20 Episode results for "San Marco"

August 28, 2020: The Fall of San Marco

Today in True Crime

16:40 min | 1 year ago

August 28, 2020: The Fall of San Marco

"Due to the graphic nature of today's crimes, listener discretion is advised extreme caution is advised for listeners under thirteen. Today is Friday August Twenty Eighth Two thousand twenty on this day in eighteen, forty, nine, the Republic of San Marco or Venice Italy as we know it today lost its breath independence and was forced back under the Austrian Empire's control. It was a devastating day for the city and its leader, an unlikely revolutionary named Daniele. Welcome to today in true crime, a podcast original today were covering the rise and fall of the Venetian Republic of San Marco and the inspiring tale. Love. It's deposed leader. Let's go back to August twenty, eighth eighteen, forty, nine to an Italian ship bound for Paris. forty-five-year-old Danielle a marine looked over the sailboats edge as his beloved. Venice receded into the distance yesterday he ruled the city today he was exiled from it beside him was his wife Theresa she was dying and it would be a miracle. If she survived the journey if Menino had kept his mouth shut a year ago, she might be comfortable in bed and he still in his law office quietly pouring over legal texts but revolution had called out to him and he had no choice but to answer. In the nineteenth century venissieux part on the Adriatic. Sea. Made it a worthy prize for the warring empires of Austria and France as the Habsburgs and the Polian battled Venetians could only pray that whoever won would treat them. Kindly, one of those citizens was Daniele. Marine he was born on May thirteenth. Four to a Jewish Italian family that converted to Christianity in the seventeen hundreds in means I, ten years Venice was traded between Austria and France before ultimately landing under Austrian rule young Benin probably had little awareness of the fear of injustice that accompanied these shifts for Venetians but that would change as he got older and went into law. By the eighteen forties when Menino was hitting forty himself, a tide of nationalism was cresting in Venice magazine frustrated by Austria's distant arbitrary laws was as angry as any of his fellow Venetians he wanted to act and give his city the justice it deserved. Then he realized he could act in his own unique way. He was a lawyer, he would fight the law with the law. In eighteen forty, seven machine presented a list of the People's demands to his Austrian rulers. One of his most inflammatory arguments was about home rule where governance of a colonized territory remains in its residence hands. Main insisted that Austria had promised home rule to Venice when they took over in eighteen fourteen but never followed through. Means boldness impressed working class Venetians. They weren't used to well to do intellectuals fighting for their rights. So my Nin became their hero. But. Where Venice Saad champion the NS saw a traitor leaders in the Austrian capital were worried. Then as wasn't there only problem they were dealing with uprisings across their empire their subjects had to be subdued making an example of Danielle mundine would be perfect first step. In January of eighteen forty, eight manning was arrested for treason but instead of quelling his subversive influence, the arrest had the opposite effect. Venetians. Were furious that their champion was behind bars and began to riot in the streets the Austrians frustrated and desperate to regain their authority released marine from on March seventeenth eighteen, forty eight. Perhaps this would quell the angry mobs but. The gambit backfired instead the rioters rallied around machine and insisted that the Freeman could now free all Venice. Many was suddenly the unwitting leader of a revolution and he took to it like a natural. What he lacked in fighting skills he made up for with his sense strategy. He recruited Venetians to form a civic guard and focused on eliminating the city's Austrian presence. On March twenty second marine led his militia to the dockyard after looting the ships for weapons and convincing dock laborers to join the fight. Menino and his men overpowered Austria's forces the invaders retreated and Menino and the Venetians took control of their own city. At. The end of this incredible day Mundine celebrated at Cafe Florian in the Piazza San Marco surrounded by his army he stood on top of a table and proclaimed that the Venetian Republic of San Marco was reborn as the crowd chanted Viva San. Marco. It must have been surreal moment from in a few months. Earlier, he'd been a bookish lawyer longing for justice. Now, he was the brash outspoken leader of a revolution and the next ruler of Venice. It seemed the worst was behind him Benin, but his hardest fight was still to come. Up Next Mundine, scrambles to keep the dream of San, Marco. Alive. High listeners. Here's a series. I think you're really gonNA like we all know that medical professionals are trained to give exceptional care. But what about those who use their skills not to heal but hurt in the new podcast series medical murders you'll discover a disturbing diagnosis that not every doctor wants to extend your life. Every Wednesday medical murders introduces you to the worst to the medical community has to offer men and women who took an oath to save lives, but instead used their expertise to develop more sinister specialties join host. Alistair. Murden as he examines the formative years and. Motives of history's most infamous killers, dissecting their medical backgrounds with expert analysis and professional insight provided by practicing md Dr, David Kipper. You'll investigate a wide range of heinous healthcare workers like the general practitioner believed to be the most prolific serial killer in modern history or the dentist who led a double life as a Hitman or even the doctor and gang member who mixed deadly potions for unhappy housewives to use on their husbands when it comes to these true crime stories the only thing the doctor ordered is murder follow medical murders free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode of today in true crime is brought to you. By simplisafe simply safe was designed to be easy to use while protecting your whole home twenty, four seven. You can order it online with just the click of a button when mine arrived, I was eager to get it set up immediately it didn't take long I just had to place the sensors plugged in and connected to my Wifi. Then suddenly my whole home was protected I didn't have to worry about tools or drilling or waiting around for technicians. The setup is also intuitive and the. Components blend into my home seamlessly as a single mom who's main job is related to true crime. I really appreciate the peace of mind that simply safe brings their pricing is fair and honest you can get twenty, four, seven professional monitoring an emergency dispatch starting at just fifty cents a day not bad for what US News and World Report called the Best Overall Home Security of twenty twenty head to simplisafe dot com slash today and get a free hd camera that simplisafe dot com slash today to make sure they know that our show sent you. Now back to the story. In March of eighteen forty, eight angry citizens overthrew the Austrian forces that controlled what's now Venice Italy the rebels were led by Danielle Mundine a lawyer who smarts and strategy ensured their victory. Three year old marine was elected president of San Marco in the spring of Eighteen, forty eight though he lacked political experience, his followers felt his legal knowledge would be crucial in establishing a new government. Menino had admirable goals. He insisted that people of all colors and creeds deserved safety and protection and set out to create a new peaceful island city. However his presidential prowess was tested in the spring of eighteen, forty nine when Austria came back to his island state with a vengeance. Led by Marshal Yosef Radetsky, Austria attacked San Marco from both land and sea. By May, Radetski's forces had destroyed the railway that linked the island city to mainland Italy. Send Marco could no longer receive food goods and valuable ammunition said, Marco's residents couldn't escape by land because the rails were destroyed they couldn't escape by sea either because Austrian ships lurked in the waters like sharks, they were sitting ducks primed to endure months of relentless attacks over the summer of eighteen forty nine Austrian forces pummeled San Marco with a reported sixteen, thousand bombs. In addition to the casualties they destroyed centuries of valuable. Cultural artifacts and even without the constant threat of violence. The citizens of San Marco were on their last legs being cut off from the mainland meant there was now a feminine and San Marco soldiers struggled to fight while starving to make matters worse a cholera epidemic ripped through the city infecting the rich and poor alike nobody was safe and then yellow Menino was dealt a personal blow when his wife Teresa got sick to. By, late August, the Austrians knew they were close to a victory. So they got creative and more devious than ever in an attempt to bring the fight home on the twenty second they strapped bombs to balloons and let the wind carry them to San Marco. The bombs dropped didn't do much damage but this was the first precursor to the modern deadly air raids that became popular in wars to come. It became clear to mean that there was simply no way to win after discussing the situation with his assembly menino reached out to Marshall Detsky to discuss surrender. MNUCHIN was still the determined lawyer. He'd always been and he tried for a fair resolution in his initial negotiations. He insisted that Venice have home rule with some autonomy just like he'd argued in eighteen, forty eight but Radetsky refused and insisted that Menino, and his closest political allies be exiled from San Marco. It was a difficult choice but many knew it was the only safe option on August twenty seventh once for Detsky promised to give amnesty to Mundine supporters Menino agreed to Austria's times and prepared to leave his beloved city. The next day was August twenty, eighth eighteen, forty, nine as Australians reclaimed San Marco Menino, and his allies sailed away Menino was headed for Paris with his wife Teresa, but he made it there alone. Theresa. Tragically died of cholera mere hours after leaving San Marco. During his Parisian exile mezzanine never forgot about his homeland. He wrote fervently about the need for a united. Italy. While he'd insisted on San Marcos sovereignty, he now believed Italian territories would only free themselves from their conquerors by working together. He wouldn't live to see that happen money died on September twenty second eighteen, Fifty, seven at the age of fifty three in eighteen sixty, six in reclaim San Marco from Austria after the third Italian War of independence were it became the Venice we know today in eighteen sixty, eight Danielle machines ashes were returned to Italy where he received a lavish public burial in his beloved birthplace. The rise and fall of San, Marco could only have happened in the chaos of the nineteenth century as modern Europe, fought to define itself. If San Marco had one, it's possible. We'd be talking about it as an independent country nowadays and Menino would be a major historical figure instead of a curious footnote. Still despite his failures, a statue of Benin stands in Venice today it honors the unlikely rebel whose dream of freedom resulted in one of the most exciting and unique years in Italian history. Thanks for listening today in true crime I'm Vanessa Richardson for more on the dramatic fascinating story of Italy's formation check out the first two episodes of podcast original dictators on Benito Mussolini Today True. Crime is a podcast original. You can find more episodes of today and true crime and all other podcast originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already have all of. Your favorite music. But now spotify's making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like today in true crime for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream today in true crime on spotify, just open the APP and type today in true crime. In the search bar, we'll be back with a brand new episode tomorrow in true. Crime. Today in true crime was created by Max Cutler, and is a podcast studios original. It is executive produced by Max Cutler sound designed by Dick, Schroeder with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden, and Aaron. Larson. This episode of today in true crime was written by a mean Osman with writing assistance by Nora Battelle I'm Vanessa Richardson. Killer nurses, deranged doctors, mad scientists don't forget to check out the new podcast, original series, medical murders every Wednesday meet the worst. The medical community has to offer men and women who took an oath to save lives, but instead use their expertise to develop more sinister specialties follow medical murders free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

San Marco Menino Venice Austria San Marco or Venice Italy Danielle mundine Marco San Marco Menino Marco spotify Benin Daniele San Piazza San Marco Theresa Italy Marshal Yosef Radetsky San Marcos twenty twenty Paris.
Bonfire of the Vanities - February 7, 1497

This Day in History Class

05:07 min | 1 year ago

Bonfire of the Vanities - February 7, 1497

"This Day in history class is a production of heart radio. Hello everyone I'm Eve's welcome to this day in history class where we take a tiny anybody of history every day. Today is February seventh twenty twenty. The day was February seventh. Fourteen ninety seven followers of the Dominican Friar Prior Girolamo Savonarola burned objects that were considered vanities like books artwork and instruments. Though this event is known as the bonfire fire of vanities the term generally refers to burning objects that religious authorities believe incite people to send Savannah Rola became a Dominican. Monk in fourteen seventy five in the following years he began teaching novices and lecturing on philosophy and he studied with various lecturers concentrating on the reality by fourteen eighty two. He had transferred to the Convent of San Marco in Florence and soon he was preaching in the Church of San Lorenzo Uh. He gained a reputation for his learning and austerity but at first he did not get much attention for his preaching in fourteen eighty four though he reported his first vision about the scourge of the church. He began delivering prophetic sermons. And he preached the Church of Sanjin Yano and fourteen eighty five live and during lent and fourteen eighty six he spoke about the wrath of God and sinfulness and he called for reform in the church at this point. His popularity began to grow Savonarola preached in several different cities for a while but in fourteen ninety. He returned to Florence He. He soon began preaching and the Cathedral of Santa Maria. Del Fiore criticizing materialism and the leaders of the world. He also criticized the policies policies of the government which Florentine ruler Lorenzo de Medici offense to go. Lorenzo threatened to banish him. Lorenzo soon died and Savonarola Yvonne Arolla continued preaching Savonarola prophesized the scourge of Italy railing against vanity and corruption. He soon led his convent to break from the ruling organization of monasteries that it belonged to the congregation of Lombardy. He advocated for other comments to do the same and he ordered that his monks give up their possessions so that they could raise money for impoverished people once Medici rule ended. He began suggesting new policies in his sermons. Plus his prophecies were painting out. SAVONAROLA quickly became a political authority. He did not hold public office but under his guidance a new republic was established in fourteen. Ninety five he immediately set out to help impoverished people demanding more jobs and telling the churches churches to melt their gold and silver to buy food for the hungry he also called for more modesty songs. Deemed Profane were replaced with hymns people began wearing unadorned clothing and art and other inappropriate objects were burned. Savonarola did have enemies like the Abbiati and the uppity but he continued to pursue drastic reform in light of the abuses of the church. He denounced jokes. Sex Gambling. Nude paintings contains jewelry and other luxuries as well as the humanistic culture of the renaissance. He shut down traditional festivals and replace them with religious festivals and fourteen ninety-seven. His supporters gathered donations from foreign teen citizens for a fire of repentance on February seventh. The carried vanities entities objects like mirrors dresses cosmetics to a fire in the Piazza Dei lesson. Yoda and burnt them. This wasn't the first bonfire sponsored turt- by the Dominicans. But it is one of the most notable lines hope Alexandra. The six ordered him to stop preaching but he refused in May of fourteen ninety-seven. The pope excommunicated Savonarola who did not stop preaching until March of fourteen ninety eight just two months after his last sermon. After being convicted of Heresy Salman Arolla was burnt at the stake. I'm jeff coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today. Hey you did yesterday. Spend some of your daily social media time with US AT T H Z typecast. or Or. If you would prefer to email us you can send us a message at this day. At IHEARTMEDIA DOT com. I truly hope you enjoyed today's show. We'll be back tomorrow. MARLA with another episode. Hello more podcasts. From iheartradio I heart radio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

Savonarola Florence Sanjin Yano Yoda Lorenzo Convent of San Marco Eve San Lorenzo Savannah Rola Monk Del Fiore Salman Arolla Piazza Dei lesson congregation of Lombardy Italy Yvonne Arolla Cathedral of Santa Maria jeff coat Alexandra
How to Get a 2000% Return on Investment Selling Online - 057

Streams of Income

33:40 min | 1 year ago

How to Get a 2000% Return on Investment Selling Online - 057

"They welcome to streams of income with self help author Ryan Rieger. For the next hour, you'll hear proven methods for how to live the multiple income streams. Dream. Ryan is passionate about helping others discover their gifts and start their own business is published five books in his courses and group coaching programs have changed the lives of thousands of students all over the World Ryan's books include private label the Easy Way Finding Your grace place and his latest streams of income. And now, here's your host Ryan Rieger. Hey guys welcome back to the streams of income radio show of your host Ryan Rieger. As you know, I, like to bring you different opportunities to make money online. There are literally so many was on a Webinar last night and today's episode is a snippets of that Webinar and one of the folks on their said that selling online or making money online. Is like being in one of those cash machines where It's like a the phone booth type cash machine were their money blown all over the place and you're trying to grab it all. It is literally like that there's so many ways to make money online and I like to bring you different ones. Now that doesn't mean that you should try to grab every single way because these might not all fit for you. But I know some of you are interested in different ways or you're looking for ways to expand what you're currently doing. Or maybe you just looking for a different opportunities and so today is one of those and I'm chatting with Greg Perry, this is actually a recording of from the Webinar. We did a last night I grab snippets of it put it together for you and greg talks about how to make a two thousand percent plus return selling on Ebay. As, we have a group called the treasure hunting prophets group. You'll notice it in this webinar. He talks a lot about or says lot our group and he's talking about the treasure hunting prophets group. We have a about a hundred and forty people in there right now that Greg is teaching these strategies and they are literally buying things for pennies and selling them for five ten twenty dollars in in more and getting crazy returns, and so you can do this to thought this would be very interesting to share with you. Because folks are doing it and I wanted to give you the opportunity to to hear how you can do it as well and if you only listen to this episode, just for the five Boulos, the beyond the lookouts, the things to look out for that, you can find at garage sales, rush doors in a state sales that will make you an incredible return. This episode will be worth it just for though. So here's my interview, with Greg. I'm going to show you how to get two thousand percent return and Ryan and I have a group called treasure hunting prophets, and this is where we have other people that get a two thousand percent return actually more than two thousand on the average. But if we said much more would sound two hundred really ridiculous, right? Yeah. Especially if you've resold for a while and you're you know doing doing reselling retail arbitrage things like that. But we really the people in treasure hunting prophets really prefer much larger return out than than we can get with retail arbitrage generally so I went to discuss where we've been where we're going. Few. Months ago four or five. I don't know time flies as bad as twenty twenty s been. It's really been flying for me. Ryan I kind of set out. On an experiment and that experiment was to train resellers to approach things far differently from the usual way that a lot of resellers and that we approach resell. We wanted to show people how to buy items extremely inexpensively and resell them successfully for sky high returns we wanted to show with our experiment. Was that one show people how to buy things like this, and we did not want our members to invest a bunch of capital I mean most a lot of people only have little invest especially right now, and so we had to do two things in this group. Or for the people that were were talking to this model, we number one we had to show. People where and how to find items that cost pennies on the not the dollar cost pennies on the five dollars and ten dollars. And then we had to teach them and you. How to sell those items so that they get more money for each item and that their item sell faster than other people trying to sell against them. hitting those competitors are really critical for us and pretty much knocking everyone else out of the game is critical not through anything like gating them or anything like that nothing nothing like we done us just pure supply and demand and competition we. I we want to outdo all others and I wanted to describe. Where we all are right now four or five months later, and you must admit for five months is not a long time. So. Before we get into the nitty gritty though I want to say from a bird's eye perspective the this group I'm talking about treasure hunting prophets that's pretty much what I'll be describing but. You can do this on your own if you want to. That's okay. We're going to give you some Boulos tonight. I'm GONNA give you five be on the lookouts that if you find just these five items a lot and you'll find, you'll find them a lot if you look you'll make. These. Returns Easel all the time. And in our group once in a blue moon as Ryan said, our members might resell an item make one, hundred percent return we're pretty disappointed. So we consider that a failure in this. So we don't want to spend a thousand dollars to make a thousand dollars. We don't WanNA. Do that. We don't we don't want to do. We certainly don't want to spend three thousand dollars to make a thousand. We we we just don't want the returns that a lottery sellers do crate on we just don't want that. We demand not our allies but our ally, and that's what we call it giant returns on investment in telling you what to look for where to go re-teach groups of products or categories of products. I don't want you scanning barcodes. I don't want you do and stuff like that all the time you don't have time for that No one has time for that unless that's your sole business model or you've got employs doing that for you that's great. That model works great. That's not for this group. We want to look for products that are rarely and usually never looked for by other resellers. We just don't want it. In our primary source for our items and this is where I think I'm GonNa lose some of you. But hang and again. Three or four years ago I might have dropped right now k our primary source for these items are three threefold garage sales or yard sales I'll say garage sales. If you're in the UK IT'LL BE BOOT SALES Garage sales thrift stores and Estate Sales. A few years ago I was one who didn't want to just mess with other people's Junk I didn't WanNA learn about it was whole thing I didn't know anything. I didn't want to know I can make some money out slow investment but you've gotta learn all this stuff and I loved the idea of retail arbitrage. I loved it and I just thought Oh man, my phone tells me everything I don't have to know what sells all I have to do is ask my phone APP if if it's any good, I don't have to learn that a DVD player is worth money will have to know anything I just check my phone. and. I liked the fact I could do all this and not really know a lot about what I'm sourcing and make thirty three cents on the dollar thirty, three percent return. If I spent five than the income would try to sell it for about fifteen hundred. What we do in Amazon primarily retail arbitrage. That's kind of a we want more than that. That's kind of a return we liked but sometimes we make less thirty, three, percent, two, hundred or more. I think that the people that we've been teaching this too. I. Think one hundred percent of them today will tell you that. They, really feared more than anything having to learn all this stuff about what in the world do I do at a garage sale? It's not for me not it's not what I WANNA do, and I think one hundred percent of them today four or five months later we're tell you their biggest regret is that Ryan and I did not start this sooner teaching people how to do this I mean it's an incredible model business model. And it doesn't have to be your only one many of our people do you. Re plans with Jimmy. Smith the whole gambit. To source. Giant returns two, thousand percent on. The second requirement is we need to train people on. How to sell what they source. So I'm in the primary place that we go to is Ebay the secondary sources we teach your facebook marketplace macari, end some Amazon merchant fulfilling reteach that very little of that. We never face tanking prizes ever. And most of the time we faced rising crisis, but even that has none of the tanking nut none of taking dangerous. Here's an example of something that can on us in price. Twenty to thirty years really twenty to twenty five to thirty years is the sweet spot for selling what we sell because twenty year old toys twenty five year old clothing games, things like that are hot and they are always hot. So every year we kinda see a drop off twenty twenty five years ago and addition for the new twenty five years ago because people who were children and teens back. Then who were big fans of things are now adults and they've got children and teens and they're kind of reliving their own pass. They now have money to buy what they wanted twenty five years ago and they want to teach their own kids about some of this stuff. So speaking of that I'm GonNa give you a Bolo our first below of the night be on the lookout for this is what you want to be on the lookout for if you WANNA, make huge returns and that is. NEON NEON is where it's at clothing and other items. Backpacks are group's no all of our resellers and treasuring know that if they see nike running shoes and their neon and they've got some good treads on them at a decent price, they'll by they'll just. Color Block shirts color boxer like you've got these bold colors next to each other a bold red and a bold. You know purple next to each other I. If they seek colored block off the shoulder tops of lady even are meant they'll source those. neon orange and. Purple. Color Block T shirts that would make I neon green with envy. Then our members will source it. So be on the lookout for Neon. It's still really hot. tote bags, anything neons pretty hot nickelodeon brought this to US nickelodeon making us money today because everything was talk back to Nickelodeon days. Have you know two, thousand, nineteen, Ninety, eight around there. So that's helping some of our resellers who are smart enough to know to look for this stuff. Okay. Categories of items to resell notice I didn't tell you which Nike shoes to buy. That were Neil I gave you a category and not on neon knock shoes going to bring as much as others Some are certainly better than others but neon Nike running shoes, for example, in general right now are huck. So it doesn't really matter as long as the price is low and our members don't like to pay more than twenty for anything except Oh some of those old. Pioneer receivers from the eighties when stereos were stereos and their. things like that. They'll pay a little more for because they bring a lot of money but they might be one hundred dollars or something like that. But you just learn if you follow this model start looking for neon stuff, you know you see a pair nike running shoes that are it with a good tread could souls and still in good shape. Good Laces. Might pay eight dollars to twenty dollars for a pair of that. You can look them up and see if they're worth selling. But they're also just worth buying just by them. You're going to sell them in a prophet you're. GonNa want him right now that is a category neon types of clothing in good condition. It kinda looks retro that's just a type of catch. It always helps to check cops were what we call comparables. It always helps to look on your phone and see what others like that have sold for recently but at the same time true not paying too much most of our people don't spend the time to check every single item. They just don't have two categories of items mean in and out get home, get them listed, and then go to Poland and half crispy cream for dessert. I mean that's more important than this stuff. So brings us to below number two name brand electronics. Even. Better. Than Twenty years ago or the forty year old ones when stir stereo equipment had knobs and lights and buttons and dials, and they ended huge and they were mammoth beast they were so cool. There were so cool. These big pioneer thing. You posted a the receiver in our group. Recently, my parents were visiting here. You're you're showing. Okay perfect. Dad had either that exact one one very very similar to it because I remember pushing all those buttons on there. And I showed it to him and he he about just fell over in his chair when he saw how much it was going for because we at we had one of those. Yeah. Isn't that amazing? Yeah Yeah. Well I wish you still had it I wish it were still. Up in your attic So but there's one thing about this. Elise will one of art will will someone who learns this model will one of you listening today? Hey more than twenty dollars for when it would you pay a hundred for one? Yeah. You'd pay two hundred for one of these but there's something about this that I don't know that you've noticed now this one actually sold on ebay this is a sold item and they did something that. We teach people don't do it they put it out for auction. So seven days went by the got one bid are people would people who learn this model people I'm telling you right now don't do that. Do a buy it. Now we would definitely get nine, hundred, ninety, nine dollars. For this thing we wouldn't even hesitate and we would still have the gall charge no eighty five dollars for shipping, but there's something else about this receiver look closely. It is for parts get doesn't even work. While we don't know what's wrong and I guarantee you this person did not give offer a money back guarantee if it doesn't work no way you do that if you're selling something as so if for parts not were something who knows what's wrong maybe power up maybe at some little tiny thing whatever it is someone paid seven, hundred fifty bucks plus they had the goal to charge him eighty five dollars to ship this thing. There's no way that cost five dollars to ship I. don't care if it's thing might be thirty pounds, but it's going to ship for thirty bucks thirty two dollars something. But so this is a prophet item according to the seller. You have any idea why that are so valuable people is it nostalgic or is there parts in there that are actually? Worth that. Mike Okay I'm GonNa give you flippant answer I my flippant answer for why did this broken reading from her for seven forty nine dollars I don't care. I don't know and I don't care. But I really don't know I truly don't know Bech. Might be missing the KNOBS and they wanNA perfect receive or and this dial mechanism often goes. It's often something that doesn't last. I don't know if the belt wears down or something. But if one of these is in good shape than they have a very important aspect of that of that receiver and there might be a tube or something if this had tubes. Out But at least they can salvage this part. So I think it's not just nostalgia I think people really loved the they did sound great i. mean it's just wonderful and they're so fun just pushed buttons so so slick so and this was real would. They might have gone to fake side veneers but I think most of this was railway back in eighty, three, eighty two. So. Man Be on the lookout for this stuff. If you can test it great. If you can't test it, you have to sell it for not working. You have to be able to test people only in have speakers anymore that we can plug into these things or you know I it's it's hard to test the. So that's part of this high price is you need to know I mean. This thing we're working I mean you charge fifteen? You'd charge fourteen, ninety nine or consider going higher and then drop if it doesn't Celena weaker too but you do have some testing. Challenges with this. Equipment and just keep that in mind or take a drop in Christ and just sell it as either whites. It's a deal. It's it's a deal. In our group we. Are we often look at people's listings. And it's kind of. It's kind of fun and you'll think it's wrong and it is but we kind of make fun of most other sellers. Through all these listings and just talk about what's run there there are sellers could tell you exactly what's wrong with this picture there's a lot of problems with this picture blame won't go into it too much here but the number one it's against ebays rules. You cannot put something in the initial picture that you're selling. So if they don't sell this turntable with this receiver, the buyer can legally. Get their money back. Then be a pretty chintzy buyer who did that, but you could. So it's really not following the rules and when you don't follow ebays rules, this person does not have a white background on this photograph and that is bad when you don't follow ebays rules, you don't make as much money because Ebay, does not give you as much search engine love they don't boost you up. into the search engine as high, and so we find and so we look through this one. I'm sure look in all of the mistakes that the sky made and didn't have good title or anything although the brand and the model number right here. Those are the most important to keywords. So it's good that he with these, but we would put other things in this title. So maybe the year. May Be just different things about it but how many ants when this were how many watts per channel that was pretty critical for receivers back in the eighties? So anyway, this had a lot of problems. This is what we're up against. We're up against a bunch of amateurs making a whole lot of money on Ebay, and so I feel bad for you if you compete against some of our people. Who learned this model or if people compete against you after tonight and learning some of these things and if you implement than like actually A white background I picture. If you actually do that, you're going to sell better than someone competing against the identical item I feel bad for anyone who competes against people who learn how to make Ebay. Worked for them. We kind of mocked Ebay in our group. I mean Amazon. COM, because they've had their the king right and so they can stand a little bit of of mocking. We're we're the David to that Goliath in Ebay and Ebay has not gotten. It's do it has not, and so we there there aren't any. There aren't a bunch of insurance agents out there selling insurance on what happens when you lose your ebay account they don't exist or if one does or they sure I don't see how they could ever sell policies. We don't have all of these organizations that exist that you can pay to get an to get an item reinstated or to get your money out of FBI out of ebay whenever. Ebay. Says you can't sell it on. We don't have people. Not Sleeping at night because they have three days to convince ebay not to close their account nothing like that happens this because ebay sellers. Ebay works for ebay sellers. ebay sellers worked. For. Buyers. Ebay has made that clear their former CEO. Went public and a national recording that we posted an art group that the CEO said we worked for the buyers. On ebay on Amazon buyers worked for Amazon. Amazon boss not you not your buyer you WanNa make your you WanNa make Emma Emma's unhappy but it's hard to make them. Happy Right I mean they're they're hard to make happy Ebay just loves it. Sellers people are liking the ebay model so much more. But there are problems I realized there are problems that you know about with Ebay and here's one it. We don't ignore Amazon it just seems like it. Just this week many of you know that to sell toys on. Amazon. FBI are on Amazon, me fulfilled in the fourth quarter you have to pat you have to jump through these hoops every year you've got to sell twenty five items before October first. Merchant fulfilled you've gotta find him you've got a merchant fulfill them. You've got to do this even if you sold twenty items were for Phil Last July you've gotta do it. I. Think between August Fifteenth and September and October Fifteenth, and you've got to make sure that you sell twenty five and if you don't, they won't allow you to sell toys, toys or important to sell merchant fulfilled in Q. Four Amazon because a lot of times you'll see a great deal and you just WanNa, flip it real fast, and you just take a photo of it or you just you just jump on a listing where it exists, but it's running out of inventory and you merchant fulfill it. You don't have time to FBI. Toy sales that happen in late November you don't have time. You don't want to you. That's not where the money is. You need to know how to merchant fulfill this week. We showed members how to get there twenty five merchant fulfilled items sold in a couple hours to at most a couple of days. So if you've been trying to get this done and trying to hoping that you're going to get twenty five cells merchant fulfilled before the deadline, we showed you how to do it really two hours. One of our members posted the next day and she said, I did it in three and a half hours I'm now proof merchants Phil because I sold my twenty-five items. Thanks to this group. So we don't ignore. Amazon we just like to kind of make fun of Amazon okay. To make a thousand dollars are members might expect to invest fifty two hundred to make a thousand Amazon using our a re plans which both are extremely successful. The investment typically runs from two to four thousand dollars if you've got this investment. Especially, Jimmy's re plans and some of the our strategies powerful strategies that you can. You can leverage and grow, but it takes a lot of money to to grow big immune does takes inventory and again, our members sleep like babies at night because they're not worried about their ebay counsel. So, there's a difference that you need to know about if if you're just hating on Ebay I, understand that there's a big difference in there are some things you need to know about otherwise, we wouldn't do it. We we have time to ebay versus Amazon number three ebay take so much more time to list not our members. We show you how fast real fast but on Ebay you've got gotta write long descriptions. No, you don't. That is wrong. It's wrong in two, thousand, five, you did in two, thousand, twenty, Ebay doesn't want long descriptions on anything it. You don't ever do that anymore as a matter of fact, evening doesn't even show your description most buyers unless they click a Lincoln ordered open up your listing in see a description Ebay doesn't even like to show descriptions but on Ebay you have to take photos of everything you sell or really Karen well you. Do you should but you don't have to. There are legal ways that Ebay has approved to steal photos from other Lee, Ebay listings, and once you hear what that is, you'll be fine with it. It's not like you're really doing anybody I mean you're not doing anybody raw and you'll say, oh, I, see now that's okay. I can see why that's fine to do that. So you don't have to take photos of everything yoursel that's that's wrong. But on Ebay you have to ship every item yourself yeah. You do. You do so much and fulfiled as well. But we learned back in April a lot of FBI sellers that were forced to go merchant fulfilled found that if they had employees, they had big this big F. B. Business and they didn't know what they were going to do but they knew they had to merchant fulfill they. They realized teaching. Helpers, how to ship and fill merchant fulfil orders is actually far simpler than teaching. Workers how to do FBI fulfilment far easier far faster training. They were getting boxes out the door far faster. So there are big advantages to this type of model where you sell one ship wonder big advantages below number three, go rhino resellers go when you walk into a thrift store, don't go to the Ferragamo. Whatever I don't know anything about ladies clothing except the very few things I sourced but fair shoes I think. So don't don't go where all the other resellers go go to this type of vile were you see a bunch of blankets and look for the San Marco blankets you'll find You'll often find San Marco blankets and you get some kind of stratton little neat design. They've got some real boring I'm not saying that this is a San Marco blanket you're on the left they've got some boring designs but you get anything that sort of cool and there's not gonna be any reseller in this aisle of blankets no-one no-one goes through these things you find something like San Marco or several other brands but this is just your Bolo find these blankets you're gonNA make a lot of money because the thrift stores can't sell blankets for much money they some I ten dollars at most you. Some work. Eight hundred dollars this lion crabby gopher one, hundred, fifty dollars per San Marco. I only know it's mark in how do you ship? It might get wakened roll it up and put it in a priority to or folded up and put it in a box and ship I've probably rolling it his better because you don't get creases but no one really cares if blankets folded is not a big deal. With remember th- rich no one looks at blankets and a thrift store. No. No one resells them. Below. Number. Four. Believe it or not those old markers that you saying we just learned about these this week vintage Sanford Markers It can be old it can be your mother's marker that you found in one of her desk drawers and it. You don't have any idea how much ink is in it as long as it rights and as long as it's still smelling. It's a good marker and it will sell for ten to twelve thirteen dollars plus shipping. I don't know what. So here's what you do. Estate Sales I don't know if you've ever been in a state sale, I don't think Ryan had ever been in one when I I told him about it maybe he hasn't yet. So. Stay sales are really cool and they're really depressing. It's on your attitude your cold here corey sellers like, yes. But in their kind of dressing as you walk into these people's home, usually they were elderly they both died in on the last one guide and they're you're literally looking through their drawers and buying things out of their house I mean it's it's a weird situation. Our members know to ignore the antique clocks that all of the resellers are fighting over and we go straight to the bathroom, but I'm not going to tell you about that. Are members also know to go straight to the office desk drawer and look for Sanford Markers because there's you're gonNA find them. They're just going to be there. You'RE GONNA find it in both the cabin if they stink great, you're gonNA take him up to the person and stay cells don't barter. They don't like to say, yeah, will take after they don't like that sort of thing they'll start marking things down over time but they don't barter with people that say would you take for this that you take them an old red Sanford king-size marker that their mother us and or you know And and you say. I I kinda have a need for one of these. Would you take a quarter now goes yup I guess sure a say a quarter and you're going to sell it for now. This isn't a lot of men unless a huge return. Okay. Twenty five cents to ten to twelve dollars plus four dollars shipping. This thing isn't going to cost you four dollars ship at I gotta be three something but you're Michael Shipping if you do this but that's a huge return not it's not a huge amount of money but these things are nothing you can put them in a little bubble mailer. You can wrap up. A half piece of bubble, wrap around it and just put it in a car. I don't know the these things are nothing to melt or not fragile nothing and their two dollars and seventy cents or three dollars and ten cents to ship or something you know. First Class. To nothing. So you find these all day, list them and. Sell them like crazy. So that's a below that. You didn't know about no one knows about resellers don't know about this and you're GonNa get all that you wanted to garage self-aware quarter or a dime just make. It incredible offer, and they're going to be shocked that you even want the thing. Bulloch number five work boots. The great thing about work boots they don't have to be on the cleanest of shape the cleaner the better they don't have to be claimed. They don't have to be in the best of shake. They do have to make sure that their souls are well attached to the booed, and you have to make sure that you know there's no bad structural damage and you. Have to make sure the laces are nice because people don't want to buy pair work boots to go to work, and then their laces don't draw lousy in got a fine laces now. So a few stores, the pair of war boots and laces our bed by a new curve lace. That's my biggest suggestion there. You know I don't know how much they are dollar or I don't go to Walmart. Five just so you'll have him these standard types of lace up boots. Now, this was a pair I literally sold I sold them for about forty dollars. It had a big crack here, but it was not all the way through it was not a structural crack it was. The kind of swayed like outer these Timberland Timberland boots which is a great brand people want want them. The. Swayed was great. It's not swayed but this leather was cracked, but it did not go through to the tower anything in this other had beginnings of that same thing and my buyer paid me forty bucks shipping no problem and these are boots that I got along with A. Bag a complete bag of golf clubs, a golf club bag that you push with wheels full of ladies, golf clubs, and these were old golf clubs they needed to be cleaned up. I didn't clean them actually, and these boots need to be cleaned up I did clean them a little bit and I sold the bridge for about forty plus shipping and I sold the golf clubs facebook marketplace for eighty dollars, the boots and the bag the golf bag of Ladies Golf Clubs, Twelve fifteen golf clubs, some woods, all the irons one powder. They were on the side of the road in our neighborhood with a sign that said, free take things. He did. I don't know what that return is. With a big return. Eighty dollars for the golf clubs she met me. She is thrilled forty dollars shipped groups. You can't. Stop on this in your neighborhood. If you see a sign that says, there is a big box in front you're an FBI seller you keep driving I, mean let's face it. You keep on driving but if you learn the Boulos in your treasure hunting prophets burson you know now I need to stop and look. You've been listening to streams of income with self help author Brian. Regan from right here. In The Dallas, metroplex Ryan teaches several entrepreneurial courses and group coaching programs students all over the world. Be Sure to listen next week at the same time for streams of income with Ryan. Rieger.

Ebay Ryan Rieger Amazon FBI Nike Greg Perry twenty twenty Jimmy Estate Sales golf Phil Walmart Bech Ferragamo San Marco Smith UK CEO
Letters to Camondo: Edmund de Waal

VINTAGE Podcast

20:05 min | 2 months ago

Letters to Camondo: Edmund de Waal

"Each cupboard is full of legends volumes of letters and boxes of photographs. Some ledges a double stacked it is a whole world. it is a family a bank a dynasty. I want to ask if you ever threw anything away. Hello and welcome back to the vintage books podcast. I'm naming producer of the show. And i'm happy to introduce today's episode. Which features a special extract from lettuce to commander by edmund edmund. Awal is an artist. His porcelain is exhibited in museums and galleries around the world. He is author of the head with amber is and the white world and he has been awarded. The are xl on jonty prize and the cost of biography award in his newest book. He paints a fascinating portrait of the eminent french art collector count moisture komodo who lived a few doors away from edmund duales forebears the i family who is central to the story of the head of them but is the kemondo family will part of bella pakai society they will also targets of anti semitism come on to create spectacular house and filled it with the greatest private collection of french eighteenth century art the his son to inherit but when nissim was killed in the first world war it became a memorial and on the counts. Death was bequeathed to france. The museum seemed to komodo has remained unchanged since nineteen thirty six edmund wall explodes the lavish rooms and detailed archives. Uncovering near less to the family story in haunting series of letters addressed to the count. We hope you enjoy listening to this. Extract from the audiobook letter one different. I've been spending time in archives again early spring morning there is that barely suppressed imminence in the trees in the park. Few leaves yet but next week will be different too cold and wet to sit for long on one of the benches. But i do even the dogs aunt hanging about. It's been raining. There is a word for the smell of the world world of terrain patrico. It sounds a little french. Everyone seems to be often away at this hour. All this forward energy repulsive i get up and walk along the damp gravelled path. Out of the great gilded gates into the avenue. Risa doll and turn left up. The dome also i ring the buzzer outside number sixty three and wait for a response. I'm going back to archives that strong pull up to those rooms. High in attics. The servant's quarters going back a hundred years letter to different. I'm making an archive of your archive. I find inventories. Carbon copies auction catalogs receipts and invoices memoranda. Wills and testaments telegrams newspaper announcements qods of condolence seating plans and many's scores up programs sketches bank records hunting notebooks for two graphs. Devout works for to growth. So the family for two growths of gravestones account books notebooks of acquisitions. Each document is on a different kind of paper. Each has a different weight and texture and sent some have been stemmed to show when a letter has been received. And when said archives our way of showing how conscientious you are and it is clear. That this is a place of st and powerful concentration. Why so much copied. Why carbon copies almost weightless here on the fifth floor of sixty three reutemann also amongst the seventh rooms is a room lined with deep oak-panelled cupboards. It used to be loss. Young godmother the old storage room according to the architect's plans from nineteen ten. Each cupboard is full of ledges and volumes of letters and boxes of photographs. Some ledges a double stacked it is a whole world. it is a family a bank a dynasty. I want to ask if you ever threw anything away. I find the letters about discussions to restaurants with gastronomic friends. I find instructions to the gardeners for the annual replanting of the poortere instructions. To a wine merchant to the book binder to keep your copies of the gazette guebuza imperfect red morocco instructions. For the storage of furs. Instructions for the vet the cooper the florist. I find your responses to the dealers who write daily. Here are your notebooks of purchases the first inscribed before nineteen hundred seven to the twenty second of november nineteen twenty six second one third of january nineteen twenty seven the second of august nineteen thirty five. They are meticulous. I find manifests for cargo. Manifests for people as cargo. I find the manifests fuel daughter for your son in law for their children. My find is difficult letter. Three different as i mostly english. I want to ask you about the weather. I won't inquire about the weather in constantinople. Now alette forest where you hunt with leo let in a blue livery at the weekends that someone zhong capita undoubted see gusty. I know that you had a rather splendid yacht but not sure if that was a plutocratic purchase of obligation or pleasure in fact. I want to know more about your obsession with speed all that bowling along the newest motorcar with the wind. Buffeting you the paris. To berlin race everything flying past as fronts disappears into the dust made by your reynaud land delay in eighteen ninety five. You sit high up in a cap and goggles and a leather muttering coat. A blanket over your knees and you're ready to take on the world. It's a sunny day. The shadows of the car along the road is empty. I wonder about the weather in the paintings. By quasi the bought for lopeti bucaliu. The small study the gondoliers straining against the wind past the piazza san marco. The penance of flying the lagoon is an imperium trade. I want to know about the porcelain room where you'll save service. Lee savvy so was oh before a displayed in cabinets on six shelves. And where you eat your lunch alone. Do you look out the window and see. The branches of the trees swaying gently new garden and beyond it in the puck m- also in nineteen thirteen. You planted acer. Chinese privet and deep red leafed prune sp- assadi cherry plum trees. You were thinking ahead. Of course this is how the english are how you are. We talk about the weather and trees. I'll ask again letter four dear. I realize that. I'm not entirely sure about how to address you. Masilo combed as i shuffled through the letters from the dealers and the tradesman soliciting your attention your patronage in the matter of the anniversary exposition your kindness in allowing us to remit this bill you addressed in various or rotund ways. I like the collegiate greeting. I found this morning from a friend from the club. Disown inviting you to join him on a gastronomic adventure in a private restaurant. Car marshek covered in these things. I'm caught between not wanting to offend a not wanting to waste time series possible dignified and might lead to cher monsieur. So i'm not gonna call you mores and to call you come on those sound. Stentorian a box greeting across the library or dinner table. I know where related in complicated ways but that can wait. So i'm writing to his friend. We shall see how we get on. I feel strange about signing of two letter. Five dear friend. i'd like to ask you about the copy of the winds. it's in liberal cell. On the large drawing room overlooking the park it is one of ninety-three carpets woven at the savannah re manufactory between sixteen seventy one and sixteen eighty eight for the galaxy dubourdieu below in the lou. This is the fiftieth. The full wins. Puff their cheeks and blow that loan homes and the air is knotted unraveled with gusts of ribbons and juno and royalists their crowns and more trumpets and cascades of flowers dila questing and stiff account this spring mutual and it's gold and blue. The color of the wind along awards have galata out of the. This is early morning stuff bracing. It used to be a longer carpet when you first walked on it in the house of the hammond dolls fellow financiers who des constantine and when they were in some financial embarrassment. You bought it from them. I'm pleased to find that charlotte footsie helped you buy it. As knew you and then new everyone could deal with the sort of thing charmingly and made things happen shawl is important to me. The cousin who set me off on my adventures. And i suppose i want to know that you notice it. Notice that you are working on air on acceleration. Let us six different. Because it is a parisian spring out. That i want to open all the windows of your gorgeous. Golden health and there are a lot of them. The facade to reutemann so is seven windows wide modeled by your architect tom. The spare elegance of the petty triano. I vest sei but rather brilliantly there are fifteen windows on the parkside where the street facade becomes two wings framing. A grand simi. Secular bay supported by corinthian pilasters. This is a house that you cannot understand without a plan and forgive me this conceit but just imagine the air moving reaching round these rooms an up that sinuous staircase. Reuniting the winds in these paintings and tapestries and a copy of the winds and maybe starting with this golden carpet wasn't quite right. But i'm feeling rather chip will being here and i suppose i wanted to write to you about what is under your feet. If i could work this out the i could get a full of feeling for where you start. I'd spent quite a few years in your company and it seems only sensible to talk about beginnings you were born in a stone house at six cam on those street in galata in constantinople and spent the first nine years of your life looking out over the bosphorus. There was an adjoining pavilion in which there is an archery and bulbs opposite the winter garden. That's a pretty telling genesis. Not many people begin in the street with a familiar name or indeed palais or hotel or polet sue or house with an archery but we will get to that in time. It's a bit of an issue but stone suggests distinction. Then i find out a little more the whole of galata seems to have been owned by your family and that your grandfather was responsible for my favourite staircases. In the world. Those sinuous intertwined runs of steps breathing in out down a hillside. I had a photograph of this staircase by cartier bresson above my potus wheel for years. I'd look up hands covered in clay and think elsewhere. If i'm obsessing about working from the ground up we could stop with dust. I know that dust matters to you on the twentieth of january nineteen twenty four in the instructions and advice for the curator's of the musee. Nissim come on do you right. I wish my museum to be admirably maintained and kept meticulously clean. The task is not an easy one. Even with the first class staff of whom there must be a sufficient number for this job but the work is made easier by a complete vacuum cleaning system which works cheaply and marvelously well due to its powerful operation. This method of cleaning should not be used for anti carpets tapestries and silks but is of great benefit. You house is so clean so charged in its defenses against dust. You didn't want time to change in a thing. Light to fade the tapestries heat to whoop veneer furniture the paneling the parquet floors dust to damage the collection. You also worry about dump on rainy days. The public should enter via the road. Undo from the covered motor car entrance linking the courtyard to the muse that needs to boulevard mouth zab. The door is approached by a wide paved area. Which could be covered with matting. And where one could place umbrella stands. The weather must be kept out. The windows kept closed. We need to talk about this again. Lettuce seven different. It's not that. I don't like being clean. It's just that i'm drawn to dust. Dust comes from something it shows. Something has happened. Shoes would has been disturbed or changed in the world. It marks time. A few years ago. I was asked to be part of an exhibition about giorgio morandi. I went to miranda's apartment in the via that sir in bologna where he lived for thirty years with his mother and sister his modest studio through a door of the dining room here. He arranged and rearranged his votive jaws and vases and painted tin cans into still lives mocking down that choreographic positions in pencil. On the tables he'd made and over these objects roads drawn ruled. A visiting art historian was a dense grey velvet. He lost like a soft coat of felt its color and texture seemingly providing the unifying element for these tool bottles and deep bowls. It was a dust that was not the result of negligence and untidiness but of patience a witness to complete peace the dust that covered them with like a mantle of ability. You live without negligence or untidiness. But i hope you might understand the witness element of this. I'm sure the mantle of nobility will speak to you without dust monsieur. It's harder to find the traces. I look back at the traces of my own family and think of how they started out in a shuttle dusty then moved to edessa on the primorsky boulevard overlooking the black sea and then onto the ring stressor in vienna until the who also ten houses up the hill from where you live here in paris and think that they must have been living in one vast building site after another unpaid streets and the hoses and carts and carriages and the stonemasons working outside the house and in and then the carpenters and pastas and painters and gilders each producing their own clouds of particular dust foul in winter and worse in the summer with a five in every room and the gas lamps that give off that sweaty sudanese and then the second empire soft furnishings. All this padded seats all that operatic. Nonsense around curtains and blinds and pelmets trading swags. There must have been dust settling everywhere to keep dust free. You need to be rich. And exacting and have servants to endlessly. Sweep away all this traces. That might show you've come from. This is the parallel dusty journey of our families. I'll give it a rest. We hope you enjoy listening to that extract. You can find out more about lettuce. Took him on in the episode description. If you're a fan of the head with number is what did you think. Let us know. You can get in touch with us at vintage books on twitter facebook and instagram until next time keep eating boldly and thinking differently.

edmund edmund Awal edmund duales bella pakai nissim Risa doll reutemann guebuza lopeti bucaliu Lee savvy Masilo cher monsieur constantinople house of the hammond dolls triano grand simi Secular bay amber Wills san marco
September 19, 2018

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

05:08 min | 3 years ago

September 19, 2018

"Good Wednesday morning. I'm Anna Palmer and welcome your politico playbook audio breathing. Stay tuned after the show for a message from AARP all of a sudden out of seemingly nowhere. It seems like Republicans are gently steering Brent, Kavanagh's supreme court nomination back on track, Republicans and Democrats are at a stalemate Senate Republicans offered Christine blazey Ford, the chance to testify publicly or privately. But her lawyer said that first FBI should investigate the three decade old sexual assault allegations against Cavanaugh Senate Judiciary committee, chairman, Chuck Grassley is going to push ahead with vote next week, if does not testify, Monday, Republicans will insist that they were reasonable and Kavanagh's fate will be in the hands of Maine Senator Susan Collins and Alaska Senator. Lisa Murkowski the more time that goes by without her testifying, the more likely it is. The Cavanaugh will be confirmed. We already see that I next shifting in the rank and file in favor of Kavanagh Senator Bob corker tweeted yesterday that Republicans extended a hand in good faith. If we don't hear from both sides on Monday, let's vote and Senator Jeff flake tweeted at eleven fifty PM last night. When Dr Ford came forward, I said that her voice should be heard and acid issue committee to delay its vote on judge Cavanaugh. It did. So I now implore Dr Ford to accept invitation for Monday public or private setting. The committee should hear her voice Daniela has exclusive with former President. George W Bush supporting Cavanaugh and present Donald Trump tweeted at eleven forty, five pm. The supreme court is one of the main reasons. I got elected president. I hope Republican voters and others are watching and studying the Democrats playbook. Here's of interesting spotted. Cindy McCain, Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, Rick Davis, and Senator Lindsey. Graham were spotted having dinner last night at ULA and Senator Jeff flake was seen at DCA yesterday. Here's what else is on Trump's mind. He tweeted at twelve four AM Kim. Jon has agreed to allow nuclear inspections subject to final negotiations and to permanently dismantle a test site in launch pad in the presence of international experts. In the meantime, there will be no rocket or nuclear testing Trump also tweeted that north and South Korea will file a joint bid to host the twenty three two Olympics. I spoke with Dana Perino for this week's women role podcast where she touched on how Sarah Huckabee Sanders is doing her job, the Trump administration overall and how she thinks she's past her prime to go back to the White House. Please listen and subscribe on. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts, our colleagues, even shepherd, break down the latest politico morning console poll that found democratic women are turbo charged to vote in the midterms, seventy. One percent say they are very motivated to vote more than any other group Inc. Including democratic men at sixty three percent Republican minute sixty eight percent Republican women at sixty-nine percent, independent men at fifty, eight percent and independent women at fifty. One percent Daniel Lipman scooped that FEMA official. John VH was suspended in connection with the pro p- and Randy Bryce responding to the congressional leadership fund after the group in at with prices brother dumping on him. The Wisconsin democrat is owning up to his mistakes. In the past, the campaign is putting up one hundred seventy five thousand dollars behind the ad. Reuters is reporting. The candidate is under growing pressure to get a NAFTA deal done and for your radar, the AP is reporting that after the South Korean president and the North Korean leader met the two agreed to a sweeping set of agreements to dismantle the main nuke site. If the US also takes similar measures and on the twenty eighteen front, Alex is in San Marco Puto report that Trump is upset with Rhonda Santa's the Republican running for. Governor in Florida over hurricane Maria, death tolls and on the investigations front ABC is reporting that the Trump dossier didn't trigger the Russia investigation as a president has often said, and here's what's on tap. For Trump's Wednesday, the president will travel to have luck North Carolina this morning. He will also travel to the Marine Corps air station cherry point before returning later in the day to Washington DC subscribe playbook at politico dot com. Slash playbook. Today's episode is sponsored by AARP, fifty plus voters, decide the Ohio midterms, the latest issue of politico magazine series. The deciders is examining working class voters over fifty in Ohio who are feeling economic anxiety and could decide the gubernatorial and senatorial elections. This November visit, politico dot com. Slash the deciders to learn more and to the latest politico AARP poll results.

Donald Trump Kavanagh Senator Bob corker Senator Jeff flake Cavanaugh Senate Judiciary com politico Cavanaugh AARP President Senator Susan Collins Senate Senator politico magazine Chuck Grassley Dr Ford Christine blazey Ford Anna Palmer Democrats Lisa Murkowski FBI Trump
December 17th: Brew Talk Awards Show HR 2

Brew Talk 1310 KFKA

46:32 min | 9 months ago

December 17th: Brew Talk Awards Show HR 2

"It's been a long week. Grab a beer and sit. Back is plutarch. Here's tanner chad in the brew. Doctor himself dr. Michael moser our number two. We came back a minute early. Which is good. Because we've got an hour an hour left but Extra minute we've got an hour in a minute left to talk and we need that time. Quick math sixty one minutes bang bang. Doc nozette chad's over there still trying to do math well commanded Award show presented by on the rocks liquor if you missed any of our nominees to hear this. That's the awards that were given out. We've got four left. We'd given out three so far. The best place to have a beer goes to adele's brewing company. The best beer name awarded wiley roots. John denver's full of stuff and the best cicilline is comprom- us distillery. This is according to the fan. Vote taking place again over three hundred people in northern colorado combined to discuss what they felt. Were the best of these different categories. These are their answers. We roll we put out the top six. They narrowed it down to three in the narrative. Down to the top one If you're wondering who we are. I am swint host. Abreu talk radio. Jackie young owner. The san marco square. Dr michael mosier. Unc brewing in laboratory scientists. The guy you'll never hear from. It is ryan kelly back. They're doing the production work. Getting all these interviews edited and ready to go. We have switched gears. You've gotta denver beer company beer that we've got here. This is their quad. This what is it go. Yeah this is a four sheets belgian quad. That's scary it is gary. It's eleven percent scary. It is an outstanding example. I think of a belgian cardiac fantastic. That's great great for the first for this rather and very christmassy dates. It's perfect and over the beer. I don't think i'm going to drink the full growler so no. I don't think any of us are award. Show classy right. So we're sipping harvey your side of with red celica out being out taking drinks so we've got four more awards to get to here tonight but i do think it's important right now. We've talked about it but it's important to remember how just how difficult of year this has been for the serving industry whether it be burris whether it be restaurants this has been probably the most challenging year in at least recent history possibly ever for these restaurants the entrepreneur entrepreneurial spirit the engineering creativity the different ways that all these businesses have found a way to not only survive but in some cases strive has been fun to watch and we've been able to be along with them every step of the way and i look forward to going into twenty twenty one with a glass half full approach after twenty twenty has changed that perspective for a lot of. Let's look at the negatives there's not a whole lot positive going on. I know that the brewing industry in northern colorado will be stronger and better than ever going into twenty twenty one. I know that the restaurant industry will do the same but it can only be done with the support from our local people in the community without you without the people out there listening right now without the people of northern colorado supporting our friends our neighbors our family we will be able to get past this so before we move on and go onto this next award i want to simply put a reminder out there that the response and the survival rate of these businesses it is not on just the business owners back it is on the backs of every northern colorado and out there. It is on the backs of us. Instead of point through that. Mcdonald's drive-thru stop by here locally owned restaurant and get something to go instead of getting another box of bush. Light by something. Similar to one of these craft breweries by these gift. Cards from these restaurants. It is on us to make a difference and not every day. Can we do so so. I think we should all take that challenge and make sure that these restaurants in these brewing industries that we love and talk about so much. We'll see a better day into twenty twenty one. And i know the people of northern colorado are up to that challenge. These seven examples are just. I mean it's just the icing on the cake is the top layer of all of these different restaurants and burris. That are doing wonderful business out there. Do your research find those locals call. Ask questions even. And i want chad to attest to this. A positive goule review a positive call and saying hey we can do this. That goes a long way. especially right. now yeah absolutely just spreading the word and and talking about your local places and letting people know that they're out there and they need your sport. It's tough and i don't mean to be the getting into that deep of a thing but it's true right now it's the the the desperation in talking with some of these owners a you can hear it. I mean it's it's make or break time. Yup and the best way you can beat it is to tell your friends right. Go out and visit someplace and tell your friends well. And here's seven perfect examples. You hear him tonight column. Say hey congratulations. We heard you won this award or you. Her her she won this this or that and without further ado. Let's get into our next award. It is the award. This is a big one fellows. This is one that i think that had the most contention amongst the three of us and deciding on the top six let alone the top three. We let the people decide. This is the award for the best beer. This was an interesting one because there are so many great individual beers and so many popular ones from fort collins. Loveland a windsor degree. And all those are represented here with a beer. That is Weld works juicy. Bits in the top. Three we've got the windsor beer. That's high hops blueberry weed and you've got fort collins represented with sad panda from horse in dragon. I all three of our votes the nominees that we voted for made the top three. I think that's safe to say. Is that correct from the original. Six down i feel like it. Yeah i feel like these are three but again it goes back to what you guys talk about name recognition marketing of it and then of course the overall quality of the beer. These are all iconic examples right great northern colorado best beers right. Not only would these be brutal approved but they might be that next step right. They may be flirting with those nines and tens. This is the tough category anyway. It's it's very objective because maybe one person doesn't like this style of beer but they prefer this style of beer and they might change their mind and they make yes might change their mind based on the season so yeah so yeah ain't really tough category but what i think is important. Is that these three beers. Would all i if. I hate it if i hated a. Let's say a hazy hazy right now with juicy. Bits a hazy. I could have that beer and say that's okay. I don't like that style but that's a pretty good beer and i think all three of these whether it's a wheat beer or It's the sad panda. You could say you know. Maybe i don't enjoy that. But yeah i know that's a good representation of the style absolutely. I think that's part of the reason. Why craft brewers and craft. Beer drinkers are so successful. They can understand that this maybe not my best style but you know that's a classy product. Right there yeah. Well let's get to the nominees for the two thousand twenty best beer. The nominees in no particular order are weld works. Juicy pits horse dragon. Sad panda high hops blue berry wheat and the winner is sad. Panda by horse and dragon is the two thousand and twenty best beer winner for northern colorado. This is a beer that you can find nearly everywhere which is another important part of this fellas. You talked about surprises earlier. This wants surprised me. This one was by. A razor. Thin margin did Did sad panda beat out weld works juicy bits so i think will surprise some people but at the same time not be a surprise to other people. I think you know you can go back and forth like you said back and forth back and forth and that's the way the vote did. When we were counting the votes it went back and forth but all great beers in the category. And it's it's a difference between styles to and when particular time of the season one of those styles might appear to be more attractive than another style. But i don't think anybody out. There is going to argue that not. All three of these weren't excellent choices to be in the top. Three right And congratulations to horse and dragon. I think it's a an outstanding beer. A it has been something that i consider. Go to in my shelf go. yeah in. This was one that would have scared me a long time ago when this was one that you guys actually uses an introductory to that style for me because it checks all those marks over three hundred votes we've talked about. This was first and second place which is horse dragging said panda and weld works juicy. Bits nine votes single digits separated this and i think that speaks volumes to the caliber of both of these beers. And really it. W- i would consider this. Maybe a little bit of an upset. Just because of weld works notoriety. But this sad pain. I mean that it holds a lot of clout it does. It's got a lot of people who are very big fans of this beer and the style like you said is so accessible and the flavors are so wow. That's something. I never thought a beer tastes like if you've gotten into craft beer yet it really will throw some people over the top on you know. I really like that. I think that's very well said any final thoughts on the best year. All good. i think you you wish you wish you had one in front of you right now. Be said is. I don't know there's congratulations. Congratulations horse and dragon. Sad panda for being the best beer in two thousand and twenty the brew talk award show presented by on the rocks. Liquor is rolling forward. We're getting into the nitty gritty of it. We've got the best seasonal beer the best brewery in the best. Newberry coming up next. The best newberry. We'll be discussing when we come back on the other side decision. Twenty twenty spoken by the people in northern colorado on northern carla's voice. Thirteen ten kfi cone now. Weekdays at four northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi k can back in the brew. Doc award show presented by on the rocks liquor the first ever first of many we are working our way through right now and as we come back every single time i am trying to trying to get our facebook posts up there. Because we're trying to for anybody who's not paying attention and listening on air. Shame on you but we also want to let the people know what the people know. What's going on guys. We've now gone through four of the seven. Nominations here your your thoughts. So far anybody changed judge hendra outfits. Wardrobes red carpet still good. We have been to the back bar few times Visited with many of the beers in attendance today. So far and i've decided that There's quite a few that we enjoy and it's not just the ones that are on the stage that are really cheap. It's it's every one of them here. We just want to celebrate the beer industry in general by by visiting with with many beers on the table and the beers that we talked about tonight. And we're thinking and we've talked about all year and we're thinking sito's are definitely requirement. Yeah you couldn't got tonight without a tuxedo. that's just. There's no way there's no way you could have got in so well. I just got to take one more person okay. They were behind the scenes. We don't have those fancy people running back taking behind the scenes. People aren't the awards. Put out there. The janitors of the the the the packaging people that the seattle celebrated minions of the brewing industry the media outlets that shine the spotlight. Oh no sorry was that it was putting back on us. Let's get to it guys these next three some of the biggest ones. Obviously we've got the best seasonal beers still to give out the best brewery. That's the big one that we're gonna be getting out. We've got the best newberry as well. Best newberry to me. Maybe the most difficult category maybe not in terms of voting but in terms of the fact that we could actually put a category together. Because what they've done in the last couple of years is incredibly difficult to even wrap our heads around and we did this and said we said the two years or excuse me or younger were the nominees and we had some really good ones. The best new burri the nominees for this year's best newbury the final three in no particular order. Envy brewing company peculiar. Ails an obstacle brewing. All three very popular newbury's all three breweries that we think will be around for a long time and or clearly doing it the right way. I doubt exactly what needs to be said to be open to be able to open a brewery. This year is phenomenal in itself. And and these are great to open a brewery this year and put out the product that these breweries are are doing speaks volumes to be successful in this. Yeah yeah it's it's been difficult. And yeah they i agree. I echo those sentiments. Let's get to it. The winner for the two thousand and twenty best new brewery is earlier. Ales and nick armitage. They win the best newberry. I will say they are the only nominee at of all of these different categories that reached a triple digit number of votes. Over three hundred people voted. They took a third of the vote themselves. That's gonna win a lot of when we talk about six nominees peculiar ails over one hundred votes for peculiar ails. They are our new best brewery fellas. We were out there. We've tried their beer. We know nick can't really argue with this. No not at all great space great beers a lotta great skill coming into the building of that place and i think that You look at the equipment and the process that They've got put together there and and you can see that they didn't just barely make they really nailed what it means to be a newbury the precision and everything that went into it was immaculate joining us now. The one of the founders. The owner they brewer four peculiar ails our two thousand and twenty best. Newberry is nick armitage. Nick congratulations my friend. Thank you very much. Well man the as i mentioned. I don't know if you heard that. But the you guys were the only nominee out of all seven of these different categories to receive a third over one hundred votes. We had over three hundred people. Vote on each of these categories. You received over one hundred votes on this that speaks volumes up. Yeah that's pretty awesome to hear well and talk to us about what this fan base is done for you because as were talking opening in the last two years has been incredibly difficult I mean yeah. The last two years. There's been a an interesting time and craft beer and this year especially So our fan base is allowed us to. I mean we're continuing production. We haven't really slowed down. We're still selling beer. And people are still braving the elements to come sit on our patio. So it's pretty crazy. Was there so you guys open. Was that august. I'm sorry john jog my memory. Yeah we opened the end of august august at that point it. Gay kinda fell. I mean the the summer had been relatively compared to now loose with the restrictions due to covid. What were your thoughts. When he opened back in august our hope was that things were going to continue to get better. We look like we on a good trend and we just. We're going to ride out. Whatever was coming our way and we had plans for all the well. What we thought were all the options on the table so we've been able to pivot pretty quickly well and that's been vital to To survival yet alona starting this drive you guys are still finding your footing and kind of a really continuing to prove who you guys are talking to us about what you've got coming out here in the next couple of months. And what's the pay. The plan for peculiar ails going into twenty twenty one. About twenty twenty one. We're hoping we're hoping good things with this vaccine. We can actually be open indoors and have people come. Experience are pretty pretty awesome space even more and then we're going to keep doing lots of fun. Ip as we're going to branch out and do some west coast. It's funny to say branch out right but We're gonna we're gonna keep the three strains of as going we're going to go with the west coast the no coast and The hazies We got a lot of fun. Skews coming up and the keto. Sarah range we just Released all mode series recently which tastes exactly like melted ice cream. Peach pie and then I'm just gonna keep doing all the lagers and and keep going so we got lots of fun. Things planned well obviously with that space over there man. How are you operating now. I know you you've got a of space outside with with that patio there but you've also started deliveries. I read we have started deliver. We started delivering distribution. So we are in liquor stores from fort collins to lakewood and we're working on adding a few more before we probably won't have enough beer to keep everybody in the talk and then Yeah we started The delivery program which has been us logo. But it's it's getting there. What does that look like. It looks like if anybody orders a beer from You know any time in the morning they can jump online and order the beer that we send out either myself or somebody else at four o'clock that day to go make the deliveries and then any delivery after four will be delivered. The next day is are those your kids in the background. are they making deliveries. That is my kid and she's not she's trying to Well we'll try to get ready for bed so well make we won't. We won't take up a whole lot of your time. And but hey congratulations. The best new brewery in northern colorado. This isn't just coming from from three talking heads around the table. The fans have spoken man and they spoke. They spoke loudly. And you are winter so again. Congratulations to you. Thank you very much. That's pretty humbling. An awesome so thanks. Nick we'll talk soon. Okay right cheers. Cheers nick armitage. The owner peculiar ales. And i could tell. I could tell i was keeping somebody i think it could have sat there and talked with for for a while but i think his His kid was ready for bed. What are you guys. Knew that you guys. Both we get could tell right. that's bedtime. It is the time of the night when you wanna put them down but You know when when there's like an award show going. Everybody takes the phone call. Everybody gets to stay up a little later. A little bit more pop in that kind of stuff. So doc starts doing that about like as soon as we get off air at like seven fifty eight dollars. Crime eight o'clock. I okay. We'll put bad. okay. I know. I know but no honestly we we were out there before right but we got lucky. We got a peculiar ails right. Before all this shutdown and what he's doing over there what i like about this and what. I commend him about this. And why i think he's such an overwhelming vote for him is that he is balancing. What he knows works. what. He has Used in scene from his past of where he used to work and adding his own twist on it and awful add some other things to it. An amazing outdoor space and local real close restaurants that are willing to serve. Yeah and i think that whole combination there has really kept him going if he would have been isolated without an outdoor space. I don't think we'd be talking to him today so To me i think that this is this total combination of all these different things just came together to make what i think is actually a quite an outstanding place. Yeah great little area in general With the restaurants and just to add to the brewery there is just an extra parental. Yeah the windmill to windsor mill. Tavern right there right next door. is sponsor on the whole show and Been in there a couple of times. They've got great beer on tap in there too. I mean i know we're talking craft beer. But they've got great beer out of there. They've got great appetizers and and food inside of their to the whole windsor mill area And hey i want to shout out real quick. I don't do this a whole lot. But michelle vance. The windsor chamber of commerce director is incredible. You talk about somebody who's going to bat for their businesses in. I said it. I've said it on noko now. We won't die too much into this. But now's the time that i if you're in that chamber if you're in local politics you have to step up for your businesses because if you don't they're going to remember and michelle van is doing that and want to give her shout out at the windsor chamber of commerce peculiar ails our best new burry. Let's take a break. We'll come back on the other side. let's get to the best seasonal beer the best brewery. Let's talk about it when we come back. It's the brew talk award show presented by on the rocks liquor on northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi here mornings with gale. We days six to nine. Northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi welcome back in decision. Two thousand twenty the first ever brew tok awards show presented by on the rocks liquor We have worked our way through five of the seven awards guys. Good to hear from nick armitage. This what i love about it. You know i. I went on that long. Spiel the the downer moment of the award show talking about where were realistically at. I know it's tough to go through but Hey these are the people you heard. Nick's kid in the background. You'll love it. I mean this families it's locally on. That's what i think. That was a great represent a representation of what i'm talking about. We had a lot of stars tonight. you know walking down the red carpet in addition to all the fans that have been listening and watching and as well as family members are all excited about what's going on. I will say that. I don't know if knicks trailed was excited. That didn't sound like excited Screams or going on in the background there it sounded like please don't put me in bed Sorry maggie gossip bathroom. that's right. yeah story to drink. I appreciate nick. Take some time and and working our way through again. All of our winner so far have been posted up on our facebook page. And we're five of seventy through so we've got best seasonal and best burri left big. These are both big because seasonal and seasonable just to define it. Knock if you would please everything other than your staple right. Yeah so a seasonal usually as a beer that comes out in a particular portion of the year it may be a beer that has produced in bigger quantity in that portion of the yearbook produced year round. But basically it's a beer you might associate with a particular season. So this could be a beer such as merits and or knocked-over. Fast that you associate with a particular time of the year it may be a light summer earth. You might associate with mowing the yard or could be like christmas or thanksgiving type beer. The associate like a winter warmer but it doesn't have to be one that's only produced at one point in the year. It has to be one. That is recognizable as part of a particular season in the year right. Well we've got a bunch. Let's go through it. it's The best seasonal beers The final three nominees in no particular order vie. The fest mars. This is another very very popular beer here northern colorado. Oh yes it is a german style. October fests. That's a good example. It's a great example. I'd say it's a great example. Sorry let her kidneys coming out a couple of weeks. Listen to the show you know. I'm a big fans chant. Big fan Mclellan's son of a nutcracker. This is one that we enjoyed. It was last january That we were able to enjoy this and absolutely tastes just like christmas. You know all those flavors wrapped into glass. That was when we were so young and innocent. We didn't know what was coming to hit. Twenty like hey enjoy bam and it was over after that the other one why. The roots slush series. This is one. I will talk about this for a minute. If that's okay but this is one that you don't even have to be a craft beer lover to enjoy the slush series from wiley this one where Let me just put it this way. We had a friday night. My girlfriend and i had too many drinks saturday morning. We're like oh what are we gonna do. We're hungry or head hurts and we thought i said okay just. Let's let's go do this and we went to the roots and we got a slush. Because you don't get that like overwhelming alcohol right to you at least the smell and your typical alcohol smell and they had and they had Yoke and around there as well so you got a breakfast burrito and it was perfect we. She's never drank. She hasn't ranked much craft beer. Perfect day perfect. Time down there. So i think that what what better cure for a hangover than a slurpee. A breakfast burrito exactly. It's not one out there right well. Seven eleven it's local and we talked about slow right kind of getting hungry now breakfast burrito. I don't. I don't do breakfast burritos at night ours breakfast. I don't know well bright but it's never breakfast. Britos it's pancakes or off. We gotta get to this. You're giving me sidetrack Let's get to it the best seasonal beer the two thousand and twenty best seasonal beer. The winner is a son of cracker by mclellan's brewing company. Graham i would company. We knew that was going to be up there. And i will say mclellan's fan base. They attack this with full force. They came through it was it was pretty impressive to see so many votes for son of nutcracker the great fan base. We both had this when we went over there. You were actually in the uk at the time of leave. Yes i was actually over in the uk drinking pints that way rather than over here drinking pints. We were having the pint there and it was. That was one beer that we both looked at each other and said that's a damn good beer. Yeah absolutely well. Let's talk to the man that brute it. Graham hers to it of mclellan's brewing company up on highland graham. Congratulations best seasonal. Beer goes to sullivan nutcracker. Thank you very much. That's wonderful cheered me up no end take. Yeah congrats man. The first ever talk award show you guys have won the best seasonal beer walk us through the son of cracker for somebody who has not been lucky enough to enjoy this beer. Talk to me about it. So this is a we kinda lately. Change every year so This year one well as an seasons was a we heavy also heavy but we slightly changed around and we see in cinnamon nutmeg into the ball and then once it fermented i we dry up to with reasons they've been soaked in brandy. And then we pretend to battles on saturday for years so it was actually Twenty eighteen twenty nine thousand nine. We actually brewed it. And then it was christmas afterwards but we still have a couple of cakes. Left sierra new listeners. Wanna come along and try it was thick it back on since it's so since you're there you go christmas euphoria. That will get you drunk. That's all i've seen is nothing by great beer really fantastic. It's it seems to be one. Everyone likes they can go. You should give them sampling to go. Yep i'll have that straight away. Like chad said it tastes like christmas. It does taste like christmas. It will actually. That was my kind of inspiration was You know those cakes. You're gonna gives you a against family. Yeah the freak. Kk exactly that was my that was my influence for it so i'm happy. It came up as it should also no man we and this is not my style. This was not something i normally go to. You know when. I was over there this year end to learning about craft beer and when he poured that for me i was like ooh. I was nervous and just followed. What chad had ordered. And would i think. I drank that the rest of the evening. I would've had more if i wouldn't have had to drive back out of there. It was incredible man. Yeah well thanks very much. I mean i just. I love making beer. And they wanted to make I i'm not gonna lie. It's one of those ones. I'm happy with that. Make once a year. 'cause it's it's it's a difficult one but it's you know the the fundamental do so. How has it aged over the last year. Oh it's it's a it's a fascinating beer. I mean it's just it's so many layers to it not even if all for overtime into I see it's almost like a burgundy beers you know with spice in there. So it's definitely good beer in fact i'm gonna drive up with the green one celebrate. We're here in greeley. If you want to bring one over. But graham thank you so much more man. We appreciate you joining us. Congratulations the best seasonal beer. And i'm sure we'll be talking soon. Okay thank you voted for. That was wonderful. You're awesome man. Thank you very much eight years. All right i would. He's the brew for mc loans bringing company. We have another for another award to give out. This is the granddaddy of them. All this is the grand finale. The best brewery the final three in in no particular order. Guys we we've talked about this. This is the big one right. This is it this one on top of everything else that we're given out there will receive one month advertising free they will be our brew hop. Stop free in twenty twenty. We will have them join us for a month. We will be able to That's it's it's valued at over five hundred dollars for this right now though and twenty twenty one right. Oh yeah yeah twenty twenty. You can't go back. This will be valued over five hundred dollars with the everything else that goes into this. The best brewery the final three in no particular order. Wiley routes max line brewing and mclellan's brewing company the winner for the best brewery to win a free month of being are brew hop. Stop to win the best burry to win everything else that we're giving away some great prizes from on the rocks liquor to win a gift card to the tavern at saint michel squares though where mclellan's brewing company get them back on the line. Graham hurst would we had to play with the guy a little bit. We really hung up on him. We're calling him back right now. Guys mclellan's fan base. They came out strong and he mentioned it and he felt rush off there. I know he did some really excited to get back on the line here. Not only the best seasonal but they are the best brewery. Let's just hope he answers the phone back. We're good. I see him back there. Yeah we didn't talk him off forever right off the bat but let's get. Let's get them back on here. I think ryan got him back here. So graham we We had to mess with a little bit my man. That's why you're -gratulations man. The mclellan's brook company our best brewery for twenty twenty. That is awesome. I think very much different. Vote for us. And i have to say I didn't even think i had a chance. Because there's so many briesen in this state you know and in this area so it was like wow walsum. Thanks guys man. I tell you what we put in there Chat and i were blown away. The criteria that we had was the environment the the staff and then of course the beer. And that's a big part of it but you guys met all of those criterias and your fan base spoke and hey man you you've just won a bunch of you've won a free brew hop stopped you a month worth of advertising valued over five hundred dollars gift cards for tavern you got you got a bunch of stuff coming your way man. So congratulations to you and the staff will thank you very much. I mean you know. it doesn't matter you know. If you're good to know you know you have to have an atmosphere. And i think they guys is really do an awesome job for us so i wanted share to them as well. So thanks guys. Thanks to our friends. I as well you know you know really means a lot. I know it's been a stressful year for everyone including myself Fortunately i have lots of deer hunt so yeah so as you can probably tell him. I'm happy with this. So thanks very much guys you totally. Yeah they're hanging out so they don't keep you on so there's no i will say this doc's plan throwing him straight under the bus. I not gonna keep you on grim for somebody who hasn't been to mclellan's you know i've told the stories of us going there. Everybody heard or month adventure over there. Walk us through. What enjoying a pint over it. Mclellan's really means you probably can tell by my accent. I'm not actually from for collins. Originally no kidding yeah. So i'm from scotland and they. They pulled me over to get skilled. Which i have to say You know. I was a bit nervous when i first came over but the people of northern colorado just beer so well you know they were coming to the door and tell me their stories broadcast scale so We have six beer engines on serving traditional style. uk ears but we also slightly ventured off as well into a few other things like having white apn moments We also have a great selection of sandwiches so you know about that. ruben man. The first time. I've had ruben was in it was in mcclellan. So you know. I'd never even heard before and i thought oh. This is a good sandwich. But you know i'll try to an arby's and i regret that you know i can eat all the time but i just don't think any big enough for me for keeping. Well yeah but i mean that's just one of the Joining the designed all the sandwiches there and there's about one is active I've been there for four years now. And i'm still not boarded sandwiches so Yeah they definitely go down. Well with our beer's it's awesome man. I don't mean to cut you off. Because i know we could go on for for days talking about no but seriously man mean it was one of those things that i've got hat that i still wear and i'll never forget you. Hooked me up with a t shirt for my girlfriend. And she was wearing the other night and i was like i need to get over there and see them. And i'll tell you what graham what you guys have done over there and what you continue to do the fact that you guys have This fan base. That came out and voted for you. And i know that it wasn't just you voting for yourself one hundred fifty times or whatever. It was a i. I'm not that computer literate to do that. But honestly grant the your fan base spoke volumes and and to be honest. I wasn't close. You guys you guys ran away with us so hey congratulations to you we'll be in contact soon about scheduling for our brew hop stop by and we appreciate everything that you've done with us and we appreciate being able to get out there and enjoy your burry and we'll be out there again real soon but congrats to you and the rest of your team over there. Mclellan's thank you very much guys. We really appreciate what you guys do for for. The deer seem up here as well. It really does help. And it's nice to be of that and the quick thing sold does well. We really appreciate it. well graham. Thanks my man anything else that we need to get out there. You've got it all out there man. Only congratulations any ye house or anything. You throw out there okay. Was there just michael. Thanks man we'll talk soon. Okay thank you. Very much cheers cheers. That's graham i it. I love that guy. I'll be honest. I mean that was that was awesome we sought and yeah is is that one that he did a quick poll out there and said who's the best brewery would. They necessarily win a whole lot if we're being honest with ourselves no but their fan base people have been to them is incredible. Great the boroughs. And they're the ones who said. oh well. this is a no brainer. Yeah let's get on there. Let's support them that. Show them how much we love. That's right and if you haven't been there yet that's basically you need to go. There see can see what everybody else's say over thirty votes compared second and third place tied over thirty votes difference. Their fan base turned out incredible. Let's take a break. We'll wrap up the award show on the other side. It's the Award show presented by on the rocks liquor right here on north dakota's voice thirteen ten. Kfi k a party. Northern colorado's forks thirteen ten. Kfi the block party wednesdays from florida tenpy And congratulations to all of our winners tonight. That was fun. Graham one of my favorite interviews and i to be honest when we did the show out there in january of last year doc. You're you're not able to join us for live. Show you talk to grandma. While he was here he gets talking. And i haven't been around that accent whole lot. So i would have to look at chad and say i would give him just like the sign language of what the hell did. He's like a lotta times. I was like whispering into the mike. But he's a tremendous brewer. What they've done over there is great beer in an environment. That whether like saint paddy's day. I would love. Don't tell anybody. But i'd love to get drunk over there on st patty's day like it's that type right. Isn't it that type of environment that it's like if i've got one might as well have fifteen. Just hoping one of these days tells me that they've got hege sandwiches or something. Like that. And i liked down. I've talked to a lot of people if somebody some people that i didn't even know they said the best ruben they've ever had was mclellan's so when you go over the first time make sure you have it. We had it that night. Oh yeah don't worry. I'll have it of rubin's or one of my favorite sandwich guys. I ever brutal award show. Final thoughts on all of this. I know i've been getting your thoughts on all of us but but just get it out there because a lot of who voted for ended up winning not that we're smarter than everybody else in better looking but that's kind of exactly what it means but guys your final thoughts on this chad. We'll start with you. I don't know. I'm better looking than anybody but i you know i think it just speaks volumes to what the beer culture and community in northern colorado has any. One of the people there were nominated. Any of the six people in each category could have easily one. That's how great the beers and the places are you know. Just bring it out and then when we have this many different breweries in just in northern colorado did you from. I mean everybody is going to buy something might also. Do you know how much better this is going to be even next year when we're able to have them all together in the same room and we've been pouring them beers all night and now we're going to have not just three hundred votes or we're gonna have thousand three thousand. Hey thank you to all the people out here made this possible especially on the rocks. They're the reason we're able to do all this and that's the reason we'll be able to do it next year but fell as chad. Doc thank you so much without you guys. We couldn't do the show. We've got a year interview next week excited for that should be your show. Oh i'm super excited for ryan kelly. I'm tanner shrink congrats to all our winters. If you missed any of it podcast coming your way thirteen. Ten k of k dot com. This has been brou- talk cheers everybody.

colorado nick armitage newbury tanner chad Michael moser burris Doc nozette mclellan swint Jackie young san marco square Dr michael mosier windsor chamber of commerce fort collins chad ryan kelly wiley Nick Sarah range
Brooke Joyner -- All Things Chocolate! (Did we get your attention)?

Courageously Go

26:48 min | 3 years ago

Brooke Joyner -- All Things Chocolate! (Did we get your attention)?

"Earning executive MBA at Georgetown, isn't the path of least resistance, but it does come with the greatest reward benefit from our strong alumni network renowned faculty DC location, global residencies. Get started at Jews, Georgetown dot com slash E. M B A. Welcome to creatively. Go where we will venture into places we've been afraid ago women of the world, we are going to start a movement a movement towards courage. Hello, everybody. I debbie. The P tro your host of critically go. And I'm so glad you're here. Joining us today. This is a global conversation about courage. We are doing this. Because I believe that when we live from our hearts by choosing courage the life of our dreams and a better world for all our possible. No matter our age or circumstances. We never needed feel stuck or alone. Are essential truths. Are as follows. I choose courage. I used my voice I embraced the new. I welcome challenge. I continued to grow. I am a woman of action. I courageous league. Oh, if any of these statements resonate with you you. You are most certainly in the right place. I'm glad you're here with us today. So today everyone out there, ladies and gentlemen. I am super excited. I have a special guest today, I've been working on her for while the join us, and I'm she's finally here with us today, and I'm so excited, especially those of you who are from the southeast. You're going to be familiar with her business. Her name is Brooke Joyner, and she is the owner in operator of Peter brook, chocolate tear here in Atlantic Beach, Florida the beaches community of Jacksonville, Peter brook was founded by Brooks mother Phyllis Geiger in nineteen eighty three and named her new chocolate store after her two children, Brooke and her brother Peter brook keeps. Busy running her store in Atlantic beach in her brother, Peter has a awesome candy store. Jacksonville called sweet Pete's and we look forward to hearing more about the story of Peter brook with. Rook Brooke, welcome to create asleep. Go thank you so much. And thank you for having me. I really appreciate it. And I'm honored to be here. Thank you. You are most welcome. And I thank you. I'm honored as well. I, you know, I tell you we both know my daughter, my daughter, Amy works for you and one thing Amy introduced me to is podcasts in in. I remember one some of our road trips to Tallahassee when she was attending FSU for a couple years. She turned me onto a great program on NPR. And I believe it was it's called listen to how I built this. And essentially it stories of companies that that we know and their story, right? How it got started? Like, I remember Amien. I listen to one about Airbnb we listen to one about whole foods. We listen to one about honest tea, and it's really interesting. I didn't realize how interesting business stories can be in how they get their start. So if any. Anyone who's maybe certainly anyone who's from Florida in in Atlanta in the in the southeast knows, Peter, Brooke, it's like Milton your mouth awesome chocolate, and I have to tell you. When might my first exposure to Peter Brooke was when I moved here from Seattle Washington in two thousand six my very first year teaching school. I was a fifth grade teacher at crown point in Mandarin. And I think it was Christmas times is about this same time of year. And you know, how kids are so good about showering their teachers with with nice things, and I got like all these bags of chocolate covered popcorn. And I'm like, what is this? And I was hooked ever since the chocolate covered popcorn. So so let's let's hear about about your this is a family business. And how did it all get started? Brooke? Well, my mother started it in nineteen Ninety-three, and she named it after my older brother, Peter and me Brooke and started as one shop and San Marco and it took about two couple years for us to grow the business. And she in really it was through the chocolate covered popcorn that gun the word out about Peter because is our most popular product. And it's dictating and and people like it. And and the way that was discovered is interesting because in San Marco, which the first store, she there's they have something called holiday magic every year and the merchants in the San Marcus square. They all come out and they offer just various different prod. Acts of there. And but it still is my mother are chocolate is very expensive. It's all handmade. And it was something where she had to find to loosen to give something that was affordable. And she went issue decided one day, she there's a actual there's a movie theater down the street from Peterborough, and she was in the movie theater, and she was had the chocolate had the her popcorn enjoying a movie. And she thought, hey, why not try pouring this on the this chocolate this popcorn? And she did it and she gave that to the customers and the people who enjoyed holiday magic. And it was a head. But she didn't customers came in after holiday magic. And they asked for the chocolate. Ever corn? And she said, oh, that's that's not a product. And then the second customer walked in. I'd like to buy chocolate covered. That's not affirmative. And then by the third person. She said, okay, K this product, this is a product. Yes. This is what we're going to sell and from that point on Peter brook started to floor fresh, and and it was just a matter of time because. Yeah. Chocolate to Bilas into our family and finally for me is an expression of love, and it's a lot of of the business because of our customer, and when customers walk in the door or look. The team for a gift, and and it's a gift for someone who's special, and we'll always works to accommodate our customers and and express that love when when people give a gift we do call it but gift his love, and it's amazing how chocolate is an expression of love. And so that's that's why I believe this company has had longevity because love is really a language that everybody understand, you know, it it doesn't have to be Berber lies. We all no were whatever language you speak wherever country you live in everyone understands that. So that's what I believe makes Peter Virk special and every single time when a gas walks in our store, we make sure that will do everything to to. Make sure that they give that gift of love, and we're committed to that. And and that's what I've believe has been special. And so that's that's what we represent. I just love that. I mean chocolate is kind of a universal thing. Anyway, I think people we just love human beings. We love our chocolate. Right. But you as to what you say like, I walk into your your store. I don't live far away from your store, and there's just a a very special loving energy whoever's there, whether it's you or one of your your people that work for you, you greet your people so warmly and in the space. I don't know who you guys have that decorates the the store for you. But it's just so whimsical enchanting. And it's it's almost like Disney for chocolate. You just want us. Just wanna hang out, you know. And and it's just awesome. It's a really big store. You don't have a lot of square footage. But what you do with. It is pretty amazing. And thank you. Yeah. Our decorator. His name is John Bianco. And he decorate my store and sweet pizzas. Well, and he's passionate about what he does. And and it's it's amazing the same in the creations that he comes up with. And so I think it's it's been a good match. And we're fortunate to to have wonderful people working with us what one of them being your Amy your daughter. Thing. I love her. And I've said this before, but she always goes above and beyond. And she I she enjoys what she does. And you can see the passion and she's a self starter. And she's a great example for the rest of the crew who work with us. So so, yeah, we'll thank you as a parent. That's nice to hear. I know. She just loves it. And she calls your store a home her second home. She really feels like that's family, and that comes from you. Because it always you any organization always starts on the top on the top. So that comes from you. So it's it's pretty awesome. I know my daughter is in a good place until she figures out her life in, you know, so I really appreciate that. Brooke? Oh, well, that means a lot to me think, you know, she's creative. And I know that there's so many things that give products. You know, you have your your, you know, your signature product that chocolate covered popcorn. But you guys have a lot quite an assortment of things from the, you know, the chocolate covered, strawberries and the chocolate covered Graham crackers in your really rich. Awesome. A scream in all these things. So so how do you come up with the products and in how do you make them? I just I know people would love the hear all the behind the scenes on how how how how you guys off all these great products. How does it come about? Well, we start with the best ingredients. I and and chocolate is, you know, it's a forgiving medium. And and you can be creative with it. Which is nice where we do is we start with the best ingredients the which is with blend of chocolate, and we actually went to type of Swiss plans and to our Peter Virk want to make our Peter gland and. Base in anything that we do. We is. It's labor is a labor of love. And it's labor intensive because we do make everything by hand. We do we toes. When when we do crossers of are are not clusters everything is posted and everything is done by hand. And like I said the forward love and the the creations and the products have developed over time by by just experimenting with different products and your daughter actually came up with a one ocean had asked for us to do the logo of of you the their signature logo quite the challenge that at the end. The N and the colors, and it was such a challenge, but she was able to meet that challenge. And so sometimes we, you know, our customers come up with a lot of ideas. And we we learn from our customers, and it's just it's just a thing that that we just developed over time, and our passion and listening to our gas, and and that's how really our product developed, and and we do have a I mean, I always tried to introduce other products other than the chocolate covered popcorn. We're very we just so that people can learn that we have Handmaid's hoffy handmade marshmallows. So everything is done by hand and Peter rugs and just developed over time now and one thing I want. People that know 'cause I don't think a lot of people don't realize this. But you guys can do custom customize orders. Right. I've overheard. You guys if a customer even from out of state, you guys are able to do special orders for people. Yes, we work with a lot of corporations ask we customize their baskets and include their materials, and they're in baskets, and whatever they may be sometimes they want their logo and a chocolate bar, and we can do that. We do a lot of orders for corporations who like to give gifts to their clients to thank them during Christmas, and we do ship out of state and nationwide. And we do also in towns livery, so that's really a popular thing during Christmas in Ballantine's mostly Christmas, a lot of doctors like the think re- they're referring doctors and clients and the same live law firms as well. Just various different businesses. And we do custom baskets for each one of them, the each one of them each customer may want different things, and we will always accommodate that for sure this. So Nate, I remember Amy coming home visiting recently was excited about I think you guys sometimes do chocolate covered wine, bottles or champagne bottles. And she said something about a one that she designed a welcome home or something like that realtors might wanna give their clients who just be closed on a new home or something. So that was that would be kind of neat. Maybe the realtors of the could reach out to you. I think that would be a good niche. I don't know a. Yeah. I agree. I agree. And actually, she did make a wine that we have these. We have a wine and beer light. And now we're able to. Yeah. So we have a selection of wine and what we do. Do is we feel the bottle? So it's a chocolate never touches the bottom, but we seal the bottle with a food safety oil. And then we did the line in the chocolate, and then it hardens, and then we can bright, welcome home. Or I love you or happy anniversary happy birthday, whatever. They choose to press may put on the bottle and basically break the seal and the chocolate fall have chocolate with your wine and oftentimes people choose to bring in crown Royal or other type of alcoholic beverage or just anything can it and we can dip it, and we can write a message on that. And and young agree with you. We'll realtors real estate offices. It's a it is a great match. We can do chocolate keys. So. Yeah. It's a great welcome home gift. I think so or even just yeah, I think so are in verse re relevant gush. So I'm getting hungry. Just thinking about chocolate though, that this sounds like so much fun. That's such that's such a neat idea with the bottles for for special occasions, and you while I'm thinking of it because this program is so short, and it goes by so quickly. So while I'm thinking of it, Brooke. If people say realtors are doctors offices are a really anybody. Maybe they they have a a wedding coming up a daughter's wedding or anything. How can they how can they contact your business to to order something? And they can call me directly and and on my cell phone, which is nine four six six two four zero three two or Email me at Brooke Peter dot com. And I will custom make anything in chocolate. I I can't think of anything that we can't make and chocolate. So we do for for wedding we mentioned wedding than we do bride and groom Pressler rods and plays. And we've oh the place setting to with a color that matches their wedding theme. And so yes, you can always contact me on my, Sal. I'm always available to run through ideas. Or and I would say that's the best way. Right. Okay. Repeat your number. And then spell out your Email for us. I just wanna make sure gets it. If they they. Can write it down. Okay. It's nine zero four six six two four zero three two, and It's Brooke B R A. Okay. E at Peter brook. P E T E R B R O K E dot com. All right. Thank you. And and you know, a lot of us. I mean, I think a lot of our listeners, you know, we are in business for selves or have dreams. Maybe we're gonna job, and we have dreams of of having a business of our own in and you have been at it. Now, you're pretty young when your family when your mom started this business. So so you've been at this for a long time. How how any advice you can give people out there that want to have businesses of their own and make it work because I've heard statistics out there that save Leo big huge percentage of businesses. Unfortunately, don't make it. And so. Someone has really passionate about something. And they wanna make a go of it. How do they make business work? Well, I would say first of all passion is essential. And and that's something that no one can take away from you. And that's what drives me. And that's always driven me. I I mean, I never stopped people. Ask me if I get sick of chocolate, absolutely not. And I think every day I wanna wake up in the morning, and I want to be better. And it's just being persistent and never giving up and believing in yourself and your dreams and having passion for your dreams. And for what you do. And I think that that is the the most important thing because if you're passionate about it, you can't you can't fail. It's just something that you you just. Work at every single day. And you never give up an you always think about who your customer is. And you care for them. And you want to deliver the best for them. And and if that's what you're doing. Then you can't fail. That's how that's those are my that's been my personal experience and blurring that screw my mother, and my brother, and we just do it because we love it. And if you do that, then success will eventually come. That's something. Remember that's great lesson. Everyone out there. That's awesome. And it really does show when when we walk in when I walk into your your chocolate store in your often bear, which is I remember when I first met you in in in your like, your the owner, you're not just it's not, you know, in your often, they're reading it and doing everything, and and that's kind of that that got my attention. That's pretty impressive. And it's obvious. You just love what you're doing. Sometimes when I stopped by visit you guys is like happy little elves back there making your chocolates and all your wonderful confections. And in you, even don't you do in the summertime, you do camps for kids, and you do birthday, don't you do things for kids birthday parties and fun things for for children you yes, yes. We do we do. And they're so much fun. You know, the parties that we do we do parties for children and for dolts a lot of adults like the MARTINI parties or the wine parties they can dip their own wine. And their message on it. And then for children it's great to because they can come in and be chocolate years for the day, and they make snow covered popcorn, strawberries, or Graham, crackers, pretzel rods, and they learn how to make it the history chocolate. And and then they take everything that they make they take home with them. So it's a great experience in the as we do camps as well and provide lunch, and then they learnt it's more of a detailed like, it's just more. You learned a little bit more, and you make a lot more chocolate, and you it's just a longer experience. And there's a lot of fun as well. Fun. And I I knew about the kids programs. I didn't know you did adult parties that sounds like. Oh, yes. That really. In one of my mottos is drink the wine. You know, enjoy life, right? So white how wine and chocolate. Yes. Albany should to my favorite things in the whole world. I think of my the Juliet who song right favorite things widened chocolate. I agree with you a hundred percent. Oh, well, my my producers already given me that two minute warning. I wish we had more time with you. So I know we are about out of time. But it's almost Christmas season. It's always hard to believe it's already were thinking of the holidays, but anything you can tell us about what we can expect from Peter brook for Christmas. What would you like the public to know about about the holiday season? Well, if you are looking to give a gift to one of your loved ones or someone who is special or like, you're referring doctors customers, we can definitely customize a basket we can tailor anything that you think of for like your your logos. And for your Christmas gifts we are here to provide the so and make sure that you get what you like. So we we provide a great gift for the holiday season. And and that's the message that I would like everybody now that we're the chocolate tear and the gift of love for the holiday season gift of love headquarters for the gift of love this holidays yet. I love it. Love it limit limit. Yeah. Thank you. We're out of time. But thank you for joining us and everyone out there. I can vouch for the it's your mouth, it's really good chocolate. And I'm really picky. I have to say I'm a bit of chocolate snob. So this is really good chocolate. So anyway, I appreciate your taking the time to spend with us. It's been interesting to hear a little more about the Peterberg story. And when we maybe we can have you back on in the new year. I'd love to hear about, you know, maybe get your brother on and we'll hear about sweet Pete's because it's nice local businesses and I love to support local businesses. So thank you. Thank you. I wish you a wonderful successful holiday season in new year. Thank you for having me. I really appreciate it. And I would love for you to meet my brother, Peter, and that would be wonderful. And I so appreciate you having me very thoughtful of you. So thank you. You are most welcome. All right, everyone. We're at time. So thank you for joining us again. My name is Debbie petro, please visit my website at courageously, go dot com. You can learn more about the show and a special challenge that I m developing for the new year and more information come on that shortly Selebi's until next time. Remember this? It's our time to shine. Let's make it. So and courageous league. Go. Earning executive MBA? Georgetown, isn't the path of least resistance, but it does come with the greatest reward benefit from our strong alumni network renowned faculty DC location in global residencies. Get started at use Georgetown dot com slash MBA.

Peter Brooke Peter brook Peter Amy holiday magic Peter Virk Florida executive Georgetown Brooke Peter dot com Jacksonville Brooke Joyner Graham Atlantic beach Airbnb Atlantic Beach Peter brook Disney San Marco
The Coordinator: Sean Lahav

ADAPT

24:35 min | 1 year ago

The Coordinator: Sean Lahav

"Business perspective say perspective that one more time. Sip water sean. Muhab is fresh out of grad school. I'm twenty four turning twenty five in february but already he's reached the point his career where he's in charge of coordinating resilience efforts for all of northeast florida. This is the adapt. podcast. I'm brendan rivers reporter. A. w. j. c. T. news in jacksonville. Florida adapt are online magazine about what people northeast. Florida are doing to adapt a sea level rise and climate change. And in this podcast. We're hearing from some of them about where they've been and what keeps them going. Sean is the resiliency coordinator for something. Called the northeast. Florida regional council will hear more about what it does in a minute. But first what is resilience. You're always going to get a different answer depending on who you ask so. If you're looking at a transportation planner for example they might be concerned with the resilience of a road system or a network of roads systems with something like sea level rise or an urban planner. Might think about keeping houses above water but he really likes the definition of resilience from the us army corps of engineers. So let's say you have a system in this case we'll call it jacksonville so on a routine basis Like today everyone's going to work the economy's functioning smoothly it's normal but then a shock comes into the system like a hurricane event so once the shockers. The system loses function the resilience abuses. How do we return the system. In this case jacksonville back to full functionality. How do we learn from that event so when we look into the future at the next shock which is going to be inevitable. How do we learn from that to reduce the curve so when the next shot comes along we don't lose as much functionality and we move forward at a steady rate and so what exactly is a resilient to coordinator. What do you do similar to a chief resilience officer for. Let's say a city or state. My responsibilities are focused on getting people in the same room to first of all talk about these issues. Then there's this educational component and really putting all the pieces together so a big focus of my position if we're taking kind of a pyramid approach is to look at resilience from a community perspective first of all and say what steps need to be taken to make our community more resilient so that starts with public awareness so recently i designed to set of initiatives to first of all educate the public about what we're doing so that starts with a business continuity presentation focused on economic resilience we work with rotary clubs and other similar groups on the ground to talk about what small business owners can do to make their businesses more resilient to natural hazards so purchasing flood insurance raising your hvac systems backing up your data things like that. So it's very tangible and it kind of plant seeds in people's heads. Here he is speaking to the rotary club of polack. Last month with the sea over is in the big picture things. Nothing will ever happen. In less elected officials and government understand it and they listen to constituents so if this is a priority for you as a community or as individuals tell your elected officials. They're willing to talk about it. Then we move up the pyramid into this presentation focused on building community resilience. So how can community leaders actually implement solutions in their own backyards and then from there we partnered with taylor engineering on this adaptation solutions presentation. That goes over all of the solutions. That communities can adopt in efforts to become more resilient protection strategies where you completely blocked something from coming in. Let's say water then there's accommodation like living shorelines so instead of saying no water is allowed. Let the water come in. Learn how to divert the water into natural areas. And then there's also concepts related to avoidance so don't build in a particular place if it's going to be exposed to flooding and then there's also managed relocation in some regards in areas. Let's say in saint. John's county and parts of nassau county Some homeowners have no other option at this point because of sand dunes fading away and roads fading away that they might have to leave so there's government buyout options and things like that if we go to the crux and the top of the pyramid. We designed a public workshop focused on asking community members. What's important to them. What are the problems facing your community. Is it storm surge. Is it sunny day flooding. Are you more concerned with silver. is or hurricanes. Wh what's the issue area in your community and from there we organized community members into groups where we work on map activities where citizens takes sticky notes identify on a map. What's important to them. And then we help facilitate dialogue to create strategies to protect those assets. So all of these services that were offering at the northeast. Florida regional council related to resilience where offering completely for free to community groups. That are interested. In the seven county region that work is paid for by taxpayers cities and counties in northeast florida. Pay dues to belong to the regional council. One of the ten planning councils in the state they helped local governments not only with emergency and disaster preparedness but also with economic development and other issues was talk about you so i was looking at your linked in profile before we sat down. And you've got an extremely impressive resume for someone your age and it kind of makes me wonder what i've been doing with my life so tell me about yourself and how you got to this point here. So i'm a byproduct of two different states. I grew up in south florida down in boynton beach. And i also lived in cape cod massachusetts for portions of my childhood. My parents operated a seasonal retail business in south florida specifically in big pine key down in the florida keys but also in massachusetts. So what south. Florida and cape cod have in common. Is this geography that is extremely vulnerable to coastal hazards. So in cape cod. There's nor'easters in extreme snow events. And then in south florida it's obvious hurricanes tropical site phones. Shawn's dad would completely bored up his house with metal shutters. I remember one hurricane in the early two thousands My parents just installed this new screener on the house. We were in the home listening to this violent wind coming from every direction outside of the house and the screen room was completely ripped off of the house and we heard it and it was a pretty scary sound and then once the storm passed We walked around the neighborhood and our screen room was five streets down the neighborhood So just showed you how powerful mother nature was in that essence like many florida. And sean has lots of memories like this flooded. Streets down power lines. His grandparents evacuating to his house and when we would come back in return to their their mobile home park just complete devastation A lot of people's lives were turned completely upside down but again. I thought this was a routine part of life. A hurricane even threatened his parents livelihood flooding cargo trailer full of inventory for their store thousands of dollars and that had a big impact on their business for the year so on a personal note. When i think of resilience i really think about small business owners and what it means to them if they're impacted by let's say a storm event like a hurricane. It can have a really devastating long-term outlook on their life and business. When sean was in college he spent a lot of time in nature even going on three months of off the grid. Expeditions and places like wyoming in the middle of winter. I just started developing a real interest. In how the environment effects society how we how. We look at the environment how we look at natural places. Do we protect them to utilize them. I don't really know how. I ended up in jacksonville. I if it was just pointing at somewhere on a map but i heard really good things about the university of north florida and i have to say it was probably the best decision i ever made. I really found a great community here in northeast florida. So when i arrived in jacksonville maybe several months after being here i started talking to the uniform environmental center and they were looking for a student to work on this video series to promote the natural parks in northeast florida specifically in duval county and this was under their environmental leadership program which was a new program in the works to connect students with community partners to work on actual projects. He ended up producing twenty videos on duval county's parks and later as a public administration masters student. He got another opportunity through the nf environmental center. The city of atlantic beach was for help as it pursued leed certification. You've probably heard of lead as it relates to green environmentally friendly buildings but the idea is now being applied to whole communities when atlantic beach got certified. With shawn's help he put together a case study on the process and the us green building council is holding up his case study as it tries to get other local governments around florida to pursue leed certification. Five days before graduation sean was offered the job at the regional council at the northeast florida. Regional council our main objective right now is to raise public awareness about these issues. We want to make sure that the public understands what government is looking at and we also believe that this has to be a team sport so government will not be able to fix this issue alone. Nonprofits won't either and as well as the business community. This has to be a multi discipline holistic activity. Are there any unique challenges. We face northeast florida. What we're seeing recently in two thousand sixteen and then two thousand seventeen with matthew and irma. There's a lot of water here. And we love in northeast. Florida live on the water. So we have that. Atlantic ocean the intercoastal and the saint. John's river and we've built homes. We've developed our businesses all along waterways. It's important to us. We look at it as a sacred entity these waterways but in addition to that we're starting to realize that water levels are rising. And we're seeing things in san marco for instance like nuisance flooding where the sky is blue. We're not having a storm event and you have flooding in the streets. So i think some of these hazards are starting to become more visible when in the past. They haven't been so. I met one individual two weeks ago. Who said that the pipe leading to an ice maker in their home there is a high tide and the water from the river pushed through that pipe into the ice maker flooding the kitchen. So what's happening in essentially san marco. Let's say you have a storm water system. That doesn't have a backflow valve on it. Water during high tide is gonna clog that system push all of the water backup through the pipe and flood whatever's on the other end so there are preventative steps. That can be taken like backflow. Valves which i think they've started to install and saint augustine. Yes so water can only go one way and it can't come back so i think that's an example of a solution to protect ourselves against rising seas but it's just one of many solutions out there given what we know about sea level rise and flooding and hurricanes why do people keep building in developing and risky coastal areas. We are attracted to waterways because of the benefits that are produced for us by living there. There's transportation so we ship and receive goods from ports that has to do with waterways. We can on the mississippi river. For instance go up and down. It was a communication element back in the day so there's not just this intrinsic value of or the straightforward attitude that we're living on the water but just because it's beautiful. I think that Naturally as we've always been attracted to water for agriculture and all sorts of other reasons. And i think that's why cities are located where they are so. I wanna put this out there. That especially coming from the northeast. Florida regional council that economic development is very important to us. We believe that it's one of the most important parts of developing a safe healthy and vibrant community but on the other hand it doesn't have to be just a focus on build build build so we have to start looking at. How do we balance development with environmental protection. How do we build in the right places and when we do build. How do we build more resilient. So if we're looking at any number of development projects. let's say in jacksonville and silver is becomes a concern in a specific area. The perspective is not to just say. Don't develop it saying okay if you're going to build this let's factor. Silver is into your design plan. This is the adapt podcast. Thank you for listening. I'm jessica palumbo. The editor of adapt so adaptation to sea level rise in northeast. Florida is personal for me. Because i rode out hurricane irma in a neighborhood that flooded when i was nine months pregnant got rescued by boat and like most of us i still live and work and shop in areas. That are close to the saint. John's river and the beach as flooding and other issues are only expected to get worse. Our community is looking to adapt for information and answers and since we launched last year we've heard from readers who are happy. They can find them in a single place. That's at adapt florida dot. Org the adopt podcast is a production of wj c. T. public media. Financial support for adopt comes from our readers and listeners. With additional support from the arthur vining davis foundations and the twenty forty foundation more at adapt florida dot org in twenty thirteen before. Sean got there the northeast. Florida regional council release the regional action plan on sea level. This was essentially dipping our toes in rising waters and the way the community looked at it. Was that silver. Is is threatening other communities in florida and that we believe it has the potential to threaten our community here northeast florida so in that same time period. Two thousand fourteen. The public private regional resilience committee was formed as a committee of the council. So this is the p. to archie committee so when p to are two was formed there is a question asked who are the movers and shakers in northeast florida. And who can guide this discussion forward and the answer was the business community in northeast. Florida i think we can confidently say that the business sector the private sector is extremely important in making these developments happen. So a broad range of industry professionals from insurance legal fields engineering architecture and many other subject matter expertise gathered in this pto arctic committee to create a list of action items that we could pursue to make north florida more resilient besides convenient community conversations on resilience the regional council also collects data and develops tools for planners like a website that lets people find the threats to specific locations on a map of northeast florida. So you have a map to the right. And then you have all of these data layers to the left that you can turn on and off and you can play around with to understand. The region's vulnerabilities. So on the top of the data options we have things like critical facilities population density low income population densities one of the first water layers that are featured are fema flood hazard zones so flood insurance rate maps that time to flood. Insurance rates are featured here. So if let's say you're in northeast. Florida and you own a home. You can look at where you are in relation to flood zones. But let's say you wanna purchase a home. This could be a great resource to look at in making that investment decision and then the next data layer that we have is storm surge so there's been extensive statewide work on understanding storm surge throughout florida. So what this tool does is puts that into one centralized location and it shows you where storm surge would go on land from category one to category five storm and then we have two other data layers as well. We have depth of flooding at different intervals or storm events. So if it's really dark blue that means there's going to be much more water if it's light blue it'd be less. And then in addition we have a sea level. rise layer that uses. Noah mapping to look at sea level rise from a one foot increase to a six foot increase. Where this tool gets really interesting is that you can overlay those flood are there's water layers with social layers in wildlife layers so the regional council also recently launched a survey on resilience. What were your findings from that. We asked all sorts of questions. Like what are the most important things that your government should be looking at. is it storm surge. Is it sea level rise it green infrastructure. And we're still organizing those results but at the end of the survey. We asked some big picture questions. And i think one of the most insightful ones and this is for all seven counties there were six hundred seventy two participants in the survey we asked. Is your community doing enough to address resilience planning and the overwhelming majority of respondents said. No eighty three percent. Seventeen percent said yes. So what this tells us is that there is a long road ahead to figure out how to how to deal with these situations and these topics before we move on. I'm going to take a second to talk about the regional council's relationship with the city of jacksonville in the fall of two thousand. Nineteen when the jacksonville city council was going over its budget councilman. Al ferraro suddenly suggested ending the city's annual financial contribution to the regional council. I was assigned to that in my first year. And i had a difficult time figuring out what they do for our city and i never really got an answer and as i worked at work and work through the last four years i found. There is some things that they do but but as as taxpayers were. Not getting our money's worth and nearly four hundred thousand dollars. Jacksonville's annual contribution is larger than any other member of the regional council and makes up about twenty percent of its annual operating budget. The city stayed in for now but the issues expected to come back up and the twenty twenty budget cycle. Despite this potential threat to northeast florida's most prominent regional effort to address the level rise. And his employer. Sean says there's a lot of positive momentum jacksonville right now. Starting with the two new committees the city created within the past year to look at sea level rise. There was the adaptation action area working group which was very focused on long-term priority areas for addressing resilience. And then there was the storm. Resiliency infrastructure view committee that was more focused on short-term objectives of how we can improve our storm water systems and a lot of really valuable information came out of the work of both those committees. And i think it's laying the foundation for how we're going to move forward. The work is continuing this year with a new resilience committee made up of city council members who will hear from experts around the state of florida. There's a lot of momentum right now in jacksonville and elsewhere so there's these regional collaborative forming all around the state. There's the southeast florida climate compaq. The recently created east central regional resilience collaborative and the tampa bay resilience coalition. And then. We're also seeing chief resilience officers being hired by different municipal local governments around florida and counties to address local concerns related to resilience planning and then there's also leadership at the state level in tallahassee. So governor onto santa's one of his priorities as governor is to address a lot of the scientific issues and environmental issues were facing as a state and moving into the future so he appointed a chief science officer at the state level and then also appointed a chief resilience officer. Who is dr julian nashua. If you haven't already listen to our conversation with julia nashua. She's one of the six people we hear from in this podcast. So there's a lot of action happening right now. We're going to start hearing a lot more about the specific topic. And i think it's all positive as long as we can target in on what's important for our state what's important for our communities and i think the the meaningfulness is going to come out of finding tangible solutions that we can implement in a realistic manner. So do you have any closing thoughts. I think a really meaningful picture that advise everyone to go home and look at. Is this photo of the damage. Left behind from harkin. Michael in mexico beach out in the florida panhandle. There's this photo of this house. This big house built on stilts it's elevated off the ground it's an a coastal area. It looks completely fine. It withstood the impacts of hurricane. Michael it was built resilient and it was still standing but all around that piece of property. The rest of the community essentially looks like it doesn't exist. Everything was just completely devastated. If your house is still standing but everyone else's collapses what's the property value of your home or your business. So i encourage everyone to think about all of the dynamics that tie into this conversation when we're talking about resilience. I think it's important to think about what steps can be taken to protect the entire community just specific neighborhoods or groups of people. And i think when we start having those robust meaningful conversations were really gonna find answers that bring us together. That's sean lahavi. The resiliency coordinator for the northeast florida regional council to see that photo. He was talking about of that house on mexico beach. Check out the web version of this conversation at adapt florida dot org there. You can get to know all six of the people profiled in his podcast. Thanks for listening to the adapt podcast. I'm brendan rivers production. Help came from. Lindsey kilbride with editing by jessica palumbo. The theme music was composed and performed by davin the well in and keith phelps from the conglomerate adapt comes from wjc t. public media with support from the twenty forty foundation. And the arthur vining davis foundations. More on how northeast floridians are adapting to sea level. Rise and climate change. Is that adapt. Florida dot org.

Florida regional council florida jacksonville Florida regional council sean cape cod brendan rivers Muhab south florida us army corps of engineers hurricane rotary club of polack duval county atlantic beach environment effects society nf environmental center san marco Sean northeast florida
NPR News: 06-16-2019 9PM ET

NPR News Now

04:57 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 06-16-2019 9PM ET

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from American pest as the leading provider of safe, sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you to take back your home or business. From menacing pests visit them today at American pest dot net. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine, Herbst, scores of people are continuing to occupy the streets in Hong Kong following a massive protest against a controversial extradition. Bill today many camped out overnight, while others were seen putting up. Barricades reports say the atmosphere is relaxed in contrast to the tension of the past week. The BBC's Charanjit Lyle is in Hong Kong. They said Monday morning, after the fed mass demonstrations in Hong Kong. And it is a stormy gray Monday, I should add, but they all still protest is on the street. There is still a great deal of anger here, amongst Hong Kong as anger over this extradition, Bill. They wanted scrapped entirely at the moment, it's only been suspended indefinitely. They're also angry about what they say, was the excessive use of police force in the demonstrations, last Wednesday that did result in quite a number of people hurt. It also led to a number of arrests. As well, the BBC Charanjit Lal reporting a massive power outage has hit Argentina and several neighboring nations, causing severe disruption for tens of millions of people NPR's Philip Reeve's reports that Argentine officials are saying electrons now restored for more than half the country, many times, we're looking forward to a relaxing Sunday. Celebrating Father's Day with the family. Instead, they woke to find themselves in the midst of one of South America's biggest ever power outages at around seven AM local time, the electricity supply crashed across Argentina and in parts of neighboring Odaguard in Paraguay train. Stop running shops, and restaurants. Shut hospitals and airports relied on generators, it happened while some areas were holding local elections voters cast ballots using cell phones. Torches Argentina's president Murray CO Macanese calling the outage unprecedented and his Auden investigation. His energy secretary says it's not fought to be sabotage clip reads and beyond us in. India's imposing tariffs on the US. The duties were announced last year. But the country delayed implementation until today after talks on a broader US India trade deal broke down and Washington dropped India's preferential trade status last month. The terrorists cover about one and a half billion dollars worth of goods on several products, including apples, and almonds. Phoenix. Mayor que Galago says an altar -cation between police and a young family was completely inappropriate and unprofessional. She's calling for action. This after a video emerged showing police pointing guns and yelling profane commands at a father and a pregnant woman with their two young daughters. Couple says they didn't realize their four year old daughter took a doll from the store. Jerry Williams is the city's police chief. I know there are people that are angry out there. I'm angry the twenty nine hundred other officers are angry. But at the end of the day, I o ATar community to listen to those forces speaking there on KNX V TV, the family has filed a ten million dollar lawsuit against the city. You're listening to NPR news. People in Guatemala went to the polls today to choose the country's next president all one hundred sixty members of congress and hundreds of local officials today, Emily green reports the election was marred by allegations of corruption. And vote-buying two of the top presidential candidates were disqualified. Another was arrested in Miami on charges of conspiring with the scene alot cartel now. Former first lady, Sandra thought is, is a favorite among a field of nineteen presidential candidates. She's facing allegations of illegal campaign financing in the two thousand fifteen election and other top candidate is a former head of the national prison system. He was accused of participating in a massacre of inmates. Seventy two year old retired professor Ugo that by said allegations of vote-buying are adding to his, his appointment, it's a trustworthy election. He says it's not entirely democratic if no presidential candidate gets fifty percent of the vote, there will be a runoff on August eleventh. For NPR news. I'm Emily green and San Marco squad. Damola a jersey belonging to late New York, Yankees baseball star Babe Ruth sold for a record five point six million dollars at auction this weekend, the gray road uniform dating back to the nineteen twenties was one of hundreds of items, the Ruth, family and some collectors put up for sale at an auction at Yankee Stadium this weekend hunt auctions, which handled the sale says the price breaks a record for the most expensive piece of sports memorabilia, ever sold Reuss family says a portion of the money from this sale. Wilco to charity. I'm Janine Herbst, and you're listening to NPR news from Washington.

Hong Kong NPR Janine Herbst Washington Argentina Bill BBC Emily green India president Babe Ruth NPR US DMV Charanjit Lyle Sandra Mayor que Galago Charanjit Lal South America Yankee Stadium
The Coordinator: Sean Lahav

ADAPT

24:33 min | 1 year ago

The Coordinator: Sean Lahav

"Business Perspective that say perspective. I respect that one more time. Water Shabaab is fresh out of Grad School. I'm twenty four turning twenty five in February but already he's reached the point in his career where he's in charge. Egypt coordinating resilience efforts for all of northeast Florida Room. This is the adapt podcast. I'm Brandon rivers the reporter a W. J. C. T. News in Jacksonville. Florida adapters are online magazine. About what people in northeast Florida are doing to adapt a st level rise and climate change. And in this podcast. We're hearing from some of about where they've been. And what keeps them going along. Sean is the resiliency coordinator for something called the Northeast Florida Regional Council. We'll hear more about what it does in a minute but first what is resilience. You're always GonNa get a different answer depending on who you ask. So if you're looking at a transportation planner for example they might be concerned with the resilience of a road system or a network of roads systems. This with something like sea level rise or an urban planner might think about keeping houses above water. But he really likes the definition of resilience from the US Army Corps of Engineers. So let's say okay. You have a system in this case. We'll call it Jacksonville so on a routine basis like today everyone's going to work the economy's functioning smoothly. It's it's normal but then a shock comes into the system like a hurricane event so once the shockers the system loses function the resilient species. How do we return the system in this case Jacksonville back to full functionality? How do we learn from that event so when we look into the future at the UH next shock which is going to be inevitable? How do we learn from that to reduce the curve so when the next shot comes along we don't lose as much functionality and we move forward award at a steady rate so what exactly is a resilient to coordinator? What do you do similar to a chief resilience officer for? Let's say a city or state in my responsibilities are focused on getting people in the same room to first of all talk about these issues. Then there's this educational component and really putting all the the pieces together so a big focus of my position if we're taking pyramid approach is to look at resilience from a community perspective first of all and say what steps need to be taken to make our community more resilient so that starts with public awareness so recently I designed to set of initiatives should've to first of all educate the public about what we're doing so that starts with a business continuity presentation focused on economic resilience we work with Rotary Clubs and other similar groups on the ground to talk about what small business owners can do to make their businesses more resilient to natural hazards so purchasing flood. What insurance raising your HVAC systems backing up your data things like that? So it's very tangible. And it Kinda plant seeds in people's heads here he is speaking to the rotary recove- polack Last month with the silver is in the big picture things. Nothing will ever happen in less elected officials government. Understand it and they listen to constituents constituents so if this is a priority for you as a community or as individuals tell your elected officials. They're willing to talk about it. Then we move up the pyramid into this presentation focused on building community resilience. So how can community leaders actually implement solutions in their own backyards and then and from there we partnered with Taylor Engineering on this adaptation solutions presentation. That goes over all of the solutions. That communities can adopt opt in efforts to become more resilient there's protection strategies where you completely blocked something from coming in. Let's say water then there's accommodation like living shorelines shorelines so instead of saying no water is allowed. Let the water come in. Learn how to divert the water into natural areas and then then there's also concepts related to avoidance so. Don't build in a particular place if it's going to be exposed to flooding and then there's also manage relocation in some regards in areas. Let's say in Saint Johns County and parts of Nassau County Some homeowners have no other option at this point point because of sand dunes fading away and roads fading away that they might have to leave so there's government buyout options and things like that if we go to the crux and the top of the Pyramid Pyramid. We designed a public workshop focused on asking community members. What's important to them? What are the problems facing your community? Is it storm surge urge. Is it sunny day flooding. Are You more concerned with silver is or hurricanes. Wha what's the the issue area in your community and from there we organized community members into groups where we work on map activities where citizens take sticky notes identify on a map. What's important to them? mm-hmm and then we help facilitate dialogue to create strategies to protect those assets so all of these services that were offering at the northeast Florida regional council related to resilience resilience were offering completely for free to community groups that are interested in the seven county region. That work is paid for by taxpayers cities and counties. He's in northeast Florida. Pay Dues to belong to the regional council. One of the ten planning councils in the state they help local governments not only with emergency and disaster preparedness but also with economic development and other issues. Let's talk about you so I was looking at your linked profile before we sat down. And you've got an extremely impressive resume for someone. Your Age Shannon kind of makes me wonder what I've been doing with my life so tell me about yourself and how you got to this point your career. So I'm a by product of two different states. I grew up in south Florida down in Boynton in beach and I also lived in Cape Cod Massachusetts for portions of my childhood. My parents operated a seasonal retail business in south Florida specifically specifically in big pine key down in the Florida keys but also in Massachusetts. So what South Florida and Cape Cod have in common. Is this geography that is extremely vulnerable to coastal hazards. So in Cape Cod. There's Nor'easterS in extreme snow events and South Florida. It's the obvious hurricanes. Tropical Saipan's Shawn's dad would completely bored up his house with metal shutters. I remember one hurricane in the early two thousands My parents just installed this new screener on the house. Yes we were in the home listening to this violent wind coming from every direction outside of the house and the scream was completely ripped off of the house and we heard it and it was a pretty scary sound and then once the storm passed We walked around the neighborhood and our screen room was five streets down the neighborhood Searches showed you how powerful Mother Nature was in that essence. Like many Florida and Sean has lots of memories like this flooded. Streets down power lines. His grandparents evacuating to his house. And when we come back in return to their their mobile home park just complete devastation. Asian a lot of people's lives were turned completely upside down but again I thought this was a routine part of life. Hurricane even threatened his parents livelihood flooding cargo trailer full of inventory for their store thousands of dollars and that had a big impact on their business for the year so on a personal note. When when I think of resilience I I really think about small business owners and what it means to them if they're impacted by let's say a storm event like a hurricane it? You can have a really devastating long term outlook on their life and business. When Sean was in college he spent a lot of time in nature even going on three months of off the grid? Expeditions in places like Wyoming in the middle of winter I just started developing a real interest in How the Environment Effects Society how we how we look look at the environment how we look at natural places? Do we protect them to utilize them. I don't really know how I ended up in Jacksonville I if it was just pointing at somewhere on a map but I heard really good things about the University of North Florida and I have to say it was probably the best decision I ever made. I really found a great community here in northeast Florida. So when I arrived in Jacksonville maybe several months after being here. I started talking to the U. N. F. Environmental Center and they were looking for a student to work on this video series to promote the natural parks in northeast Florida specifically in Duval County. Any and this was under their environmental leadership program which was a new program in the works to connect students with community partners to work on actual projects. He ended up producing twenty videos on Duval county's parks and later as a public administration masters student. He got another opportunity through the NF Environmental Fire Mental Center. The city of Atlantic beach was looking for help as it pursued Leed certification. You've probably heard of lead as relates to green environmentally friendly buildings but but the idea is now being applied to whole communities when Atlantic beach got certified with Shawn's help put together a case study on the process and the US Green Building Council is holding up his case a study as it tries to get other local governments around Florida to pursue Leed certification. Five days before graduation Sean was offered the job at the regional council at at the northeast. Florida regional council our main objective right now is to raise public awareness about these issues. We want to make sure that the public understands is what government is looking at and we also believe that this has to be a team sport so government will not be able to fix this issue alone. nonprofits won't either and as well as the business community. This has to be a multi discipline holistic activity. Are there any unique any challenges. We face in northeast Florida. What we're seeing recently in two thousand sixteen and then two thousand seventeen with Matthew and Irma? There's a lot of water here. And we love in northeast. Florida live on the water. So we have that. Lana Ocean the intercoastal and the Saint John's river and and we've built homes. We've developed our businesses all along these waterways. It's important to us. We look at it as a sacred entity these waterways but in addition to that we're starting to realize that water levels are rising. And we're seeing things in San Marco for instance like nuisance flooding where the sky is blue. We're not having a storm event and you have flooding in the streets so I think some of these hazards are are starting to become more visible when in the past. They haven't been so. I met one individual two weeks ago. WHO said that the pipe leading to an ice maker in their home there is a high tide in the water from the river pushed through that pipe into the ice maker flooding the kitchen? So what's happening opening in essentially San Marco. Let's say you have a storm water system that doesn't have a backflow valve on it. Water during high tide is GonNa clog that system push all of the water backup through the pipe and flood whatever's on the other end so there are preventative steps. That can be taken like backflow. Valves which I think they've started install and Saint Augustine. Yes so water can only go one way and it can't come back so I think that's an example of a solution to protect ourselves against rising seas but it's just one of many solutions out there. Given what we know about sea level rise and flooding and hurricanes why why do people keep building developing and risky coastal areas. We are attracted to waterways because of the benefits that are produced for us by living there. There's transportation so we ship and and receive goods from ports that has to do with waterways. We can on the Mississippi River for instance go up and down. It was a communication Gatien Element back in the day so there's not just this intrinsic value of or the straightforward attitude that we're living on the water but just because it's beautiful. Well I think that Naturally as humans we've always been attracted to water for agriculture and all sorts of other reasons and I think that's why cities are located where they are so i. I want to put this out there. That especially coming from the northeast. Florida Regional Council that economic development is very important to us. We believe that it's one of the most important parts of developing a safe healthy and vibrant community but on the other hand it doesn't have to be just a focus on build build build so we have to start looking at. How do we balance development with environmental protection? How do we build in the right places and when we do build? How do we we build more resilient? So if we're looking at any number of development projects let's say in Jacksonville and silver is becomes a concern learn in a specific area. The perspective is not to just say don't develop it's saying okay if you're going to build this let's factor silver is interior design plan This is the adapt podcast. Thank you for listening. Jessica Palumbo the editor of adapt so adaptation to sea level rise in northeast. Florida is personal for me because I rode out Hurricane Irma in a neighborhood that flooded when I was nine months. Pregnant regmunt got rescued by boat and like most of us I still live and work and shop in areas that are close to the saint. John's river and the beach which as flooding and other issues are only expected to get worse. Our community is looking to adapt for information and answers and since we launched last year we've heard from readers who are happy. They can find them in a single place. That's at adapt Florida Dot Org. The adopt podcast asked is a production of Wj C. T. public media. Financial support for adopt comes from our readers and listeners with additional support from the Arthur vining Davis foundations nations and the twenty four foundation more at adapt Florida Dot Org uh in twenty thirteen before Sean. Got There the northeast. Florida Regional Council released the Regional Action Plan on sea level writes. This was essentially dipping our toes in rising waters and the way the community looked at it. Was that silver is is threatening other communities in Florida and that we believe it has the potential to threaten our community here northeast Florida so in that same time period in two thousand fourteen. The Public Private Regional Resilience Committee was formed as a committee of the council. So this is the P. to Archie Committee. So so when P to archie was formed there is a question asked who are the movers and Shakers in northeast Florida. And who can guide this discussion for it and the answer was the business. Business Community in northeast Florida. I think we can confidently say that the business sector the private sector is extremely important in making these developments happen so a broad range of industry professionals from insurance legal fields engineering architecture and many other subject matter expertise bridges gathered in this PTO Arctic Committee to create a list of action items that we could pursue to make northeast Florida more resilient besides convening community conversations on resilience the regional council also collects data and develops tools planners like a website that lets people find the threats to specific locations on a map of northeast. Florida Florida so you have a map to the right and then you have all of these data layers to the left that you can turn on and off and you can play around with to understand. The region's vulnerabilities. So on the top up of the data options we have things like critical facilities population density low income population densities one of the first water layers that are featured are fema flood hazard zones so flood insurance rate maps. That tie into flood. Insurance rates are featured here. So if let's say you're in North Florida and you own a home you can look at where you are in relation to flood zones. Let's say you WANNA purchase a home. This could be a great resource to look at in making that investment decision and then the next data layer that we have is storm surge so there's extensive statewide work on understanding storm surge throughout Florida. So what this tool does is put that into one centralized location and it shows you you wear storm. Surge would go on land from category one to category five storm and then we have two other data layers as well. We have depth of flooding at different intervals or storm events. So if it's really dark blue that means there's going to be much more water if it's light blue it'd be less. And then in addition we have a sea level. Rise layer that uses. Noah mapping to look at sea level rise from a one foot increase to a six foot increase. Where this tool gets really interesting saying is that you can overlay those flares are there's water layers with social layers in wildlife layers so the regional council also recently launched a survey survey on resilience? What were your findings from that? We asked all sorts of questions. Like what are the most important things that your government should be looking at. Is it storm. Surge is is it silver is is it green infrastructure and. We're still organizing those results but at the end of the survey. We asked some big picture questions. And I think think one of the most insightful ones and this is for all seven counties there were six hundred seventy two participants in the survey we asked. Is Your community doing enough to address stress resilience planning and the overwhelming majority of respondents said. No eighty-three percent seventeen percent said yes. So what this tells us is that there is a long road ahead to figure out how to how to deal with these situations and these topics before we move on. I WanNa take a second and talk about the regional council's relationship with the city of Jacksonville in the fall of twenty nineteen. When the Jacksonville City Council was going over its budget councilman Ferraro suddenly suggested ending the city's annual financial contribution to the regional council? I was assigned to that and my first year and I had a difficult difficult time figuring out what they do for our city and I never really got an answer and as I worked at work at work through the last four years. I've I I found. There is some things that they do but but as as taxpayers were not getting our money's worth and nearly four hundred thousand dollars Jacksonville's annual contribution is larger than any other member of the Regional Council and makes about twenty percent of its annual operating budget. The city stayed in for now but she's expected to come back up in the twenty twenty budget cycle. Despite this potential threat northeast Florida's most prominent regional effort to address the level rise and his employer. Sean says there's a lot of positive momentum Jacksonville right now now. Starting with the two new committees the city created within the past year to look at sea level rise. There was the Adaptation Action Area Working Group which was very focused on long-term priority already areas for addressing resilience and then there was the storm resiliency and Infrastructure Review Committee that was more focused on short-term objectives of how we can improve for storm water systems and a lot of really valuable information came out of the work of both those committees and I think it's laying the foundation for how we're going to move forward. The work is is continuing this year with a new Brazilian committee made up of City Council members who will hear from experts around the state of Florida. There's a lot of mental right now in Jacksonville and elsewhere so there's these regional collaborative forming all around the state. There's the southeast Florida climate compact the recently created e central regional resilience collaborative and the Tampa Bay resilience coalition. And then. We're also seeing chief. Resilient officers being hired by different municipal local governments around Florida and counties is to address local concerns related to resilience planning and then there's also leadership at the state level in Tallahassee. So governor onto Santa's one of his is priorities as governor is to address a lot of the scientific issues and environmental issues. We're facing as a state and moving into the future. So he appointed appointed a chief science officer at the state level and then also appointed a chief resilience officer. Who is Dr Julian Nashua? If you haven't already listen into our conversation with Julia Watch she's one of the six people we hear from in this podcast. So there's a lot of action happening right now. We're going to start hearing a lot more about the specific topic and I think it's all positive as long as we can target in on what's important for our state what's important for our communities and and I think the the meaningfulness is GonNa come out of finding tangible solutions that we can implement in a realistic manner. So do you have any closing thoughts. I think a really really meaningful picture that advise everyone to go home and look at is. This photo of the damage left behind from Hurricane. Michael in Mexico beach out in the Florida panhandle. So there's this photo of this house. This big house built on stilts it's elevated off the ground it's an a coastal area area. It looks completely fine. It withstood the impacts of hurricane. Michael it was built resilient and it it was still standing all around that piece of property the rest of the community essentially looks like it doesn't exist. Everything was just completely devastated. Devastated if your house is still standing but everyone else's collapses what's the property value of your home or your business so I encourage urge everyone to think about all of the dynamics that tie into this conversation when we're talking about resilience. I think it's important to think about what what steps can be taken to protect the entire community not just specific neighborhoods or groups of people and I think when we start having those robust meaningful conversations. We're really going to find answers that brings together. That's Sean La. The resiliency coordinator for the Northeast Florida Regional Council to see that photo. He was talking walking out of that House on Mexico beach. Check out the web version of this conversation at adapt Florida Dot Org there. You can get to know all six of the people profiled in this podcast Thanks for listening to the adapt podcast. I'm Brendan rivers production. Help came from Lindsey kilbride with editing by Jessica Palumbo. The theme music was composed and performed by Davin Llewellyn and Keith Phelps ops from conglomerate adapt comes from W. J. C. T. public media with support from the Twenty Forty Foundation and the Arthur vining Davis foundations more on how northeast Floridians beans are adapting to sea level. Rise and climate change. Is that adapt Florida Dot Org and.

Florida Northeast Florida Regional Cou regional council Sean La Florida regional council Jacksonville Hurricane Florida Dot Org coordinator Jacksonville Public Private Regional Resili Florida Room Business Community South Florida US Army Corps of Engineers Atlantic beach
636 Athens Neighborhoods; Digital Nomads; Venice Lagoon

Travel with Rick Steves

51:35 min | 5 months ago

636 Athens Neighborhoods; Digital Nomads; Venice Lagoon

"Take a look at the capital of greece. We are now at proper metropolis a place where you find the most traditional hand in hand with the most contemporary guides from athens tell us how the city's neighborhoods are making the city a little more pedestrian friendly. Get more out of a visit to them by getting out into the lagoon that surrounds the city. Look at how the light changes look at churches vanish from you. Look when suddenly their seabirds for landing on the water and following your vaporetto. the nearby islands are worth a stop to attack is kind of an up and coming island for younger people and hear how a little tech savvy and good wifi can help you become a digital nomad in work from almost anywhere. You'd like to live a lot of people now are going to have trouble going back into an office because they realized so many benefits of remote working. It's all in the hour ahead on today's travel. With rick steves. Hey i'm rick steves. You can experience my favorite european people places and stories in my newest book for the love of europe or your copy today at rick. Steves dot com. Have you ever thought about trying to live abroad but didn't know how you'd make a living in just a bit. American makes a gun. Ski explains how he became a full-time digital nomad. He shares with us. How he's learned to make working remotely from overseas worked for him from his home base in tbilisi georgia the waters that surround us and sometimes inundated can a curse and a blessing. We'll get a view of venice from its lagoon with fred. Plotkin and american born artists stacey kubota. Who's made it her home for twenty years. Let's start today's travel. With rick steves increase hosting the olympics in two thousand four forced that famously chaotic and polluted city of athens to invest in more pedestrian and eco friendly alternatives tour guides cars and pastas doris joining us. Now to look at what you can expect when you scroll the neighborhoods their city by the way we recorded this conversation before the pandemic shutdown international borders things very much. What's it like when you hear. An american. say athens used to be terrible today. It's changed big low. We are old enough to remember what you mean. Because i grew up in the nineteen ninety s where we had these serious problem with his cloud. Above athens was pollution cloud. Yeah but then a they introduce measurement which was not. All cars are allowed to enter the city center the yukon enter Based on the you and your license plates so this improves the today. Absolutely yeah and athens benefited a lot from. That's an apostolakis. There's more sensitivity for pedestrian zones. I think from syntagma square. You can walk downhill on on. What used to be a very crowded traffic street and now it's like a park weekly unification for q logical sites so he can start working starting from sedan west and you can make your way old down to get me. Cost the asking symmetry of otherness. It's beautiful walk without motorbikes. And there's this beautiful pedestrian sort of park. That goes to me almost all the way around the acropolis also the hill that the city is built around. That just seems designed for people and it's beautiful in the evening. It's beautiful in the day. It is beautiful twenty four hours. It's very safe. Someone can walk and enjoy their coach kill sites they can grab an ice cream and walk for about thirty to forty minutes beautiful. Walk so when we think about athens. First of all of course. It's the city of the golden age with socrates. Plato and in of that and then acropolis means city on the hilltop. Acropolis doesn't mean athens acropolis. There's there's many a crop ally but athens has far and away. The most famous acropolis that travelers come to see at the base of that. You've got the ancient market but also the town that was two hundred years ago which is a town. Today's touristy shopping area called the plaka but then in modern times athens just went crazy. I mean what was it. Ten thousand people or something hundred and years ago and today four or five million. Greeks are packed into athens. Can you tell me phillips first of all if my thumbnail. History of athens was correct and then why grew so much in the last century. You are absolutely right about what you said. This is exactly the history when when we want to speak about athens i say yes. We all know about the classical times if six four fourth century bc. But let's go to what's going on now. Modern nothing starts in eighteen thirty four when it becomes the capital of greece because after four hundred years of turkish ocupation. We are liberated than they initially make. Enough play on as the capital of great. But then they say wait. A second acropolis is the place that everybody associated with the ancient spirit with democracy with philosophy so they decide to turn very unimportant whole town so nap. Leon was the more logical city because it was a real port a substantial town in a lovely town to this day. Fight as well but it had none of the Spiritual heritage that of course was athena. So sorry napoli on. We're going to make the capital. This almost nothing village. That has the great ruins absolutely and they decide to do that. And when athens becomes the capital the allied forces the big forces of that time. The english the french and the russians this okay. What is greece meeting aching. So they bring a king from very. His name is auto because there's so many princes that they have to find the kingdom for them because they will never become kings so when he comes he takes advantage of the fact that he's a king and they start building the historical triangle which is defined by the acropolis the cemetery of course and what we call the parliament today which used to be the palace it used as we're talking eighteen fifties or so yes. We're talking exactly about that. The okay so welcome. Modern european capital with a german prince. Our guides to happens on travel with rick. Steves are apostolate doors and philippos kind of cars so they also rex contemporary theatre troupe. And apostolos has been a presenter greek radio. They specialize in showing visitors the ancient and the modern attractions of their city. You can email us about your travels at radio at rick. Steves dot com a posthumous after world. War two athens all the sudden triples or quadruples in its population. Why did all that all of a sudden you've got sprawling city of millions of people after the war who have development first of all in the fifties and sixties and we have what we call her by nation should organization so what happened to people that were living in the countryside and villages. They were looking for work. The didn't want to work in the fields anymore and that's happening telling many countries in europe. We happen all over the world in france. You've got the depopulated little towns in the countryside a little towns were deserted increase Because we have a lot of young people coming to athens not only to study but find work and this is why we can see an expansion of the city and suddenly we have today for half million people. When you stand on the acropolis you can almost see half of all the people in the entire country. You have one of the most amazing views when you're up at the crew and now it's not going to be clouded in smog. Because you've done some serious work taken care of your pollution now. I remember athens was still pretty crazy and struggling and rough-edged but in two thousand four. You guys had the olympics. Philip was how is that Sort of a turning point. What's the heritage of the two thousand four olympics. I would say the main thing that has to do with us in the by saying i mean the athenians is the fact that we had the building of the metro the our ground we investment because we're apostolos lives which is the western suburbs of athens. The only way to access them. If you didn't have a car was to get it public transport bus which meant at best an hour and a half due to the traffic. Now you can be there in ten minutes ten minutes as opposed to an hour and a half and it would have been worse today. If you didn't invest in the underground way back then of course in two thousand eight Like much of the world you had the economic collapse and and greece. I just thought how you ever dig out of this whole pasta house greece looking now considering the very difficult economic realities of the country and its massive debt. It is definitely a challenge. Each a very complicated issue the crises to be able to analyze it now. But what i would like to say like a lot of young people. They come together and the opening small businesses in the city centre. I feel that. I feel that energy that creativity all of the small businesses for me as a tourist. It'd be boutique hotels and wonderful little foodi restaurants so certainly greece has some very serious economic challenges. But i've got to say as a as a traveler a tourist coming into town. You don't feel that he feel happy to contribute to the economy by enjoying all of the small businesses and restaurants that are popping up. This is travel. With rick steves were talking with philips car and pastas doors and we're talking about athens. We have an email from roya in huntington beach california and royal rights with the economy that greece's facing how to tourists get treated. How safe is it to walk around without being part of a tour group so very good concern howard tourists treated. Is it safe to walk around a law that goes. Let's start with a with a safety issue. I will say that. Greece and athens and more specifically despite the financial crisis. I would say that it continues to be one of the safest places in europe. The crime rate is quite low. Of course we have some neighborhoods. That i wouldn't recommend someone going later tonight but this applies for every city in the world. It is very safe and this financial crisis turning people around when it comes to their mentality when you visit now you re far more welcome even for us been greeks and being local athenians we witness with our own. Is that when we go to restaurants cafes bars. We are treated much better place because people value the fact that they have a job. That's the feeling i had. I had restaurants were happy. I stepped ender. Happy there's tourism there Pastas there's neighborhoods. That are so characteristic and these two have almost no terrorism but now they're delightfully welcoming to the tourists and lots of great restaurants and shops and activities. What are a couple of neighborhoods. We should keep in mind. I can mention three neighborhoods and the shark kid. I'm ekos ghazi and seedy. So can macos named. After the cemetery there cemetry often and then ghazi named after the gasworks. The guy gus work can theory. P. s. y. Okay what will we find in these neighborhoods in in this neighborhood. First of all one is very different to the other in. Pd for civil. You can find all these like very small specialized stores and you can see a little little bars and restaurants. They've changed the atmosphere of the city is a beautiful area. Someone can go for his troll and enjoy nicer of lackey or have a greek pastry philipos. If you walked with me through siri what might we be sure to do. I will definitely take you for a nice fuzhou in a very nice bar that i go to and then i'll take you to a place to fried meatballs gift. Vaca as we call them. So there's this small taverna that's been around before you became a trendy area when you see you say seriously and then you sit down. And you have the best fried mic bulls. You've ever had in your life with a nice glass of cedar. Which is the white wine that we make in greece with something special that you will find in this country and then we would go and just follow interesting people and you find yourself in a place where with colorful bottles or places with really nice music music. You wouldn't expect to hear in a country. Like greece like alternative rock music and made somewhere in california. And you would go there and have a nice whisk. Why not yeah. Athens is rather metropolitan city. And that's what's important for people to understand that because of all these different people that came the last fifty years in the we are now at proper metropolis a place where you find the most traditional hand in hand with the most contemporary a proper metropolis you nailed. Because in the old days when i used to say see it and get out. It was metropolis. But it didn't have much charm or class it just wasn't very welcoming now. You want to sit and savor it and you'll find those magic moments absolutely. Let's finish off with just. You're traveling around the united states. When you get home back to your hometown athens what will you do to just celebrate yes. I'm home apostolos. What i would do. I would go to my local coffee place and heavy genuine greek coughing a greek dabble medium. Greg coffee with my friends with my neighborhood. France so this is something i always think when i go back and plus i will go to my balcony. I'm very lucky. And i can see the acropolis in the sea front of athens. Though i'm downtown. And i will open a bottle of wine that i bought on the south key. I love it. It's a fine white wine. I will drink that than just embrace. The evening of athens phillipus kinda cardis apostolate stewardess. Thank you so much. Thank you thank you. There's more about our guests each week at rick. Steves dot com slash radio. We'll take closer. Look at venice from the water in just a bit but i if you like the idea of being able to travel forever and build a successful career you'll want to hear how bikes gun skis doing it. The digital nomad tells us about his global career. That's next on travel with rick. Steves imagine if you do your work while traveling. The world travel writer and entrepreneur. Mike's with guns ski is full of tips for working from anywhere you on lip. He is a digital nomad. He's worked in lived abroad for the last decade visited about eighty countries already. Mike joins us today from his home base in the republic of georgia. That's about six thousand miles east of atlanta to share ideas from his book global career. How to work anywhere and travel for ever mike. Thanks for joining us. Thanks so much for having me on rick. Spend a tuck somebody in the republic of georgia and to be thinking that you could be working anywhere and living anywhere this kind of radical that your disengaging those two things. Where do i work. Where do i live. Can you define. What a digital nomad is please. Yeah i'd say there's a lot of connotations behind the term mad. I would say the simplest way is just somebody who makes money online and has the freedom to live from anywhere. And you've spent the last decade doing just that. Give us a quick rundown where you've been and how the work you've done has nothing to do with the countries that you're living. Yes so the first five years of my journey was spent working physically and overseas and other locations and then the ladder five has been as a digital nomad working remotely building my own companies and i would say it's been a great transition where i kind of was able to continue expanding and growing my career while traveling the world and doing something that i absolutely love so must be kind of an interesting evolution in your outlook. Are your assessment of what are your opportunities. When i think of working abroad i think. Oh what are you going to do in prague and you probably started that way and then you realize hey. It doesn't matter where where. I'm laying my head at night. Yeah exactly so. The location doesn't really have too much impact. I do have a lot of clients customers us-based so i'm used to working some of those midnight hours but again it comes with the territory and it's great to have that flexibility known your book global career. You talk about you work on your terms what is working on your terms mean as as opposed to the standard working where you live and work in the same place yeah would say. Traditional route is between the hours of nine to five. You have to be online working for somebody else's terms in my lifestyle. I can wake up i want. Don't need an alarm clock. If i don't want one and i can essentially choose when i wake up and when i go to sleep everything i want to work on anything i want to do. I can kind of structure my life. The way i want to and i think a lot of people now are getting a little taste of that with remote working and being able to work online. So it's like untethered. I like that word job. In the homer no longer tied together exactly being able to kind of mold. Your life around. Your work is kind of the new future of work now. You're you're nomad. It kind of means you have no country. What's the psychology of. That is their downside. Yeah would say. There's definitely some downsides to being a nomad a lot of times your friends and your your routine can be a little spontaneous. Your friendships can be transient. If you're moving around every three to six months. But i would say. The most term digital nomads. Like myself they usually find a hub where they're going to be spending a year or two at the very minimum instill traveling from that location. But because you have a travel hub you're going to be making more concrete friendships. You're gonna have a more solid routine. That's easier to get back into and i would say that's probably one way to kind of overcome a lot of the cons of digital medicine. A lot of people think it's you know you're moving around every month or so but most long-term digital nomads have some sort of home base where they travel from and whatever type of combination. That is whether it's nine months spent in your home base and then that you know the rest of the time traveling around the world. It's up to you. But i think most people like to have that travel hub and for me. That's boise georgia part of it. I've known a lot of people who are for instance teachers here in the united states and suddenly their teaching online and and entity occurs. I'd teach in los angeles. But i don't need to sleep in los angeles. I can go visit relatives in iowa and still teach in los angeles. So you could have your hub. But you could also go on an extended trip and still do your work and conceivably your employer wouldn't even know you're no longer at your normal hub. Yeah there's a lot of benefits. And i think you know the cost of living in la versus somewhere else in the mid west is gonna be a big night and day difference and even internationally. That's i would say. One of biggest benefits for me is taking advantage of gio arbitrage where i can earn. Us dollars and live in a much affordable country where i can kind of elevate my lifestyle a lot of people in the. Us are going to realize quickly by changing their cities and locations. Just around the us. But i think some of them realize the big benefits of living overseas or guest on travel. With rick steves is digital nomad. Mike's wigan ski makes the author of a book called global career how to work anywhere and travel forever and he blogs at global career book dot com. So make certain practicalities here. I would think some obviously some jobs lend themselves this some jobs. Don't how do employers respond to you as a nomad. Let's say the the work is conceivably done just as well remotely. Do you have to sell the notion to employers or employers getting the message that you don't have that conventional need to have your employees right there in the office next to you. Yeah i would say you know. In the past year things have kind of sped up probably ten to fifteen years in the future so what more employers are on board with you know having a flexible working location and a lot of them are more open to remote working Before that it was kind of a little bit more boutique. Certain companies were really on board with it. Some other companies weren't but we've really kind of all the one eighty on the remote workforce and now a lot of industries that probably would have taken ten to fifteen years to get on board are very receptive to having their employees working remotely because it's a win win for both sides of the coin. Yep as an employer. I'm starting to see get that message. I remember i was pretty adamant about. I want people together physically. But now i can see. There's a case to be made for remote. I wanna go through some practicalities here. There's just a lot of basic stuff. I'd like to cover and get your take on first of all. Are you generally clocking in. And do they expect you to work some equivalent of nine to five or is it. Are you just on a contract to do something full-time how do they keep track your hours. I would say there's a few different methods the majority of remote companies that i work with. They're having their employees focus on their outputs and not their input. So they're going to have certain goals that you need achieve through the week and no matter how much time the takes takes you sixty hours or forty hours or ten hours They're more concerned with the outputs as long as you're getting your work done. There's gonna be a lot more flexibility. So what are the taxation issues. Be the bureaucracy of of being an american working in the republic of georgia. Or you're in colombia or in the czech republic headaches because you are an american working in their country or are you just essentially a long-term tourist. That's getting a lot of stuff done for pay from faraway. Yes so there's definitely a lot of clear defined incentives for remote workers in for people that are living overseas. The foreign earned income exclusion is actually an irs tax incentives. That essentially allows people that spend more than three hundred thirty days after the united states not to to pay income taxes. So there's a lot of other to that and there's a few other ways to find eligibility but again each country is so different that some countries. If you spend more than six months in the country you become an automatic tax resident. But it's really a very on the country and again. I always highly recommend people to consult a tax professional both in the us and overseas to make sure that you're not breaking any laws but there is some irs incentives so you don't have to pay income taxes you could conceivably be making hundred thousand dollars a year and paying no taxes because your living in one country and working remotely exactly. That's a huge advantage. It's essentially it's one of the biggest perks getting to live overseas and not have to pay taxes. So yeah if you're not meeting the local tax requirements like. Let's say you know you have to spend more than six months to meet the local tax incentives. So if you're spending five months in his country you can just kind of move along and do the visa shuffle where you essentially don't legally have to pay taxes so there is a lot of incentives for that in the visa shovel. That's another thing. How does the visa and work permit sort of concerns impacted digital nomad. Yeah i've always found that. There's there's always some sort of way. Some sort of legal way to stay in a country long-term whether that setting up a local business and applying for a remote work visa or just doing a visa run where you leave the country. Go across the border and then come back for example here in tbilisi georgia. One of the reasons we came here is because they have a one year tourist visa. When that one year tourist visa leaves you can do in our border run to armenia and come back in now. Things have changed a lot recently. But there's some sort of way if you do find a country they absolutely love to stay there a little bit longer. Had a sense from reading your book that you you in colombian you liked columbia but then it got complicated from a legal point of view. You decided to leave it and settle down in the republic of georgia. Which is much more lenient. Yes oh i. Essentially had a spreadsheet tracking the days. That i'd spend in the united states the days that i'd spend in columbia and i just got kind of tired of that so finding a country like georgia which is extremely welcoming to lots of different countries and has a long tourist visa option. That was one of the biggest incentives for the reason we came here. Imagine if you never had to come home from vacation. Mike's begun skis guest from his current home. Base in tiblisi georgia right now on travel with. rick steves. mike's been working and traveling fulltime since twenty eleven on a journey. That's taken him to more than eighty countries. He shares his. I tend advice for creating your own international career as a digital nomad in his book. Global career how to work anywhere and travel forever. His website includes blog entries on how to get started teaching english overseas and inching online business and living light with a minimum of steph. It's that global career book dotcom so this is really a new frontier mike. You built a life in different cities as you've traveled. You mentioned parachuting into australia. I would imagine parachuting means drop in with no connections and put your life together. What what's the routine of that. What happens when you enter a new country. You don't know anybody you don't know the laws you just want to put up some roots. Yeah i would say honestly. It's almost easier to meet people overseas. Because you're going to be connecting with other expats. Who are in kind of the same boat. So they're much more open to meeting new crowds. There's always a lot of events in for the example of australia. I was on the working holiday visa which allows americans to essentially find any job that in australian do and the majority of people that are going. There are looking for fruit. Picking jobs and other type of backpacker jobs. But i went in with the mentality to find a tech marketing job and within seven days i was able to find a really nice job where i had flexible remote working. I was getting a much higher salary than most other. Backpackers in was something that i was proud of something that i could put on my resume and continue building my career so i think just having that different mindset when i arrived to australia to really connect with people to start applying for jobs and just kind of immerse myself as soon as possible so mike when i think about working abroad i've always thought countries are sorta of threatened by somebody from a wealthier country that comes into their country and and displaces local worker by doing a job that that local worker could do. Therefore they don't wanna let that american work in that country but when you're working remotely that takes that whole concern off. The table doesn't it. You have nothing to do with taking the job of local worker when you are living there but working remotely. Yeah i definitely think. A lot of countries now are seeing that benefit with remote workers coming in. They're going to be spending a much higher salary than than the locals could potentially be employing a lot more people we employ some people here so we are giving it back to say and i'd say that's that's going to be like the new future where you know instead of having tourists come in for a few weeks you know. They can appeal the tourists but they can also appeal to these longer term digital nomads. Who might spend six months to a year and and probably invest a lot more sustainability into the economy. So they aren't worried necessarily about people taking jobs. Yeah you are kind of in this gray area of being an online worker. Now for ten years you've been on the road of you had the same phone number the same bank account the same social media identity. I mean are you still the american you were before you left america. Ten years ago what about you know. How do you have those kind of roots or stability in your life or you. Yes oh since i was eighteen. I've had the same phone number. I was able to afford it over to google voice. And there's a lot of good options for if you wanna have an international phone number a us based phone number so to answer your question. I'm definitely a different person than when i left Around the age of twenty one. I've grown in a lot of different areas personally and professionally. But i still maintain a lot of my identity friendships and family in the united states. I still keep in contact with everyone. That i that i can over the years but again i've definitely grown and kind of may travel part of my identity. It's something that. I'm extremely passionate about something that i love and i want to help others get started in a much faster pace than i did. As you've lived abroad and worked remotely from abroad. You've dealt with cultural differences. I would imagine tempers of life Respect for seniority issues of pervasive corruption racism lack of trust in institutions. Terrible red tape. One society takes risks. And another won't encourage you to take risks. What are your experiences somebody who works abroad. But who is fundamentally a traveler. What have you learned between countries while you know how much time do you have. I mean i could talk about this for hours. I've learned so much by living overseas and it's the thing that's opened up my eyes and helped me grow so much as a an individual and i would say anybody who is out. There is looking to really grow themselves. Doing solo travel our. You're really just putting yourself out there on. Your own is probably one of the most personally beneficial. Things that i've done is far as learning about other cultures. Studying my masters degree in south korea was probably one of those big culture shocks where i always felt kind of at home in europe and australia and new zealand but when i got to live and study overseas in south korea i was studying with ninety percent. Were south ends. It really immersed me into a completely different culture that they really just accepted me as kind of like a younger brother in the mba program. And i would say that was probably one of the most beneficial ways that i grew inside the classroom outside of the classroom with learning about this new culture new language. What kind of makes these people driven every day. And the korean people that i was studying with an had been such lovely people that they kind of accepted me with open arms. I mean you've you've experienced that sort of intimacy with the culture. Actually putting down roots there in korea in columbia in the republic of georgia in czech republic. And you're still got an american phone number. It is so fascinating today has been digital. No man mike. And mike's book is global career outta work anywhere and traveled for ever make. I'd like to finish off with a moment when you were working as a digital nomad realized this. This is going to be minority. Yeah that's a great question. Rick i would save my first digital nomad job when i was in australia and i of was going there with the mindset to find a job that was gonna further my career and i was looking for something remote. I'd been until this point. I'd been working kind of physical locations that had me tied to that city or that location but my job in australia was essentially. I could work from my laptop. And once i kind of freedom. It was a one way street where i knew there is no going back from being able to wake up. Go to my kitchen makes some coffee turn on my laptop and start answering emails and start. Doing my job knew that was the wife. And that was the light bulb moment for me. That really clicked where this was around. Two thousand fifteen. And i had this remote work life i could travel. I could work from my laptop and once. I knew that there was no going back. I knew that from that point on. I would only be remote working and again it's been once you're introduced to it. I think a lot of people now are going to have trouble going back into an office because they realize so. Many benefits of remote working make listening to your experiences reminds me that. I've got this favorite phrase in italy for some reason. I just love to say bone lavoro to people. it's like. Enjoy your work born in the borough and always like to say happy travels and as a digital nomad. You can have bone lavar and you can have happy. Travels in. sounds like you figured it out. Mike bernardo and happy travels. thanks so much rig. Happy travels to yourself the history history as going across the business when it's basically bony student venice. She decided to stay. She's made it her home base now for twenty years pumpkins and exploring and writing about italy. Since he was a student a few years ago he was even awarded honorarium by the government of india for his contributions to promoting italian culture and cuisine around the world. They join us next on. Travel with rick. Steves for lagoon-side view. Venice stay with us. Before twenty twenty. The tourist crowds in the romantic canals in piazza's of venice were said to be loving it to death in november twenty nineteen that deepest flooding and fifty years so the city with exceptional aqua alta high tides. Our friend stacy kabbani who lives. There had to rescue her artworks from her ground floor studio. We got her on the phone. Share her experience with us and with fred pumpkin bread to longtime italy expert who's followed the slow progress venice's made at controlling the rising waters from its lagoon. They join us now for a conversation. We recorded shortly after the flooding and just a few weeks before the pandemic closures as we reflect on the future of venice thank you. Thanks for having me no fred. You wrote your thesis at. The university was on the what was called the death of venice. Tell us why we have the aqua alta and what's the back story of this flooding venice. Well historically there were always tied at full moon and so on and the city throughout its history had periodic flooding. But nothing like what we've seen in recent times. The problem really became aggravated the way. So many things did with the rise of fascism in the nineteen twenties. Mussolini decided that he would widen the three natural inlets of the lagoon understand that the lagoon separates venice in the north from the adriatic sea. In the south. The three in length recalled lido mullah moco and keo joh- and by widening them. It allowed more water to come into the lagoon more saltwater. He did that because he put stupidly oil refineries in the mainland town of marghera. So the oil tankers would go out of the lagoon into the adriatic. And ever since we've had this problem and to that that the pollution that was result of the refineries plus agricultural runoff meant that the foundations the fundamentals of the city of venice were eaten away so by the nineteen seventies. Venice was sinking. Because of all of this rot long story short. The city was actually supported and made stronger. It sinks ever so slightly now. We have a new problem. Climate change has led to melting to hire waters bigger storms so that most of the recent disastrous floods in venice have been in the first decade in the second decade of the twenty first century including three horrible days in november twenty nineteen. The high water really is a It's a perfect storm of of different variables. You've got to win. You've got a high tide with a full moon. You've got changes caused by the development of the region and we've got venice's inability to to do anything about it. It's sort of a helpless situation. Isn't it describe what it's like stacey because as a tourist. I've been there and you know it's kind of you take photographs of it and they've got the elevated walkways and some people pull on their hip boots and it's something to it's kind of exciting but you're living there and you've got the reality of of mold and bacteria and humidity problems with your electricity. What's it like to live in venice after a big flood. I think that i mean obviously. I'm not venetian as we all know. I've adopted the city as as my home. I have to live in this beautiful delicate place that to me. Hold so much. Magic to the high waters are part of my conscious decision to live here. I don't wanna complain about them too. Because it's part of the choice that has been made and the venetians have that same sort of confident energy. You're just you're cleaning up after the high waters you fred one thing that i find really interesting when we think about the aqua to the high water is pesticide market where most of the tourists think of as the ground zero for their venetian experience is about the lowest part of the city. It's the first place to flood and when you look at it the columns for the doges palestine to be getting shorter and shorter in understand it crickets because overtime when the water when the city sinks in the past it was the city thinking rather than the than the water rising they would take up the stones and marco and put down another layer of sand and put the stone back into place and slowly. The altitude of the city would would rise to make up for the the sinking of it to end. Owner is that you are correct. And that's a certain kind of patching for lack of a better term that they would do in the absence of real solution. But frankly the piazza. San marco is where the money is made. It's it's a wonderful place. I always tell people. Go the piazza san marco. After all the tourist leave sit there at about eleven pm When just a couple of the bars are still open On one side during the days where the sun is uc the german wagner. Went to that one on the other side in the shade where the italians went because they did not want to be in the sun. So there are two rival. Cafes had phase one another but by nine eight. it's quiet and even on that big beautiful square. You sit theory. Look the five coppola of the basilica of san marco. You see the four horses of san marco. Everything comes into relief in a different way and so it too can have its beauty once all the tourists have gone. That's why you need to stay overnight. In venice for a week would be better. You know i. I was filming. Wants to shows in a row over ten or twelve twelve days. It was really situated in venice. And i get up early every morning and walk across town and it became my my favorite time of the day. Was that two hours before the tour groups arrive. You know when. It's just people setting up and i loved it and the same thing as fred said being out after after most of the groups are back on their cruise ships and back on their hotels on the mainland we're looking at the impacts of tourist crowds and high waters in venice on travel with rick. Steves our guest sir. Fred plotkin author of the classic italy for the gourmet traveller and american born stacey kabbani. Who's lived in venice. Since arriving there has an art student tom from sherwood. Wisconsin is on the line at eight seven seven three three three rick with a question about visiting more of the islands in the lagoon. What do you recommend seeing on the island. So moreno barranco torricelli lido. I'm not sure how to pronounce it. But we deca and then the cemetery island. I wanted to find out what you recommended on those islands. Okay well let's let's fred. I explain what is the lagoon and then we'll talk about each of those islands. Thanks for your call tom. Thank you so back story. When attila the hun invaded aquileia which was a roman settlement. The people of aquileia move to a hundred eighteen very inhospitable islands in the northern lagoon of the adriatic. They created finish venezia in other words rising leica phoenix so this is aquileia transformed to venice. And therefore they built the city that was based on number one women having more prominence than had been seen anywhere else in that part of the world number-two on democratically elected governments and each of the islands developed its own administration and each of the islands took on its own personality and characteristics so that morono and boudin were glass making happened again. Romans began making glass but it was in venison nearby. that perfume was developed. Would they would take flowers. Combine it with with alcohol from wine and put it in beautiful bottles. So all of this evolved in venezuela where beauty became virtue more than ever before and everything had to be beautiful functional and distinctive. And therefore when you go for example to more donna and board. Oh yes they still make glass yes. Some of it is touristy but they have a glass museum and that's worth going to discover the history of glass-making in that part of the world so fred. That's i love that comment that notion that is tied in with beauty and venison. When you travel there you really do experienced that but if you go way back to the very beginnings of venice my understanding stacey correct me if i'm wrong but we're both tour guides and this is i think the story that we like to tell the people on the mainland kept getting. After the fall of rome they kept getting run over by barbarians and they finally said enough of this. I you know we're gonna move out into the lagoon and hope the barbarians don't like water and they actually left their farming. They went out into the lagoon. Kind of almost deforested. That part of the venedetto by getting all these trunks and pounding him into the mud to give themselves foundations and they became fishermen and then traders and that really was the birth of venice in the dark ages of europe. What was their magic potion. How did venice become so powerful than well. I feel so exactly you everything you just said rick and don't forget about the salt harvesting okay. So salt harvesting was a very valuable trade before refrigeration. It was critical people and of course of by our poor man's fishermen cuisine that a typical venetian cuisine Has a lot to do with salted food. Bokola for example one of the of venetian diorite. Belinda and buckle. And i'm thinking about your Comment about deforestation typical roman action and the street trunks You know every time. The tides are exceptionally low. the Cities foundation is at risk for exposure to air. Which can eat away at those treetrunks which makes our city in unstable And that's another conversation that has come up in relationship also to the powerful cruise ships that come through the canal for it. What would your tip be for going out to moreno. Enjoying the glass industry in the heritage of glass from very close to san marco this of to the takes you there and what i always tell people in venice. The journey within the city is part of the pleasure. It's not just. Let's not pay attention to we get their look at how the light changes look at churches and vanish from view. Look when suddenly their seabirds at our landing on the water and following your up pareto. You're still within the city but when you get to the island of morono or board on other near to one another one of the things you immediately notice is that the houses in some way seem more modern. They're more brightly painted than elsewhere in the city. The have intense colors kind of like if you've been to norway and you see red. Houses were wider gold houses standing against the water. It's the same thing in this part. And there's a reason for that. The buckle the cod trade came from norway and the venetian traders than the and traders saw what it looked like in the north and brought back that imagery and painted the houses in modiano in budo the way they sought nor withers even an opera about the fish trade between norway in venice. I've always thought borana it's got this it's more saturated. It's more more colorful. It's got pastels in the extreme. And i've always thought my my photographs look better in verano and revealed at their fascinating destination in the lagoon is also the island of Cello thomas about tort cello and my understanding is. This is the in some ways the oldest part of venice but it was decimated by a malaria. Attack a thousand years ago or something but it has the oldest church in venice. And when i go to cello and when i go to top the belltower i look at in the lagoon and i can imagine that very first venice from those refugees coming from the mainland cc. What's your experience on tour cello. I absolutely in love with talent. When i drag all of our clients out there on on regain day because i just love it and rick. You've been going there forever as well as fred and do you remember when it was still just a dirt road to take you down to the oldest church in the lagoon now. It's all nice the the fundamentals all bricked up. Nice and there you can see that. The local people have become very involved in farming out there in barranco and toward cello. There's a lot of push towards that farm to table here in the city as well and local restaurants and and there are younger farmers out there. And that's something that sort of coming back from from another time and i. i love that about the torch. Shallow stacy goonies on the line from her home and arts doodo in venice and telephoto. Fred pumpkins in the studio of the radio foundation. In new york we're looking at issues of over tourism and flooding from its rising lagoon that were frequently plaguing venice before the pandemic shutdown much more to the lagoon. And we could talk for hours about it but fred. And stacy. I'd love for each of you just to share one other dimension. A ninety percent of the tourists go to moreno. Barranco entered cello. What would you recommend. People take seriously as a sightseeing destination in laguna fred. I love keo jonky. Yoga is technically on the mainland. It's where the po river the brenta canal are. It is the fish market venice and these magnificent species of fish that wind up venetian tables are found in kyoto. So if you love food if you love fish that's where it all begins. And that's a big into sizable city on the south end of the lagoon. I think it's spelled c. h. I. o. i. a. and in just it feels like venice without the cutesiness. A workaday town with as fred said a thriving market stacy how about you. I am a huge fan of san francesco than lavinia. This beautiful small islands. That saint francis pass through once upon a time and they're still community of brothers there. It's very very beautiful. Natural space to be in. And i just have to add one more if i may rick because certosa is not as difficult to get to us and they live in. Yeah turtles is closer it. You could maybe combine it with a trip out to the cemetery which is an amazing place to visit. Certosa is kind of an up and coming island for younger people. They have a lot of community activities going on out there. They've boat parking. There's a company of young people who have designed electric boat motors. You can take a tour with them. Rabbits on the island of churchill avenue. So your first destination was saint francis. I send francesco della lavinia. It's a little farther out if you can get there. Maybe if you're going on a private tour or with a taxi that's gonna take you do like a torch shallow slash san francisco than lavinia visit and exactly and it's pretty convenient if you're visiting the cemetery or if you're maybe at the arsenal coming around the backside there okay now somebody mentioned send me kelly and that is of course the little cemetery island and it's just it's on the way to moreno for what about the cemetery from your experience. Well one of the great things to do invent a sad though it is is to go to a funeral there or at least be present when it happens because the hearses in are gondolas or small craft that convey the morning family as well as the coffin to the cemetery and it's a very somber thing because ben who pilot the boats are dressed in black the way you would see in funerary observances elsewhere but on water. And then when you go there. It's a beautiful beautiful setting. There's a musician section. There's an artist section priests as you said and if you think it's quiet on the mainland events you should try the cemetery. No place quieter. The whole world. Tranquillo fred plotkin author of italy for the gourmet traveller and stacey cavani. Wonderful tour guide an artist. Who's resident in venice. Thank you both very much for giving us a better appreciation of the lagoon of venice wreck. We enjoy hearing how our listeners described their travel impressions surprises in the form of haiku poem. Every so often someone sends us something a bit more elaborate way back in the second year of travel with rick steves listener from the tidewater area of virginia sent us a poem she wrote about the rising waters events. We thought you'd enjoy hearing it again. Rachel ugh reads it for us. Maureen mullen from virginia beach right says this poem she composed about venice she whispered. Venice is sinking. She whispers as revolved plays couple sway while the earth boat floats on water rising reaching for a hand firmly tucked away in closed to a lovers grasp palazzo's and pigeons gondolas in moonlight bridges. That cy she wonders is venice sinking. Or am i travel with. Rick steves by tim tatton with cosma hall down bardsley added. Rick steves europe and edmonds washington. We'd love to get an original haiku poem that you've written about the impressions you get from your travels. We might even read it on the air one day there. A link for setting schumer said. Rick steves dot com slash radio. Let's get together again next week with more travel with ricky. I'm rick steves. I love art and in my new book. Europe's top one hundred masterpieces. I share my favorites with gorgeous photos and vivid descriptions. It's a greatest hits sweep through art history via the finest paintings sculpture and texture ever. It's all in europe's top one hundred masterpieces for the traveler. It's available now at rick. Steves dot com.

athens Rick steves greece rick Us georgia venice olympics Steves europe stacey kubota tbilisi roya ekos ghazi australia mike fred Greg coffee Mike joins
Negro History Week launched / Bonfire of the Vanities - February 7

This Day in History Class

15:32 min | 8 months ago

Negro History Week launched / Bonfire of the Vanities - February 7

"Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. is that shakespeare. It's geico here. Yeah that shakespeare from one of his unpublished works would be not for awakening. May give it the batteries for fifteen minutes. Could save you fifteen percent or more. No it's from geico. 'cause they help save people money i hate to break it to you but geico got it from shakespeare gyco fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Do you like fresh out of the chocolate chip cookies. You love wholesome hetero normative lifestyle like pretending that many cycles just don't exist then you'll hate. Tampons rock tampon. Rock is a scripted. Comedy podcast kinda like frightens except gay and with black people so actually really not like friend right but it is about friends and it's a musical sorta but that's all the time we have so binge all the episodes now on iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. Hey y'all were rerunning episodes today. Enjoy the show. Hi i'm eaves and welcome to this day in history class. A show that uncovers a little bit more about history every day The day was february. Seventh nineteen twenty historian. Dr carter d woodson now affectionately known as the father of history month. Blindst a negro history week in partnership with the association for the study of negro life in history with since insistence on bringing black history into the spotlight. Talent popular notions about black people's role in american history helped preserve history and culture and encouraged by people to draw inspiration from the past within got a masters degree from the university of chicago and doctorate from harvard in history. The coming the second african american to get a phd in history from the university within published his first book the education of the negro prior to eighteen sixty one in nineteen fifteen and he co founded the association for the study of negro life in history that same year. The next year the organization began publishing the journal of negro history now called the journal of african american history within noticed how often black people were left out of conversations about american history and when blindfolds were depicted they were often portrayed as racist misrepresentation and stereotypes like in the nineteen fifteen film the birth of a nation within have been studying black history for years and he recognized the need for more historically accurate and less biased accounts of black historical events and figures. His philosophy was that history is more than just facts about the past. History should be balanced and acknowledged the true role of black people in it without distorting facts. What since mission to educate people on the actual contributions of african americans in history and improve relations between black and white people would drive his work for the rest of his life. What sim once did. If a race has no history it has no worthwhile tradition. It becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world and it stands in danger of being exterminated would since efforts served to counter all the damage that had been done to people's perception of black history in advance a new understanding of black culture and accomplishments within documented or histories from slaves collected artifacts and historical documents of black history sponsored research projects in wrote hundreds of essays and dozens of books on black subjects for years. The historical profession had excluded black scholars of history and presented historical inaccuracies about african americans. But there was no organization black historians welcome to join at the time. White publications often reject it research. Black history in libraries and archives didn't carry primary materials about african americans so woodson set out to create platforms were black historians could present and publish their research. After the association for the study of negro life in history in the journal of negro history were up and running woodson founded associated publishers to ensure black scholars would have their work published. These organizations did face financial setbacks despite the fact that they were to secure some funding from black scholars and major institutions but they succeeded in promoting black history and the study of black history and they increase public awareness of how black history had been ignored and manipulated and in nineteen twenty six within in the association for the study of negro life. History proposed observance of a negro history week to celebrate achievements of black people. It would take place in february because that was the month. Of abraham lincoln's birthday and frederick douglass is observed birthday events that were already celebrated in black communities but within one it people to celebrate the contributions of all black people. Not just two men who people might not even have the most. Comprehensive knowledge of announcement of negro history week brought black history to a wider audience. Schools around the united states began including curriculum to celebrate negar history. Week and black history clubs began for me so the association began providing study materials to educators and if formed branches across the country and in one thousand nine hundred thirty seven the association for the study of negro life in history began publishing the negro history bulletin now called black history bulletin. Its goal is to provide educators with peer reviewed information about the history of africans and people of the african diaspora since hope. Though was that celebration of black history would extend beyond one week. He believed black. History should be acknowledged year round and he imagined a day. When the week-long commemoration would no longer be necessary as early as the nineteen forty s. People began celebrating black history. Throughout the month of february and in nineteen seventy-six the association for the study of african american life and history which had recently changed. Its name exclude. The word negro declared february black history month. Keep us president. Gerald ford proclaimed black history month. A national observance debate continues over the necessity of black history month. Some claim the celebration of black history should be confined to a single month while others claim the commemoration is racist but today plaque history month is celebrated in the us canada the uk and other places around the world. I'm eve's coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can subscribe to this day in history class point apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. We'll see you tomorrow good afternoon. Would you like to try free. Sample of our double fudge brownie. Oh sure that's very good. I'll just take one more just to be sure. Yep still very good. Some things never change like never being able to take just one free sample and gyco saving folks. Lots of money on their car insurance macadamia nut. i taste. Take one more sir. I thought so fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more yes. It's black history month. I love companies. It's drive to celebrate black achievements. Not just for a month but every single day like our friends at kohl's they know that i strenght lies in diversity. Which is the driving force. Behind their kohl's diversity design council a group that includes black designers who curate collections that reflect black culture. It's a mixture of products designs and messages that celebrates tradition and history unity and ally ship kindness and hope these designers pay tribute to the major moments of black history while serving as modern day. Examples of black excellence very cool. But kohl's is doing more than just elevating 'black voices. They're also raising awareness of the health crisis happening within black communities. Kohl's donated one hundred thousand dollars to alliance for a healthier generation. This is a group that works with schools youth serving organizations businesses and communities to help kids develop lifelong healthy habits and support new programs that address specific health issues facing black families. Kohl's is out there making a difference. And i just love that. Learn more at kohls dot com. Hello everyone. I'm eve's welcome to this day in history class where we take tiny of history every day. The day was february seventh. Fourteen ninety-seven followers of the dominican friar girolamo savonarola burned objects that were considered vanities like books artwork and instruments though this is known as the bonfire of the vanities the term generally refers to burning that religious authorities believe incite people to send savannah rola became a dominican monk in fourteen seventy five and the following years. He began teaching novices and lecturing on philosophy. He studied with very lecturers concentrating on theology by fourteen eighty two. He had transferred to the convent. Of san marco in florence and soon he was preaching in the church of san lorenzo. He gained a reputation for his learning and austerity but at first he did not get much attention for his preaching in fourteen eighty four though he reported his first vision about the scourge of the church. He began delivering prophetic sermons. And he preached in the church of san jim. Yano and fourteen eighty five enduring land and fourteen eighty six he spoke about the wrath of god and sinfulness and he called for reform in the church at this point his popularity began to grow sonal roll up preached in several different cities for a while but in fourteen ninety. He returned to florence. He soon began preaching in the cathedral of santa maria. Del fiore criticizing materialism and the leaders of the world. He also criticised the policies of the government which florentina ruler lorenzo medici offense to though. Lorenzo threatened to banish him. Lorenzo soon died and savonarola continued. Preaching savonarola prophesized the scourge of italy railing against vanity and corruption. He soon led his convent to break from the ruling organization of monasteries. That it belonged to the of lombardy. He advocated for other convents to do the same and he ordered that his monks give up their possessions so that they could raise money for impoverished people once medici rule ended. He began suggesting new policies in his sermons. Plus his prophecies were painting out. Savonarola quickly became a political authority. He did not hold public office but under his guidance a new republic was established in fourteen. Ninety five he immediately set out to help impoverished people demanding more jobs and telling the churches to melt their gold and silver to buy food for the hungry. He also called for more modesty songs. Deemed profane where replaced with hymns people began wearing unadorned clothing and art and other inappropriate objects were burned. Savonarola did have enemies like the beauty and the tippety but he continued to pursue drastic reform in light of the abuses of the church. He denounced jokes sex gambling nude paintings jewellery and other luxuries as well. As the humanistic culture of the renaissance he shutdown traditional festivals and replaced them with religious festivals and fourteen ninety seven. His supporters gathered donations from foreign teen citizens for a fire of repentance on february seventh. The carried vanities objects like mirrors dresses and cosmetics to a fire in the piazza dei lasting area and burnt them. This wasn't the first bonfire sponsored by the dominicans. So it is one of the most notable mines hope alexandra. The sticks ordered him to stop preaching but he refused in may fourteen ninety seven. The pope excommunicated savonarola who did not stop preaching until march fourteen ninety eight just two months after his last sermon after being convicted of heresy salmonella was burnt at the stake. I'm jeff coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. Spend some of your daily social media time with us at teeth. I h c typecast. Or if you would prefer to email us you can send us a message at this day. At iheartmedia dot com. I truly hope you enjoy today's show. We'll be back tomorrow with another episode for more podcasts. From iheartradio iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by ford. The ford f series has been america's pickup truck leader for forty three years counting and the all new twenty twenty one f. One fifty is completely redesigned to be the toughest most productive f one fifty ever then tear has gotten a huge upgrade with more luxury and comfort than there's ever been an available tailgate work surface. Help simplify and support. Your work includes guides for measuring an even a built in slot for a smartphone or tablet. Computer tough this mark can only be called f one fifty check out the all new twenty twenty one ford f one fifty at ford dot com built fort. Proud built ford tough.

association for the study of n geico Dr carter d woodson the journal of negro history n shakespeare woodson the journal of negro negro history bulletin now cal savonarola association for the study of a apple kohl kohl's diversity design counci university of chicago Kohl frederick douglass Savonarola america
Tally: Markel Murder Trial Update #2: Wendi Adelson Takes the Stand  | 11

Over My Dead Body

13:58 min | 2 years ago

Tally: Markel Murder Trial Update #2: Wendi Adelson Takes the Stand | 11

"Over my dead body is brought to you by Madison. Read my producer Heather. has this really beautiful curly hair with Blonde highlights but she tells me she said issues coloring your hair at home. She worried about what ingredients were in there for the actually damaging her hair. Well Heather Medicine read at home. Hair color is made with ingredients. You can feel good about it's a Monja free and it's also infused with Carrington in Ginseng root extract so not only do you get great color but shiny healthy looking hair best of all coloring. Your hair with Madison Reed is incredibly convenient. They deliver it right to your door on your schedule. Whenever you're ready you can call your hair and under an hour in the comfort of your own home. Get Ammonia free multi tonal hair-color delivered to your door for less than twenty five dollars at Madison Dash Reed Dot Com listeners of over my dead body get at ten percent off plus free shipping on their first color kit with code over my that's code over my at Madison Dash Ry Dot Com from wondering I'm Matthew share and this is over my dead body. Maybe he'll do. You've got his sins on your hand This is the second a series of updates about the murder trial of Dan Marquel. Wendy Adelson is barely spoken publicly since her ex husband's murder brown Friday. Wendy took the stand good afternoon Johnson good afternoon. Are you doing okay term. The fight nervous. Am I nervous. Yeah yeah some nervous lawyers question Wendy. Did she reveal anything new. You know the consequences of not being truthful here of course and you also have a separate obligation as an attorney to write course now. Do you know who killed Denmark Tallahassee Democrat reporter. Carl headers was in the courtroom. Hey Again Carl. Hey bad so wendy. The ADELSON's appearance came right at the end of a long day in court and for most of the day now retired investigator Craig is been on the stand answering questions about how his theory about a murder for hire plot come together but then the prosecution called Wendy Adelson. Please introduce yourself and spell your name. My name is Wendy Adelson W. E. N. D. I. Ad L. S. Oh what was that moment like most of the day on Friday there was you know awesome. General Buzz that Wendy Adelson would be called to testify and as the day sort of went on and on and on we got to about four o'clock. It looked like maybe she wouldn't be called when they said her name I don't think a lot of people were expecting that at least in the gallery and the people that were watching she's wearing a grey blazer. Dress Wendy was very composed and very stoic when she took the stand her in her attorney was there in the courtroom most of the day just sort of watching and whatever nervousness was there. It didn't last very long or at least she was able to overcome that and and really focused on the answering the questions as asked she is an attorney so it's not like she's unfamiliar with this entire. Fox's so before we go onto the actual content of her testimony. Tell me about this. You had been even covering this case for a really long time. You've been writing about Wendy and her her divorce from Dan Marquel. What was it like to actually see her on the stand talking about the case after so long I've been writing about this case and written. Wendy's Vein Watt never actually met her in person to see her. Take the stand during this during the trial of two people accused of killing her ex husband a little shock surprise you know back. July there was talk that she may not testify she'd given a deposition to defense attorneys gene and enacting their Fifth Amendment Rights during those and I think one of the things I was as she did take the stand does Kinda the wondering what she would actually say during questioning and then so it was a lot of anticipation you know in those few moments between when they called her name when they start actually asking question now you are testifying today under a state subpoena correct correct and that state subpoena gives you immunity for your testimony mony right yes. Can you explain to the jury since you're an attorney. What's immunity. Is Freedom from prosecution. There's a couple of different kinds of immunity community in Florida. The one that Wendy was testifying under basically prosecutors can't use anything that she was to say during her testimony in that courtroom against terror whoever that doesn't preclude investigators from filing charges or charging her in connection with this murder to that means that anything you say today can't use against you if the state decides to arrest you are on the state isn't going to decide to wrestling on. Do you know what they consider. You suspect I don't know so the prosecution begins its questioning and they essentially walk us through Wendy. The it'll sends relationship with Dan how Wendy and Dan moved to Tallahassee and how their relationship broke down. Would you consider your divorce with Mr Marcal cal to be a nasty divorce. I think most divorces aren't very pleasant. Okay but this one was like really unpleasant right. I found getting divorced to be unpleasant. Yes and can you tell us a little bit about some of the problems in the marriage that the prosecution asked about a lot of the questions of the prosecution asked about their marriage really stems from more than five hundred pages of divorce first filing you gotta realize that at the time of the murder bleacher SORTA starting from zero they don't really know a whole lot about either one of either Dan Marquel or Wendy Adelson and so all of the questioning on Fridays surrounded sort of the fallout from their marriage it talked about the sort of dishes back and forth court filing that had to do with custody of the children visitation rights of Wendy's mother Donna Wilson you know George Kaplan the lead prosecutor on this case did ask about what if you look if you just read the court filing seems like very petty things about Ns rackets and different things that were in the house that they seem to be fighting over Wendy during her testimony really it. Ah led us to believe that those were minor things that had sort of been blown up by prosecutors and by their theory of this case about how contentious divorced actually was that didn't seem that those things were such a big deal to her during her testimony. I notice in the emails that your mother referring to who I think is Dan Marquel as Jabar's. What does that mean. dippers was a nickname that that I gave Danny when he was being really difficult and causing me. A lot of pain was sort of a nickname I gave him to make him feel less threatening so it was a derogatory thing. I wouldn't say it was drawing Tori. Did you call him that to. His face knowing called them Danny to face at some point we get to the issue of Charlie Adelson. WHO's Wendy's brother now. Tell us about this. Tell us about the the vein of questioning Charlie did according to Wendy Charlie like Dan she that he probably wasn't charlie favorite person there were several Walker family members that were upset and sort of angry with Markelle. They were going through the divorce proceedings. Would you describe your parents as being over involved in your a personal business as compared to other people's parents yeah. I don't know but Charlie was the only one who seems to have a joked about hiring a hitman. Can you tell us about that. Did that come up with Wendy was understand that part of this case about Charlie Adelson joking not hardly hitting his then how for a couple years now we saw in Wendy's first interview with police three or four hours after Marquel had been shot. She told detective Craig isolate her brother had sort of made this audion joke about hiring a hitman he tended to repeat himself and sometimes he would make jokes that weren't very funny about all kinds of things did. Charlie ever say that he considered all possible all options to take care of the problem the problem being Dan Marcal Captain Meg attorneys sort of directly asked her about is she knew Til Danmark hell and she said no and then they immediately follow that up with your brother San Marco. I don't believe so I don't believe so you know. Take that to mean whatever you like but I think that that is a question that really played into the prosecution's theory in this case. That's interesting one of the another another fascinating thing that comes up up his the issue of Wendy changing her sons last names from Marquel. Can you talk a little bit about that and and how Wendy responded to those questions Wendy when he talked about you know in the in the time since Dan Martell deaths or the intense media scrutiny that has come on her and her family even before their investigators theory of this murder for hire was out there She said that she changed her son her. Tucson last names to Adelson Adelson to protect them from that media scrutiny. Have you been keeping up with the media coverage in this case. I don't watch any media related to this case so but oh you are aware of the attention that has been brought on this case. I'm aware only because of the constant death threats that I receive yes okay so just so here's the big the big question the perhaps the biggest question from from Wendy's testimony. What does it mean for the prosecution the defence in and more specifically I guess has this changed anything for the case. I don't think Wendy's testimony change anything for the case but I think it in a way sort of bolsters. The prosecution's case a little bit she. She said she really doesn't know much about the theory of the case She's really unaware of what's been going on on. That's what she says that she's unaware of what's been happening and but some of her answers especially the ones about whether she thinks her family was involved ball in killing. Dan Martell think really add some weight to the prosecution's case particularly sorta before word answer about whether brother had anything to do with killing Dan Markelle. L. And I don't believe so you as a juror. You have to wonder what does that me because someone like. Wendy is so careful about what she says right so you you you think when response comes like that that it's loaded in some way. I guess sure and she she knows that every word that you say on understands is going to be scrutinized. The meaning of everywhere they'd say is going to be sure Nice D- Listen Carl. I know we've got a few more weeks ahead of US or at least a couple more weeks and we'll catch up with you really soon. I'll talk you later. Thanks Carl. We'll continue following pulling the Dan Marquel murder trial as it unfolds and we'll have special updates exclusively on wondering plus. That's also where you can listen to both seasons of over my dead body ad free sign up today wondering dot com forward slash plus. That's W. O. N. D. E. R. Y. Dot Com slash P. L. us from wondering this is a special episode to pull over my dead body. If you have a tip about a story involving two people pushed to their limits and could be the next season of over my dead body email us at tips us at wondering dot Com. That's tips at wondering dot Com. If you'd like to help us spread the word. Please give us a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe were available on Apple podcasts spotify Pandora in every major listening as well as on wondering dot com over my dead body was written and reported by me. Matthew share and Eric Benson associate producer is key over my dead body body is executive produced by George Lavender Marshal Louis Hernan Lopez for wonder Sir.

Wendy Wendy Adelson Dan Marquel murder Wendy Charlie Wendy Adelson W. E. N. D. Madison Dash Reed Dot Com Charlie Adelson attorney Adelson Adelson Dan Martell Madison Reed Dan Markelle Carl Dan ADELSON producer Madison Heather Medicine Craig
594 Basque Carnaval; Venice Sinking; Ghosts in Papua New Guinea

Travel with Rick Steves

51:19 min | 1 year ago

594 Basque Carnaval; Venice Sinking; Ghosts in Papua New Guinea

"Venice is built on foundation of problems. The fundamentally of the city of Venice were eaten away so by the Nineteen Seventies. Venice was sinking. Because of all of this rot. Coming up. We examine why Bennis recently had its worst flooding and fifty years. And how it's resident suffered through it. Chirac wins and the brain and the full moon. Everything combined perfectly to allow the one week of of pressure. We'll also hear what it's like to hike the length of the infamous Kucova trail across Papua New Guinea. It was the site of fierce battles during the second world. War The jungle at times oppressive. And all you can see is thirty. Seven shades of green and hear how to celebrate carnival like they do. In Basque country. Many people go in to see carnival. But you have to live. Let's see the world together in our head. It's travel with Rick Steves. Exceptionally high tides in the Venice Lagoon caused near record flooding in November. Twenty nineteen just a bit. We'll check in with Italy cultural expert Fred Plotkin and with a resident who had to clean up after the Aqua Alta flooded the ground floor of her home they'll share some interesting perspectives with us on. Why the high waters in Venice are getting more and more serious and travel writer? Canton's and tells us about one of the toughest hikes up his life when he crossed the historic coca trail Papua New Guinea. Let's start with a look at the Mardi Gras and Carnival celebrations going on in Basque country. The customs and street parties will vary from town to town one of the oldest cultures in Europe. The Basques include some interesting public festivities in the days leading up to the fasting period of length traditions. That sometimes go back further than anyone can remember for a peek at how they do carnival in Basque country. We're joined by Claire Noah. She's from Hess Barron in the French Basque country and a Gustin lives in San Sebastian. On the Spanish side of the border. Welcome Claire and Augustine. Thank you very much so first of all. You're both from best country. Claire who are the Basques just very briefly and the basket is one of the oldest civilization in Europe and we are divided on those two parts one in France in another Barton Spain and Augustine. Those the language of Basque people yes. We speak Basque language which we call Skater. Who Scatter I WANNA talk about. Carnival carnival basically is the blow out before lent that leads up to Holy Week and Easter. It goes way back to even pre Christian Times on trying to get through the winter and there's a hope for resurrection for new crops in the fields for the end of the hunger time and the darkest depths of winter. I think the meat was going to go bad. And they had to eat it. All or something or carnival. Carney is the word meat and that led up to forty days of denial lent and then Easter so we know Mardi Gras in New Orleans. That's basically fat Tuesday in French. And IT'S CARNIVAL TIME RIGHT. Turn tell me about carnival. Because it's a big deal in Basque country. A Gustin what is carnival in your perspective. As a person in Basque country we have to waste of Celebrating carnival the more more than Christian celebrations. There are more popular on the Spanish side on the more traditional Pagan celebrations. That you can find in the past country of France. The difference is the recent history. I mean this pagan celebrations were banned by the dictator Franco for thirty five years He banned the use of the language and all kind of Celebrations related to pass or and this was banned. Sue was probably lost the in that time. So let me get this straight. You've got Basque culture. Which is a lot of ways? The same in France and in Spain but carnival is a mix of Christian and pagan traditions. And when you see these crazy creatures jumping up and down in Europe in many cultures it's pre Christian and it's a way to integrate the the indigenous religion in ancient times with the Christian. The newer religion and Franco was allied very carefully with the Catholic Church in Spain. He didn't want any pagan influence in the Spanish Basque country so he said this is a Christian festival none of that Pagan stuff but in France they were more free to have let loose with the pagan craziness. Correct correct Franco considered himself the highest representation of the Catholic Church and turn the country into a religious state Now clear I would imagine in France. Then you have some pretty wild costumes when people dress up during carnival especially where the Pagans go crazy in the French side of the border. What is the carnival? Can you just were on radio but paint a picture for look like for me? It's colorful with many natural things so we will have flowers leaves and we will have ribbons. We will have a chilling chuck which is a small bells everywhere. So you have to hear the carnival and you have to say it's an explosion. Okay of joy. It's just a moment where you go out from last year and everything that went wrong and you wish something really good for the next one so you just have to explodes yourself and just let it go. Go out with your animal part of you. Let your animal free and you're inside and we all have this side in so we have just. This is the perfect moment just to and then you start again so you dress up. There's music there's staying up all night. What's going on in different places? You've got different carnivals into French part of the Basque country three provinces for example Nepali which is really famous. You've got cash Celtic. So those people are going from house to house every weekend before carnival low even after they go to each house. They had get to know the neighborhood. So it's kind of ritual and they'll go to every house they sing. They play music. They DANCE. They share several cups of wine. And then it's a big party the tired but it's it's really nice. This is so interesting because I've been going to the best country for a long time and I have to be honest. I feel there's more character and enthusiasm in Spain because the French Basques are more French to me. More controlled by Peres but here on carnival. You let that ask animal that when you hear Claire. Talking about that from the Spanish Basque side on Carnival do you relate to have an animal you're gonNA lose all And fortunately now we have just a couple of little towns in the north of Navarro which are having the celebration in which the these men are carrying big belts that are bouncing and making big noise. Dig Like cowbells accounting. Yes huge cultures. A lot of this You know animal caretaking in the Malki. As the purpose of it is to wake the nature awake. The youth. Springtime is communist very much related to the end of winter. Welcome in the New Year and also we can in the nature and the spring is coming. So he's very much really. That's something you can see in two different towns in the north of Pamplona Navarre and also a couple of towns in the area outside San Sebastian. When I think of eastern Spain anyways I think of processions solemn processions like in savvy and so on some Amazon Too Holy Week Carnival feels a little more. Just apart and in. Holy Week is more sacred. Yes especially in the spiny side. You'RE GONNA see is big. Parades like you'd like him to turn off taller than most popular. One people go from all the areas. Go and see this parade. Our guest from Basque country are Agustin Cerita from San Sebastian Spain and Claire. Moya from aspirin a little town outside zone in the southwest corner of France. They're sharing. What makes the days leading up to ash Wednesday special and Basque country and what their traditions include on both sides of the border so clear got this image of being in the middle of all this festivity and chaos and music and happy people help me just better understand it. First of all people are dressed up like animals. What kind of animals would they be? So demane animal is a bear. Okay so the bear is opening the spring so the bear will be around. He will care the Children. And then you've got people with long hats horns flowers mirrors and ribbons everywhere so mirrors on their head yet and ahead and hot long heads. Yeah long hunted. Punted has been these these what color the pointed with many flowers. So you need to represent nature. And then they hire a Cornucopia of life really. That's right okay. And what else have also skirt with A sheep wool the horns and then also a natural shoes at whatever you find in nature you do it like trees or whatever you find. These are a bunch of little ferry Elvis and so on coming out of the woods and stirring up all the energy of people. What about the music? What kind of music? We've got a lot of music really punchy. And a lot of songs linked to Legendary people are the witches. Or whatever would this be kind of just noisy ringing bells and hitting drums or is it actually melodic? We've got to we've got the drums and the bells just to make a lot of noise to wake everybody. And then we've got ours. We single out in the Basque country. So we have a songs with all the people getting together. It must be a time when the community feels like. It's one big family. Oh yes and that's part of the beauty. It's part of ritual to be together and have fun. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking about carnival in French country and Spanish. Basque country are guides are clearly and Augustine. Garissa sounds like a fun time to come to Basque country. What should I know about tourism about travel clarify? I'm coming to best country on the French side. Where will I go is there? There's a different energy in the small towns in the big cities I love. Sam's Ron Blue's can I just stay there and have a good time. Or what do you recommend so during Carnival time? I will reconcile on the loose just in front of the bay. You've got Zebu and they have the shocking gower which is the witch night. And you see those people with the bells and it's really and popular thing. I will go to see whoo. So which is the which night the Friday night the Friday night. Okay and Augustine. If you're coming to best this country in Spain how would you best enjoy it during carnival? I would suggest to stay in a big city and then move for today. Or maybe two days to these ton of Tolosa. Tolosa TILLERSON'S O. L. O. S. A. Tolosa like to loosen frontyard Spanish to lose would be Tolosa. And actually we call carnival in Yalta the AC or astaire still mysteriously Tuesday yes celebrations really Tuesday Mardi gras Tuesday fat or skinny. We have Thursday and Friday. Okay good but you're gonNA have a great time on that weekend and just to cap this beautiful discussion. I'd love both of you to share with me. Your favorite sort of childhood memory of carnival in your corner of Basque country. Clear if you think back. Just what's one memory that you just go? Wow that was crazy. Time to being demidov carnival because for many people they go in to seek. You have to leave it so you are in the middle. You're bit lost to get lost. And to see all those people looking with colors and animals and to be with them and to just distribute you food and like and you mean in the middle of it literally like there's crazy decorated people all around you and figuratively where you're letting yourself free to be overcome by. Yes so it's the and then you find your parents like Oh Great Nice Augustine. What's your case Being born and raised in a city like Sebastian and having a carnival celebrations as. You'll find anywhere else. Go into small towns in the Basque country France. That was an experience. Seen all these People dressed up in the traditional outfits and also representing these wild animals. That was something when I was a child to see these people carrying the big. How Belsen making that huge noise when you're a kid that's the kind of frighten and that is still even today. We can experience that. You're going to go to San Sebastian. If you happen to be there during carnival you can head on up to two Lhasa. Yeah on the Spanish side but if it happens that you were there before that there are celebrations to meet late. January fill the week of carnival in the country of France. So you just need to go and check up to France for the party. Every weekend you're going to have these Celebrations that clerks. Splint a very good lesson. Augustine Theresa Clear Lug. Thank you very much and happy. Carnival animal out eight seven seven three three three seven four two. That's her phone number radio. At Rick Steves. Dot Com is the email address will head to the other side of the world to Papua New Guinea. A little bit. But next let's look at why the flooding episodes are getting more frequent and more serious in Venice. It's travel with Rick. Steves the Aqua Alta that means the high tides Venice soaked the city November twenty nineteen was the deepest flooding in fifty years. The author of Italy for the gourmet traveller has examined these issues that Vanessa's faced for years. That's Fred Plotkin and Stacey Caponi is resident of Venice. She's an artist and she was there and her home was flooded and she was living the experience and she joins us also as we learn more about the challenge of Venice. The high water the alcohol too so fred. Thanks for being here in in Stacey. Thanks for being here. Also thank you. Thanks for having me. No Fred you wrote your thesis at the University was on the what was called the death of Venice tell us why we have Aqua Alta. And what's the back story of this Flooding in Venice. Well historically there were always tied at full moon and so on and the city throughout its history had periodic flooding. But nothing like what we've seen in recent times. The problem really became aggravated the way. So many things did with the rise of fascism in the nineteen twenties. Mussolini decided that he would widen the three natural inlets of the lagoon. Understand that the lagoon separates Venice in the north from the Adriatic Sea. In the south. The three in lead through cold Lido Maluco and killed Joh- and by widening them. It allowed more water to commend lagoon. Lagoon more saltwater. He did that because he put stupidly oil refineries in the mainland town of Marghera. So the oil tankers would go out of the lagoon into the Adriatic. And ever since we've had this problem add to that that the pollution that was result of the oil refineries plus agricultural runoff meant that the foundations the fundamentals of the city of Venice were eaten away. So by the nineteen seventies Venezuela's sinking because of all of this rot. Long Story Short. The city was actually supported and made stronger. It sinks ever so slightly now. We have a new problem. Climate change has led to melting to hire warriors bigger storms so that most of the recent disastrous floods in Venice have been in the first decade in the Second Decade of the twenty first century including three horrible days in November. Two Thousand Nineteen. Well the high water really is a It's a perfect storm of different variables. You've got to win. You've got a high tide with the full moon. You've got changes caused by the development of the region and we've got Venice's inability to to do anything about it. It's it's sort of a helpless situation. Isn't it Stacey? Now I was GONNA say your description is a perfect storm. What we had this last November. Two thousand the nineteen and and it was more like seven days of the waters because with the four tides that you have in and out you know every so many hours places like my home. We're filling up with water. You have to wait for the tide to recede before you can open your door to allow to escape which just comes back in when people go traipsing by your house pumps go on. But the borough wins in the Sirocco winds and the rain and the full moon everything combined perfectly to allow this one week of pressure. It's part of daily life to live with the title situation in a place like this. We're used to but not to have it remain so long. Describe what it's like Stacey because as a tourist I've been there and you know it's kind of we take photographs of it and they've got the elevated walkways some people pull on their hip boots and it's something to it's kind of exciting but you're living there and you've got the reality of of mold and bacteria and humidity problems with your electricity. What's it like to live in Venice after a big flood? I think that I mean obviously I'm not the nation as we all know. I've adopted the city as as my home. I've chosen to live in this beautiful delicate place that to me. Hold so much magic. So the high water are part of my conscious decision to live here. I don't want to complain about them to you. Because it's a part of the choice that has been made and the Venetians have that same sort of confident energy. You're just used to cleaning up after the high waters living here. The thing that was most frustrating was to be watching the news and see all the nations politicians and their posses having a fashion show in San Marco with their hip waders. On as opposed to you know sending out more crews to help local people and business owners clean up the mess so that was actually a case where you've got your city leaders in your politicians sort of just frolicking in the Spectacle of the flood while residents. I mean there's what just sixty thousand people still living in Venice. You guys are. They're wondering how are we going to deal with this? Stacey you mentioned How Maddening. It is that trysts. Just wander into your house and take photos of you while you're dealing with this real serious problem that definitely makes me lose my patients so when you're mucking out the water that's you know come up to the third step of your entrance and you know it's part of my art studios downstairs so it's just frustrating. Not Anything is on the floor but with it. Being almost at the two meter market definitely came in and to damage my biggest problem. Is the the drywall that have down there? That'll has to be taken out and the electric doesn't work anymore so while you're busy mucking out on day four and somebody just sort of comes in right behind you at your open door and is taking a photograph of your home. That's just shocking. This is travel with Rick. Steves we're talking with Stacy Caponi. Who's an artist in Venice living through the floods and we're talking with Fred plucking who's a scholar a lover of all things Italian and he's fritters written a book called Italy for the Gourmet Traveller and Fred? I know when you were a student that was your theme was studying the phenomenon of the fled when we think of the flood and what we were talking about this perfect storm of things that contribute to this problem. You've got this issue of cruise ships dredging bigger. Canals you've got the causeway that was built in the in the middle of the eighteen. Hundreds that stopped the circulation. I know when they made the cause to Moan Summer Shell in France that caused things to silt up and they took that causeway away. So there'd be a better flow. What are some of these factors. And then what is the hope of the Moses Project It's been so much promise and so much investment but so much corruption and so much disappointment all kinds of issues here and I can put them concisely. The Austrians Occupied Venice for much of the nineteenth century. They built the railway bridge. Eighteen forty six connected the mainland chin. True story of the Old City of Venice. That for many people was the beginning of the end. They destroyed neighborhood to build the Santa Lucia train station and in affected made Venice dependent on the mainland. Also that bridge did stop the waters in certain ways and it is a source of real resentment. Verdi wrote a whole opera about it. Ought teela about until the hon the Austrians Being Attila coming in sacking Venice and the Venetian Roman general. Says of right to Lunenburg so readily Talia. May you can have the universe. Let Italy be mine. So that was the beginning. And then with Cellini ebbing all of the industry and widening the three inlets then pollution after World War Two with industrial buildup then corruption in Italian business and government November fourth nineteen sixty six was the highest flood in the history recorded history of Venice. It was seventy six inches to give you context. November twelve twenty nine teen was seventy four inches in other words the second highest recorded history and there were two more in the days that followed this vicks height above the regular Seila. Yes yes so to tell you about the mosaic. In Italian Emma see it means Moses we think of Moses Holding back the sea but it stands for Momodou low MO SPAGHETTI mentality the S. electromechanical in other words. These are mechanical gate sitters supposed to open and shut that were to be installed in the Lido Molomo and killed Jay inlets. They did not start on that until two thousand and three and they are almost done but they're not really working there was I can't go into all the government corruption and so on and payments and bribes but the problem is basically that for fifteen years now. This flooding has continued. The salt pollution has continued. It's not the Venice's sinking so much. It's at the waters are rising have cruise ships come in displacing when you have six thousand passenger ship. It seems fashioned. Three thousand displacing huge amounts of water onto the Piazza San Marco. Just by ship has nothing to do with the high tides. Then what you're doing is allowing Venice to be destroyed. That's why people are angry but the commercial interests want would hold the more. The Fujian other words eaten run tourism of people who land at the ship terminal. Do a little shopping leave money and then leave Venice. So that affects hotelkeepers. It's in the long term terrible for the economy events and a few people are making a lot of money in the short term. But they're destroying the city. What is the feeling among the nation's Stacey about trying to get money in certain areas like cruise ships and so on is really threatening the very existence of life for people? Who Live there. Well I mean I guess I can only speak for the people that I know right so I tend to know the people who are anti cruise ships. Not An anti. I don't think you should travel by cruise ship person. In general I just think that the laws Affecting the cruise ship industry around the world needs to be looked at for it's not just venison is suffering under the stress of this type of tourism. As we all know the Venetians in general are rather divided. It depends on where their family's income comes from. Venice gets the extreme case. People just stampede in. They don't eat in a restaurant for dinner. They don't sleep in a hotel they just stampede. In congest everything Eat some fast. Food takes photographs and then go back so I can see some people thinking. This is not my idea of a nice part of our industry. We're looking beneath the surface of Venice to examine why the city's flooding more often end with greater impact. We're joined by ITALOPHILE. Fred Plotkin. He writes the regional food guide deadly for the gourmet traveller and a book called Opera One. Oh one in Stacey Kabbani painter photographer and Tour Guide who had to rescue her art from the floodwaters seeping into her studio. She posted samples of her work at Stacey. Gabonese DOT COM. Anna's listening in from Rochester New York and she joins us on the phone at eight seven seven three rick. And what are your thoughts about Yeah so I'm curious what you know. I can do to be more responsible. Tourists never been to Italy very looking forward to going for a long-awaited honeymoon with my husband and We want to visit Venice. But we we're not sure how we can do this responsibly. and still enjoy everything the city has to offer. This is such a timely question. And it's an interesting issue for several cities in Europe that are over touristed in Venice along with Amsterdam and Barcelona in a couple of others are getting to the point. Where you wondered is a tourist even welcome of course good tours miss welcome. But there's there's tourism that just takes doesn't give Fred what's your thought on how somebody can visit venison away. That's positive honored. The first thing is to stay away from the Piazza San Marco in the most touristed area. Stay in a low condo which is an in in one of the outlying areas there. It's called associated. They're six districts in the Old City of Venice staying in Castelo staying candidate. Joe STAY IN ONES. That are less frequented by tourists. Try to find a neighborhood. Were you develop your local bar? You form a community for a few days frequent local Venetian food places. Don't go where you see. All the crowds of people lining up for Pizza Pizza's not Venetian go to museums. That are less well known in addition to the academia but above all for me Venice among many virtues is acoustically. It's like nothing else in the world and if you walk down certain alleyways and you hear people doing their dishes or they're on the phone you suddenly realize the you are away from your world of vehicular traffic of all kinds of noise that really cluttered our minds and makes it hard to think in. Venice you reflect not just on the water not just in the sky but you hear things you don't hear Ellsworth who bring not only your eyes to Venice but your ears and wonder without direction without a plan and you'll have the best discoveries of all. That's a beautiful answer Fred and I know that we've talked before and and you are considered a pleasure activist and that's a very good league. The pleasure is to appreciate the Acoustics Stacey. What are your thoughts on how tourist? I Love Fred suggestion and Ricky and I've talked about this before it comes venison get lost right but I encourage you to stay definitely in a hotel in the city. Run by a family. When that'd be nice please. Avoid Illegal AIRBNB. That's a topic for another day. Please eat at local restaurants. Please don't day trip and come in from the mainland. Please take a Gondola ride and do exactly like Fred has suggested quiet. And you're going to listen to the water. Be in the place. Forget about your selfie stick. Try To make those memories your photographs of your mind because this place needs to be felt Not just seen quickly so if you can stay for a week then you can do exactly what Fred is suggested and find yourself local cafe to have your coffee and meet the local people and learn a little Venetian dialect. While you're at it. Make One more suggestion yes. Please make Venice your first stop. Fly there. There's the airport there go into the city by Ferry and it will near vision and so on this way your first impact with Italy will be Venice. Then you could leave by the railway station and go to the mainland. But it's the best first place to have contact with everything Italian as a beautiful way to be introduced to one of the most magnificent cities anywhere in your travels. Thanks for your call Anna. Thank you very much. This is travel. With Rick Steves. We're talking with Fred. Pumpkin he's the author of Italy for the gourmet traveller and Stacey Kabbani. Who's a local tour guide? Whose AMERICAN WHO's decided to embrace Venice actually become a local stacey if you had a visitor to Venice What's how do you appreciate the wonder? And the the magic of L- Assertiveness Cima- The serene city. Well I'm like you. I like it early. In the morning for sure The peacefulness and it's when all the local people are out kids are going to school. People are going to work. I mean I can get up at five thirty in the morning and open my studio window and start to see people going into work and I think that's a an interesting thing to enjoy but when people come to visit I encourage everyone to get lost to not hold onto their map to know this day before they walk out the door. Have some kind of general plan okay. Today I'm headed towards The academia like Fred had suggested and as I get there I will pass through other neighborhoods. What will I be looking for maybe an all NBA? The Habit of the local gentlemen to have. Go alone every day to go. Have a glass of wine in the shade of the Bell. Tower leaked out into the other. Sist yet and it's still a habit of the local people and I enjoy taking foreign visitors to participate in the ged. Lumbra meet a few local characters. You know I'm so thankful that the traditions of Venice survive and that somebody like you. Stacey who can appreciate Venice can actually move in and and embrace those traditions as a local as you've become twenty years he fred. Plotkin and Stacey Goodbye. Thank you so much for joining us for this discussion about Venice. And in the high water thank you. We include links to our guests with this week. Show at Rick Steves Dot com slash radio and you can always reach us by email are addresses radio. At Rick Steves Dot com the sound you hear on the cocoa trail are a world. Apart from the Serenissima the canals of Venice up next travel writer recanting and tells us about his grueling hike from one end of Papua New Guinea to the other it goes through some of the most unforgiving terrain on earth travel with Rick. Steves Rick Antonsson is explored some of the world's most inaccessible places from mount era to Timbuktu. But he says the most grueling adventure he's ever experienced was crossing the Kakuta trail in Papua New Guinea. The single track trail was built. As an overland mail route it goes from the scrappy colonial capital of Port Moresby over a six thousand foot mountain ridge to the northern coast of the island for Antonsson. The trail presented him with more than the physical challenges of wild tremaine whether extremes did introduced him to the modern realities of tribal world. That's older than civilization rick. Antonsson welcome to travel exceeds. Thank you. It's very nice to be here. So Papua New Guinea it's just sort of fabled as one of the last wild places on earth before we get into the experience you had rick. What's unique about postponing Guinea? It's part of a large island. New Guinea second largest island in the world after Greenland and people are fascinated by the name. Often people think Papua New Guinea is the entire island in fact it is the eastern half. The western half is part of Indonesia. You know it's it's always amazing when you think of the complexity of things down there and the thought that Indonesia is a archipelago of violence as big as the continental United States with similar in it the same way. Yeah so many people and Fascinating and that that one giant island would be split when we think of Punter Guinea. It's almost for archaeologists like a treasure chest to studies tribal societies and this sort of thing well and it was fifty thousand years ago when the the first people were arriving there about the same time as early settlement within Australia. They arrived in capitated pockets somewhere. Inland Valley next to them was another valley of people that they never saw. They didn't have a need for trade and they weren't going to war so they didn't know one another didn't share languages. They would be more diverse per square mile because of the rugged terrain than somebody who lives in Nebraska. Where there's really no mountain separating people absolutely or even in the Canadian rockies or the Swiss Alps anywhere else. These pockets in Papua New Guinea were isolated and had no motivation to become not isolated. They connected with each other. Yeah and there was no need for one nation until okay call. These were established and then people had all the angst around that and there began to be mobility. So Rick. What made you want to go to this? Remote Corner Quite happenstance My wife was an airport management with the the cans airport in Australia and we moved into a new place. Neighbors came over the night were on and his name is Glen. His friends call monkeys thorough part of my book walking with Golson Popular Guinea and monk said to me late at night. I'm going to do the cocoon. Do you want to come and I said absolutely the might have been a little bit of liquid courage off and then he smiled and I said just one thing. What's the CODA? And he said to me. Plan to the look of naivete on my face he said it's a walk across the country and I said what country and he said Papua New Guinea and that began the challenge was on. We shook hands. And and you're you're Canadian. I'm Canadian and he was a an Aussie Aussie through. And this is one thing we do have to remember for me. As an American Papua New Guinea just seems like literally the opposite end of civilization but for the Australians. It's kind of like going to the Yucatan for an American or something. It is but there's not a a comfort with too much travel there right now described the trail. This you must have learned about the trail You hate it. What is it. How long has it just physically? What what is the trail? It is grueling. It's about sixty miles long year. Up Up down down up and down up and down up and down. It is continuous. There are lots of false summits where you think. Well there's the village can't be very far away and then you spend the next two hours going up and down these. I'm at the top. Oh no there's another top higher up so it is at times Real creator of Angst for Hager. It is utterly demanding. They ask you to show medical coverage that will get you helicopter out there through insurance if there's anything that happens one recent year four people died on the track to them in the same week. All hurt related. So is it an organized hike? Is this kind of like a guided tour or is just. It's every person for themselves. You have to go with an organized group. Do you are not allowed to go there on your own. Because many of the land tribal the villages where they let you stay. Do expect some form of compensation. Sometimes they're assisting you they may even help with a bit of food but you have to be prepared. You also need to have the safety of of a group. So you don't just go on your. I was there twenty years ago with my church making video about work that churches are doing places like Papua New Guinea and I was really impressed with how important the big man is in each village. You have to meet with the big man and you have to recognize. He's the Big Man. And if you're on your own you would know who these people aren't necessarily did you. Encounter that the leader we would encounter someone who had come to greet US upon arrival and our guides usually we had two guides they usually would be the ones that would jost if there was any. So you're lucky to have your guys with you absolutely mandatory in in my view I mean conceivably conceivably you could that. Oh this is a hindrance for our freedom but I would imagine doing this particular hike. You're glad you had given the complexities of tribal issues and so on. You probably lucky to have local fixers. You are right and then the other thing about that is that sometimes you arrive and you what we could make camp here and somebody says no you. Can't you have to move on? We'll you're moving on. It's getting dark. You WanNa find a new place so you need to be aligned with the locals. Recanting sends telling us about his grueling trek across the dakotas trail in Papua New Guinea. Right now on travel with Rick. Steves he writes about adventure and what it showed him in his book. Walking with ghost in Papua New Guinea ric also writes about his trek up. Mount Arafat in full moon over Noah's Ark about his exploits on the back roads of the desert southwest in route. Sixty six still kicks and about his African travels in a book called to Timbuktu for a haircut. His website is rick. Atkinson DOT COM. The only souvenir I brought back from Papua New Guinea was three spears and I brought him from this crazy guy. He didn't speak much English but he pointed to each said fish. Chicken Human Well. And it's a land that still has the legacy of cannibalism ahead hunting. That very much comes to the surface. One of the challenges for me. Rating walking with ghosts was not sensationalized that but to acknowledge it and how important it was to them as a a tradition and as a practice in something that had lots of honor and integrity around honor and integrity around the head hunting. It was very much a a ritual. That wasn't just about capturing an enemy it was about taking the soul of the enemy the whole cannibalism was absorbing the good parts of the enemy. This is a way of triumphing away of growing. This is a way of self enhancement. It's a way of being able to boast to your family or others within your village or competitive villages to be able to have a skull or the membranes but part of it was the head hunting the trophy as it were also cannibalism. The actually consumption of it was to give your body and your spirit of additional stress that you wouldn't have if you hadn't done that but on your trek. They brought meat from the grocery stores. Yes we carried with US. Actually a lot of freeze dried food. Just because of the way we had porter's which is something else that you need to arrange but we want to say something else about the phillies that I think you would have encountered and that's very much amazing singing voices of the children I was so impressed and we had this on several occasions but pounds are a wonderful people. But the children's say under the age of twelve or fifteen when they sing and they did often in a village to entertain us or inform us they have some of the most remarkable young voices in the world and in particular when they sing the national anthem. Which isn't an anthem. You here on sports teams but it is a remarkable song. One of the most beautiful so to celebrate Tori National Hymns. I remember that now that you mention that is just. There is a sort of John Thomas. It was just really light and fun. I like that Word Josh Audience. That's what it was and something related to that. I learned which give me a real respect for how important it is to go to these places. In the Punter Guinean language drivers. There is no word for orphan. There would never be a child abandoned. The community always took care of the children. I did not know of that concept. But the closeness of the community. It's like everywhere else in the world. We all kind of want the same things. Never Forget Rick. Standing in a village talking with some of the parents and a kid ran by and they could look at the footprint of that child the barefoot footprint in the sand and know what child that was remarkable and that was a good example to me of how tight they knew every child's footprint in that beautiful village where they had no word for orphan. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with Rick and Pinson and telling us about one of the most arduous journey of his life. I can along the cocoa trail in Papua New Guinea. His book is called walking with ghosts in Papua New Guinea. You call this the most grueling adventure sixty miles you know. That's that's a long hike but it's certainly not one of the longer hikes around but in dense jungle was the temperatures crazy. Were you afraid about your health. Were their animal's swinging from trees. What was it? That made it grueling. Well first of all you media advance at about a mile an hour so if you're out for six or seven hiking hours in a day you haven't really made much progress on a sixty mile trek size. You're going to be making the commitment of being seven to ten days on the journey. That's if the weather is good the jungle at times as oppressive and all you can see is thirty seven shades of green fascinating. And if you stop and listen you can hear all sorts of noises. That are observing you. And you don't know whether they're predators are birds but the sounds are fantastic particularly at night when it's his black black can be your sleep and you wake up and you think what are those choices. How Vulnerable Am I? And you're happy to be surrounded by some mates. You're probably fully aware that you are such a rookie when it comes to jungle life skills. Isn't that true and these other guys? That's just I'm thirsty. I'm GONNA climb this tree for a coconut. And they make it work. The other thing was that the pounds were to a person or porters. The helpers anyone with the cooking they were absolutely wonderful as hosts and in effect saying this is my country. I will share with you. Whatever you would like to see or learn about it. They would talk. They would tell stories and we could hear their music late at night or first thing in the morning before we were even though yeah. That's great so something I should say about. The cocoon trail is that its prominence has come because during the Second World War. It was the site of fierce fighting between the Australians and the Japanese and it was a different time than the world. We live in today. Societies are different today than they were then but for six months this was and the terms of general macarthur the worst fighting conditions anywhere in World War. Two coincident with this were the Americans at Guadalcanal. So that's the timing in nineteen forty two and we had pretty good weather on the Kakada but in nineteen forty to the September was the wettest September on record. I talked with other truckers. Who have been on there before like our guides and they were there when it was rainy. And you would take ten or twelve days to. We did in five or six right. Just because you're you're you wrote quite movingly about the Australian military campaigns and how heartbreaking. They must've been. I will tell you twice on the trip. I cried when we were in a little bit of a memorial we had stopped to talk about Butcher Hill or Brigade Hill or other places where the battles had been fierce for both sides but to think of the young lives. That were were lost in all of the brutality order. I woke up one night and it was foggy. Though that the rain and come in and it was dead quiet it must have been two three in the morning and I was this fear of what it would have been like to be thinking that somebody was maybe twelve feet away and wanted to take your life so emotionally. It was draining. I would say that most places around the world if you go to an old battle site say in Europe it's been modernized or fixed up the access routes. This looks like it did in nineteen forty two with the jungle overgrown where it wants to the jungle has its way with the path so you are walking through history but it's as it looked in nineteen forty two you wrote about gold prospectors and British colonial forces and tragedies why was there an awareness that white imperialists have had really had a brutal hand here in this on this island on the island of New Guinea me with the Spanish the British the Germans the there were colonial powers that the Dutch in Indonesia next door so a lot of that played out with sort of the territorial bits and then world war one changed that a bit World War to change more dramatically and then in the early Seventies Papua New Guinea became its own independent country with its own flag and some national anthem. And its own pride. The sometimes gets tarnished today by the the image of the rascals. Ne'er do wells who had the rascals Joe and when you're on a bus going across Papua New Guinea you've got these two bit bandits out there and they're not gonNA kill you. They're just going to take everybody off the bus take all their clothes and other jeweler and other cameras and just leave him naked there. And then they're going to laugh into the next valley What was the rascal situation for you? So we encountered it not on the trail but when we got to one of the maybe second or third largest community around there. Which IS PAPA DATA? And they were very much around the the compound the we went into the grocery store. Jovan and our motor vehicle and then the gates were closed behind us. We did our shopping. But you'll get protective compound protective armed guards because they're these quote rascals out there and they call them rascals because they're not murderous thugs they're just petty thieves. Is that the deal. Or How would you well? They are both of the above the harder they do. So the RASCALS R. A. S. K. O. L. S. The rascals. Have more from being tribal feuds to coming into the major centers not always having jobs there becomes the drug trade got a lot of initiation that sometimes for youngsters is not just robbing. But it's a salt and it's it's very hurtful things there. Also are feuds that remain unresolved from over the years and so there have been stories of truckers being accosted. Usually it is the guides. They are with the bear. The brunt of being accosted by another tribe and there are a lot of tribes. We've got an email here from Richard and Margaret River in Australia and Richard Rights. I taught in the capital city. Port-moresby at the University of Papua New Guinea for several years was very impressed at the language skills of the citizens. There there are over eight hundred languages in Papua New Guinea and most residents understand about three or four of them and actually used several languages. Were you aware of the amount of languages that society has to deal with their? I became aware of that more through research than encountering because while we hear songs in different languages being sung by the porters and some of them spoke different languages they would have talked piston or they would have about pigeon version by Papa. New Guinea has eight hundred thirty two different languages. There are six thousand eight hundred eleven languages in the world so it means that a small country small population twenty percent of all the languages in the world around that half an island exactly which has point one percent of the world's population and the only other country with eight hundred living languages is India and they're twelve percent of the world's population is so when you juxtapose that it goes back to the the early settlements were all in pocket. Valley's spread along the ocean shore up rivers and they survived on their own in their languages were totally independent structures. This has traveled for exceeds. We're talking with Rick Anthem. Sent his book is walking with ghosts in Papua New Guinea. If you just think while you were there was there a moment when you thought this is just an exposure to a different world and you're so thankful that you were there to benefit from that. I would think the middle of the night experiences when you just wake up. One Night I got up. I want to them. The Boertien was coming back and the stars and only nine thousand stars. We actually can see with the naked eye and you could see more in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere because of the tilt whatever number I looked at they were masquerading as a billion and I felt the intimidation of the night sky and being in a country where that moment. I thought I was possibly the only person awake. So that was humbling and inspiring at the same time. I bet you're glad you took your friends. Offer up to go to Papua New Guinean hike the CUCKOO trail. We you know I would turn to monk every once in a while particularly if we'd gone up something like the wall which is a nearly vertical in your hearts thumping tonight look at might say some walk across the country. But you're glad you did. I am all right Rick Antenna Fascinating the book walking with ghosts in Papua New Guinea. Thanks thank you travel with. Rick Steves it's produced by Tim. Tatton is a Kaplan Wilner and Casimiro Hall. At Rick Steves Europe in Edmonds Washington. Our website is managed by Andrew Wakeling and of our chemical we get promotional support from Sheila Rusoff. Our theme music is by Jerry. Frank thanks to the Radio Foundation in New York City for their help this week. There's more and Rick Steves dot com slash radio each year. Rick Steves tour guides take thousands of free travelers on the scooted tours through Europe. One small group to time this year you can choose from more than forty different vacations in Europe's best destinations from Ireland to Greece and practically everywhere in between begin your next trip at Rick. Steves DOT COM?

Rick Steves Venice Papua New Guinea Rick Fred Plotkin France Europe Spain San Sebastian Stacey Italy coca trail Papua New Guinea Venice Lagoon United States University of Papua New Guinea Gourmet Traveller New Guinea Nineteen Seventies Claire
How the internet is causing English to evolve  and creating intergenerational confusion

The Current

24:01 min | 1 year ago

How the internet is causing English to evolve and creating intergenerational confusion

"This is a CBC podcast. Hi Rick saw. This is a podcast from the December. Twenty twenty third edition of the current. That's the sound of a busy. Italian cafe will earlier this this month in Rome. A group of usually clashing. MP's put their differences aside for an issue that bridges all divides in Italy Espresso. The group met inside the the Italian parliament to announce they'd be putting forward the tiny cup of dark bitter liquid for candidacy on the UNESCO heritage list the same week. Though another other Italian group put forward their own version of espresso the NEOPOLITAN Espresso to be considered for UNESCO heritage status. This was an Opportunity Espresso lover for Megan Williams could not pass up so she ventured out into the mean streets of Rome and Naples and joins me now to talk about Italian Espresso. Good morning to you. Make Good Morning. So most people think when they think of UNESCO they think monuments not necessarily beverages I know beverages are not what spring to mind when when you think of of safeguarding world monuments. But this is a specific UNESCO list which is called The the intangible tangible cultural heritage list and there are already other comestible 's that are on this list including Neapolitan Pizza Belgium beer and even other kinds of coffee like Turkish coffee go so earlier this month. I got invited to this. Press Conference Conference in the Italian parliament here in Rome where a group of politicians from the populist to the center left to the fall far right all sat in a row and announce this push to get espresso. Put on that list. But it's important to note that they're not just talking about the actual drink but also oh about the culture and the rituals around it. HERE'S CENTRE-LEFT MP Muddy Academy. We need to have these Fantastic beverage. Recognize as immaterial. Ery Tash of humanity in Italy. Coffee is SOCIALITY is condition and it is a manner of production so we need to distinguish Italian coffee traditionally Italian coffee with other coffee so it sounds like there are two things they want protected here the actual coffee and how it's produced and all of the traditions as well that surrounded. Yeah that's right and I you know I think it can be argued that it's actually the coffee rituals and the and the social fabric created by those rituals. That are most most important. But we'll talk about that a little later I I think it's essential people understand. Just exactly what an espresso is so brace brace yourself I asked the head of the producers group which is called the consortium for the safeguarding of traditional Italian Espresso. Coffee what the requirements requirements are to be classified as a real Italian Espresso. Here's the answer. I got from the headman. George Joke Bellini Disaster Caratto who I cornered at a nearby cafe just after the news conference for me here that I'm Akina DA I'm hearing more than a few numbers there. You are indeed so here we go The Espresso liquid has to come out of the machine in twenty to twenty five seconds. Seven seven to nine grams of coffee. Beans has to go into each cup with volume in the Cup of thirteen to twenty five cubic centimeters in a warmed. Porcelain Cup made eight by an Italian machine operated by a person the precision the rules. What happened to a relaxing cup of coffee and yeah it doesn't stop there? The the coffee has to come from certain countries it has to be roasted at a certain temperature. blyleven acceptable blend. What Italians call me? Shelagh Arabica or boost coffee beans so we've got quality taste temperature volume and production. Yeah and there's one one more very important characteristic of espresso coffee which is lack Lamma. It's that frothy. Hazel nut colored cream that sits on top of your special liquid liquid for at least not two minutes the rules say but one hundred and twenty seconds and it has to be there to pass the test of being a real espresso visual proof that it's been properly made now. Jonathan Morris is a professor at the University of Hurts for Shire and he's the author of a whole bunch of fascinating books on coffee including coffee global history. I caught up with him on his way to a specialty coffee chair and Milan. Here's his explanation about the Special Calama on top of the expressway in nineteen forty eight Akili gadje basically put in to manufacture the first machine that actually used a lever which was kind of this sort of spring operated lever episode was able to generate very high precious that forced water down through the coffee. So that's the kind of expressing the water through the coffee high pressure and and that produced cream this crema on top of the coffee. The Gajah device became known as making chronic cafe cream coffee. This whole new look beverage the one with a cream on top. It's really interesting so the Espresso that we know today day only really dates back to the postwar years. Yes that's right. A coffee itself dates back much further in Italy at probably came up through North Africa through through Sicily but officially meaning you know written documentation It entered through traders from the Ottoman Empire into the port city Venice in the late sixteenth century And that's when the first coffeehouse opened in parts of San Marco Saint Mark's Square which is still there today and initially. Initially it was a drink of aristocrats artists and then it sort of filtered down to to the Popolo. What about Cappuccinos well? Surprisingly Capucci no goes back further. Here's Jonathan Morris Again Sa- Cappuccino who is actually an older word fan espresso. I'm MM and really is the first version of wide coffee in Italy. The reason that we call it Campesina. Cappuccino is this National Milk blending with the coffee to create cola similar to the The habits of Cappuccino monks say that kind of brown around car now. That is very much northern and again in its which diet continues to be the case fee very very difficult Milky Coffee South Ryan. You didn't really see a Cappuccino points you know. It's not traditional thing now. An interesting cultural aspect of the Cuppertino in Italy is is the time of day that you drink it the most sure. Fire Way to yourself as a tourist in Italy to order a couple Chino after dinner no oh self. Respecting Italian would be caught dead drinking a Cappuccino past say about eleven o'clock in the morning noon at the very latest noted right. I'm very glad I didn't do that on my first trip to Italy. But why is that. Well it tells are very regulated and disciplined about what and when they eat and they consider consider milk after a meal to be way too heavy for the digestion process which they pay a lot of attention to smart. I'm curious so what about you after all these years. Well you know when in Rome I would not have a Cappuccino after lunch but I tend not to have them at all. Now when I'm outside of Italy for for the simple reason that the in North America at least they've essentially become a milk drink not a coffee drink mm-hmm and I won't even get into FRA Chinos and all the other variations If I do order a Cappuccino even here in Italy I order what Italians call a couple Capuccino school. which is a dark cappuccino? It has about a third of the milk that you get in a place like say starbucks and interestingly enough about about eighty percent of the coffee that Italians order is black you know the simplest breslow maybe a little maybe a cafe macchiato which is a little sort sort of frothy. Bit of milk on top But they really don't drink much milk with their coffee whereas ninety percent of the coffee that people drink in North America is is with milk so so you know Cappuccino or Latte days or double doubles or whatever. So what about the second part of this whole UNESCO bid the cultural aspect of Italian N- coffee how is that different from coffee culture anywhere. Well to me. This is the really fascinating part of it because living in Italy I you know I see how important the role that coffee places and maintaining What I think about as as you know this really rich and warm and Vibrant Auburn Social Fabric? Here I'll let sociologist Massimo Chiloe. Who who who? The Italian politicians have enlisted To to bolster their case the UNESCO case I'll let him explain about what we mean when we talk about Espresso Culture in Italy when we talk about the ceremony to Italian traditional espresso coffee. We talk about three key. Words Democracy Forms of sustainability and generosity democracy because the concept of public sphere is born into coffee a few hours and board in front of a Little Cup of coffee. Public sphere is a public space. Where a lot of people can talk about several arguments without differences about classic about culture about financial situation situation about religion? The public sphere is a space where we can't create a phone soft talk and affirms affirms of conversations to sustain our eat ideas. We can't make societies in Frans of Alito Cup of cuff. How is though Megan? What he's saying about bringing people together particular to Italy? Well I think the way Italians drink. Coffee at a cafe is very different. From other places in the world in the Balkans or France say. There's there's that tradition of sitting and smoking and talking for hours and hours about news or nihilism or something and that's kind of Forming way of of having your coffee but in Italy you have your espressos standing up at a bar and that dates back to pre first World War When a law was passed that put a low cap on the price of coffee without service? So that's why Italian stand up at the bars. It's cheaper If they don't sit down at a table and and this is where a lot of tourists who come to Italy get trapped because the prices prices. When you the minute you sit down at a table that prices tripled but if you stand up at a bar and they slide your your cup of espresso across the bar? It's you know it's generally about a dollar dollar and that's also the reason why the vast majority of cafes in Italy our independence. There's just not enough profit in coffee To to interest interest chains. So it means it's also quick You know an espresso consists of two or three sips. You're standing up and then you're done There's no reason. Listen to take a paper Cup. Because you know you'll take two steps. Your coffee is over and the unintended consequence of this is that it. It provides a safe kind of pressure. Free Place to socialize You can chat with someone because you know. This coffee is not going to last for twenty minutes. So Oh you're not worried about keeping that conversation with a stranger going for a long time you can chat with the young teenager beside your or the older woman you know. And then it's Jordan Jordan Jordan Atta and you're on your way the cafes as I say. They're not changed their family. Run businesses so so it's the same Barista behind their who get to know you You walk in they say Chow Bella Chow Allo. They sometimes learn your name they learn what kind of how you like your her coffey whether it's a cafe Makhaya tower glass or whatever and all of those little things are really important. They're small but they build older community and I think that's what's unique to Italian coffee culture. Here's Jonathan Morris again. We talk about something Mitch Michael Banal Nationalism as little things that tell you you're in a certain place and tell you that you're potter set in community and coffee coffee. Presser coffee is it is it is a bit Talionis. I'd like to think though Megan that that can exist here too. Well well I think it can and I think it does in some cafes but as as Jonathan Morris points out generally speaking coffee chains in North America serve the the inverse purpose. They allow people to come together without interacting. Here's sociologist Massimo. Chitalo talking about places like starbucks because is a space where I can write my books when I can text free Wifi Free Wi fi. He's a concept. Today is not common to concept of Italian stressor coffee. You know earlier when Mr Turtle'll was talking about the three key words that do describe espresso culture. He mentioned not why but generosity generosity fit into the picture. Well we need to move south in Italy to Naples for that part. So Ah here. We are at this beautiful historic cafe that overlooks the vast main square in Naples. Piazza the flabby sheet that fronts the the former royal palace. We're at the Glen Cafe Gumby News which was founded in eighteen sixty picture elaborate morano glass chandeliers there's green marble topped counters waders wearing Texas and bow ties mouth-watering array of the stuff's sugar sprinkled neopolitan based. Thanks please just shipped right now mice again. So ten years ago Gamboa's Gambrinus turned one hundred fifty and wanted to celebrate so they came up with the idea of reviving. This lost mostly loss Neapolitan tradition of the cafe. A face so spencer which in English translates into the suspended cafe. The suspended coffee. Here's Genaro the manager. I've campinas explaining that traditionally when someone one at the races or a bet to celebrate their joy they would buy an extra coffee for someone else not someone they knew it was an anonymous gift for someone who came by later. Couldn't afford a coffin. So how does it work you just by two coffee. Yes essentially you go up to the cash you pay for your coffee and then you say you'd like to buy a cafe. She'll says Oh and then they they the person behind the cash gifts do the two receipts and so you take the receipt for the second coffee. The cafe suspend their news. Stick it in this case in this big cafetiere Lebron's coffee pot by the door. Did you actually see anyone by an extra coffee. I did. You know it's A. It's a lot of tourists during it. They in particular like distribution and while I was there there was an Italian who came in Diego but An Italian who lives in southern France. who heard about this Through on television or something and he bought one. I think is a good thing because you think about somebody else you know and You know even the normal coffee even place like this you pay one Eurotech twenty which is nothing basically and you can pay another extra for personal that cannot afford coffee. There's a kind of way. Think about in the vision really and did you see anyone coming into get a cuff. Especially yes I did ED The sixty eight year old gentleman named Antonio who lives in in the neighborhood that's renowned working class neighborhood in Naples it's called last senator. He came in with his wife and I asked him how often he came nearly every day. Not just because they got us. This is special coffee but because one of the few places that still makes a decent coffee in Naples. I've had some bad luck in life so I'm glad of this tradition done uh-huh sprite. Is this now again. Well in in practice. I don't think it's that widespread famous Neapolitan writer who channel they could ashamed. So cited cited this tradition in a book a few decades ago and it sort of began to return them but mostly in people's imaginations. I think the tradition actually doesn't even go back that far to postwar years when most of Naples was still very very the report and when I was down in Naples last week I went around and I asked if I could leave a cafe so spazio at a scattering of different front cafes and different kinds of neighborhoods enables and this is the kind of answer I got no Eze Steak Wa Nice. That's you asking if you can leave one. Yeah and that's that's the Barman saying no no no no we don't do that here So I think the idea of the cafe so special is very appealing to talion specifically neopolitan To the way they wanna see themselves as generous which I do think his equality of Italians expressed in coffee culture here You know for instance when you go to take a coffee break with colleagues here more often than not you treat the person you're taking the coffee with or or or they treat you and that's a pleasure and joy that that just is part everyday life here. I mean it can happen in Canada but it's not the norm and you know that's a cultural difference but I also suspect It's just an economic omic question because here your your coffee or your Cappuccino is GonNa cost you not much more than a dollar whereas you know some of some of these some some. I'm coffees in in. Canada can go as much as five dollars depending on on what you ask for. But in Naples especially there's another part of coffee culture that it really takes center stage and this is it in a nutshell total wallet up three Ritu. -ality yes ritu -ality. That's Francesca Media Borelli. He's a regional politician. And the head of the Neapolitan Coffee Group. That's pushing for. Its own own separate UNESCO recognition. Now I met for an after lunch espresso outside of Gambrinus and you know. He said his group is going a step. Further than the Italian Espresso UNESCO group which says as as we've talked about that That they want to suppress recognized for both How in Espressos made but also the culture around it but early says that the Neopolitan Espresso bid did is really actually not about the coffee at all that the coffee is just an excuse to celebrate and protect the neopolitan culture around it and says that coffee culture is very different in Naples? Not only from the rest of the world but from the rest of Italy in Alberta. It's not just about coffee rituals in cafes but also Napolitan home rituals the rituals around our traditional additional coffee pots that we've transformed and elaborated in our homes in Milan when people would come. They don't speak with anyone. They down there coughing out the door. There are Comedians who do skits showing how the Milanese get dressed and do four other things while drinking their morning coffee Naples it's the opposite it's about relating into those close to you it's about talking about what's new if the Naples soccer team won or lost the latest elections. What's in the papers it's a it's a moment of collegiality cofre toys? So it's that north-south divide again so these two groups are now competing for UNESCO recognition. Yeah they are. We'll see what happens but assured me that he was going to reach out to the other Espresso Group and see if they cooperate. But you know it's been a couple of weeks and so further not talking. What happened to coffee? Bridging the divide my goodness but in all the talk about Italian Coffee Culture in the UNESCO bids I wonder is there an economic economic motivation here. Oh yes yeah. There is but but the economic motivation isn't within Italy. It's about Italian roasters. Coffee brands feeling the squeeze from both both the Nestle capsules that have taken off around the world and what we can classify sort of as hipster specialty coffee and so- Italian Espresso producers want to claim their position as the originators of the Espresso Espresso culture throughout the world. So that they can. You know kind of CL- claim some sort of supremacy in those markets alette Jonathon Morris. The last word of the UNESCO initiative is a way really of trying to get recognition for that culture culture which they hope will enable them to maintain their position not just in the Italian market but also in the world market. Because obviously obviously that's where the the prophets are to be made at this point. It's all fascinating who knew. There's so much poured into that tiny cup of Espresso. So indeed. I sort of feel like we barely skimmed the creamy surface. I mean there's there's just there's so much culture in this little tiny Hiney Cup of coffee fantastic. I have to say though. I'm going to be so much more annoying or just exacting. The next time I order an espresso. Welcome took club. Thanks so much. Megan thank you. Megan Williams joined us from Rome. And there's more to see on our website including videos and pictures from from that cafe in Naples. That said C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash. The current for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

Italy Italian Coffee Culture UNESCO Italian Espresso Naples Neapolitan Coffee Group Megan Williams NEOPOLITAN Espresso Naples Italy Espresso Italian Espresso UNESCO group Jonathan Morris North America Rome Espresso Group starbucks Milan Massimo Chiloe Neapolitan Pizza Belgium Twenty twenty
Italian espresso's push for UNESCO recognition

The Current

24:01 min | 1 year ago

Italian espresso's push for UNESCO recognition

"This is a CBC podcast. Hi Rick saw. This is a podcast from the December. Twenty twenty third edition of the current. That's the sound of a busy. Italian cafe will earlier this this month in Rome. A group of usually clashing. MP's put their differences aside for an issue that bridges all divides in Italy Espresso. The group met inside the the Italian parliament to announce they'd be putting forward the tiny cup of dark bitter liquid for candidacy on the ESCO heritage list. The same week. Though another other Italian group put forward their own version of espresso the NEOPOLITAN Espresso to be considered for UNESCO heritage status. This was an Opportunity Espresso lover for Megan Williams could not pass up so she ventured out into the mean streets of Rome and Naples and joins me now to talk about Italian Espresso. Good morning to you. Make Good Morning. So most people think when they think of UNESCO they think monuments not necessarily beverages I know beverages are not what spring to mind when when you think of of safeguarding world monuments. But this is a specific UNESCO list which is called The the intangible tangible cultural heritage list and there are already other comestible 's that are on this list including Neapolitan Pizza Belgium beer and even other kinds of coffee like Turkish coffee go so earlier this month. I got invited to this. Press Conference Conference in the Italian parliament here in Rome where a group of politicians from the populist to the center left to the fall far right all sat in a row and announce this push to get espresso. Put on that list. But it's important to note that they're not just talking about the actual drink but also oh about the culture and the rituals around it. HERE'S CENTRE-LEFT MP Muddy Academy. We need to have these Fantastic beverage. Recognize as immaterial. Ery Tash of humanity in Italy. Coffee is SOCIALITY is condition and it is a manner of production so we need to distinguish Italian coffee traditionally Italian coffee with other coffee so it sounds like there are two things they want protected here the actual coffee and how it's produced and all of the traditions as well that surrounded. Yeah that's right and I you know I think it can be argued that it's actually the coffee rituals and the and the social fabric created by those rituals. That are most most important. But we'll talk about that a little later I I think it's essential people understand. Just exactly what an espresso is so brace brace yourself I asked the head of the producers group which is called the consortium for the safeguarding of traditional Italian Espresso. Coffee what the requirements requirements are to be classified as a real Italian Espresso. Here's the answer. I got from the headman. George Joke Bellini Disaster Caratto who I cornered at a nearby cafe just after the news conference for me here that I'm Akina DA I'm hearing more than a few numbers there. You are indeed so here we go The Espresso liquid has to come out of the machine in twenty to twenty five seconds. Seven seven to nine grams of coffee. Beans has to go into each cup with volume in the Cup of thirteen to twenty five cubic centimeters in a warmed. Porcelain Cup made eight by an Italian machine operated by a person the precision the rules. What happened to a relaxing cup of coffee and yeah it doesn't stop there? The the coffee has to come from certain countries it has to be roasted at a certain temperature. blyleven acceptable blend. What Italians call me? Shelagh Arabica or boost coffee beans so we've got quality taste temperature volume and production. Yeah and there's one one more very important characteristic of espresso coffee which is lack Lamma. It's that frothy. Hazel nut colored cream that sits on top of your special liquid liquid for at least not two minutes the rules say but one hundred and twenty seconds and it has to be there to pass the test of being a real espresso visual proof that it's been properly made now. Jonathan Morris is a professor at the University of Hurts for Shire and he's the author of a whole bunch of fascinating books on coffee including coffee global history. I caught up with him on his way to a specialty coffee chair and Milan. Here's his explanation about the Special Calama on top of the expressway in nineteen forty eight Akili gadje basically put in to manufacture the first machine that actually used a lever which was kind of this sort of spring operated lever it was able to generate very high precious that forced water down through the coffee. So that's the kind of expressing the water through the coffee high pressure and and that produced cream this crema on top of the coffee. The Gajah device became known as making chronic cafe cream coffee. This whole new look beverage the one with a cream on top. It's really interesting so the Espresso that we know today day only really dates back to the postwar years. Yes that's right Coffee itself dates back further in Italy at probably came up through North Africa through through Sicily but officially meaning you know written documentation It entered through traders from the Ottoman Empire into the port city Venice in the late sixteenth century And that's when the first coffeehouse opened in parts of San Marco Saint Mark's Square which is still there today and initially. Initially it was a drink of aristocrats artists and then it sort of filtered down to to the Popolo. What about Cappuccinos well? Surprisingly Capucci no goes back further. Here's Jonathan Morris Again Sa- Cappuccino who is actually an older word fan espresso. I'm MM and really is the first version of wide coffee in Italy. The reason that we call it Campesina. Cappuccino is this National Milk blending with the coffee to create cola similar to the The habits of Cappuccino monks say that kind of brown around car now. That is very much northern and again in its which diet continues to be the case fee very very difficult Milky Coffee South Ryan. You didn't really see a Cappuccino points you know. It's not traditional thing now. An interesting cultural aspect of the Cuppertino in Italy is is the time of day that you drink it the most sure. Fire Way to yourself as a tourist in Italy to order a couple Chino after dinner no oh self. Respecting Italian would be caught dead drinking a Cappuccino past say about eleven o'clock in the morning noon at the very latest noted right. I'm very glad I didn't do that on my first trip to Italy. But why is that. Well it tells are very regulated and disciplined about what and when they eat and they consider consider milk after a meal to be way too heavy for the digestion process which they pay a lot of attention to smart. I'm curious so what about you after all these years. Well you know when in Rome I would not have a Cappuccino after lunch but I tend not to have them at all. Now when I'm outside of Italy for for the simple reason that the in North America at least they've essentially become a milk drink not a coffee drink I'm and I won't even get into FRA Chinos and all the other variations If I do order a Cappuccino even here in Italy I order what Italians call a Capuccino school. which is a dark cappuccino? It has about a third of the milk that you get in a place like say starbucks and interestingly enough about about eighty percent of the coffee that Italians order is black you know the simplest breslow maybe a little maybe a cafe macchiato which is a little sort sort of frothy. Bit of milk on top But they really don't drink much milk with their coffee whereas ninety percent of the coffee that people drink in North America is is with milk so so you know Cappuccino or Latte days or double doubles or whatever. So what about the second part of this whole UNESCO bid the cultural aspect of Italian N- coffee how is that different from coffee culture anywhere. Well to me. This is the really fascinating part of it because living in Italy I you know I see how important the role that coffee places and maintaining What I think about as as you know this really rich and warm and Vibrant Auburn Social Fabric? Here I'll let sociologist Massimo Chiloe. Who who who? The Italian politicians have enlisted To to bolster their case the UNESCO case I'll let him explain about what we mean when we talk about Espresso Culture in Italy when we talk about the ceremony to Italian traditional espresso coffee. We talk about three key. Words Democracy Forms of sustainability and generosity democracy because the concept of public sphere is born into coffee a few hours and board in front of a Little Cup of coffee. Public sphere is a public space. Where a lot of people can talk about several arguments without differences about classic about culture about financial situation situation about religion? The public sphere is a space where we can't create a phone soft talk and affirms affirms of conversations to sustain our eat ideas. We can't make societies in Frans of Alito Cup of cuff. How is though Megan? What he's saying about bringing people together particular to Italy? Well I think the way Italians drink. Coffee at a cafe is very different. From other places in the world in the Balkans or France say. There's there's that tradition of sitting and smoking and talking for hours and hours about news or nihilism or something and that's kind of Forming way of of having your coffee but in Italy you have your espressos standing up at a bar and that dates back to pre first World War When a law was passed that put a low cap on the price of coffee without service? So that's why Italian stand up at the bars. It's cheaper If they don't sit down at a table and and this is where a lot of tourists who come to Italy get trapped because the prices prices. When you the minute you sit down at a table that prices tripled but if you stand up at a bar and they slide your your cup of espresso across the bar? It's you know it's generally about a dollar dollar and that's also the reason why the vast majority of cafes in Italy our independence. There's just not enough profit in coffee To to interest interest chains. So it means it's also quick you know an espresso consists of two or three sips. You're standing up and then you're done There's no reason. Listen to take a paper Cup. Because you know you'll take two steps. Your coffee is over and the unintended consequence of this is that it. It provides a safe kind of pressure. Free Place to socialize You can chat with someone because you know. This coffee is not going to last for twenty minutes. So Oh you're not worried about keeping that conversation with a stranger going for a long time you can chat with the young teenager beside your or the older woman you know. And then it's Jordan Jordan Jordan Atta and you're on your way the cafes as I say. They're not changed their family. Run businesses so so it's the same Barista behind their who get to know you You walk in they say Chow Bella Chow Allo. They sometimes learn your name they learn what kind of how you like your her coffey whether it's a cafe Makhaya tower glass or whatever and all of those little things are really important. They're small but they build older community and I think that's what's unique to Italian coffee culture. Here's Jonathan Morris again. We talk about something Mitch Michael Banal Nationalism as little things that tell you you're in a certain place and tell you that you're potter set in community and coffee coffee. Presser coffee is it is. It is pitcher I'd like to think though Megan that that can exist here too. Well well I think it can and I think it does in some cafes but as as Jonathan Morris points out generally speaking coffee chains in North America serve the the inverse purpose. They allow people to come together without interacting. Here's sociologist Massimo. Chitalo talking about places like starbucks because is a space where I can write my books when I can text free Wifi Free Wi fi. He's a concept. Today is not common to concept of Italian stressor coffee. You know earlier when Mr Turtle'll was talking about the three key words that do describe espresso culture. He mentioned not why but generosity generosity fit into the picture. Well we need to move south in Italy to Naples for that part. So Ah here. We are at this beautiful historic cafe that overlooks the vast main square in Naples. Piazza the flabby sheet that fronts the the former royal palace. We're at the Glen Cafe Gumby News which was founded in eighteen sixty picture elaborate morano glass chandeliers there's green marble topped counters waders wearing Texas and bow ties mouth-watering array of the stuff's sugar sprinkled neopolitan based. Thanks please just shipped right now mice again. So ten years ago Gamboa's Gambrinus turned one hundred fifty and wanted to celebrate so they came up with the idea of reviving. This lost mostly loss Neapolitan tradition of the cafe. A face so spencer which in English translates into the suspended. Cafe the suspended coffee. Here's Genaro Johnny. The manager I've Campinas explaining that traditionally when someone one at the races or a bet to celebrate their joy they would buy an extra coffee for someone else not someone they knew it was an anonymous gift for someone who came by later. Couldn't afford a coffin. So how does it work you just by two coffee. Yes essentially you go up to the cash you pay for your coffee and then you say you'd like to buy a cafe. She'll says Oh and then they they the person behind the cash gifts do the two receipts and so you take the receipt for the second coffee. The cafe suspend their news. Stick it in this case in this big cafetiere Lebron's coffee pot by the door. Did you actually see anyone by an extra coffee. I did. You know it's A. It's a lot of tourists during it. They in particular like distribution and while I was there there was an Italian who came in Diego but An Italian who lives in southern France. who heard about this Through on television or something and he bought one. I think is a good thing because you think about somebody else you know and You know even the normal coffee even place like this you pay one Eurotech twenty which is nothing basically and you can pay another extra for personal that cannot afford coffee. There's a kind of way. Think about in the vision really and did you see anyone coming into get a cuff. Especially yes I did ED The sixty eight year old gentleman named Antonio who lives in in the neighborhood that's renowned working class neighborhood in Naples it's called last senator. He came in with his wife and I asked him how often he came nearly every day. Not just because they got us. This is special coffee but because one of the few places that still makes a decent coffee in Naples. I've had some bad luck in life so I'm glad of this tradition done uh-huh sprite. Is this now again. Well in in practice. I don't think it's that widespread famous Neapolitan writer who channel they could ashamed. So cited cited this tradition in a book a few decades ago sort of began to return them but mostly in people's imaginations. I think the tradition actually doesn't even go back that far to postwar years when most of Naples was still very very the report and when I was down in Naples last week I went around and I asked if I could leave a cafe so spazio at a scattering of different front cafes and different kinds of neighborhoods enables and this is the kind of answer I got no Eze Steak Wa Nice. That's you asking if you can leave one. Yeah and that's that's the Barman saying no no no no we don't do that here So I think the idea of the cafe so special is very appealing to talion specifically neopolitan To the way they wanna see themselves as generous which I do think his equality of Italians expressed in coffee culture here You know for instance when you go to take a coffee break with colleagues here more often than not you treat the person you're taking the coffee with or or or they treat you and that's a pleasure and joy that that just is part everyday life here. I mean it can happen in Canada but it's not the norm and you know that's a cultural difference but I also suspect It's just an economic omic question because here your your coffee or your Cappuccino is GonNa cost you not much more than a dollar whereas you know some of some of these some some. I'm coffees in in. Canada can go as much as five dollars depending on on what you ask for. But in Naples especially there's another part of coffee culture that it really takes center stage and this is it in a nutshell total wallet up three Ritu. -ality yes ritu -ality. That's Francesca Media Borelli. He's a regional politician. And the head of the Neapolitan Coffee Group. That's pushing for. Its own own separate UNESCO recognition. Now I met for an after lunch espresso outside of Gambrinus and you know. He said his group is going a step. Further than the Italian Espresso UNESCO group which says as as we've talked about that That they want to suppress recognized for both How in Espressos made but also the culture around it but early says that the Neopolitan Espresso bid did is really actually not about the coffee at all that the coffee is just an excuse to celebrate and protect the neopolitan culture around it and says that coffee culture is very different in Naples? Not only from the rest of the world but from the rest of Italy in Alberta. It's not just about coffee rituals in cafes but also Napolitan home rituals the rituals around our traditional additional coffee pots that we've transformed and elaborated in our homes in Milan when people would come. They don't speak with anyone. They down there coughing out the door. There are Comedians who do skits showing how the Milanese get dressed and do four other things while drinking their morning coffee Naples it's the opposite it's about relating into those close to you it's about talking about what's new if the Naples soccer team won or lost the latest elections. What's in the papers it's a it's a moment of collegiality cofre toys? So it's that north-south divide again so these two groups are now competing for UNESCO recognition. Yeah they are. We'll see what happens but assured me that he was going to reach out to the other Espresso Group and see if they cooperate. But you know it's been a couple of weeks and so further not talking. What happened to coffee? Bridging the divide my goodness but in all the talk about Italian Coffee Culture in the UNESCO bids I wonder is there an economic economic motivation here. Oh yes yeah. There is but the economic motivation isn't within Italy. It's about Italian roasters. Coffee brands feeling the squeeze from both both the Nestle capsules that have taken off around the world and what we can classify sort of as hipster specialty coffee and so- Italian Espresso producers want to claim their position as the originators of the Espresso Espresso culture throughout the world. So that they can. You know kind of CL- claim some sort of supremacy in those markets alette Jonathon Morris. The last word of the UNESCO initiative is a way really of trying to get recognition for that culture culture which they hope will enable them to maintain their position not just in the Italian market but also in the world market. Because obviously obviously that's where the the prophets are to be made at this point. It's all fascinating who knew. There's so much poured into that tiny cup of Espresso. So indeed. I sort of feel like we barely skimmed the creamy surface. I mean there's there's just there's so much culture in this little tiny Hiney Cup of coffee fantastic. I have to say though. I'm going to be so much more annoying or just exacting. The next time I order an espresso. Welcome took club. Thanks so much. Megan thank you. Megan Williams joined us from Rome. And there's more to see on our website including videos and pictures from from that cafe in Naples. That said C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash. The current for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

Italy Italian Coffee Culture Italian Espresso Naples UNESCO Neapolitan Coffee Group Megan Williams NEOPOLITAN Espresso Naples Italy Espresso Italian Espresso UNESCO group Jonathan Morris North America Rome Espresso Group starbucks Milan Massimo Chiloe Neapolitan Pizza Belgium Twenty twenty
Ep. 527 Russian Tour | Borsa Vini-Vinitaly Russia 4

Italian Wine Podcast

21:58 min | 6 months ago

Ep. 527 Russian Tour | Borsa Vini-Vinitaly Russia 4

"Previa welcome to our to rush into is sarah said will air each day this week coming is dedicated to the events being held at the end of march this year moscow and some fitness boom versa. Vini envy italy. Russia oregon is by off year and the italian traded powered by the ministry of foreign affairs and international cooperation. Grab your favorite italian wine and we will see you. Russia if you enjoy listening please considered an eighteen through a one. 'cause dot com any among helps core equipment production in fully gatien costs and remember to subscribe rate our show wherever you mean. Hello this is the italian wine. Podcast russian tour. I- rebecca learns an anti may. Now i've been introducing needs to. The italian winemakers are participating in the border vinnie and vinitaly russia joint events ron of yet and the italian trade agency. I g with the support of the ministry of foreign affairs and international cooperation have scheduled for the end of march this year and moscow and petersburg we've been asking why and produces taking part in b. two b. sessions in russia to present themselves with one wine that best characterizes the winery and to answer two questions. Why is this wine. Special fee on which traditional dish of your region says well with the wine in particular. Today tomorrow. we are going to present to you. The italian produces taking pot and the italian trade agency b. to be meetings in russia. This is a program powered by the ministry of foreign affairs. International corporations called piano suit so let's dive in and see what we have today. A swirly winery finial cantina. I audio lavinia day. Sarah go let me start with the esuli. Winery vineyards located in the western part of the heart of sicily. Between monsanto delvalle trapani with a mild and breezy climate and altitudes of one hundred. To six hundred meters above sea level soils of middle texture klay shingle. The western side of sicily called a sui in the local dialect means under the sun. In fact the sun the light the high mineralogy of the soil. The mediterranean perfumes brought by the wind characterized these winds great personality the caruso family that owns the winery combines tradition and innovation in this magical location. The winery is the result of the patient. Restoration of an old eighteenth century value and it renews a winegrowing family tradition for over three generations. Now the area of a sudi winery consists of five plots for a title one hundred thirty hectares vineyards around six to eighteen years old hundred hectares of this land mainly suited for the indigenous grape varieties such as narrow davalos zubi bought in somalia luchino paddock corny but also a perfect for the well-known center. What else well the winemaker agronomist of. The winery is dr lorenzo landy. A sui is a modern organic certified. Winery where the innovative techniques are used environment and landcare policies are followed. The company embodies the principle of identity of the territory of origin by promoting the production of organic sicilian wine containing romance. That make this island unique. The winery stuns in an area renowned for centenarian wine-growing history and comprise the d. o. C. city certification as soon as three main pillars are the indigenous grape varieties the organic growing and italian culture so simplicity and respect for the land of the fundamental principles their daily activities and the choice in producing only ones impurity the choice to pursue a sustainable development based on the respect for environment and health. All this enriched by multiple connections to the sicilian art and literature. Let's speak a little more about orlando. Hi everybody i'm analia promo ova. Sto expert manager for solely wine. And now we'd like to introduce low landau a hundred percent metal dowa blasting. The cecilia didn't mean jonah duties unit. Control that it's a very lovely wine. Its future signing thens ruby red with purple hues. The nose is a dive into their almost of this island intense. Chance the Fruit it shows a good balance with soft tennis this wine especially for me as its name evokes the one of the pilot of the point orlando furioso encourage said this thing voyage to those chilean nod in literature Excellent which made aged cheeses and the rusted made with potatoes see assume show and thank you very much. A red wine of drc sisley narrowed avenue in one hundred percent. The production area is dotted on a soil type of medium rich texture stone pebbles with good mineral endowment the vine city an altitude of one hundred to one hundred and fifty meters above sea level with an insulin. Mediterranean climate. with mild winters and breezy summers. The harvest is from the end of september into the first week of october. Obviously depending on the ripening of the grapes each year the winds traditionally fermented with twenty five to thirty days of maceration. Very soft extraction through traditional pumping a temperature of around twenty six to twenty eight degrees celsius after a period of model lactic fermentation three to four months. Is captain stanley. Still an ambassador for another three to four months an intense ruby red wine with purple hues aromas of red ripe fruit which are well-balanced with soft. Tannin's so no landau is excellent with a cheeses in red meats. This wine has twice been awarded with trae gaddi by vini d'italia and got ninety two points in two thousand and sixteen from james suckling. We talk endlessly about one in sicily. We'll definitely come back here but other participants of the project waiting for us so we must move to julia. And when i calling themselves wine ottesen's rather than wine produces the multi. Here is the excellence of the territory. Cooperative spirit in constant attention to the modern cultivation techniques the lead to a production of great quality. Welcome to julia. Italian region located in the southern peninsular of the country bordering the adriatic sea to the east they iranian see to the south west and the gulf of toronto to the south. And we are going to present to you a company with strong innovative character. Vin i all the minhas stand in the middle of the tunnel deep julia where the quality of land in the ideal climate favors the cultivation of vines whether tradition and quality of the capita grape s- turned out to create a wine that respects the territory and gives pleasure of taste in nineteen fifty-nine in orta nova during the economic boom aggripa. Farmers decided to found the cantina so challenge a cooperative setup among members only to make good local wine by harvesting the grapes from their fields. In two thousand fifteen the cantinas. So charlie was transformed into vanilla policy finale esera with the modernization of the plants and offices with new partners in the winery decision to focus on the growth of the company but keeping intact the traditional work of growing grapes and improving the interventions to generate the flagship wine of the five sites. As for the wine. The wine have been i only see. Today is narrow. Detroit awarded in national and international contests created to satisfy markets and different targets. So they have a line dedicated to large scale distribution finial bears the name of the company and four lines dedicated to record channel. Five reality mediterraneo. Knepper glenn fetus as putin winemakers used to say drinking well to live well in venereal as they do the best to make this happen today. We have the winner liaising narrow detroit one hundred percent vines at an altitude of one hundred meters above sea level on fresh deep soils canopied in harvest by hand in the third week of september. That de stemmed pressed a rated during fermentation are controlled. Temperature is six days with pumping over racking with soft pressing and optima lactic fermentation has completed pouring off filling barrels and a spirit of rest in cement storage tanks before bottling they are then left to refine in bottle for a further two months. This is a ruby red colored wine with lingering an intense fragrances. A floral and underbrush soft and delicate flavor ideal for light first courses such as roasted meat medium season cheeses and cooked vegetables. Let's hear what the winemakers in early please. They have to say good. Modeled joined the marketing. Communication manager of new york do please. And though about iowa's oscar to porcelain the first why vying special to me but these wines special Because it has a an hunt city he story which has its roots in the territory of the five Outside took up dairy to read a lot to where a d shaw and quality out of the bologna. that's conduct titties or that He's a spirit as in the color palette by any dance and delegate brush stroke like it's blend the or dis traditional dishes Joan bechtel's Where we these wine so order get them hopes anytime beyond the name is or But took the secret of these Lied positionally in the optimal cooking of vegetable with expedience end the knowledge of the raw materials. Hello to obtain a Where the of flowers. Thanks today do. I just think you could ask. Giovanni the sunshine the sea breezes local hospitality. It's nice secret and traditional dishes combined with local wines over many. Warren lovers here are exploration of the south of italy. Continues today into the companion region. Where we're going to talk about cantina. Your audio county is located in tortoise. Guzzo at the slopes of mount tabor. No on calcareous massive known as the sleeper. 'cause observing this group of mountains from a set in distance it looks like a lying down sleeping woman here. Long stretches vineyards create a picturesque natural. Park that thanks to its territorial structure and particular weather conditions allow production of high quality wines. Sonya benavente tanno is an area highly educated in the cultivation of grapes and olive the great part of talk nurse grape varieties diffuse today have been inherited from the greeks already since the roman period that was a particular preference for wines from this area and to underline the fertility and prosperity of this region planning the elva defined it as companion felix. This tree is also known as the land witches because of an ancient legend we leave the story to the people to reveal it once. You get the chance to come here. The winds from sanju other result the desire to preserve on valorize. Talk to nasa vines. And this is why. The local wine production is characterized by strong to piss ity on an easily recognizable sensory profile. In fact continue audio decided to orient. Its hope production to eliana confined. Geena giving these grapes. Interpretations eliana call also known as the barral of the south on one of the most important wines in the region is here eliana co deltona and this is a full. Bodied wine characterized by strong. Tannin's good predisposition to aging. The toronto mountain is also ideal for the cultivation of falun geena a white grape variety very much appreciated in companion continue audio is a project realized by two brothers with the desire of continuing a family tradition. They great grandparents culture vacated graves and stored the wine in large vessels and waited for the merchants of the nearby cities to voter in the early ninety s. Pietro in his twenties decided to start a company devoted to such passionate work. The small family seller comes back to life together with the tools. His ancestors used to work with some years later luca. The younger brother joined the company in two thousand and fifty an innovative. Modern cellar was built to provide the opportunity to produce sparkling wines. Now they use this modern technology to produce wines from autonomous grape varieties that represent the territory so piatra reserves the viticulture techniques and is responsible for the grape harvest and the relationship with vine grows that cultivate vineyards care and dedication and also make up part of the continue audio and luca deals with the winemaking techniques in the winery together through tradition and innovation. They produce high quality wines that convey the authenticity of the territory. One of them we will find today. The sanyo eliana co. Do see made from one hundred percent eliana in the two burner. Drc sanyo area in companion the vines here. Two hundred fifty to three hundred meters above sea level on limestone and clay soil and aghia training system plan density of around three thousand pounds per hector they are harvested in the last week of october by hand and then undergo maceration control temperatures of twenty four to twenty six degrees lactic fermentation aged for eight Then aged for eight months in still four buckling they have deep umbreit red color intense fragrance of red fruits with spicy sense solid and elegant tannin's blended with a balanced acidity and full body. Sanyo eliana rodeo see is ideal with grill steaks and remained. Hello everyone i'm on now. Raw sex with men are manager over continued yoyo continuing audio isa. Winery located the enough suffer. Itogi just to give you an idea. We are around the one under kilometers from me. Ulcer for me. It's very big He are we do. And that will like to introduce you land. i'll hauer february contini oreos wind. It's about the sonya yanni. I just these wine percival because it is funnel percents a young and we are in the actual lender of aids represents our soul. We are hard. Workers a hopeful. You will appreciate. He's a very deep umbreit. Random caller he tonight's program saw operated a fleet and of course lisa final sense of spicy. Each can be one pair with our traditional. These shut may also poor a red peppers that vague potatoes. I hope you will enjoy thank or european and the by. Thank you rosa. Export manager of the cantina. You audio. what's next last for today. Lavinia some article welcome to lavinia demarco a territory immersed in the heel of italy. A unique territory cilento kissed by the sun and caressed by the sea breezes which bring the the sense of the mediterranean a cradle of wine in the classic era this land has jealously preserved the unique imprint of its fines until present day. Lying between the ionian in the adriatic seas mostly flat. The cylinder territory is exposed to the many wins that sued the heat of sauna. The scarcity of rain and the soils of limestone and clay composition. Give these wines. Remarkable body an intense k. Destined to the production of high-quality. Gop wines the heritage of this unique area is constituted by his precious by diversity. A knowledge that passes from generations of winegrowers in an apologist who resonate with the ancient voice and the offer of modern technology decades before the winery was born in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy two. The retailer family grew grapes. It was the grandfather. Marker who in the seventies of the last century decided to produce on his own since nineteen ninety. His son franco. The new generation focuses on the native grape varieties of cylinder and their unique characteristics from two thousand seven hundred. Sallow family has significantly expanded production of high quality wines. Thanks to new wineries. Thanks to a new modern establishment. Which in a few years has allowed living disa- marco to spread the wine culture slender bobby on digitally today. The sallow family owns one hundred. Eighty hectares of land in the countryside of challinor san marco. These vineyards gardens of piston tradition. Eighty percent of the land of family is dedicated to the vines of this territory. The reinterpreting wine culture of celente each fine is a nuance of the voice of this land. Persuasive tone of negro mato decisive rhythm. Primitivo the ancestoral echo of malveaux. Natta the lively chatter of susan yellow. But let me tell you. A few more words about zephyr primitive demon doria. Do see line crew. This is made from one hundred percent. Primitivo grapes grown in the manduria production area. On alberta low vines and manually harvested the harvest occurs in the first period of september carried out during the coolest hours of the day with nfl sorting of the grapes. After pressing in d. stemming on twelve fifteen days on the skins there is racking then mullah lactic fermentation and aging in breaks this produces a deep intense ruby colored wine with sweet red fruits black breeze and blueberry flavored sent it with coffee orange peel and ball samec nerds at has good structure and silky. Tannin's an alcohol balanced by a good freshness and long finish traditionally food pairings have been diverse from pork shantou sausages even age. Jesus let's get some more information from the representative of levino december Roberta loopy one. No hello to everyone. My name is rebecca loopy and the exponential manager of lebanon disarmer effeminate company. Born in one thousand nine hundred seventy two located in. They loved italian within the salinas. I'm marco countryside it sallow family pharmacy. One hundred eighty akhtar saw venus. They eighty percent of these properties. They dictated to local vines to produce quality piece defied winds such as pretty doria at the wines are premature art production as of one million bottles. The wine would like to present. You is our chief was asking the wide receiver for wine especially for me. Because he pays a very fine and elegant one hundred percent primitivo demand do zepa means some gusts of wind in an ancient languages spoken in some areas of fog. This elected branches are collected small boxes. The grapes are left on skin support. Twelve fifteen these follow by raking malak determination and aging in french of boras for six months which are traditional dishes to enjoy zipper wine. Enjoy with real the or oven roasted meat dishes and aged cheeses. See you soon coach. Our thank you so much roberto so a quick reminder of the winds to try that we talked about in this episode landau narrowed avalon dc from sicily from australia. Winery narrow detroit. I julia from policy. Sanyo alleanza code from cantini yorio and z primitivo. Di manduria from lavinia demarco. That's it for today. Thanks for tuning in. And we'll see you again for another edition of the russian tool on the italian wine podcasts. Listen to the italian wine. Podcast wherever you get your podcasts. Were on soundcloud apple. Podcasts himalayas fem. And more don't forget to subscribe and rate the show. If you enjoy listening please consider donating through talion line. Podcast dot com any amount helps cover equipment production and publication costs until next time she gene.

ministry of foreign affairs an sicily russia italian trade agency delvalle trapani davalos zubi dr lorenzo landy julia landau analia moscow eliana captain stanley trae gaddi vini d
75. Casa VIII, el regalo

AstroC?bala C?smica

34:03 min | 1 year ago

75. Casa VIII, el regalo

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Lavishly in Denison, the mental guest mentors. In. Experimental Passion. Or therapy or the. Swell had up. Different Commercial Specter's exterior than the rather than in the all in after here. is level of Morozov. Pulling data. You doing civil levels and vision. And garage this push plenty Amanda she s comment journalists. There are some dimple says. Yes I've sectors. E. School the United States. Of meekness maneuvers. As they. Sit Up comprehension. Coach business rough getting. Shorter and she wrote A. Business established in Bay Remodel, model? X. Series. because. These GRANDPA cannot care if winter is up and. Get Him. Eunice. Solace women and. especially not reinstated into mentality. Beating Jewish. Komo factors. That Britain would. she pushed. Team xtreme damage professors. K Yan. This extreme and I think Lonzo pensioners, K.. E. This okay. Twelve garnished with. Marshall speakers than. Last year. By breeders are Susie data more the Jimbo too much college or mutual mafia has. 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Jessie

Coming Out Stories

22:59 min | 1 year ago

Jessie

"From what goes on media this is coming out stories as apoe cost about one of the most important conversations of. Your Life. I'm Emma Gos- well you're going to hear from Jesse now she's a singer a Dj and also a radio presenter. Oh I get to work alongside a radio one of other jobs. She was just in her final week. Him Co presenting. The breakfast show in this interview was recorded. I identify as a female lesbian growing up in Essex. It was very much like with the popular girls over the time at school and not just knew the. It was pretty goes. I was friends. Wave always in that popular group of the sports teams with And we always got the good looking boys kind of hovering around us of which obviously they became like really good friends with them. But I remember thinking why is shade? Itin him why is Hay's eighteen because I always though maybe I'll just fancy my friend school because she's really pretty say alike court she was. She's really outgoing. Range really popular. She's great person. You know that kind of thing thinking maybe I don't actually fancier live a new audit. I used to talk myself out of. It's just because you like what she's wearing kind of thing. So did you have a full-on crush with friends are modum best friend car. We speak about it now. All the time I always had quite pretaped. Fem boyfriends like the real girly pretty looking. Boys Lot really gorgeous. I mean sticker wig on like you have me different. You know a really long blonde hair and blue eyes that kind of thing but I would always got like a boy in the school for like two free weeks then that want to have a case whatever else fancy many more fancy someone else so you got around it that way you ever. Did you ever have any so-social called coincide? We're boys well had boyfriends growing up but like never kind of pass the quite kissing unquote phase until I got to sixteen. Hottest boyfriend is v day and he was a couple years older than me. When I sixteen. Yes I lost my virginity to a boy and experience. I just knew it wasn't I mean not love him but not like that mean and decide. I Wa- I was with him for year and I was thinking I don't want this to happen anymore. From the age of sixteen I moved away from home to go to this performing Arts College. I went to London. Said cops mean just slightly out of London and I lived there all of a sudden I got all this freedom from the age of sixteen had quite a bit of money in my account. Because I've done a lot of like TV jobs. Growing up performing arts stage shows in the western moments safety from got spunk connor. Sixteen I got friends. Who the Guy Boys Era Doreen Bird for college and obviously used to be like a fried are like come on. We got into town and we'd go to like heaven in London G. Y. When it was a story in London sixty nights not so it was in the ninety S. I'm yeah yeah late nineties and it was just incredible. I remember the first time we can in thinking. I just feel so high and at the time I still have this boyfriend in Essex. The LOST MARVELED UNITY TO I. Don't use remember standing in Heaven under the arches in London. And there's like this kind of Baolcony bit that surrounds the dance floor and you look down dots on remember seeing this girl. She's really fit and I was really attracted to. I don't just couldn't help a thou- I don't speaking my friends my gay male friends and they didn't know what I was going for all. She's happy to be going out with them to these gay ause. I thought you were straight gail. Just hanging around with look coming out for the law a few drinks always the Joe. Ca- me some looking down the balcony and this girl. She keeps looking at me but I couldn't say to my friends because it didn't know Oth- oh maybe a light boys and girls and that's okay. I've got bisexual friends. Maybe having all this free my heads the guys went to the toilet. Now you know what guys like when I go to the toilet. I took forever in the them. Guideline that stock saw. I like all way here knew exactly what I was doing. I just as they went away. I said make sure you come back away in this box. It was always packed. I'm looking at with the dance floor and she's gone whereas Cisco Gone Looking for. Oh what am I going to turn round? She was there a my face. She went you guy. And Yeah a believer city. I just went and we still kissing and it was like the most incredible experience of my entire life. I had my first Lesbian Kiss in heaven. Then she went on what she name. I was like Jesse and she said Oh. Hi I'm Laura. I'm just going to tell my friends where I am. And she she was doing didn't show. Yes you slightly older. The me lie. She knew and I'll just start as low fly baby into dancing when she starts then he walks off Patrick Species Leffler. That was me I was like. I was all in a panic but it was amazing. Incredible Fade in the NFL. And she go back Laura. Laura thought Noah I'll tell you so she didn't come back but you know I was kind of relieved because my friends then came back from the toilet and I did not explained by the way. I'm a lesbian now because I didn't know how always failing so they just about the toilet and things ripple nothing happening here and my friends. My best friend crease. He was longer than usual. So a Wolfer the dance ought to say and this. Chris was out yet. Either Chris Wherever you not. We've all been waiting for you. The was still up the balcony bay towards the toiler. This time I said. Where have you been all that was a massive Qaeda's a massive q? And Chris a totally black game and deny walk. Bad person for doing this is because I wanted to tell him what did just happen to me. I'll make Chris. Don't lie a know your I of just seeing you kissing this guy outside the toiler Ole all. Please don't tell anybody score Asia's whatever Russkoe shocked by the way. I'm very sorry to to the Scottish people but yeah I told him. Talk Bobby off just kissed. A girl just jumped this massive hug all throughout college. Chris was gay arm lesbian. We just had this collection together that nobody knew we love here so he had been kissing a boy saw. The toiler wouldn't totally blocked and got it. Rai Yes a totally go awry stays this one night of say Dave and tell you I was wearing. I remember every dates how it was such a massive. Carter point in my life. It was an awakening an awakening. It why love is the fact that you literally have sounds like that was the first time you'd ever verbalize those words. I'm gay and then within about three seconds you're kissing a woman. She just stuck tongue thrown up for where she's bloody gorgeous. She's ready Fan. I'M NOT GONNA say no and honestly wanted for such a long time and then obviously a couple of months down the line. Chris and I start going out together and my best friend best friend from college and like it was just so amazing. I had this guy best friend the I could be myself around all that stuff going school on new fancy my best friend at school. Actually I'd accepted everything. Do you ever told you best friend at school. I've told her since we still in really good contact now and we did have a bit of a case in a nightclub in the she went. You always fancied SCO avenue it co- cover stop it but yeah on. A sleigh is just amazing and then going through. I realized I thought I liked boys as well. I thought I was bisexual because I had such love. You still have this boy talk. So what happened to him? Well I just kind of Went Down Essex to visit my family to visit him. Nauseous largest is just not for me. Didn't she say to him? I can't be reviewed because on lesbian artist could earn just went ready. I wasn't ready and all that judgment. I thought I was going to get. You know I always as kind of grown up being around heterosexual people all the time like I didn't until I went to college. I never I've never had a gay friend or it wasn't until as much as it is. Now I I remember seeing grey notre ones in G. Y. On shooters that's amazing. He's gay made on TV. I just it does make a difference. Doesn't it having those role models and those people out Amoco's well that's really amazing what you're doing as well because having things like this. I think if I'd had this growing up it would have helped me to just accept to lot quicker like I went through thing whereas maybe if I just set with another guy I would be straight because I really struggled with. Don't want to be a lesbian for was. Why was there a period than what you really were in the closet and didn't want to admit it to be especially when I came home from college like summer holidays and that kind of stuff unites along six weeks? When you can't feel you can be yourself. I mean I don't need to have a badge. Sign on Lesbian. But you know if I saw Angelina Jolie on telly I want to be out. Say she fit mom more. Hold him back a huge part of May and of my life and there was this guy. It fixed incomes calm the Gary H and he says a fancy adult. I kept knocking on the door. Boot Ronald Flowers. I even went on a date things. My mom was always lovely what you should go on a date with him. I'm not in the end. Don't thinking what am I doing? So this one I sixteen. It was about eight months off to my first lesbian. Kiss only eight months in the closet though nothing. I honestly I've had a really easy story. Compared to a lot of my friends it was just basically me except for myself to mom. Mom I gotTa tell you something. I'M LESBIAN. She went all right. Then what you want dinner. Brilliant Mommy Brooks absolute legend but honestly since then she said to me awful guy for if as I thought. I'll just go with it but should well. He's not a phase now obviously off the married to a woman. Did you have any questions? She didn't have a she up in conversation again. She just went with their. You know and you know if I was coming out. She's kind of all we going to like an algae bt new tonight and then the next door to me and that kind of thing but as you can tell I can talk forever but put me in front of the I really fancy I. I'm not a CON speak. I just want the ground swell me up so so that sense of things are a couple of girlfriends but not really till I was like nineteen twenty so she took it in stride by the sounds and it was never ever an issue. No it was never an issue in the Modesitt also domino lesbian is. What's The punch line I sit? There is no punchline. But that's my nutshell like we have such a laugh about now. Such del Boy you know. So they lay. You can be worried for so long but if you accept yourself and you're happy with who you are. It doesn't matter to share your story. If you need people tonight maybe might not be easy but it will be eventually and you can always choose your own family. Do hear that a lot of illness so when he was still in college then did you eventually. Come Out till your friends at colleges. Well today what I came out there was a group of four of us. Oh is Chris and I guess. Coach Chris Ryan Jenkins whose huge now in the Performing Arts World Irish friend Kitty McGuire and it was four of us. Two guys to Kitty Straight Ryan Chris. Gay and Lesbian. It was the four of us. We got this amazing friendship and we just helped each other through everything. It was incredible so obviously on social media and stuff I post. You went off in in a relationship with a woman. Obviously I Mari to a woman that kind of thing so college friends now from social media about Oh three days ago we had to college reunion one. St Anything all if you go at the moment. Let's go because it just brings back how you felt carnage. Janie will UK. And I do feel like specially during the breakfast show at gauge. Your outing yourself every single day you just get used. I think the more you accept it the more you talk about it the as life face. That's my experience anyway. Well mean quite often during these interviews. I ask people whether they're out at work. Because that's quite a pro sometimes some people but you really have more out and prior job. Could you bring hosting the breakfast? Show Day I always always done radio. Well the last fifteen years and Johnson singing dancing just hands so within radio safe. I had to go friend of on a great weekend my partner and I or way or I would never say she gopher from why why I just kept it very neutral. So in retrospect coming to gay GEICO. I don't know if you've noticed but I'm the most lesbian I've ever been even my friends. I end in a bad way. There's nothing bad about being who you are. You invented lesbian Wednesday. Let's be honest. Thank you I would take the credit for less waste. You help rages like really my massive. So thank you very much goes well but started out what it means the just celebrate on a Wednesday. Don't talk about them even more than usual. Well yeah exactly. Why not have a day to celebrate women like exactly exactly we need to be celebrated lesbians. Are Incredible. Yes Oh so. You've never had any issues coming out really know because I'm where wherever I've worked I've been accepted like when I was singing on the circuit in Spain. People don't realize by the way if you talking about a singer on stage you shouting towards the speaker so the singer can hear you just to let so I often heard. Oh that's Jesse Book. That's the lesbian really. Yeah because I was literally on. Espn there. I mean. There's loads more. Now it's incredible. I'm talking about back in the day. So it's never been direct to me. But you know you are is what as and so. That's the extent is the homophobia that you've experienced don't even say is High Bay at the end of the day. Once these rumors went around that Jesse Brooks Lesbian the goes on stage as to do quite well fix used to get all the straight women coming over to me and I used to get your say strike out the term lightly but yes I. I had a really good time. I spent ten years in Spain. Worked ON TO OTHER RADIO STATIONS. Coming back Just for years before I luckily got the job from you. Actually F- breakfast no time. Yeah it was getting into work and it was like we direction boss Taibbi when you kind of prepare him for the shy taught find the gay stuff that's going on. Never really directly look for specific stories or quiz stories and gay you know my love for Angelina. Jolie of never expressed not so much on a on another radio station. I've worked on and I am the mice lesbian up every pain. Because I'm so now not I used to hide. I just didn't choose to particularly speak about it. That's why I think it is so important. Because actually radio stations they do have gay presenters talk about it very much and it's not like a total secret but it's kind of brushed under the carpet on gay celebrates it and it's just part of everyday. Life is now to go to a place where you can be who you are without being judged as honestly I'm on putting Mahanama heart now is incredible is so fulfilling and it does wonders for the soul. Life goals the interesting. You mentioned social media earlier and you are someone who loves adores social media so much so we've just been to Aldean. You did three instagram stories. Just an algae demagogues well how can lead to reverse celebrity you know how much am all blushing no social media so you important talk about sexual activity and be and proud on social media as well as is that another part of it important. I would say yes important for especially the younger generation very blase always easier for the younger generations to come out easier for them. They've got social media and idols to the COP. Two on you know as he ever no. I still think it's important that we go out of our way to make it easier for the younger generation or just pay there you know. Obviously we walk media on radio people tune in and listen to what we're saying is important that we get it right because all the are looking up to us. I'll say why don't you obviously? He's about normalizing it. Isn't it really? Yeah we social media you know if I am on canal straight on content stray. If I'm Brighton on the saying why not post it? If I've just poured a hot brunette with Blue Eyes nightime by the way. Why not post a picture of US together? I do think it's important. Yes obviously I see a lot of really good benefits with the job. Get to go to prides around the world. I try to post in a way so safe examples it in New York for pride a complete guy. I try not to pice the fact that I'm in New York. Look I'm doing that kind of Brag because a lot people of food try to post it in a way like this is what you could be doing experiencing this amazing queer environment wherever you go. There is a same and it's different every don't try to promote our LGBT plus seen. Have you ever faced any sort of homophobia backlash on on social media through doing thought a couple tonight? I haven't actually told anyone they semi. I've had a couple of instagram messages. Saying all I thought you were straight away who you think you are talking about. Basically being who I am. But it's always come from time. I don't want to generalize at least from five straight men that wanted to take on a day and I've just been on NAMA LESBIAN and I've a backlash user can watch all they kinda attornal because you haven't given them what they wanted. So you know I love men. I'm not a lesbian. As men I launched lesbians not just want to make that clear because there is a kind of way that some people look lesbians as well which one's the man for example. Well actually you know reverse we love because we're women you dot com dot typical prejudice against but I am a strong woman and if I can help anyone come out then much. My Job's done well brings me nicely onto my last question. Really which because you know that you alluded to this earlier. This is the reason why have done the calls? Because I wanted people to hear other people's experiences I may be getting word of advice about people that were done and happily out and proud. What would you say to it to younger person listening or also just hadn't done that part their journey about coming out? Yeah because there's a Polish October. That's just come out the age of one hundred I love. The story is is amazing. And you know what is never too late? It's never too late. It's never too soon either. If you've got that one person it might be best friend. It might be family. Might be relative some. You know if you've got someone that you can talk to. There is always always someone you know wants to speak to give me a message on instagram. Honestly there's always someone the advice gave as they who you all except here you are and the sooner you do that the quicker you will feel just as the relief as the relief the stress goes and you can do with it day by one time and it will be the best thing that you've ever done. Thank you to Jesse for talking to me. You can still hear on guy by the way on a Saturday night and if you do want to say on instagram she is the Jesse broke. Please do subscribe wherever you get your calls from but also really appreciate it. If you'd find the time to leave us a right thing or view find out more about coming out. Stories Oscars the question or even offer your own story for an interview. You can follow us on twitter. A comment stories all at coming out stories port on instagram. We'd love to hear from you on swell and coming out. Story says edited by San Marco. What GOES ON MEDIA PRODUCTION? Next time you'll hear from Cayden Aquar- Trans Man from Florida. Who had to come out several times in his life but it wasn't until he was reading a magazine age twenty two realized who he was was raining magazine and they were talking about a trans woman. I had never heard the word transgender in my life. Who I didn't even know what it was but I was reading this article and they were talking about what transgender people were. And I was like well. This is this is me this is who I am.

Ryan Chris Jesse Essex Angelina Jolie instagram London COP Emma Gos Doreen Bird Itin Arts College Laura Ronald Flowers twitter New York GEICO connor Spain
Venice Is The Latest Victim Of Historic Flooding From Climate Change

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:48 min | 1 year ago

Venice Is The Latest Victim Of Historic Flooding From Climate Change

"This message comes from on points sponsor. Indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast from NPR W. R. Boston. I'm Meghna trucker Birdie and this is on point Aqua Alta that is what the Italians called floodwaters. Here's and specifically the flood waters. That are submerging Venice. The historic city experienced the worst flooding in fifty years this month. The second highest water levels ever recorded their. The tragedy is a combination of an ancient sinking city. An Egg inexorably rising sea and bulled engineering solutions bogged down by bureaucracy bureaucracy corruption and misplaced ambition in other words. Venice is an accelerated test case for every world city that is on or near rising water so this hour on point flooding climate and saving Venice and we will begin today with Sylvia Pohjola. She joins us from Rome. She is. NPR's senior European correspondent. And she's just back from some extended time in Venice. We have links to her reporting at on Point Radio Dot Org Sylvia. It's great to have you on the program. Thank you thank you for having me. It's the first of all. Tell us what you saw when you were in Venice well. I arrived On Sunday just as at the peak of a high tide not quite the. It didn't quite reach that terror. Very very high hit on Tuesday November twelve which was the worst flooding in more than fifty years More than six feet of of the sea level but it was very high arrived at the station and it was in my my boots. Were not quite high enough to get through the water But I was the all the water buses service was suspended because the buses couldn't go under low The the boats could go under low-hanging bridges and and Was Lucky to get a A water taxi which is a motorboat. But what really struck me and this is really. The idea of rising sea levels really hits home when I got to the pier here. The boat was too high for me to climb in and he had to go to the water bus Peer which is a bit higher so that I could climb down it was simply the the the boat where I should be pretty stepping onto the deck was over my waist. It was impossible. Meet in. Wow and the that was really Sean. The and the the extent of the damage then That that we can know thus far to to the city and its its architecture always impossible yet to calculate relate. There's you know there's the damage to every day houses. The the damp. The the salt corroding buildings Then there's of course all these artistic monuments the Saint Mark's Zilic. The crypt was under water for more than twenty four hours in there. Say they're experts have already determined that there's been damaged to the mosaics sakes and some of the marble pillars the danger there is the all the salt water creeping in will corrode The the marbles The would everything you know. The the visionaries who built Venice of more than a thousand thousand five hundred years ago used materials that could withstand water that could be easily replaced but with rising sea levels now is getting into the into the cement into the into the marble into the wood. And it's really. The buildings are in danger of crumbling rolling. So let's talk for a moment. Sylvia about how both the Venetian and the Italian governments are coping with this disaster in Venice. Last Thursday Italian Prime Minister Minister Giuseppe contest spoke with reporters in Venice and he pledged government support for flooding victims to restore the prime minister. Kante they're saying with regard to repairing the damage caused by the tide. We will proceed in two phases. In the first phase we will be able to compensate individuals and traders up two five thousand euro for individuals and twenty thousand euro for businesses. These resources will be released immediately. that's the Italian. Prime Minister Giuseppe Kante so Sylvia. What is the government doing right now to well this? This was the emergency Decision because certainly the images of Venice underwater you know our has a huge impact on all Italians To city beloved by everybody. It's so unique. It's and so you know the government had to do something but it's definitely it's certainly it's just a it's a stop gap It's certainly not enough. I mean then it's GonNa be all the as I said all the cultural The artistic works churches. There's one hundred and twenty churches at least half of them have been damaged Bell Towers You know Museums I was the other day at a Cultural Foundation Dacian that Had A it's library was seriously damaged and we're all volunteers. There were trying to salvage books putting paper towels between the pages. Trying find you do at least a again a stop work so this is all. There's a lot of volunteers. A lot of young. People have flocked event is to try to help and not just doing the cultural helping Venetians Venetians get out of their houses. Their houses are totally wet. Helped the move You take to someplace to higher ground. There's been there's been a big big outpouring pouring of emotion and help and very positive thinking I think I certainly among younger people. Well so let's hear then On that note Sylvia let's hear what the Venetian Mayor Luigi Brune. Yaro a said in a video statement Last week he asked for help and cooperation in addressing pressing the city's flooding and that's the Venetian mayor. He's saying quote. We are really risking not being able to manage this anymore. Tomorrow we will ask for a state of disaster in the city and we are asking for help because there will be so many expenses. We need everyone to help each other. We need to be united to face. The effects of climate change Sylvia climate change. 'cause Venice has had a flooding problem for for a long time. More than many decades is this. Are we hearing now. Italian officials pointing to the inexorable effect of climate change change as a as a major part of the problem. Well it's very interesting to hear the Bruni said that because he's also a member of he comes from center right party. That has never really been I'm very much in Acknowledging the dangers of climate change. So it's interesting that he has changed his His mind you know as as you know this This is this. This is something. That is more more mystifying. Anything is that the Venetians that the Italians never went to. It seems they never went to Holland to see what the Dutch oven doing. And they've certainly been working to help protect You know the country from from tidal waves. There's there's been this insane. Huge huge big project called mosaic. which stands for it's it's an acronym but the word means Moses in in Italian and the sense of the parting of the waters? These are this. It's a very it's the poor. Perhaps the biggest civil engineering project. That's ever been undertaken in Italy and it's been under construction for sixteen years and it still unfinished and it's it's been Plagued by cost overruns big delays and many many corruption scandals. In fact most Venetians believe that this project object was the most expensive and it was picked purpose simply for that. So the as many people as possible could Shave off as much money as they could. I mean we're talking in the one nine ten to twenty billion euro range here. We'll we'll talk a lot more about mosaic A little later in this hour Sylvia because that being the chosen solution for the the double problem of climate change and a sinking cities of very interesting test case but but Sylvia Sylvia Poggioli joining us from Rome. Hang on Sylvia because I want to turn now to Venice itself and joining us is Toto Bergamo. Rossi he's director of the Venetian Venetian Heritage Foundation. which restores buildings and artworks in Venice he's author of inside Venice? A private view of the city's most beautiful interiors ears. Toto Bergamo Rosie. Welcome to point. I know so from your perspective there in Venice as a as a master restorer. How how bad is the damage from this latest flooding right now? Well as you mentioned before I mean you have to understand from especially from American people Is Not a Katrina is not a tornado knock could be reverted with a lot of currency that took the house down That this is the race and the problem is they've already sold it. So decides goes inside every every single break wall with beans and the Sotraz meet the humidity up so as a kind of cancer at that even if you wash a lot and you you you clean and wash with the clean water but once that materials are touched by the water They started to have that kind kind of deterioration project that take forever and never so this is the real thing doesn't get. It's a sea water that go inside every every single building entrance meet after when the water is done is over one flat is over. You have that kind of sold crystal in. He never breaks. And after the break started explored is something very slow. But but it's it's it's it's kind of long reaction that make thinks these appear ear right well and in fact if when when the when flood waters subside in Venice you can see the evidence of that sort of that capillary action that leaching leaching of the salt up further from foundations. You can visually see it in as you say. It has this long-term corrosive effect on the buildings on the frescoes on the walls. Can you tell us. Specifically Sylvia had mentioned Saint Mark's basilica now appear to send Marco is one of the lowest points in Venice here. What is happening specifically we to this beautiful historic church in Venice? Well because you know this is the old part of Venice and and this is why supermarket the Mark Pathetic still look like a Byzantine ten full because it was never renovated a never really changed the size during the century resource deal and early middle age building and the level of the floor. Fill the original one. So this is why that part of the city's very low because I mean the rest of Venice. Was You know renovated many times for many centuries so they raise the level of a little street of squares but some Marcus squares and especially it. Does he feel other level of you know ten century so this is why would the raise of the water everywhere. In General Edna Raw compared to ten centuries ago of course there will now go with almost every day closely the week of the mark and especially this time was a huge huge amount of water in and Sylvia had mentioned that there's flooding in the crypt of San Mateo. Yeah this is very bad because they had done this work. You work like few years ago. the creep is under the main holiday and by the way we could create but it was the region of all. Church is the creep creeped of Samarkand. After they'd be what I'm talk- so it's a very old part of the of a building And any completely isolated a few years ago to to avoid water problem voter was coming from the floor and this case it was not coming from the thrower but from I'm from from the floor above so it was like a waterfall so and they water gets stuck in and You know it's it's something like I mean nobody. Nobody thought about water will come from the floor. Because there is quite high. F- So Toto Burger Modo see standby for just a moment and Sylvia Pohjola in Rome. Hang on we will be right back. We are talking about the historic high water in Venice and how climate change engineering solutions. All factor into a test S. case for every city on planet earth. That's on the water will be back in just a moment. This is on point This message comes from an points sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste. You need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed lead post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor sponsored jobs new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast terms conditions and quality standards. Apply it. I know you have the best intentions. You want to keep up with the impeachment hearings but maybe you have a job. There will be hours of testimony from witnesses in impeachment impeachment inquiry this week and the NPR politics podcast will be there every afternoon to keep you up to date on all the key moments. Listen daily this is point. I'm making a trucker bardy. Were talking this hour about historic flooding in Venice about climate change and about saving one of the world's most beloved love cities I'm joined today by Sylvia Pohjola. She's with us from Rome. She's senior European correspondent for NPR. Toto Berga Morosi also joins. He's in Venice. He's director of the Venetian Heritage Foundation which restores buildings and artworks in Venice. and Mr Bergamo. Rosie Lemme ask you. You were talking about how there had been some efforts in years past sort of isolate parts of Saint Mark's basilica from water to keep the water out but of course water fines away. Hey especially as it rises and rises. I just wonder are there. Efforts or thinking Underway that perhaps regarding San Marco specifically we do parts of it needs to be moved. I mean can this building be saved in the long run. Well you know the problem is you. Can't you can't take some mark. Mazzetti can put some other places. I mean it would never happen and you cannot raise the level of the floor because all Jackie tetreault design would change. And and so. It's not it's not really policy but I think we have to continue to work in this way but just you know We have to make that that that project finish. I mean the very very You know everybody talk about this molded take this this Watergate there and at CDC. Before I mean it's it's ninety percent of the work has been done in too many years and a lot of money these appeared and it was very addictive between different political tarts but in any case we have to be pragmatic Mikic and the war. Problematic is not something that we use a lot in my country unfortunately So we have to be matic and just finish that because they spent already seven medians of seven billions sorry billions of euro on the project and And there is like I plan to finish every year and a half so I hope that now would that kind of be catastrophe than have last week they who they can and they could accelerate and and and and this project earlier just to prevent any other. You know. We can't have another floss like this. And I'm I'm I was born. Nineteen sixty seven so the big flood of ninety sixty six. You know when I grow up I always heard about the floods of sixty six and yet fact and the damage and how bad it was. But I mean it's unbelievable that after fifty three years. We're still doc with the same. Well Silvia let me turn back to you here because toto mentioned that perhaps this latest historic flooding might kick in a sense ends of pragmatism to get those dams fixed. I mean based on folks that you've spoken to in the past week or so. Is that sense of urgency now amongst the the Italian political bureaucracy. Well you know the project they just As total just said that their plan they have said that they will have it completed by by the end of two thousand twenty one. That's you know two years from now which is You know a long time. The other question people are raising it was pro it was projected that the the design was done. Something like At the end of the nineties early two thousands and it's not clear whether they did at that time time you know. I don't know what the predictions were of rising sea levels at the time. Many people are worried that it's going to be they're not going to be sufficient to to really we keep the tides Away the other issue is that environmentalists are very worried that even once it's functioning the floodgates will have to be open a lot of the time time which means that the lagoon gets cut off from the from the ocean from the and that would alter the whole the whole ecosystem that has been really building building vanderbilt and nurtured by by human beings for free. You know fifteen hundred years. It's a marvel of this this combination of human human in nature working together the video Venetian lagoon. which is a huge lagoon and It's a very delicate ecosystem ecosystem. And there's this concern that even wants if they do function which nobody is really sure that they will. I'm sorry about my skepticism. But I think I'm reflecting the the sense of most Venetians. I heard only skepticism. I didn't hear much enthusiasm on the part of anybody. They're so tired and resentful towards also politicians. And what they've been hearing for so long so it's It's not clear that even once if they do work you know what impact it will have on the lagoon on the ecosystem. There's there's really it's begun on their well Toto Bergamo Rosie one last question for you as as a Venetian you know better than any of us around the rest of the world that I mean. The one of the painful ironies here is that Venice is water. Water is Venice. This is a city. That's since it's founding on on those many many millions of piles at all. Those buildings sit on has been intricately bound to water and yet here it is water that is spelling the overall perhaps the overall doom for Venice I mean. Do you think that let me just ask. You can be saved in the long run. Well if we use like this I don't think so also because I mean it's this is why I mean. Sometimes because catastrophe can provoke something at the end something good I mean reaction So and my my concern is not about only about the big flats than we have a few days ago. But it's the way then the city is run and they not only under the last administration of our our little Local Donald Trump. Then we have a mayor of Venice but that is not only about that. It's more about years I I mean it's years of neglect that Position I mean the people. They don't decide they don't then it's still runs like nineteen seventy when we were like when we have other time maximum six or seven medium by year of tourists this year we had thirty meeting even presence and with still have the same kind of a of a of organization. So it's not you know. Van It if they don't take series series important from the governmental realm decision about how this should be run It's GonNa be like that. CD of these and they were just for cheap tourist and of course wilder everywhere and this is something like make make me read. It suffered so much because you know I dedicate my life to try to save the most beautiful building of the museum. The Churches Collection Make Exhibition. It'd be some big books. S- caught our shape and the result is that at the end. Everybody wants to use. Then it's all of everybody just to make their own little money and there is no big vision about what is going to be in twenty years. If there's a Venice in twenty years yeah well total Burgum Alrosa Director of the Venetian Heritage Foundation which resort restores and preserves artworks in Venice joining us from Venice. Italy today thank you so much for being with us. Thank you okay. So let's dig in a lot deeper into what we've talked about already this hour and that is that question of of Floodwater protection and this massive engineering project. that is hoping to be the savior of the city of Venice so joining us now now for more on that as Rafael brass he's with us from Atlanta Georgia. He's professor in the School of Civil and environmental engineering and at the School of Earth and atmospheric sciences at Georgia Tech. He also worked on the flood barrier project in Venice from nineteen ninety. Five to two thousand thirteen working with the consortium. That's developing the flood ludd barrier project. He headed a group of experts overseeing the barriers development professor bras. Welcome to point. Thank you very much pleasure so I smelled like to actually just sort of give people much more detailed sense as to what we're talking about when we're talking about these submersible flood barriers right so so take us to the those three inlets On the edge of the Venetian lagoon. Where the water? From the Adriatic Sea flushes in and out every day. Those are the sites it's where these mosaic dams are being built. Is that right. That is correct With the idea is to protect the Laguna Venison general not just Vannes although although that certainly the main subject it's a fifty kilometer thirty kilometer fifty kilometer long Lagoon Buddy history. Well defined inlets if you can separate those. Let's see from the lagoon. During periods of flooding then We would have protection of the loan and the the the design of the mosaic barriers themselves. Right they they're supposed. They're designed to sit underwater flat right during regular title events So that water can come in and out of the lagoon and then when a high tide or a particularly high tide is predicted. Those bears are supposed store rise up and close off the lagoon. Is that right. That is correct they. They were designed to effectively seat on the water and going going to operation only when needed and the reason for that is to allow Traffic in and out of the inlets and also so for over for aesthetic reasons. I think that there was a requirement or regionally for designs. That would be US less intrusive as it's possible And Flood Berries like this. Are we've seen in other places. I mean the Thames Barrier in London is a is a good example. It stays open. Most of the times of the Thames River can flow into the north. See but it can close To protect London win with unusually high tide events There so it's not it's not a And out of the ordinary idea here but why has it taken so long to to construct a mosaic beer. You heard Sylvia report that it's not done yet. It might be done in two years but it's been a long time. What's the hold up? Well that's unfortunate done. I'm not sure I know all answers both As you know the barrier earlier while so originally intended to take on the order between eight and ten years to build if I recall correctly our targeted date that point and Wesson died two thousand twelve two thousand eleven two thousand. Twelve delays Hata Care Oh largely because of financing financing issues since then There were corruption Issues that arose for political corruption corruption in the in in the unit that was doing it. that tool sort of action so but unfortunately those actions seem to have implied the the stopping of the the effort to finish the barriers. Were which were largely finish By the twentieth thirteen Sylvia. Do you have of a d ever thought on that. I mean does. It seem still kind of optimistic that the the Italians might finish this project on the time. They've stated well. It is an Italian problem. Generally generally it's not just in Venice that Then delays and again usually mostly due to corruption and not not not no more than anything else but no I mean I have no idea I mean they say another two years Adler brings it to eighteen years if it is completed by the end uh-huh and who knows how much more money it's true they've been there's also in Italy when there's changes of political governments instead of having sort of continuity when one government makes certain decision the the next government government comes in and starts blocking it making COMP COMP- complications money is suspended so there's that it certainly that is also one reason for delay away but there's also tremendous suspicion of where all summit all this money has gone and why it is the psalms have increased the cost of increased so much over this period And who will see its video. Mo- you know. Yesterday I was. I visited the island of police phillies three now which is one of the barrier island. There's Lido and the three inlets are at the top of leader. The bottom of Lido and then there's police three to kill John the mainland on. And there's a very thin very thin strips of Barrier Islands Lido and Palestine piteously. The last week suffered tremendous damage. It's mainly its inhabitants are mostly fishermen and I went to the Along the port there and it's just like a row of Electrical appliances refrigerators washing machines absolutely destroyed by the waters. They all were all the homes were flooded. The fishermen have this initiatives unique thing that they have in Venice Lagoon. They have these you see when you go in by boat you'll see often these wooden platforms that you're never really sure that she'll like little sheds and what they are. Are there storage areas for fishermen where they keep their nets and their whatever their equipments in tools and one fisherman. Several fishermen told me there's we're totally destroyed. One was like two hundred square meters shed. He lost everything. All the fishermen have lost all their all their their nets everything because the combination also what happened last week was the combination of an extremely high tide. Plus a very very strong wind. Two wins the northern border wind coming from the north and the sheer shirow. Coming from the south they sort of it was literally everybody calls. It was a perfect storm. Mom well the professor Ross. Let's acknowledge that the very existence of Venice shows repeatedly the triumph of human engineering. Right I mean this is a city that was first when it was built it was built on the water using in many millions of wooden piles and kind of an an a an act of audacity. I would say thousand years ago that that that the Venetian said we. We can do this and they did it. And then we've had subsequent you know in the centuries following other large-scale engineering projects to help save Venice. Sylvia had mentioned earlier here that rivers have been diverted out of the lagoon so that it doesn't those rivers don't poor You know all sorts of contaminants and chemicals into the lagoon so the idea idea. That engineering can save Venice. Deeply embedded into the city's history. I want to acknowledge that but given the multiple all factors right now most specifically climate change that are acting on on Venice here. Do you still think A flood barrier solution is the right one. I believe it is. I think the flood barrier willing fact work of for a significant amount of time. We have talked knowledge that if syllable rise continuous and this is not just strictly limited to that radic it. It will be a concern. All across the world is so events were able to protect the lagoon and he'll it'll be appointed out. He's not just Venice appropriately for several decades of considerable length. There's time to think of solutions. But at that point if the worst happens Let's face it Manhattan of South Florida New Orlands We got problems all over the world To deal with with that condition. There's no doubt about that. And that's why this is. So vitally important. The question then becomes is ten billion euros for some of flood barriers that might by Venice a couple of decades cades. Is that the best and smartest use of those ten billion euros to achieve the longest term protection for the city every coastal city. You just mentioned has to have Bob do that. Same cost benefit analysis. Are there other ways to spend ten billion euros to protect Venice for a longer period of time. In my opinion I don't have have any other solution that will guarantee a safe and banished forever. If you if that's what you're implying this solution that would work. And as you stated earlier in fact barriers are us across the world quite successfully. So I think this will do do it. And it will have to owning other places and the amount of money a lot but it's not unreasonable. Well Professor Rafael Brass and Sylvia Pohjola standby. We are talking talking about saving Venice in the face of climate change will dig into more about that when we come back. This is on point This week on the story or podcast from NPR. We take you back to two thousand fifteen when Osmo Jama a Somali. American woman woman was assaulted for speaking Swahili at a restaurant tune into here how asthma found support from an unlikely source. The sister of the woman who attacked her. And this is point Meghna Chakrabarti. We're talking this hour about historic flooding in Venice. Italy and what it's going to take to save of this city and lessons for coastal cities around the world is climate change keeps seal seal sea levels rising inexorably and we're joined today by Rafael Brass. He's professor in the School of Civil and environmental engineering at Georgia. Tech he also worked on. The consortium developing Venice's flood barrier project not worked on that consortium from Nineteen Ninety five to two thousand thirteen. He's with us from Atlanta Georgia and joining us from Rome is Sylvia Pohjola. She is senior European in correspondent for NPR. She spent quite a bit of time in flood. Sodden Venice here and Sylvia in the course of your reporting you talk to a lot out of people about their current taken reactions to this Mosaic Barrier Project that we've been discussing tell us more about what what people have told you. well as I said. There's a tremendous amount of skepticism. There's anger there's there's frustration but everybody says okay right already. Let's get completed. Let's let let's see what it can do I think the other thing that certainly a lot of people I spoke to also said that given this given also the attention worldwide attention that this has drawn Venezuela visual impact of seeing people walk wading in water up to their knees said and Saint Mark Square flooded. Why isn't why doesn't van and has become in a sense? It could it such it would be the perfect city to become sort of international laboratory to study climate change in every sense. Not just scientific not just the technological but kind of like you know it's really it's also it's It's the environmental issue. Th they're talking about it as environmental humanities also from the cultural point of view from The human aspect of what it means to live with rising sea level Venice with all its universities with all its foundations. It's it's sort of like the perfect place to really for the rest of the world is it would be the perfect place to start thinking about this major problem which is going to affect which is already affecting so many coastal areas all over the world real time as you're saying to think about the the the human effects and impacts of climate change happening happening as you say in Venice Professor Bras I want to sort of Look at the the different factors at play here in more detail. We're talking about historic floods right now in Venice. But I'm seeing here that just Saint Mark's Square Piazza San Marco just regularly floods more than sixty times a year anyway. in sort of normal flood events and given the fact that the Adriatic continues to rise and not just the Adriatic Sea level Mean Sea level rising all over planet earth here but as it continues to rise is. Aren't we facing a future. I don't know fifty years from now where those The Mozambique might have to be continuously closed. That's certainly a possibility. And that was considered during the design of the barrier and elements of appropriate different management to ameliorate eh condition. Where does he level rise? When over that design where toll? They'd and as I said no engineering solution like the barriers or anything else is permanent That you you have a horizon on you. Try to resolve that but the bottom line in my mind is that we got a real problem. The world has a real problem. More importantly talons and Benicio have a real problem and it has to be they'll now with the way we can Sylvia pointed out. There was plenty of skepticism Tizi. Some about the most project and I understand that There was a lot of debate back. I'm forced before anything was done. A lot of it driven driven by political arguments were another. I believed that the time is now something needs to be done. The sense of urgency is now but I must say back in nineteen sixty six. We had the same sense of urgency. And that's what led to ultimately international competition sounded cautions and ultimately to the design of this project. I just hope That that will see the project completed. We're losing time. It is nearly there. Oh it could have been done this is time as Sylvia pointed out that. Let me ask you I these specifically to Venice and its lagoon if you have those barriers having to be closed repeatedly or far more often because mean sea level is going up where the lagoon is. It's the lungs. It's the environmental lungs of that whole region and part of the. We haven't talked enough about this part of the the profound found environmental concern is that you have chemical laden runoff coming from the Italian mainland pouring into the Laguna Venice that has to get flushed. Washed out into the sea so one of the potential negative environmental consequences here is if if those barriers are often or permanently. Could it not choke the lagoon itself. Let me put it this way. Eve sea-level rises to the worst scenarios down. What is the option? You have a choice Sakon. I would argue and think of this you you set a very well. If have you want to eliminate water contamination. Then don't put the contaminants in the water and that is clearly the in the first quarter of this solution and a lot of that has been don and so I think that's that given given a situation of inexorably rising sea level the choices do you protect the city or not one way or another. If he gets to that point we have to separate that radic from the lagoon or otherwise. You'll give up. The city is so that that is the key and as you said the earlier Laguna Venice. I'm Ben is engineered environment. The Venetians were unbelievable. Engineers for better worth They created aided lagoon. Were there was none. He was at this point in time with the Venetian interventions. That will be a whole marshland. The diversion over the reverse were not an issue of contamination where unusual eliminating sediments into the lagoon so that they will not fill up In fact the problem now is that you don't want to redirect the rivers because Dan they will drink contaminants into gone so we have to. I think that this is an engineer environment for better worth an engineer environment that we'll off I'm would need to protect And I think that there are engineered solution Lucia. But that's not going to be. All their socioeconomic issues has been this cost to make the city comma life again but it cannot come alive alive underwater Sylvia in your reporting in Venice. I have have. I've heard the professor say couple times already that the mosaic project is sort of the the centerpiece of of a system of ideas to save Venice very expensive though. And it's taken a long time. Did you speak with other people who said no there are other solutions that that Venice can adopt. That might actually be more effective. Well I have no I haven't heard You know people are just No I mean there's see everybody was there were at the beginning of solutions. I don't know all the technological all the technical details of what they were but certainly a the at least the the the Vox Populi is that this was the most expensive and clearly. They chose that one so that some sort of a lot of people who can make as much money as they can that's that's sort of what the average Venetian believes And it's pretty widespread well Rafael breasts. there's another issue that we actually haven't haven't discussed it all about why Venice has this accelerating problem. The sea level is rising for sure but the city itself is sinking right. I mean there's subsidence going on all all across Venice that's also human caused. Yes or no subsidence isn't the Iran issue uh-huh and he was a very serious issue until the late sixties Early seventy s when he was determined that a lot of the supply. I was the result of water pumping for industrial uses in the area health. Mestre which is in the mainland died a lot of those IOS users on water pumping was eliminated and the rate of subsidence then reduce so the rate of subsidence that we have make sure at least the last time I saw that Ada is what I would call the natural rates of rate of subsidence the consolidation of the clays on on their day lagoon area. That has been going forever and we'll go forever at this point. That rate is probably no less than eh fourth or fifth of the sea level rise. So the number one Asia's sea level rise. Okay so let me ask you. Sylvia said something earlier in the program which I thought was very very important and that is you know if we're looking at Venice as a canary in the coalmine. We also on on the flip side. We have entire nations specifically in the Netherlands that have been dealing with holding back water for centuries here so I mean what lessons can can. We draw from the Netherlands. It's not just like one giant engineering project that the Dutch have done. They have a whole system at various levels of flood control. Could something like that be adopted. I mean what would you look to in the Netherlands as as relevant to Venice. But I think the dodge have been extraordinarily good at doing this us On their church leaders but keep in mind that the dodgers are not talking of saving a lagoon. They're talking about saving their country. Doubts the magnitude of the issue they face and they have dealt with it quite aggressively without much. Political this caution because is life or death For them and they have done it with a multiple of things from barriers on the coals to tie the barriers I like in the port of Rotterdam which works on exactly the same concept or principle that we have in. Venice is separating. In this case the North Sea from the Puerto Rotterdam. So again they are. They're doing it. They do have a much bigger problem. They have invested hundreds of times more not more Because their country depends on it Well but it could. Could we take some lessons from the Dutch. In terms of the efficacy of more local level. Flood Control I mean. I know because of Venice's historic nature and the importance of its art. Its its architecture particularly. has there been resistance to the idea of maybe. Just I'll take Piaf's Marco as an example. Maybe we ought to be erecting more local local flood barriers right there to keep the water out. But I'm glad you mentioned that mcnabb because in fact the people think of the so-called most also project as the barriers in reality it was more than that and that is something that these appoint me. They haven't carried through. The project itself had the protection separation of the Arctic from the lagoon from the other barriers carriers but that kick seeing when the floods predict that above a certain level below that level for example. I'm pulling Piazza Mark Cool. The local protection was supposed to be operating. And that involves so making the whole and there's plans for their designs for the Piazza's Marco Oh essence making preventing water from going up from below. Oh which happens very early on with natural tides and racing the walls along the edge of the Grand Canal there so a other parts of Venice there were plans of raising the pavements and the West they were raised in different different places where it could be done without affecting our architectonic golly important areas so the bottom line is you're absolutely correct. This was not just simply raising barriers are building buyers combination of local protection for the smaller flats and the barriers only for the high floods and people forget that but of course the long term problem is is that those high floods we've become far more frequent because of sea level rise and climate change. Is that not true. Professor Bra absolutely true. In fact a while say we then fifteen years ago They I was there that that was indeed happening We're just seeing what we've been seeing now for for the last years Sylvia Sylvia. We've just got about two minutes left here and I WANNA turn this back to the people of Venice itself. I mean we we know that cruise ships disgorge urge millions of tourists into the city. Every year here Which is kind of a strange irony because Venice has been slowly depopulating over our time in terms of its liveability as as an actual city where people live and raise their families here? How're Venetians looking upon sort of this precipice their city is at the vanishing Venetia Vanishing Venetian? Right yeah well because what's left because I think it's something like a little over fifty two thousand about You know a tremendous. They've they're just losing people all the time students can't afford to live there. it's It's it's just extremely. They're not there no more any grocery stores hardly any grocery stores Just even moving things as you can imagine because they'll the bridges and everything just any kind of transportation tation of goods is. Everything's very expensive in Venice there. No more plumbers there. More carpenters You know it's it's There's a lot of Jewish Jewish Souvenir shops designer boutiques It's a city that has really become a catering mainly to tourists The big spenders The and And the probably the most damaging are the daytrippers. They're just Because they don't spend that much they come and they leave a lot lot of waste and there's a lot of complaints about there's talk about putting taxes on in entries taxes to people coming in so it's it's a huge problem Aw and so you know what's something needs to be done. It's very hopeful that a tragedy like this disaster like these this flood the the last Week of a huge high exceptional high tides may finally sort of You know create stimulate people into thinking that something has to be done to help also the Venetians to make a living city again. It's going to be very hard though because you know there's not much political or vision right now in this country we'll Sylvia POGGIOLI senior European correspondent for NPR speaking to us from Rome. Sylvia it's a great pleasure to talk with you. Thank you so much. Thank you and Rafael Bras. Professor in the School of Civil and environmental engineering and at the School of Earth Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech. He worked for the A consortium developing Vanessa's flood barrier project between nineteen ninety five and two thousand thirteen professor bras. Thank you so much for joining us. It's been a pleasure. Thank you very much Josh. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti this point.

Venice Sylvia Sylvia NPR Sylvia Pohjola professor Rome Sylvia Sylvia Poggioli Laguna Venice Italy Venice Lagoon Professor Rafael Brass Sylvia Georgia Adriatic Sea School of Civil Netherlands NPR Saint Mark's basilica Venetian Heritage Foundation