 min | 9 months ago

'Notorious RBG:' Ginsburg transcended the court to become a pop culture icon

"Calling Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a relentless litigator and an incisive jurist who inspired generations from the tidy ist tricker treaters toe law students burning the midnight oil to the most powerful leaders in the country. Ginsberg died Friday from cancer complications at the TV at the age of 87 News nation reporting, The Ginsburg felt that equal rights for all is critical. I have three granddaughters like to be take able to take out my pocket constitution and say that the equal citizenship stature of many women He's a fundamental tenet of our society. Illinois politicians weighing in on the pass is passing of justice skins. Berg Mayor Lori Lightfoot said. Ginsberg represented the finest among lawyers in our country, Governor Pritzker said. America has lost a Nikon. And our legacy will endure and 11 district 11th District U. S. Congressman Bill Foster said Ginsburg was truly a pioneer in the legal world and an American hero. Ginsburg was the second woman to sit on the high court, joining Sandra Day O'Connor in 1993. She went on to become its longest serving woman in history. She was also the first female Jewish justice indefinitely. A Liberace two skins, Berg won the respect of many conservatives with her grasp of the law and her carefully crafted opinion. And as the court shifted to the right, her scathing Descents elevated her to a pop culture icon, inspiring legions of young I'm fans and feminists to emulate her famous outspokenness 25 24 3 and her fitness routines, earning her the hip hop inspired nickname Notorious RBG. That's a B C's

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ginsberg Berg Lori Lightfoot U. S. Congressman Bill Foster Governor Pritzker Nikon Illinois Sandra Day America
Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

Bloomberg Law

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

"Been talking to Stephen Black professor at the University of Texas Law School about the decision today We're a divided Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana law that opponents said would have left the state with only one abortion clinic. Chief Justice John Roberts provided the crucial vote during the court's liberal justices in a 5 to 4 majority. So Justice Stephen Breyer, who also wrote the majority opinion in the Texas Case, wrote the majority opinion here did he reiterated his reasoning in the Texas case, or did he just follow precedent? No American. I think a lot of the plurality of him by the prior was very much not just reiterating what he wrote for the majority four years ago in the home of health case, but also do not carefully trying to explain why that decision for your so should control the case. Why the Louisiana line is not in any material way. Actually, or legally different fromthe law that the court threw out in Texas four years ago. If I can, you know for Brier, the queue is to show why these cases are not the similar And you know, I don't get you. Justice. Roberts actually agreed with that. I think you just agreed with the endorsement of the analysis from the earlier decision on hold and help if that's why he felt obliged and compelled to write separately. What was the thread running through the dissenting opinions? What's interesting about this case is, you know if you read the sentinel opinions that actually very little tune about roar, Casey and a whole lot about standing, you know, I think for the defenders, the ground they were hoping in this case would be resolved on Was that the abortion providers June Medical Services, etcetera weren't proper parties. The challenge Louisiana long the first place that would have allowed the court sidestep a major ruling on the stuff into scope of the right to pursue a pre viability abortion. But of course, there were consequences all his own indignant much harder for a court to hear these kinds of pieces going forward, so No, I think for the dissenters for justice Promise Justice Alito. The quarters from Kavanaugh know there at least stated opposition here with principally to the court allow in this case to reach America at all. I suspect June that that no one will be surprised if no. Were those marriage to be properly before them. They just hostile to them that know the descent maybe focus on stand them, but I think it's not hard to imagine that there are objections on the merits behind them as well. So during his confirmation hearings, Justice Cavanaugh was questioned again and again on Roe v. Wade, and he said he would follow precedent. Did he veer from that in this decision? I don't think so. I mean, just, Kavanaugh wrote only a very short to page dissent, although he joined a large chunk of just much longer defense. You know, I think Kavanaugh is a little bit cagey and careful on exactly that point. Doesn't say a lot about roar. Casey. He really put it on the procedural question of whether these planets had standin on why he thinks that matter should have been read ended the trial court traditional back finding on that question. But, you know, I think folks are not gonna have trouble reason. If you imagine this is You know, suitable and without necessarily saying that he's probably a reliable vote for the conservatives in a case where the merits of an abortion restriction really aren't properly before the court. You know, I don't think it's directly inconsistent with anything, he said during the confirmation process, But Matt it certainly doesn't come running like wall. We've heard a lot about Justice Roberts Justice Gorsuch Has Cavanaugh been a reliable conservative vote during his first term here, I think, for the most part, I mean, I think there's one or two paces June where You know he's been on the other side. We're siding with the progressive on Ly one that comes to mind when you was the deciding vote on. It wasn't an especially major contention case that without an antitrust case You know, I think he's probably been in some respects more reliable in a smaller data set as a conservative vote than justice. Gorsuch has been, obviously, of course, it's you know, it's fresh off of the Majority opinion he wrote in the LGBT discrimination case, You know, so I think I think it's pretty clear that injustice. Cavanaugh, the conservative, got what they were hoping for. Um Whether that hold across the larger data set, we'll see. But you know, I also think it's also a sign of the times. June. You know, we had a 30 year period We had a Supreme Court with No. Two very obvious swing. That justice is Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Justice Anthony Kennedy, where you could see these pretty profound shift in majorities from one case to the next. That's not where we are. Now we have a solid conservative majority and results, like the abortion case, don't change that. I think they just show that there are at least some elements that even the solid conservative majority won't transgress. This was the third time in two weeks that Chief Justice John Roberts disappointed conservatives in a blockbuster opinion. Is he now the next Justice Kennedy Oh, I think it's been clear June since Justice Cabin always confirmed to the Supreme Court that in most, not all but most of the high profile, divisive partisan No social and contentious cases before the Supreme Court. The departure of death of Kennedy puts to Justice Robert from the middle, and I think, you know we're seeing that this term in spades. It's not just his decisive vote today in the Louisiana abortion paid not just his majority opinion in the doc a case you know that he also joined Justice Gorsuch. In the LGBT discrimination case, So you know they're going to be out liars where it's not the chief Cruz the swing vote, But I think you know in the high profile cases more often than not, yes, where there's a 5 to 4 majority, and it's No for the conservatives who sent him the the one who will have been personally to switch sides with the chief justice John, I don't think that's because anything about the chief has changed. I think that because No. The court itself has changed. And because the kind of dispute the court is taken are increasingly grounds new towards ones where any of those five justices were going. Be disinclined Tio. Ride with the quote unquote conservative position. It's going to be John Roberts. Using this opinion and looking forward at some of the other opinions that are coming out, especially the decision on the subpoenas for Trump's financial records. Does this tell us anything about how justice Roberts may vote on that? I really don't think so. You know, I don't think that this is any kind of broader shift or pattern in how the chief justice instead of his job, you know, I think he's he's able to take that from cases differently. I mean, you know, right after we got the abortion opinion this morning, we got the chief justice's majority opinion. And that's the Buchanans, which was a very classically conservative separation of powers. Hold them from him. So I don't think we should read anything broader into his vote in these cases, other than the reality that he is now the Longboat And, you know, do not could show up again as early as you know the cases where they were coming down on Tuesday or the rest of this week or next week. You know, I don't think this is the last time this term that the chief going to be the swing vote, But I also don't think that you know the fact that he's this one wrote in some cases allows us to predict in which cases It most likely

Chief Justice John Roberts Justice Roberts Justice Gorsuc Supreme Court Justice Cavanaugh Justice Anthony Kennedy Justice Stephen Breyer Louisiana Justice Alito Justice Roberts Kavanaugh Texas Justice Sandra Day Justice Cabin Casey Justice Robert Stephen Black University Of Texas Law School June Medical Services
In a heartbeat: abortion in America

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:47 min | 2 years ago

In a heartbeat: abortion in America

"Today. A federal judge in Mississippi will rule on whether a new abortion law in the state should be upheld. Almost certainly. It's one of several strict anti-abortion laws being passed across the country that aren't really expected to survive court challenges, so called heartbeat bills. They prohibit abortion, as soon as a fetal heartbeat can be detected can be as early as six weeks. At noon local time across the country today abortion rights protestors aligned with more than fifty organizations will descend on houses and court steps to decry the laws. All this legislation directly challenges Rovers, is wait, that national legal standard says that abortion should be protected until the fetus is viable, but Kay Ivey, the governor of Alabama who signed the strictest of these recent bills into law appears ready to challenge, it certainly cannot deter, you efforts to protect the one because of calls if it means going to state to the United States Supreme court. So this year alone, there are twelve bills, at least going through the state legislatures being ridge is our US news editor, she's been reporting on the progress of these laws for the economist and four, Hoppy bills of past. It's quite likely that other states will announce similar bill's in the coming weeks. And how did we get to this stage? There's this sort of proliferation of these kinds of bills being proposed so ever since row versus Wade, was to Ted by the supreme court to be a constitutional right in nineteen Seventy-three pro-lifers in America have been finding ways to take it on and challenge it the way that they've traditionally done, this chip away at wrote, but undermine it. So introducing a state level regulations, which make it very difficult for women to access abortions and photonics to provide them. So one way, typically that they would do this exciting very precise thing like the width of the corridor, and connect, so that's been very successful strategy. But in the last couple of years, her life is not all of them and not to organize Asians have adopted. More aggressive stones, and that's right to directly challenge Roe versus Wade. And they've been impacted that festival by the election of Donald Trump, he promised as a presidential candidate that you would overturn Roe versus Wade, it'll happen automatically in my opinion because I am putting pro-life justices on the court. Importantly by his appointment of two conservative justices to the supreme court and with the appointment of the second of those cabinet last year, the supreme court now has is solidly conservative majority. So what's in the Mississippi law said the Mississippi law that's going to call today is a hobby Bill abortions would be banned. Once Hoppy has been detected and that typically happens around the sixth week of pregnancy with which is a short time after a woman has missed her menstrual periods. Lots of women do realize that, that pregnant is six weeks, lots of people calling them, -ffective washing bounds, rather than early abortion by and there are no exceptions. In the case of this law for rape, or incest, only exceptions, if the pregnancy endangers the woman's life or health. And how is it that the Mississippi law heading to court today, we'll be upheld? It's extremely unlikely. It's a completely clear straightforward violation of Roe versus Wade. So it's, it's pretty straightforward legal case. The, the court will strike it down on my certainly and the. Judge that actually looking at this case in November. He struck down a Mississippi abortion ban that would have come into fifteen weeks of pregnancy. So this seems impossible that he would allow through an even more stringent abortion ban. So these bills being put forward to realistically become laws that being put forward in the hope that they were some point if there are enough of them get before the supreme court and in front of both conservative justices, who they hope will want to overturn very versus Wade. And what's your view on that? What do you think the supreme court would do should they be presented with a case? I think there are two puff this, I disagree in court won't be action to take one of these bands. And Secondly, if it does, I think, is on the whole unlikely throw return it because especially couple of years or year, before presidential election. It would be seen as a very partisan act and the chief Justice in particular doesn't want to be seen as as being partisan. He also is a very keen institution, est, he doesn't want to return, long-held Preston's, especially one of importance. And how do you think this, this will? Eventually play into the twenty twenty race. So Donald Trump's got a bit of a balancing act here because he needs to hold onto the conservative evangelical voted feminine twenty sixteen. And for many of them abortion, is the single most important voting issue. But he also will be aware of the fact that majority of Americans want abortion to remain legal, at least in the first trimester. So they want to stand. In other words, he doesn't want early abortion bounce to become a big issue. In fact, over the weekend, he puts out some tweets suggesting that these bounds were bit much. He said he had the same view on abortion, as Reagan and we should remember that Reagan appointed a female supreme court Justice, Sandra Day O'Connor who voted to uphold road. The safest bet for him is to rail against late term abortions, because while most Americans believe that early abortions should legal there much less certain about lifetime abortions only thirteen percent of Americans think that late term abortion. It should be available under any circumstances. So he feels safe rating and raging against late term abortions is heated in his state of the union address to defend the dignity of every person, I am asking congress to pass legislation to prohibit the late term abortion of children. The mother will if the president isn't really pushing for an end to early abortion and the people aren't pushing for an end to Roe versus Wade. Why is it at risk at all? Wait is unlikely to be overturned anytime soon. But I think what will certainly happen over the next couple of years. Is that row will be challenged in incremental steps? So every time is a regulation at the state level, that's challenged by an organization and ends up going to court ends up to import it's more likely to held now than it would have been a few years ago, meaning that states will have fewer abortion connects and women will find it more difficult access abortion attorney stage during pregnancy. And so his wait will be slowly and steadily chipped away at. Thank you very much for your time.

Mississippi Wade United States Supreme Court ROE Donald Trump Kay Ivey Rovers United States Alabama Hoppy Bill Reagan Rape Congress News Editor America Attorney Sandra Day
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Started showing in the mid nineteen nineties hell owned, but his hey, he was born nineteen thirty. So that would have been mid in his mid sixty now subtly at first but scary, a very vibrant guy was a big time lawyer and Phoenix who was over. They had a great love. They would go out dancing. They that a great relationship, but he gradually declined. And she wanted to care for him. She was determined not to turn them over to a caretaker. She would take him to her chambers. He would sleep on the bench visitors would find him there. Really? And finally was just too much. And so that's why she quit. She said, I my husband sacrificed for me when they came to Washington in nineteen eighty one he gave up his job as the big man in Phoenix. Big Phoenix law firm and came to Washington, and he was not a success as a lawyer in Washington. So he sacrificed, and so she said, I he sacrificed. Me. Now, I'm gonna sacrifice for him. I'm gonna quit. She was still very successful Justice. But in two thousand five she announced her resignation the know for a time she and I live in same building. So we'd see other quite frequently. And I would say Madam just is good to see you. And she would remember me and then gradually. She did not. I think one of the most poignant stories in regard to not only hurled timers, but her husband's was that. She was very aware. He with him in that nursing home in Alzheimer's world is called a mistaken attachment. It's not that unusual. John was after wall. She couldn't care from anymore. So she put him into a home and at the home. He I'm not sure fall in love is the right term. Because I'm not really sure what's happening, but he forms an attachment to another woman. And so he's he's sitting there with this other woman at one time she comes in. And he he he says to Sandra I'd like to introduce you to my wife pointing to the other woman. Can you imagine how heartbreaking that well, and Santa was heartbroken by that? But because she's a tough cowgirl to the outside world. She said, it's great. My husband's no longer depressed. He has a a partner. Now who he's he and his good for his spirits. And of course, it was good for spirit, but it was horrible for her spirits and she put on a brave face, but she began traveling intensely. I think she would never say this. But just because I think she couldn't bear to spend time with him. So she began relentlessly traveling. She would take any offer just to keep moving a little made me think of Theodore Roosevelt who was kind of a lot. Like, Sandra O'Connor once said after his wife. His mother died on the same night that black hair cannot ride with a horse's paces fast. And she kept a fast pace to try to shed black hair. But of course, she couldn't and at the same time she's starting to get her own symptoms of dementia. Does she know it? She denies it. The doctors teller she doesn't want to hear it. Her son says to her, you know, mom. But she doesn't want to believe it at first. Of course, she doesn't. But of course, she knows she knows she sees her mother this way. In fact, she had told her friends her greatest fear in life was that she would get dementia, and she did, you know, one of the most touching scenes in regard to her visits to her husband was that at one point his significant other at the home is holding one hand. Yes. And she's Sandra Day O'Connor comes in and holds his other hand. How is that? For is how much courage and human wisdom. Does it take to do something like that? You know, she she told her state lawyer about this other woman, and and what the other John said about the other women being as wife, and the lawyer had the good sense of say, well, you know, Sandra that shows you how much John valued marriage his marriage,.

Sandra Day O'Connor Santa John Phoenix Washington Alzheimer partner Theodore Roosevelt one hand
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Allowed herself to vote for something that gave corporations free speech rights, and that meant that they had they could spend money and spending money as a form of speech. That's the argument in any case. And so she regretted be on that side one citizen. United happen after she had left the court all my God. I was part of this this process, and I regret that I in from two thousand six on this same program in discussion with me, Sandra Day O'Connor talked about retirement, I think they're properly a lot of people Justice counter who feel sad. Fatou, but it that time came and that's the decision at comes sooner or later. Anyway, I I have a wonderful poem. I should have brought it, but describes how you may think you're indispensable. But it's a little like putting your hand in a bucket of water and stirring around and it makes a big splash at the time. But when you pull your hand out the water settles down, and it's absolutely undisturbed. So I hope that in the long run will be the effect of mine departure is now the same poll, but the indispensable man, she may have kept that palm. When she may have cited on your show, but she didn't believe it for a minute. She was very upset that with her replacement Justice Alito because he felt that she felt that a leader would undermine her. She said this to a friends that my legacy is being undermined. She actually I thought uncharacteristically for Justice o'conner overreacted a little bit. I don't think it was all that terrible. But she was she was really upset about it and told her friends uncapped with uncharacteristic regret that she did not like the swing of the court to the right Alito is a doctrinal conservative like Scalia. He's not a pragmatist, and there's a lot of water between O'Connor began as a conservative a Goldwater conservative. But she's a pragmatic conservative. There's a big difference between a doctrinal conservative of an originalist textualist and O'Connor's kind of conservative which is much more moderate and looking for for solution. She also did not feel warm. Personally towards the Alito because I think she felt he was a little wary around her. I'm not quite sure what happened there. But again on characteristically, she did not have one feelings about Justice Alito. Tell me how much time you were able to spend with her for this book about six days. She was not in great shape. I didn't quiz or about the cases I talked to a little bit about a couple of cases that were important, but mostly I talked about growing up about her marriage, which was credibly important to her about her personal life. And she was able to talk about that, you still have long term memory, and she was able to talk, but she deteriorated even while I was saying her. So her short term memory was was terrible. It's so awful to think that her husband had exactly the same thing. I mean, it was hung heavy over their lives. She was incredibly vibrant, sedro Connor was full of life and love life. But she knew this sort of Damocles was hanging over her head because her mom had Alzheimer's. And now she saw her husband declining and she to try to take care of his symptoms..

Justice Alito O'Connor Justice o'conner Sandra Day sedro Connor Alzheimer Fatou Scalia Goldwater six days
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Allowed herself to vote for something that gave corporations free speech rights, and that meant that they had they could spend money and spending money as a form of speech. That's the argument in any case. And so she regretted be on that side one citizen. United happen after she had left the court. Oh my God. I was part of this this process, and I regret that again from two thousand six on this same program in discussion with me, Sandra Day O'Connor talked about retirement, I think they're properly a lot of people Justice counter who feel sad. Fatou, but it that time came and that's the decision at comes sooner or later. Anyway, I I have a wonderful poem. I should have brought it, but describes how you may think you're indispensable. But it's a little like putting your hand in a bucket of water and stirring around and it makes a big splash at the time. But when you pull your hand out the water settles down, and it's absolutely undisturbed. So I hope that in the long run will be the effect of mine departure is now the same poll, but the indispensable man, she may have kept that palm. When she may have cited on your show, but she didn't believe it for a minute. She was very upset that with her replacement Justice Alito because he felt that she felt that a leader would undermine her. She said this to a friends that my legacy is being undermined. She actually I thought uncharacteristically for Justice o'conner overreacted a little bit. I don't think it was all that terrible. But she was she was really upset about it and told her friends uncapped with uncharacteristic regret that she did not like the swing of the court to the right Alito is a doctrinal conservative like Scalia. He's not a pragmatist, and there's a lot of water between O'Connor began as a conservative. She was a Goldwater conservative. But she's a pragmatic conservative. There's a big difference between a doctrinal conservative of an originalist textualist and O'Connor's kind of conservatives in which is much more moderate and looking for for solution. She also did not feel warm. Personally towards Alito because I think she felt he was a little wary around her..

Justice Alito Justice o'conner O'Connor Scalia Sandra Day Fatou Goldwater
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"And we're back here is my conversation with Evan Thomas. His new book is titled first Sandra Day O'Connor at intimate portrait, a the first woman supreme court Justice back in two thousand six I entered Sandra Day O'Connor. She talked about her belief an independent to dish. I've lived a pretty long time now and in my lifetime. I don't believe I've seen as many complaints by members of congress by state legislators by other officials and even by the public about judges. We're hearing. Statements rather frequently. I think complaining that judges are activists. Godless, secular humanist trying to impose some new regime on the nation. James, Madison, we think of as the father of our constitution. And he said that an independent judiciary is an impenetrable board against every assumption of power in the legislative or the executive now that's putting a little strongly. But what I think Madison was trying to express is that the courts are important guardians of the guaranteed freedoms in our constitution. Well, how she's say that right now? So. So so unbelievably relevant to the moment, we live in when the rule of laws being questioned and by the chief executive, so you know, she was an early. It's interesting. She was early on to this. She was worried about these threats before a lot. I mean now too. Yeah. You know, every editorial pages full this. So why was she onto wealth? One thing. She'd been stay court judge where they were elected and she saw the money sloshing around. And she saw the Justice could be bought and she saw how important it was to have a truly independent judiciary, not one that was bought by campaign donations. So that's that's one thing. But also she had a real pre of the balance of powers having been in a state legislature. She understood there's delicate bow the constitution is written for a reason. And it's the balance power. I have to ask you about Bush fee. Gore. Justice o'conner was this person who never showed regret is she medically. Don't go around regretting this one case. She publicly regretted it once with Chicago Tribune. She said, maybe we should've taken that case, which is interesting because that's so unlike her, and you could tell she was bothered, you know, it it it speeches. There's people would ask her about it. And she get crotchety and she'd say move on get over it. And she was she was just not like her. She was not deft about it. Why? Because it may the court look bad five to four Republicans on one side Democrats on the other makes the court look, very political. And she was one of the five Republicans. She told her son that morning half the country is going to hate me. She knew the impact. But why does she do it? She hated messes. And she felt if the voting went on if the if the voting was allowed to go on and gore pulled ahead, and you had a certified group of electors for Republicans and then Gore's winning it's going to go back to congress. It's going to take. Months? It's in the person who actually underlaw would have broken the Taiwanese the governor of the state of Florida whose name was Bush. She saw how chaotic that was going to be. And she said, let's end it. So now, she did not like the way of look so partisan. She lost some friends about this. But it's very much the way, you know, grab the bull by the horns take the hit deal with it still. She wasn't comfortable. How do you think she felt about said since United? She wasn't there for citizens United. But she made an earlier campaign spending decision that was a precursor to citizens United, and she did rigor publicly regret that she regretted that because she really she.

Justice o'conner Madison Sandra Day O'Connor Bush congress Gore United Evan Thomas chief executive executive Chicago Tribune James Florida
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"And we're back here is my conversation with Evan Thomas. His new book is titled first Sandra Day O'Connor at intimate portrait, a the first woman supreme court Justice back in two thousand six I entered Sandra Day O'Connor. She talked about her belief an independent to dish. I've lived a pretty long time now and in my lifetime. I don't believe I've seen as many complaints by members of congress by state legislators by other officials and even by the public about judges. We're hearing. Statements rather frequently. I think complaining that judges are activists. Godless, secular humanist trying to impose some new regime on the nation. James, Madison, we think of as the father of our constitution. And he said that an independent judiciary is an impenetrable board against every assumption of power in the legislative or the executive now that's putting it a little strongly. But what I think Madison was trying to express is that the courts are important guardians of the guaranteed freedoms in our constitution. Well, how she's say that right now? So. So so unbelievably relevant to the moment, we live in when the rule of laws being questioned and by the chief executive, so you know, she was an early. It's interesting. She was early on to this. She was worried about these threats before a lot. I mean now too. Yeah. Every editorial pages full this. So why was she onto wealth? One thing. She'd been a state court judge where they were elected and she saw the money sloshing around. And she saw the Justice could be bought and she saw how important it was to have a truly independent Ituri not one that was bought by campaign donations. So that's that's one thing. But also she had a real pre of the balance of power's having been in a state legislature. She understood there's as delicate balance constitution is written for a reason. And it's the balance power. I have to ask you about Bush fee. Gore. Justice o'conner was this person who never showed regret is she medically. Don't go around regretting this one case. She publicly regretted it once with Chicago Tribune. She said, maybe we should've taken that case which is interesting because that's so unlike her, and you could tell she was bothered. You know, it it it it speeches people would ask her about it, and she get crotchety and she'd say move on get over it. And she was she's just not like her. She was not deft about it. Why? Because it may the court look bad five to four Republicans on one side Democrats on the other makes the court look, very political. And she was one of the five Republicans. She told her son that morning half the country is going to hate me. She knew the impact. But why does she do it? She hated messes. And she felt if the voting went on if the if the voting was allowed to go on and gore pulled ahead, and you had a certified group of electors for Republicans and then Gore's winning it's going to go back to congress. It's going to take. Months? It's in the person who actually under the law would have broken the taiw- was the governor of the state of Florida whose name was Bush. She saw how chaotic that was going to be. And she said, let's end it. So now, she did not like the way of look so partisan. She lost some friends about this. But it's very much the way, you know, grab the bull by the horns take the hit deal with it still. She wasn't comfortable. How do you think she felt about said since United? She wasn't there for citizens United. But she made an earlier campaign spending decision that was a precursor to citizens United, and she did rigor publicly regret that she regretted that because she really she.

Justice o'conner Madison Sandra Day O'Connor Bush congress Gore United Evan Thomas chief executive executive Chicago Tribune James Florida
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"And just sit there until they came with her at lunch and by the late nineties, it took years, she was getting pretty much full attendance at lunch Justice Thomas told me the story he told me she was the glue Thomas actually has an interesting story. Imagine Clarence Thomas after the Nita hill hearings pretty brutal. And he does he's not sure how he's going to be received by his fellow justices. Especially by the one woman, Sandra O'Connor. So she walks with him from the first conference, she walks with him and she saying nothing and finally she says. Clarence those hearings were really damaging. And he doesn't know what to say. I mean, he's he's thinking to himself damaging to the court damaging to me Madam me personally. But the court I mean, and she doesn't send you things we didn't say anything next day. He walks with her again and the next and he starts she starts saying Clarence. You gotta come to lunch. He doesn't wanna come the lunch. He's lonely, and he's humiliated and he's sad. He's not coming to watch finally Clarence. You're coming to lunch. And he told me, and I did and changed everything for him because he became closer to his colleagues. He wasn't you know, wasn't a forgiveness exercise. He just had to work with these people, and she was typical of her in the real world. No matter what happens you have to work with other people. Tell me how she got along with stiff Scalia not too. Well, but she hit it. She at first she in Scalia were pals because he's a very vivacious guy. But he's a bit. Of a bully and intellectual bully and in the court he needed to show. He was the smartest guy in the room. And he would put her down. He he only. Yes. An abortion opinion. He once said her opinion, he did his publicly he wrote her opinion should not be taken seriously. Right. So she did not like this. And he I remember clerk saying once that she's on the phone with him. And he Sandra gets off the phone just as kind of gets off the phone and says, he just hung up on me. I mean, he he was a bully. But it was very important to her to not fight back publicly not to get into a into a pissing match with a skunk. If I may. And and and so she didn't she owes toned down her own sense. Winter clerks clerks often draft the opinions of justices when the clerks took some shot some day at Justice Scalia. She take it out. She was very mental outdoor not to get into stupid fights with bullying, men and less. You absolutely had to she did couple famous and the state legislature of this story her nemesis, and legislatures of drunken, and I mean drunk by ten AM drunk guy, then Goodwin who was at headed has appropriated and Sandra finally called them out for being drunk and. No privately privates. And he said he said to O'Connor said he said if you were a man he said, I'd punch you on the nose. And she answered if you are a man you could oh. So she knew how to stand up when she had to. But she didn't get into kind of big foolish. She would have if she had if she was altogether there today. She'd hate the internet these big public slanging matches that go on now, this this anger. These public shows of anger would be deeply upsetting to her. She knew there was a time to be angry. And there was a time to stand up yourself. But to do it quietly, and privately when you could not get into foolish fights. Didn't do anybody. Any good course, she with Philip as this wing vote on the court, which she didn't like that word. Swing implied fickle to her like she just swung from one side of the other. She preferred thank you for self as decisive vote. Which she was. No quick break. When we come back more from Evan Thomas. Hi, coach. I'm here. I hope you enjoying on my mind. And I also hope you checking out the co Joel numb de show. We connect the dots between events happening in Washington, Maryland Virginia through conversations with politicians artists. Chefs the list goes on you can listen to our podcast on demand by subscribing on your favorite podcast app. So you never miss an episode..

Sandra O'Connor Clarence Justice Scalia Justice Thomas Nita hill Evan Thomas Goodwin Joel Washington Maryland Philip Virginia
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Especially by the one woman, Sandra O'Connor. So she walks with him from the first conference, she walks with him and she saying nothing and finally she says. Clarence those hearings were really damaging. And he doesn't know what to say. I mean, he's he's thinking to himself damaging to the court damaging to me Madam me personally. But the court I mean, and she doesn't send you send anything next day. He walks with her again and the next and he starts she starts saying Clarence. You gotta come to lunch. He doesn't wanna come the lunch. He's lonely, and he's humiliated and he's sad. He's not coming to watch finally Clarence. You're coming to lunch. And he told me, and I did and changed everything for him because he became closer to his colleagues. He wasn't you know, wasn't a forgiveness exercise. He just had to work with these people, and she was typical of her in the real world. No matter what happens you have to work with other people. Tell me how she got loan with sticks Scalia not too. Well, but she hit it. She at first she in Scalia were pals because he's a very vivacious guy. But he's a bit. Of a bully and intellectual bully and in the court he needed to show. He was the smartest guy in the room. And he would put her down. He he won't really. Yes. An abortion opinion. He wants said her opinion he did his publicly he wrote her opinion should not be taken seriously. Right. So she did not like this. And he I remember clerk saying once that she's on the phone with him. And he Sandra gets off the phone just as kind of gets off the phone and says, he just hung up on me. I mean, he he was a bully. But it was very important to her to not fight back publicly not to get into a into a pissing match with a skunk. If I may. And and and so she didn't she owes tone down her own dissents. Winter clerks clerks often draft the opinions of justices when the clerks took some shot some day at a Justice Scalia. She take it out. She was very mental outdoor not to get into stupid fights with bullying, men and less. You absolutely had to she did couple famous and the state legislature of this story her nemesis legislatures of drunken, and I mean drunk by ten AM drunk guy. Then Goodwin who was at headed has appropriations and Sandra finally called them out for being drug and. No privately privates. And he said he said to O'Connor said he said if you were a man he said, I'd punch you on the nose. And she answered if you are a man you could oh. So she knew how to stand up when she had to. But she didn't get into kind of big foolish. She would have if she had if she was altogether there today. She'd hate the internet these big public slanging matches that go on now, this this anger. These public shows of anger would be deeply upsetting to her. She knew there was a time to be angry. And there was a time to stand up yourself. But to do it quietly, and privately when you could not get into foolish fights. Didn't do anybody. Any good course, she with Philip as this wing vote on the court, which she didn't like that word. Swing implied fickle to her like she just swung from one side of the other. She preferred thank you for self as decisive vote. Which she was. No quick break. When we come back more from Evan Thomas. Hi, coach. I'm here. I hope you enjoying on my mind. And I also hope you checking out the co Joel numb de show. We connect the dots between events happening in Washington, Maryland Virginia through conversations with politicians artists. Chefs the list goes on you can listen to our podcast on demand by subscribing on your favorite podcast app. So you never miss an episode..

Sandra O'Connor Justice Scalia Clarence Evan Thomas Joel Washington Goodwin Maryland Philip Virginia
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"He got lonely in Washington starts writing his all love and warms to the task. And finally, right, Sandra. Will you marry me and she turned down because she was already in love with John O'Connor? It it so Fettes Nate in. You say they are classmates yet he comes to Washington. He clerked for this premium Korda, she can't get. Get a job. Let's think about this for a second. He's the smartest guy in the class. They didn't do class rank. But he is the smartest guy. But she's maybe the third smartest. I mean, they're moot. Court partners their equals he gets a job clerking for a supreme court Justice. She applies to forty law firm, forty California law firms L A and San Francisco she gets out of forty letters. And she's order of the coif for all this. She gets one interview not to be a lawyer. But to be a secretary how well do you type? Well, she says middling he actually didn't get the job as a secretary. Wow. Yeah. You know, this very classically Sandra instead of being all bummed out by this. Of course, she was bummed out. But instead whining and moaning about it. She went she said, you know, the good thing was forced me to the public sector. She goes over to the local DA and says can I work for you? And he says, I don't have any money. She's I'll work for free. I don't have a place field. I don't have a desk. Well, I'll work for off your secretary's desk. He hires her. He's she's great at it. And that's the beginning of her public. Now, you know, I also onto ask you about that vote to approve her as supreme court just for ninety nine to nothing. She didn't have opposition because when she was a state legislator. She had voted to decriminalise abortion this guy Jesse Helms and the Christian right all upset. So there was the beginning of opposition. This is the religious right was growing in power nineteen eighty a lot of your listener. Will remember this? And so look like trouble, but she was such a skillful politician that she was able to disarm Helms. And so by the time, she was done with their confirmation hearings in which she was funny, and charming and warm. The vote was ninety nine to nothing that doesn't happen anymore in Washington for sure I have to tell you. I was on the air the day that news came down that she'd been approved and in middle of my conversation. I said what? And my boss called me. And his after I got on the off Air New said, you know, Dan, that was not very professional their fish, whatever. I. People women who listening to this news burst into tears exact rove off and had to stop their car dot just women. Eric motley at the Aspen institute told me that his father is a poor black kid growing up in Alabama, his father put O'Connor's picture on the wall along with Martin Luther King. She was a symbol to a lot of people. That's that's a big, you know, two hundred years of no no women on the court. That's no small thing. And she's early in this game. She's twelve years before Ruth Ginsburg. She's you know, thirty five years before Hillary Clinton run for president nineteen Eighty-one was still early in the game. So how did she get along with her colleague pretty well? But she found the court to be chilly. I mean Cole where cheeses cold, not just the building a cold marble building. She goes to lunch. They have this lunch justices. They're only four other justices there. For the justices are boycotting the lunch UAE because they don't really trust each other the book the brethren has just come out, and it's full of leaks, and they don't they're not sure who's the leaker. So she's surprised by this. And is so classically Justice o'conner. She makes it her business to make sure justices go to lunch. She would show and they're off in the chambers. And just sit there until they came with her at lunch and by the late nineties, it took years, she was getting pretty much full attendance at lunch Justice Thomas told me the story he told me she was the glue Thomas actually has an interesting story. Imagine Clarence Thomas after the Nida hill hearings pretty brutal. And he does he's not sure how he's going to be received by his fellow justices..

John O'Connor secretary Korda Washington Ruth Ginsburg Fettes Nate Justice Thomas Justice o'conner Jesse Helms UAE Hillary Clinton Eric motley Nida hill Aspen institute California rove Martin Luther King Dan L A
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"I discovered it because I found a box of letters not inner papers, which are in the library of congress. But in the supreme court, it was just a box of letters that have been tucked away. And they're fourteen love letters from Bill Rehnquist of Sandra Day, they were law school classmates. They were law school classmates at Stanford and they had broken up after a romance their first year he was going to clerk for supreme court Justice. He got lonely in Washington starts writing his all love and warms to the task. And finally, right? San. There will you marry me and she turned down to she was already in love with John O'Connor, it it. So that's Nate. And you say they are classmates yet he comes to Washington. He clerked for this premium Korda. She can't get a job. Let's think about this for a second. He's the smartest guy in the class. They didn't do class rank. But he is the smartest guy. But she's may be the third smartest. I mean, they're moot. Court partners their equals he gets a job clerking for a supreme court Justice. She applies to forty law firm, forty California law firms L A and San Francisco she gets out of forty letters. And she's order of the coif for all this. She gets one interview not to be a lawyer. But to be a secretary how well do you type? Well, she says middling he actually didn't get the job as a secretary. Wow. Yeah. You know, this is very classically Sandra instead of being all bummed out by this. Of course. She was bummed out. But instead of whining and moaning about it, she went she said, you know, the good thing was that forced me to the public sector. She goes over to the local DA and says can I work for you? And he says, I don't have any money. She's I'll work for free. I don't have a place field. I don't have a desk. Well, I'll work for off your secretary's desk. He hires her. He's she's great at it. And that's the beginning of her public. Now, you know, I also want to ask you about that vote to approve her as supreme court just for ninety nine to nothing. She didn't have opposition because when she was a state legislator. She had voted to decriminalise abortion this guy Jesse Helms and the Christian right all upset. So there was the beginning of opposition. This is the religious right was growing in power nineteen eighty a lot of your listeners will remember this. And so look like trouble. But she was such a skillful politician that she was able. Disarm helms. And so by the time, she was done with her confirmation hearings in which she was funny, and charming and warm. The vote was ninety nine to nothing that doesn't happen anymore in Washington for sure I have to tell you. I was on the air the day that news came down the cheered been approved. And in the middle of my conversation. I said what? And my boss called me into his after I got on the off Air New said, Dan that was not very professional. Fish, whatever. People women who listening to this news burst into tears exact rove off and had to stop their car dot just women. Eric motley at the Aspen institute told me that his father is a poor black kid growing up in Alabama, his father put O'Connor's picture on the wall along with Martin Luther King. She was a symbol to a lot of people. That's that's a big, you know, two hundred years of no no women on the court. That's no small thing. And she's early in this game at twelve years before Ruth Ginsburg. She's you know, thirty five years before Hillary Clinton runs for president nineteen eighty one was still early in the game. So how did she get along with her colleague pretty well? But she found the court to be chilly Cole where cheeses cold, not just the building. It's a cold marble building. She goes to lunch. Yeah. They have this lunch justices. They're only four other justices there. For the justices are boycotting the lunch UAE because they don't really trust each other the book the brethren has just come out, and it's full of leaks, and they don't do not sure who's the leaker. So she's surprised by this. And is so classically Justice o'conner. She makes it her business to make sure justices go to lunch. She would show and they're off in the chambers..

Sandra Day Washington Bill Rehnquist Jesse Helms secretary Sandra John O'Connor congress Justice o'conner Stanford UAE San Ruth Ginsburg Hillary Clinton Eric motley California rove
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Wade the famous abortion case, she's a. Reagan appointee. She's said that the abortion is personally abhorrent to her. And he thinks all my gosh. She's going to be the fifth vote to overturn Roe v. Wade goodbye abortion. He wants writes a note to himself. She is just against abortion wrong. She ended up being the one who preserved the right to abortion in a more limited way. She did. She didn't buy Blackman's complex reasoning and Roe v. Wade she allowed there to be some state limitation. She came up with what they call the undue burden standard, the state cannot put an undue burden on women's right to abortion the effect of that though was to preserve abortion at a time. When a lot of people, including the author of the abortion case thought, it was done for she did that because all she did find abortion personally, appoint she understood that the country was divided about this that there had to be a compromise their head. To be some way of giving the state some control, but not doing away with this basic, right altogether. That took some maneuvering real maneuvering politics secret court politics, but she pulled it off. How did she feel about the qual rights seven? This is also classic O'Connor. She introduced it in the Arizona legislature in nineteen sixty nine I think it was nineteen seventy she is reduced it. But she let it die in committee. And the feminists were furious at her for that they thought felt betrayed. Why did she do that? She knew it didn't have the votes, and she knew that it was going to pick a Utah fight and have blood all over the floor for no good end. Whereas as a legislator, she could amend state laws one by one to get the gender bias out of and she did hundreds of Arizona. State laws that had gender bias. She made sure every single one of them was amended. So by working locally, she got the job done without getting into a huge fight that was gonna produce nothing. So why did Ronald Reagan choose her as the first woman on the court? There were no other women. Judges in nineteen eighty the law is avert was was a very male thing law firms were all male there. Just weren't women lawyers today. I think about half of law schools are female that is Sandra started that revolution. I think eight hundred federal judges and nineteen eighty I think six were women. Well, there was one of the qualified a woman in Cornelia Kennedy. But she was kind of dull and Reagan wanted somebody liked and Sandra Connor was likeable relatable. They they in the interview they he Reagan started ask about abortion, which is going to be a loaded. Oh, but he stops. He never actually put the question to her. Instead, they talk about ranching in Reagan's. I'm tempted to say fell in love. You know, he's certainly liked her that you could see the body language in the photographs, and she was a good politician and chief seized her moments and one moment came when she's asked to go on a boat trip with the chief Justice of the United States or burger and lake Powell and nineteen seventy nine. And it's a social thing that a friend's of is a friend of friend of a friend, but she and her husband immediately know, hey, this is a chance to advance her career. And she charms up that chief Justice like crazy. They stepped to o'clock in the morning talking and she made the most of it. So he became a promoter. The chief Justice and lobbied President Reagan on her behalf. There are other. He wasn't the only one has it happened Justice Rehnquist secretly lobbied on her behalf. Now. This is interesting because our little scoop in the book in nineteen fifty two Bill Rehnquist than a clerk for supreme court Justice ask Sandra Day to marry him. Oh. This a secret that they kept all their lives. Neither Bill Rehnquist nor Sandra O'Connor ever told their families about this. I discovered it because I found a box of letters not inner papers, which are in the library of congress. But in the supreme court, it was just a box of letters that have been tucked away. And they're fourteen love letters from Bill Rehnquist of Sandra Day, they were law school classmates. They were law school classmates at Stanford and they had broken up after a romance their first year he was going to clerk for supreme court Justice..

President Reagan Wade Sandra Connor Bill Rehnquist Justice Rehnquist Roe Sandra Day Arizona Sandra Blackman Cornelia Kennedy Utah congress lake Powell Stanford United States
"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"sandra day oconnor" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"It's titled. I it chronicles the trail she blazed at the way she shaped American rule of law. The years just as so appeared on the Diane Rehm show several times. So you'll get to hear from the Justice herself. Evan thomas. Greg tizzy you. Great to see you, Diane. So go ahead. You've done his book. Tell us why you decide now was the time for a bio of Sandra Day O'Connor. She was thinking of doing her own memoir for a long time. She wrote a wonderful book called the lazy be about growing up on a ranch I program, and and publisher Random House was after heard of right around memoir, but she got Alzheimer's tragically dementia, and so they sort of looking for Bogra for and I was at L. It's wonderful. Thank you, truly Kelly's what those year growing up on that lays he meant for her. The lazy is enormous one fifth size of Rhode Island. And there was no running water. They had like one bath a week. There was no electricity. It. It was very cruise. She loved it. And she she grew up with these Cowboys a little girl. She Lushje could fire a rifle by the time. She was ten. She could drive a truck by the time. She was ten she could Brown branded calf. She was very resilient, and the, of course, is incredibly important to our life. Of course, it was she learned how to take care of herself under very difficult circumstances. I let's talk about her years on the court. She really tried to bring a different vision. She was intensely practical. She was the only one on the court who'd been elected to office, she'd been majority leader legislature. Markup fact, she'd been the first woman majority leader of state Senate ever, nobody noticed at the time because it was just so unusual that they didn't even bother to pay attention. But she was that and she had the kind of real world experience and political vertical hands on. Physical experience that modern justices. Don't don't it. We've had this in the past just as black had been a Senator. And you know, there have been Douglas had been head of the SEC in the old days. Supreme court justices often came from political now, they come from a closed loop of doing well law school court of appeals judges and that that is a world, but it's not the real world that most of us experience. Sandra O'Connor was from the real world. She had worked in public life and other way, she'd been an assistant attorney general she'd been a state court judge state court trial, judge ac- she was incredibly sensitive to the world as it is. And not the world just the world that we wish it to be. So when she got on the court, she brought that since -delity two issues, they were dealing with and the heart issues, you know, she had a real sense for the public mood, and and for instance, Justice Blackmun who wrote Roe v..

Lushje Sandra Day O'Connor Diane Rehm Supreme court Evan thomas Greg tizzy Rhode Island Justice Blackmun Cowboys Alzheimer Bogra Kelly Douglas Random House SEC Senate Senator assistant attorney general
Republicans introduce House version of bill banning infanticide after failed abortions

Sean Hannity

10:57 min | 2 years ago

Republicans introduce House version of bill banning infanticide after failed abortions

"If a mothers in labor, I can tell you exactly what would happen. The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable the infant would be resuscitated. If if that's what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother, oh, by the way, he's a pediatric surgeon those pictures of the person in black face on his page, and in a Ku Klux Klan outfit. That's you know, he's a medical student. He's a pediatric doctor apparently. So let me understand the. So you know, we'll deliver the baby who make sure the baby's comfortable. And after the baby's comfortable. Then the mother's going to decide whether if the baby's in need of medical attention, whether or not help resuscitate the baby, okay? There is a human living soul that is apparently being kept comfortable living on its own a human being, and then well, we'll let the mother decide you wanna keep it or not keep it. Then we'll have a discussion with the doctors and the mom not. Maybe we'll go down to the maybe we'll go down to the kitchen or the commissary in the hospital and see what that's like I mean, it is beyond gruesome now, it's expanded to Rhode Island and New Mexico and California and oh now Massachusetts has gotten on board. They wanna similar Bill. It was a motion in the Senate to protect babies born alive from an abortion, Democrats, wouldn't even let it come up for a vote that would have offered protections for babies have even botched abortions that lived you. Don't think it happens. It did. It it does. Now joining us is Melissa Odin. She is an abortion attempt survivor, and by the way is gone on to live a great life. As I understand it as two daughters of her own. She didn't miscarry one son. She speaks out loudly for the voiceless, and we also have with us, doctor Levin Tino. Dr levered Tino started doing abortions in nineteen seventy seven in New York state. During his residency graduated in nineteen eighty went into private practice. I in Florida than in New York and five years doctor Levin, Tino, he performed over twelve hundred abortions, including one hundred second trimester saline abortions. And then later DNA abortions up to twenty four weeks. And they both join us now. Thank you for being with us. Thank you. Melissa odin. So. Your mom, tried to abort you. But you're alive. What happened? Well, I was the type of procedure Dr Lepetit. No, did I am a saline abortion survivor, and it was also in nineteen seventy seven. So you know, what I know is that my birth. Mother was nineteen years old. She was a college student, and she was actually forced into this abortion by her mother. My maternal grandmother who was a nurse at the hospital where it was performed. So this type of procedure was meant to poison and Skuld me to death. And my medical records actually indicate that I soaked in this toxic sell solution for five period while they attempted to induce my birth mother's labor. And finally that fist day they succeeded. I was expelled from the womb in the final step about abortion procedure. And of course, they thought I would you delivered as a successful abortion, otherwise known as the deceased child, but lo and behold, I was born alive. It's unbelievable now did you ever confront your mother about this? Yeah. So I'm adopted and didn't know that I survived a sealed abortion until I was fourteen. How did you find out? By complete accident. Really? It was a pretty traumatic thing. But my sister, my older sister. Let me know that there was more to the story of my life. And I sat her mother down and never expected for her to say, you know, you survived a failed abortion, and you know, it's devastating. I wish the other side of this issue could understand how traumatic it is to live this kind of life. This is not an easy truth to live through or to live in this kind of do you have any residual physical or mental impact from this. And other oil, you're describing emotional, but are there any physical issues that you've had to deal with as a result of what you're describing is utter brutality. Right. Not long term. So when I first survived the day thought, I had a fatal heart defect there were arguments about whether I would be provided medical care. I've actually been contacted by nurses at that Haas. Spital who were there? I'm gonna meet one of them next month probably face to face for the first time. But I know that there were arguments that they laid me aside that certain people didn't wanna provide me medical care. And so when somebody actually mother your your real mother, ever apologize. Yeah. So I'm one of the few abortion survivors, who's been connected with my biological mother. We actually have a really great relationship. We actually live in the same city. I have this very face filled life that God has blessed. So we live in very close proximity. I was just the other day. She's very sad about what was done to me. What was done to her? You know, she said her greatest regret in life is that she didn't run away from our family to save me. In other words, it was her family pressure that she was pregnant. I assume another young age, and they were pressuring, right? And not just pressured. I mean, literally her mother made that abortion takes place. Wow. Don't talk about right? So many times this past. That's what it used to be. You know, nobody remembers what happened to one of the Kennedy kids putting a hospital, and and basically had a lobotomy some horror riffing treatment of children. Geraldo willowbrook when he discovered with some disabled kids, in the way, they were treated like animals, it was horrible. Dr Levy Tina, let me start with you. So you. Perform some twelve hundred abortions including abortions as late as twenty four weeks. If a if can we can cannot child now be sustained at twenty four weeks with all the medical advancement. We've made. They can. And this is this is what prompted Sandra Day O'Connor years ago to say that Roe versus Wade was on a collision course with itself because row the original decision. Seventy three said that a state could prohibit late term abortion third trimester abortions, and they picked that third trimester. Because that was the beginning of viability and nineteen Seventy-three medical science has not stood still even the WHO at this point recognizes that fetal viability starch probably around twenty two weeks. Now, there are some that survive earlier, but survival is viability is now defined barely consistently is about twenty two weeks of just station. Well, let me ask you a so you did this for a number of years twelve hundred abortions one hundred second trimester saline abortions DNA abortions up to twenty four weeks. How do you feel about having done that at this point? And then I'll ask you to describe it, which is why I gave a listener warning earlier, obviously, I'm not happy that that's the decision. I made I stopped doing abortions over thirty years ago. How would you stop you change your mind? My almost six year old daughter was killed in an auto accident. I'm so sorry when you do a DNA abortion, a second trimester Dini abortion. You are literally tearing a child to pieces with your own hands. And I did over one hundred and twenty of those procedures I did do saline abortions in my residency many years before but those became. Say we don't do those anymore, but you know, after her death, and I never thought anything of it. I got used to it. But after you lose a child, and I tell people, you know, if you have a child, you may think you have some idea of what that's like if you haven't been through this yourself. You have no idea what it's like, I hope you never find out. And after Heather died was struck by a car and killed several weeks later, I showed up to do my first Dini abortion, and literally tore out an arm or a leg in the instrument got sick, but had to finish the abortion. I mean, once you start an abortion, you can't stop you'd have to get two arms two legs and all the pieces because if you don't your patients gonna come back, infected bleeding or worse. Well, let me ask you. Okay. So an early term abortion is what you're describing at what point does it become. You're talking about tearing out limbs. And when you take them out with these instruments, which are ripping out. I mean, you see an arm you see hands you see fingers. You see toes you see ahead. You see is. I mean, what are you seeing when you're doing this? You got it. You just described it yourself now first trimester abortions are typically done either by suction DNC, or now the medical abortion pill, R U, four eighty six or Mitha practices is called. But even when you do a section DNC, and you can only do that a few weeks after pregnancy if I'm not mistaken right right now, it's approved up to ten weeks from last menstrual period or eight weeks from conception. But in reality mifepristone is being or are you forty six is actually being used in the second trimester as well. So it's being used even at later stages of pregnancy at this point. But you know, whether it's the suction. Eight weeks last menstrual period from head to rump. That child is about one inch tall at twenty weeks. Look at your hand from the middle of your middle finger down to your wrist. That's the crown rump size from the head in the rump. Counting legs of a baby at twenty weeks. And as I always tell my students and others. You know today, you're an adult one child. Once you're a baby. Once you're an inch tall. But it was always you.

Levin Tino Melissa Odin Ku Klux Klan DNC Rhode Island New York Rump Dr Lepetit Private Practice Mifepristone Senate Sandra Day Massachusetts Dr Levy Tina Geraldo Willowbrook Spital Haas New Mexico
O'Connor, Rehnquist And A Supreme Marriage Proposal

Richard Eeds

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

O'Connor, Rehnquist And A Supreme Marriage Proposal

"Showed a future chief Justice of the supreme court once proposed marriage to the first woman who would sit on the high court correspondent, John stolas has more biographer Evan Thomas told NPR's morning edition that he found a letter that was written by future supreme court chief Justice William Rehnquist to Sandra Day O'Connor who would later become the first woman on the court Thomas said he found the letter while doing research for his upcoming book on O'Connor called first rank west and O'Connor dated while both were students at Stanford law school in the early nineteen fifties they broke up but remained friends. But during their courtship Thomas said the letter from rank west read to be specific sandy will you marry me this summer, she said, no as she was also dating another student. John O'Connor who she would later Mary in nineteen fifty two.

John O'connor Evan Thomas Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist John Stolas Stanford Law School Sandra Day NPR Mary
E.U. Rejects Italy’s Budget

24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

E.U. Rejects Italy’s Budget

"The first woman on the US supreme court says she has the beginning stages of dementia, and it's probably Alzheimer's disease. Sandra Day O'Connor said in a public letter that her diagnosis was made some time ago, and that are conditions progressed, and she's no longer able to participate in public life. The announcement of her diagnosis comes a day. After a story by the Associated Press that she stepped back from public life and her son j O'Connor said his mother had begun to have challenges with her short term memory O'Connor who was seventy five when she announced her retirement from the court in two thousand five is currently eighty eight years old. Hi, I'm making crane AP digital manager and host of the podcast ground game. A look at the top political issues bubbling up around the country ahead of this year's midterm elections. It's available on apple podcasts and podcast one. While you're there, be sure to subscribe rate and review it that's the podcast ground game. AP radio news. I'm Tim Maguire earlier

Sandra Day O'connor J O'connor AP Alzheimer's Disease Tim Maguire United States Associated Press Apple Eighty Eight Years
Sandra Day O'Conner, 1st Female Supreme Court Justice, Has Dementia

Investor's Edge

00:12 sec | 2 years ago

Sandra Day O'Conner, 1st Female Supreme Court Justice, Has Dementia

"Former supreme court Justice and first woman appointed to the supreme court. Sandra Day O'Connor announced today that she was diagnosed with dementia, and is withdrawing from post retirement career that included speaking engagements

Supreme Court Sandra Day O'connor
Sandra Day O'Connor says she has dementia

Barsky Radio

01:05 min | 2 years ago

Sandra Day O'Connor says she has dementia

"Run? And then like, I said I hear these stories. I'm like, oh, you know. I mean, maybe forty is a little too early for you to sixty. But I'm telling you after eighty or whatever things started happening, and it's scary. Yeah. It really is kind of scary. You know what I mean? Yeah. So anyway, her husband, by the way, passed away of Alzheimer's in two thousand nine. So she served on the supreme court between Eighty-one two thousand six after being appointed by former president Ronald Reagan. She's a pretty good supreme court Justice from what I understand.

Ronald Reagan Alzheimer President Trump
Sandra Day O'Connor says she has dementia

Chris Plante

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Sandra Day O'Connor says she has dementia

"Never dreamed. She would become the first woman Justice on the US supreme court. A man who was

Justice United States
Sandra Day O'Connor and US discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Sandra Day O'Connor and US discussed on NPR News Now

"The first woman ever on the US supreme court is moving back from public life for more than a decade after leaving the court in two thousand six, Sandra Day O'Connor and kept up a fairly active schedule, including serving as visiting federal appeals court. Judge O'Connor also founded her own education organization

Sandra Day O'connor United States