25 Burst results for "San Francisco State University"

"san francisco state university" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

04:42 min | 11 hrs ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Transmit this huge amount of information. Yet the fascination with the brain he points out is just a western thing. It's a uniquely west and thing. Even the Egyptians had little use for it. He said they would kind of, you know, when they mummified people, the brain ripped them out. The brain that would just rip it out and throw it in the white basket. But the hot was put into one of those jars, wasn't it? Yeah, every other organ was mummified and kept together, but the brain is I just threw it away through the nose. And he said the question we had been debating that day in the lab when looking at these brain slides was whether the human mind was confined to the brain, or even to the body for that matter. And he said, no matter how meticulously we examined the slides of the brain, obviously, the mind kept diluting us. And he said, the more I learned about the brain, the more confounded I became about the mind. And this just went on and on. It was like a dead end. He couldn't get any answers to the mind by just looking at the brain. So by his mid 20s, he was the youngest clinical professor at San Francisco state university, he said he was directing his own lab. It was the biological self regulation lab. And he had started to branch out into more esoteric areas. He was investigating how energy medicine and visualization could change the chemistry of the brain. So they were able to increase production of endorphins, by nearly 50% utilizing energy healing techniques that were kind of doing these groundbreaking studies on raika and all sorts of other stuff. And they'll making these fascinating discoveries. But at the same time, he was still disenchanted. He still wasn't getting the answers he was looking for. I bet he's probably also thinking this is a placebo effective some kind, like looking for a rational scientific non new age. Way to explain it. It was actually more practical than that. He writes in the book that even by understanding some of this stuff, they still didn't know how to help people that were suffering from a life threatening disease. It wasn't enabling him to pursue this path of understanding how to apply it. He said, we will like children who discovered that we can mix modern water and turn it into clay, I wanted more. So, eventually, he wanted to track down the experts in the world he had heard stories about. The masters across the globe, who supposedly had extraordinary abilities to heal the human body..

San Francisco state university
"san francisco state university" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

04:34 min | Last month

"san francisco state university" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"Went there. Which was i think it was late last year. I went with lizzie james Who kind of best. Friends will know Well but like we did a tour of arcades. We hung a bunch of arcades. There was persona. There was a persona event in in a sega arcade And we got to sit down and eat like persona themed food and trade qods. At this event they had like a bunch of cards that were specifically for the event persona characters and we went in and sat down and they will like kids in middle aged people an elderly people walking around like gingerly approaching each other being like. Hey i've got a you know. I've got a mock on a on a makoto. Would you like to swap and like it was unbelievable. It was so nice and it was so hot warming and the fact that places like that are kind of going away is hot breaking and you should watch the video because like it starts and then there's amanda shots and then i was like really it. Awesome it it's so funny. I didn't realize that this place was a big deal. I went there. When i was in japan just casually just walked through it and i didn't even play anything just there and i was like dotto so cool i i love sake and i love the history of sega and just them as a brandon especially when it comes to the arcade stuff like that moment around so caliber. You know like going into that. That dreamcast era like the naomi board. And all that stuff like it. They really push things forward. And i loved that they committed to arcades honestly to the end even when daytona and stuff like back in the nineties but like to keep pushing that through to even today. It's like that's crazy but yeah definitely sad closing. Yeah someone who grew and up. Playing arcades went a massive the o'hare during my youth because by the time. I was like in a place where i could go and spend money in tanya basically didn't exist the one major one. We had was a sega arcade in in central london. I remember spending so much time there and like when they went away they went away too quickly for my liking. I didn't get experience them much. And the two remaining places where all kids still kind of a dream to visit with japan and the us and in the us it kind of like very slowly has fallen away. You get a few find game. Places now Japan genuinely was where you could go and relive the glory days of having arcades and it just sucks the The kind of going away. Yeah how funny. I was so lucky. Growing up in san francisco because pure thirty nine had a legendary arcade and it was kicking my entire life. Growing up was going to archaic. Like when i was in middle school. It was like the cool thing to do for me. And my friends to go to unite literally every day in the summer. And go to this arcade and play time crisis and dr and whatever the fuck else was coming out of time but like it was a full featured arcade that would get updated with the newest releases. That were coming out there trickling. There wasn't too many of them but it was always a big deal when a new machine would come in like. There was a culture around here that i as i grew up. I learned like. I remember reading in video game magazines. Everyone thought arcadia data michael. It's a fucking you talk about like. It's not dead at all and then as i grew up i realize oh it was dead the entire time i was just lucky to get this and i'll never forget it just closed one day like out of nowhere. It seems and they renovated it. The arcade was gone and got smaller in smaller smaller. It's still there but it's not what it used to be like is just a couple of machines and the owners of it ended up starting a new arcade mini arcade at san francisco state university And there was like in the food court area to this day. There's this like strip of arcade games and it's like all the classics a ton of fighting game enthusiasts go their. That's their place that they they play you. Put the quarter on the screen for next up. All that and i'll never forget streetfighter. Five was first announced. Pre-release released it to just a handful of places in the world and san francisco. State was one of them. Like i got to go play three hundred five and there was a lie out the fucking door and it was when i was going. Ask the state so it was. It was really cool but those are my archaic memories. Bring back case. I'd say but before we do any of that i think it's time from a word from sponsors me. This episode of kind of funny games daily is brought to you by away whether you're running to the grocery store planning a weekend away or taking an extended stay with friends or family. We're all still.

lizzie james sega japan amanda brandon tanya san francisco us london san francisco state university michael
Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

Unreserved

01:55 min | 6 months ago

Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

"Black and indigenous communities share similar struggles as marginalized people on turtle island that combined. History can be quite complicated. My next guest has dedicated much of his work. As an academic to thinking about these connections robert keith collins is an expert on black indigenous interactions. He's an associate professor of american indian studies at san francisco state university. He's african american and choctaw. And he's here to tell us about a history. Many people know very little about welcome to the show dr collins. Thank you very much for having me. So let's start at the beginning. What is the beginning of indigenous black history. That's a fantastic question. And actually we owe a lot of our understanding about it to a canadian scholar. Alexander francis chamberlain france as in in eighteen. Ninety one wrote one of the most comprehensive analysis that we have today and that was african americans and what we find in that study is that this is actually a history. His later colleague would refer to as the third line of colonization. We've talked about a european and native colonization. We talk about european and african colonization. We seldom talk about american. Interactions during the colonization and this is a history that brings that back to live where we actually see cultural exchanges between people that are taking place within sovereign native communities as well as nations and families we also see interactions taking place especially for like in the united states among the five civilized tribes chuck. Todd's cherokees creeks chickasaw seminoles in slavery were native americans owned slaves and have an cultural impact on africans within their communities on their

Robert Keith Collins Dr Collins Turtle Island Alexander Francis Chamberlain San Francisco State University France Chuck Todd United States
Unpacking The Surge In Violence Against Asian Americans

Fresh Air

04:20 min | 9 months ago

Unpacking The Surge In Violence Against Asian Americans

"Seeing a surge and anti Asian attacks against the elderly. A 91 year old man was violently shoved to the ground in Oakland's Chinatown in 84 year Old Man was killed in San Francisco last month. And this uptick in anti Asian violence is not just local wrestled. Young is a professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University and co founder of Stop A P I Hate, which is tracking these incidents. And professor have the number and kinds of these incidents against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders change since the pandemic began. Yeah, in the beginning at the start of the pandemic, when people had higher fears when shelter in place started. And when President Trump began to insist on using the term China virus, we saw clear surge of racism. We saw how hate speech like using the term China virus led to hate violence. And I think that has invited a climate where people can target Asian Americans and attack them. It's really horrifying the crimes against our elderly population. You know, my mom's 94. I grew up with my grandmother. So for the Asian American community, see our elders. An attack like this is particularly Horrific and touches close to home. There have been previous waves of hate crimes against Asian Americans over in our country's history, obviously and during periods of economic distress going back Two the murder of instant shin in Michigan in 1982. Does this seem different to you? We've seen surges and racism against Asian American during times of epidemic. During times of war like Japanese American incarceration, Yes or 9, 11 and in times of economic downturn. It's different now, because we're have all three conditions. We have the pandemic. We have the worst recession since the Great Depression. And we have the U. S. China Cold War. What kinds of incidents are you seeing? Um, Obviously we've seen these brutal physical attacks against the elderly Recently. What other kinds of incidents are you seeing? Yes. Oh, about 8% of our incidents are physical thoughts were getting pushed and showed having rocks and bottles thrown at us another of large percentage. We're getting coughed and spat upon 8% of our cases. So my own wife was Running insulin disc, locked her away on a trail and coughed in her face That's happened so often again. We began to track it and because because people think we're a health hazard, so they want to get back at us by coughing at us, it's sort of unique to the pandemic. Most cases, though, our verbal harassment 70% are we're getting yelled at again. We have racial slurs slung at us, but the other, not this micro aggressions. They're pretty traumatizing. They're really troubling these cases of hate. And how satisfied are you with the response by law enforcement in the community, especially here locally with these recent incidents. Think law enforcement and local jurisdictions have been responsive. They recognized the problem. I think it's because Asian American community has advocated and stood up so strongly. President Biden issuing a memo announcing the anti Asian here. I think that's a victory for the Asian American community breath. These concerns his attention. You know, Friday's Lunar New Year do you have, you know heightened safety concerns around This, uh, this upcoming holiday? Yeah, we do. Asian American only are often going out shopping may have more money and then could be more vulnerable. So we're calling in at least in the San Francisco Bay area is for local residents to go out and patronize Chinatown because of the pandemic, Things had been shut down. And so the elderly when they do go out or more isolated if we could have more residents going out shopping, strolling not acting as vigilantes or patrols, but just being present. Also calling for more funding for community ambassadors, not necessarily more policing. But more hiring of local residents who know the neighborhood come from the community that speech of the merchants and the residents. No, even serving the UN house. People in our neighborhood. Okay.

President Trump China San Francisco State University Oakland San Francisco President Biden Young Michigan Depression San Francisco Bay UN
Interview With Shuttle Carrier Aircraft Pilot Ace Beall

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

04:16 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Shuttle Carrier Aircraft Pilot Ace Beall

"Show. I'm joined today by ace spiel. If you've ever seen the pictures or the videos of a seven forty seven carrying the space shuttle on its back aces the guy flying that he's a nasa pilot. It's really cool having you with us today as thank you so much for being with us. Thank you george. It's a real pleasure being here. Thanks for having me. You're willing to tell us how you got your start in aviation well. My interest probably probably started with my dad who is a world war two pilots who have six hell cats in the pacific right. He was a fighter. Ace jot down. Seven zero sank destroyer so that that probably would what's first introduced me aviation muscle lived in the san francisco bay area and i can always. We could see quite often from where we live going up. Point the final approach for san francisco international airport. So i've really enjoyed watching the airplanes. Come in and that just kind of got me interested in aviation basically so i assume that with your dad as an ace after the war where people were there a lot of adulation or was it kind of a a normal thing to be ace. Well i don't think it was a normal thing. I think a lot of people were proud of it for that but but as time went on it became something more within the family that you know we we. We knew he was guy we thought of him as kind of a hero in his flying endeavors and listening to stories was a lot of fine. You know sure so. Wendy take your first flying lesson first. Flying lesson in nineteen sixty. Seven is my first year in college. I graduated from high school. And i was interested in the asian so i wasn't sure you know exactly what i was going to study. The only college in california that offered a four year degree in in Aviation was san jose state but that was in business administration the the college of san mateo community college. They had a two year. Course that specialized the end basic training to be a pilot studied aerodynamics amex navigation in urology and stuff in in in one of the three hundred courses was actually forty hours of flying a cessna down to san carlos airport so i thought this is the perfect way to get going and so i enrolled in that program guy solo to november of nineteen sixty seven eighteen. Okay now did you. Did you collect ratings right away. After that i got my private and the course led to a commercial a rating but after about the first three semesters i kinda realizing that. This is really what i want to do. My goal is to become an airline pilot. And i knew it'd be an airline pilot. That i was gonna actually need my adp. And soft. and i was going to need to accumulate. You know quite a bit of experience. So i kind of decided you know. I'm not going to spend any more money trying to get my commercial because right now. Let's talk to serve me. 'cause i plan on getting a bachelor's degree us like to go into the military base. Oh okay so where did you go to get your bachelor's. I ended up at san francisco state university. I got my bachelors in mathematics. And then you went there were you in. Rotc not was it. Ninety day wonder and ots officer training school. At lackland in san antonio. So i i graduated from college. In june of seventy two and two weeks later. I went out to san antonio and started into your ot s for a for ninety days and they were gonna pound with training. Poetry was up. Advance up in enid. Oklahoma and i enjoy them quite a bit. It was the i found all came fairly naturally and easy the advantage of already abbot close to two hundred hours of flying time so i knew all the basics basically so it was you know i. I really have good pilots right. I felt for the guys really haven't or part wasn't that tough

College Of San Mateo Community San Francisco International Ai San Francisco Bay Nasa George Wendy San Carlos San Jose California San Francisco State University San Antonio Lackland Rotc Enid Oklahoma
Herbaria with Director of the William and Lynda Steere Herbarium, Dr. Barbara M. Thiers

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:04 min | 11 months ago

Herbaria with Director of the William and Lynda Steere Herbarium, Dr. Barbara M. Thiers

"An honor to have you. How about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Okay name is barbara tears. My title is patricia k. Holmgren director of the william. Linda steere herbarium of new york botanical garden herbarium. The garden is the second largest in the world. It has almost eight million specimens and it has been in active force implant research. Since in founding the institution the late eighteen eighteen hundreds. And what we do there is we add specimens to this survey. Remember here we also make them available as loans or as we allow people to come visit. And we also are digitizing the specimens at a fairly fast clip with thanks from funding over the last decade. Or so actually more from the national science foundation. So that's my job. I have a staff about thirty people and one of the things i do in. That job is a fair. Bit of public outreach. In the way of giving tours of the herbarium over the years to writing people local students to the general public houses. Our collection isn't like a museum in that it's open to the public. The this all behind the scenes so we let the public in occasionally but really just for a few days at a time and also then for people who might wanna help right about or support our herbarium. So it's through really through the the the tours that i'd given over the years that i began to really think about the herbarium and how to talk about it in a way that would interest people because on his face. It's a collection of dead plants and it doesn't sound very exciting however i've been really heartened that Especially in recent years. Maybe with a heightened understanding or appreciation of the environment of worry about climate change that. There's been a lot of people have been a lot more interested in this aspect of science. It's not the glamorous part it's where we store the research results you know that others have published upon and we have to store them forever. it's never ending. They absolutely have to be maintained. Forever and It's it's hard to do that. It's hard to keep the funding to keep the staff. It's hard to keep the collection up when you have so many but it's it's an absolutely crucial aspect of the scientific process. This is where the the the documentation of the plant. Biodiversity research is located in terms of my background. I sort of grew up in a herbarium. My father was actually a psychologist studied. Fungi and started their barium at san francisco state university and all my childhood weekends were spent either collecting mushrooms or it was the season than Often to get me out from under foot from my under my mother's feet my father had become to the herbarium on a sunday afternoon and help him do things. Like lou label. Simple jobs it. I got more complicated. And he gave me a little bit of money for it. So i was. I was happy to do it. And i did that for years. I enjoyed in good. I became a teenager and i was so interesting. And i i didn't I didn't want anything to do with our barium or my parents or anything but Somewhere my college years. I actually found my way back. I just seem to me that my father and his colleagues his students all just could hardly wait to get up and go to work and make new discoveries every day. They were so passionate about what they did. And i hadn't really come across any other community where people have that kind of passion and i wanted to be part of it so The focus of san francisco. State was on fungi. Although there were people working on lichens and other groups but one group nobody was working on. Were the liver words. The had paddock's thought they were too hard and apply they're not a terribly rich flora in california so they weren't always even very easy to find but they intrigued me so i began to kind of teach myself What could i made a lot of bad identification. But i graduate but i grew to really love these little organisms. They're they're tiny. They're beautiful all sorts of falls structures to their leaves and so forth. And you just feel like when you look at the the microscope you just kind of entering a miniature world Which is just full of beauty. And then i went on to grad school. I was able to convince someone to let me study with them. rather famous man rudolf schuster who wrote the mammoths treatment of the bryant of the hypocrisy north america. He was actually a horrible mentor. But that's okay. I still got my degree. And i was lucky enough to get a post doctoral position at the new york botanical garden. Right out of grad school. Once i was there i knew i never really wanted to leave. So that's that's kind of story mike.

Patricia K Linda Steere Herbarium Of New York Botanica Holmgren National Science Foundation Lou Label Barbara William San Francisco State University Paddock San Francisco Rudolf Schuster California North America New York Botanical Garden Mike
"san francisco state university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:52 min | 11 months ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Recorded history was caused by a virus. The influence of pandemic of 1918 struck every major U. S. City dropping people where they stood. There were at least 20 million people killed worldwide. In the 1918 pandemic in the 18 31 cholera epidemic in the smallpox epidemics. Everyone feels that somehow either there personally immune because they're living a moral life or secondly, there after control over Something that's going to be decided by God. And that's a very dangerous combination. When you have that, from strong tradition that really cataracts, all public health, communal activities was public health is a communal act. I mean, it's an act on part of the public of all of us, but it's not something that can't be overcome. If the conditions are right. Public health messages are embraced. One example the smallpox outbreak in New York just after World War two. These pictures show a patient who had a nun set of smallpox. The day of arrival in New York from pointy 47. Hundreds of thousands of people lined up to get vaccinated without any fear, without any anxiety with complete trust in the government. You have to remember this was coming after 10 years of economic depression, in which the new deal was understood as a major tool. FDR was somebody you trusted. It also came after World War two when we had a tremendous faith in the ability of government to do things trust in science, the government and other institutions, so it makes sense. Rosner says that the next time that trust falters, the 19 sixties we see another public health campaign struggle in the 19 forties was discovered that if you have some floor right to your water supply, you could actually reduce the cavities that kid's had in the 19 fifties 19 sixties, however, it became a real political issue. Some towns if traffic country introduced flow right into their water. When organizations like the John Birch Society, which was a right wing group, use fluoride is a symbol of the intrusion of government into people's lives. And the fear that somehow you're being poisoned by in this case Communist, you know, if you remember in the 19 sixties, the film Dr Strangelove Right. You had General Jack Ripper, right? It was part of his mad kind of ramblings in the film. You and I need fresh, pure water. Replenish our precious bodily fluids. He was worried about his precious bodily fluids and they were being invaded by use of fluoride. Do you realize that florid ation? Is the most monstrously conceived and dangerous Communist plot we have ever had to face fearing Feely's who are going to take over our bodies or take over our souls to take over our government pick of our liberties, so that's always there, but it only comes out at moments when they're used by political leaders. David Rosner, history professor at Columbia University. Prisoners. He's 2020 as another moment where distrust of professionals institutions, etcetera is a vacuum for a certain kind of politics to fill heading into the election. Despite the pleas of public health experts Cove in 19 became a political football and to understand more about how that happened. We turn to Gaurav Suri. He's an experimental psychologist at San Francisco State University. He studies decision making and motivation. Not surprisingly, he says. Words matter. For example, the word mandate is not a pleasant word for many people when the same policy is framed as a mask, band aid Republicans are inclined to receive it a lot less favorably, then they are when it is framed as a protection plan. But if any public policy is going to work, it's very important that it be compatible with people's communication preferences and styles and what they're going to be open to. Many people are just not open to the word mandate. Making big changes requires us to Taylor and communicate public policy in a way that's going to be open for all segments of the population. Given what you've learned when you read news reports about people who claim they don't believe that the disease is real or that it says it's like the flu or even comments from the White House. How do you think about that? In the context of your work? I think it's a disaster. I think this is a existentially threat to our culture. And I understand why it's happening. I think it's happening because We take belonging to social tribes very seriously. And the president has sent signals that look, all this mask wearing is not not a very necessary thing to do. And so it's it's sort of become a symbol and people who value their belonging. To that Social tribe are trying to reduce dissonance right because on the one hand, they say, we're not wearing a mask and the other hand, there's all these news reports about reports about The severity of the pandemic. So how do you reduce dissonance? You just deny off what's producing the dissidents. In this case, they deny that this is a serious disease. I think that's risky, not just to themselves, but to their loved ones to their networks to the entire country. We have to start communicating better about science than we have. Bean. I think this pandemic has really exposed Lack of communication about what science is what the scientific method is. And how we should live. Gaurav Story of San Francisco State University story is also a neuroscientist, and we'll hear more from him tomorrow on pandemic fatigue and why our brains have trouble understanding risk. It's w when my C you're listening to all things considered just ahead during the pandemic. More people, of course, started shopping online in China. Fast deliveries come at a cost. For more than three million delivery workers, and they are surveilled by algorithms that don't easily forgive mistakes. We'll have that story and more right after news headlines on W.

smallpox David Rosner San Francisco State University New York FDR U. S. City Gaurav Suri John Birch Society Dr Strangelove General Jack Ripper Feely Columbia University White House China Taylor
'Overlooked': Asian American Jobless Rate Surges But Few Take Notice

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:41 min | 1 year ago

'Overlooked': Asian American Jobless Rate Surges But Few Take Notice

"Asian. American workers have gone from having the lowest unemployment rate in the country to one of the highest from Vietnamese nail salons to Cambodian doughnut shops. Asian. Owned businesses have struggled during this pandemic. Here's NPR's Scott horsely. Jerry Rayburn was excited last October when he landed a job with a mortgage servicing company in southern California, it was a step up from his old job as a food delivery driver but six months later, the pandemic hit the business decreased dramatically and based on seniority. I was like, Oh, Rayburn who came to the US from Thailand when he was eight years old now shares a single room with his mom brother and sister in another family's house and things it's been downhill and I. I. Don't have adult late night and still unemployed fortunately and I've been looking David Kinley also lost work when the pandemic struck can lists who's from the Philippines had been consulting for software startups right now nobody has starter capital nobody has the budget go hire consultant nobody even feels comfortable from you to come into their office. The Spike in Asian American unemployment stands out even during the wide-spread misery of the pandemic asian-americans usually enjoy a lower jobless rate than any other racial or ethnic group but at ten point seven percent in August the Asian American unemployment rate was higher than that of whites or Latinos Economists Marlene. Kim University of Massachusetts laments that doesn't get much notice. Asian Americans are absolutely overlooked. People have the sense that Asians are fine. That they're a model minority that they have good jobs and are doing okay geography explain some of the Newfound Challenges Asian Americans are concentrated in places like New York and California where the virus has taken a heavy toll occupation also plays a role Donmar San. Francisco. State. University, says nearly a quarter of the Asian American workforce is employed in industries like restaurants retail and personal services such as nail salons. Does industries have been hard hit by that pandemic and traditionally employed many Asian Americans. Asian Americans say president trump hasn't helped his provocative labeling of what he calls the Chinese virus Paul along of Ucla says town in Los Angeles suffered an earlier and deeper drop foot and vehicle traffic than the city's other commercial neighborhoods. People are avoiding these areas in part because of this myth that somehow Asian Americans are tied. In with the spread, Corona virus certainly that he said true an unfair but there's no question it gets reflected in the impact on the ethnic economy that can be a real problem for Asian Americans who are new to the country or have limited English skills in ordinary times the social and economic networks an immigrant community can open doors and provide opportunity, but also says the lions on those networks can be. A trap during a crisis like the pandemic if you're in an ethnic sector and all the restaurants are facing the same problem of being shut down, your opportunity to find work is very minimal. If not non-existent Jerry Rayburn, the laid off mortgage service worker has grown frustrated with online job applications, but he keeps filling them out while also attending community college. His younger brother recently landed a job at home depot. Rayburn says, events have tested but not yet beaten his immigrant families. Hope for a brighter future life is not in any country and I believe a Mogo. We'll get better

Jerry Rayburn Lions NPR David Kinley Kim University Of Massachusett California Scott Horsely New York Philippines Donald Trump SAN Francisco United States Los Angeles Consultant President Trump
"san francisco state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Election. Male in a timely and secure manner. Brian Naylor NPR news Six months into the Corona virus. Pandemic. Layoffs continue to register at historically high levels across the nation. The Labor Department reports 884,000 Americans apply for first time unemployment benefits last week. On Wall Street, The Dow is down 68 the NASDAQ Up 33. This is NPR Live from K Q E D News on Brian Watt. Oakland is demanding records from the Trump Administration on its threat to deploy federal agents. Two cities that are considered progressive The city. Six other local governments in a nonprofit group filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the administration yesterday. President Trump signed an executive order in June that purports to allow the federal government to send in its personnel to help protect federal property. The administration sent dozens of officers to Portland to quell protests over police brutality. San Francisco State University is laying off more than 130 workers in an effort to close a $41 million deficit it says has escalated with the pandemic Media's Karishma Petar DEA reports. The bulk of the cuts are hitting administrative staff. The eight custodians are also losing their jobs. The layoffs take effect November 9th. Adam Paganini coordinates one of S. F s use science departments. He received the layoff notice Tuesday. Fagnini says. Instead of cuts, the university should consider freezing pay furloughs and dipping into their $1.5 million rainy day fund. When you lay off people, they lose their help. Sure. When they lose their health insurance. They're less likely to go to a doctor during a pandemic. Do not want that confluence of events happen at the same time as professor you, president Lynn Mahoney said. The layoffs are painful. But the pandemic has hit enrollment and created budget challenges. I'm Karishma Petar Dia que Nadie news and there's more dot org's I'm Brian Watt. Support today. Support for NPR comes from Fidelity Wealth management, providing perspective on a client's entire financial picture, investment minimum supply, Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. And by the listeners and members of the day. Spare the Air Alert Bay Area through tomorrow. At least hazy.

Trump Administration Brian Watt Karishma Petar Dia que Nadie Pandemic Karishma Petar DEA San Francisco State University Brian Naylor NPR Adam Paganini President Trump Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Labor Department Oakland Fagnini Lynn Mahoney executive
"san francisco state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To sixty six dollars Newsome says there will be an emphasis on nutritious locally produced food we want to connect our farms add to this effort we really want to focus our values throughout the state of California the governor says local officials will decide which restaurants to partner with adding it will provide much needed tax revenue for counties in the process Newsome says it's part of a larger effort to reach out to seniors I'm Scott Shafer KQED news San Francisco based gap incorporated says it has stopped paying April rent for stores across North America after for allowing a majority of that store staff during the pandemic uninsured Chaudry is an economics professor at San Francisco State University she says more shuttered stores could follow people are going to hold back on their demand for things that they belong to the need to now the charge we expect to brick and mortar stores selling items like groceries will likely continue to attract customers the anti viral drug with print does appear is being tested in a number of clinical trials as a possible treatment for covert nineteen as KQED's Peter Cooney reports early data from two studies are inconclusive the first news from Chicago study seemed to show room does have your helps patients recover that study did not include the control group the latest from a stat news reports on the China study did include a control group it found room disappear did not significantly change the mortality rate compared to placebo without city ended early neither study has gone through peer review that process is important to assess the quality of room does have your studies.

Newsome California partner San Francisco North America professor San Francisco State University KQED Peter Cooney Scott Shafer Chicago China
"san francisco state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What the master tenant of the ghost ship warehouse that burned in open in late twenty sixteen killing three dozen people could be released from jail soon that's amid concerns over the spread of the corona virus in Alameda county lockups Derek al mana is awaiting retrial on thirty six counts of involuntary manslaughter his bids for pre trial release have been repeatedly rejected but the judges indicated new willingness to transfer al mana to home confinement with monitoring through an ankle bracelet and other conditions a minute attorney say his health has deteriorated after almost three years in jail and he's vulnerable to contracting the potentially deadly virus the district attorney is opposing al menos release both sides are expected to conference with the judge tomorrow BART's board of directors is expected get a close look today at the ugly fiscal realities facing the agency due to the corona virus crisis KQED's Dan brekkie reports board management is projecting a best case scenario in which the agency faces a revenue shortfall of more than four hundred million dollars through the middle of twenty twenty one the budget gap is due mostly to a ninety three percent decline in ridership with most commuters now sheltering at home district general manager Bob powers says his goal is to keep the system and its staff intact for one the bay area goes back to work when the restrictions start to be listed in the medical professionals give us direction on how and when that goes in I want to be ready to help this region recover to save money for his slash his daily schedule restricted overtime and imposed a hiring freeze I'm damn brekkie KQED news commencement season is just a month away in some bay area colleges are trying to figure out how to create two graduation ceremonies in this time of coronavirus KQED's charisma hydeia reports the decision to postpone or cancel graduation ceremonies is in the hands of each university many students are checking their college websites daily to see what the next steps will be Alondra Vega graduated San Francisco State University last fall and was looking forward to walking the stage and may figure is the first in her family to graduate from a four year institution when it comes to my parents we want to see what they want to celebrate with me and it's not going to be the same as virtually as the state has yet to announce their decision UC Berkeley is serving its graduates to find out whether they prefer a delayed commencement ceremony or a virtual one I'm Krishna Petagna KQED news and there's more.

Alameda county involuntary manslaughter attorney al menos BART KQED Dan brekkie Bob powers Alondra Vega San Francisco State University Berkeley Derek al general manager
Trapped In Wuhan During COVID-19 | Jen Knight

Migratory Patterns

08:55 min | 1 year ago

Trapped In Wuhan During COVID-19 | Jen Knight

"Gen nine says that she won the in laws lottery when it comes to Chinese husband's parents but luck wasn't on our side this past January when a day after she arrived in her husband's hometown just outside of Wuhan for a Spring Festival celebration. The Chinese Government started shutting down all transit lakes into and out of the area effectively trapping her at ground. Zero of what would soon come to be known as the covert Nineteen Corona virus outbreak. She was as she easily admits terrified and filled isolated but what helped her feel less alone was participating in a study. That has china-based ex. Pats how they were feeling during the crisis and through two months of lockdown and plus two weeks of self isolation in an apartment in Shenzhen. Her notions of home have shifted. Or maybe she was just being made aware of a ship. That had already taken place. This is a really great conversation. And I'm thankful we were able to get this glimpse of what life was like for Ex pats in China as the global pandemic first emerged. I hope that you learn as much from her story is ided. Please sit back relax. Enjoy my conversation with JEN night. Gen night welcome to migratory patterns. Thank you so much for having me. Where is home so and I thought about how to answer this question. I came up with three answers. Three different places. One would be the place where I you know grew up and was raised which would be suburbia midwestern suburbia so a suburb of Milwaukee Wisconsin and a second place. That is home. Would Be San Francisco Bay area where I lived for eight years before I moved abroad and where my family is now. Located is in the North Bay and then the third place that I came up with it feels like home would be where I am right now. Which is my apartment in Shenzhen China? Where my husband is and my apartment is and jobs and life. I think in the first person with three answers. Oh really pretty sure. It's always interesting. Everyone's unique and I love how people will somehow work in where they're from originally some people you know there are few who like where I am now and all that stuff but I think the first TRIFECTA. I think if you'd asked me a few years ago it would have been just too but as I've gotten a little bit older I felt more strongly connected to my roots in a way and so I really wanted to add that third one in about where I came from because I think it's so important It's something that I wanted to leave behind when I left there at the age of eighteen nineteen. I was like goodbye. I Never WanNa see you again suburban Midwest. So let's talk about that so so suburban Midwest. Where exactly was that so it was in? It's a suburb of Milwaukee Wisconsin Like on the north side of town and it was it was a nice place to grow up and I've gone back a few times over the years. My family doesn't live there anymore. So the only real pull. I have our friends and people. I know who still live there but I found the last time that I returned which would have been seven years ago I think about. I felt I really felt the sense of home. It was so interesting so when you ask that question. That immediately came to my mind. That's interesting so you said you were looking to get out of there at eighteen. What was that all about? Was that Just sick of suburbia type thing? It's kind of an archetype in in the US. Yeah I was. I was always ready to get out from a pretty young age and my friend and I we just pointed at a map and there was Seattle and we had one friend who lived there who said we could sleep on his floor and we sold all of our stuff and bought backpacks and took the train for three days to Seattle the train. That's awesome. I love the train still was school. You were going to college or you just get out and I was just getting out. Although I ended up studying my undergraduate was in Washington state so I did live there for a number of years but interestingly it never felt like home so that is interesting so After so how did you get from? Let's say Seattle because that's kind of where you can set off on your journey. How did you get from Seattle to where you are now? What was that like? Well I my family had relocated to the San Francisco Bay area and I visited there one time before and felt really like a strong Paul to San Francisco and I went through some personal problems in While I was living in Seattle and I ended up packing up and moving and decided to relocate there and I just loved it I mean I had an amazing eight years living in San Francisco and I remember driving my used Acura over the Golden Gate Bridge like crammed with all of my stuff and I really felt that sense like this is going to be my home for awhile. Kinda cool this kind of cool so then you went to San Francisco. So what motivated jumped from San Francisco to overseas? That'd be fair. I Guess San Francisco can kind of feel like overseas from suburban Milwaukee. Well yeah so I made the first jump to Seattle and then from Seattle to San Francisco and I think San Francisco for me. I feel like I just had done it. I don't know how else to explain it. I just felt like I was John. Like I had done everything that I needed to do. There I had an amazing time. I met amazing people. I had incredible experiences. It's a beautiful place to live. There's so much to do. There was such a buzz. You know the entrepreneurial seen everything there when I was living there but I did feel like my time there was complete and I felt really unsure about what to do next and I ended up going to New York for a while and I went back to the Midwest for a while and I was really torn about my next move and sort of out of nowhere. The opportunity to teach in Shanghai came up and they said we have this job for you. You have two weeks to get here and I just went for it. What was the job? It was teaching in a school there but it was kind of a startup situation where I would be helping them. Start an American program within a Chinese school so it was a lot of curriculum development and teaching As well as some other like Adleman kind of stuff. It's a great way and so did you study to be a teacher when you're teaching in the US before you left. Yeah I had a California teaching credential and I got my master's from San Francisco State University so when I moved to San Francisco that was. That was the reason why was for a job that I got in Oakland Public Schools. So my background is very heavily in education is a teacher and I know what you guys do. So good on you for that work. Is You know you? Kinda got out at San Francisco. Probably right at the right time. It's just San Francisco to me. I've been there several times over the last few years last several years and San Francisco from to me feels like that really cool band. That sounded awesome but then sold out immediately and not quite as cool anymore. I love that analogy. Yes I could not agree more so so you hit China and did you say was shot high. Yeah Shanghai is where I lived I so for four years. Wow you've been bouncing all over the place where you did you. Did you go to Thailand for Awhile? Yes so after we were in Shanghai Shanghai four years we lived poop hat Thailand for two years and then we just moved back to China. Shenzhen last August. Well what great timing I actually right now. I'm pretty happy to be in Shenzhen overall right now I mean you know. Obviously we're this is the time of the time of Corona virus right now and it China. Ironically when the outbreak I happened so many people were streaming out of the country. And now there's tons of people who would love to be able to go back because they got a handle on it I it's Conan and argue at the methods but They've worked yes. Yes and I was at the epicenter of all of that so I I rode the roller coaster.

San Francisco San Francisco Bay Seattle China San Francisco State University Shenzhen Shanghai Milwaukee United States Wisconsin Shenzhen China Chinese Government Shanghai Shanghai Wuhan Midwest North Bay
"san francisco state university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The virus was first detected in China Russell junk is a professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University and he set up a website to compile reports of discrimination when we reached him at home of course in Oakland California he told of an incident in a local park so my wife was walking on a trail in a regional park and this person was approaching her and they can see each other she moved to the side but the person moved in front of her she called out he didn't respond but when she passed him he coughed after so we don't know if it's intentional or unintentional but this type of coughing up people and spitting up people it's something that Asians are actually experiencing a lot more so that the speeding is pretty obviously hostile act and I suppose in a time when people are worried about contagion coughing on someone would probably be seen just the same way yeah it is and so if you do get spit on you that's actually a physical assault and in San Francisco and we're getting reports now on our reporting center and ten fifteen percent of the reports are about physical side of people getting either physically attacked or being spat upon our costs down what is the database that you've been gathering and why did you start so we've recognized early on that people are experiencing a lot of bullying a lot of shining a lot of avoiding when the corona virus outbreak occurred and we don't have any hard data to document what was going on so the first thing we did is we look at news trends and we counted news stories that had corona virus and discrimination or xenophobia and that we found hundreds of articles about policies that people thought was you know phobic economic boycotts of Asian businesses and then later on about interactions that Asian Americans were having four people were bullying taunting harassing and now talking we had hundreds of accounts to go to the state legislature and say this is happening we need to get it documented we need to proactively address these trends and since the government didn't have the capacity in California we started our own website as a reporting center and it just was launched last week and we've been getting over a hundred reports every day a hundred reports every day what are some of the things that I don't know if come in today or the last time you looked most are verbal harassment name calling that people would just be walking by and people would yell out coronaviruses because if you are they would shake cough in front of people so name calling and and just verbal harassment micro aggressions for the most common moves up to people having bottles and cans thrown at them their homes being vandalized and then regularly maybe three times a day we have people actually being physically attacked assaulted being hit or punched pushed on subways we've noticed that women for example are three times more likely to be attacked them men and so this is a very gendered experience and we wouldn't well I wasn't expecting that it's clear now that we could see the trends that people are now getting into conflict a lot more grocery stores because every other place is locked down so burst restores our where we're interacting with other people do you think about this trend when you go out of the house and you're moving around in someone's approaching on the street do you think about what that encounter might be like yeah now more than ever I think Asian Americans are hyper aware and sensitive of how other people perceive them I think what's sad is a lot of children and youth are afraid of being bullied and that type of racial profiling and that experience of having people not trust you having people look at you as a disease carrier I think that's all on a lot of people's minds in the Asian American community do you feel you understand why people are doing this well it's easy to understand this is it's been part of Americans racist history it's easy to understand if you take into context how president trump has decided in four minutes enough idea it's easy to understand why people have heightened fears because of the disease that's it's part of a person of color's experience already and so we call the coronavirus discrimination and racial profiling is to be expected actually are there things that have happened that have made it worse though you know after nine eleven people were attacking a Muslim Americans and President Bush came out and said we have to not discriminate or mistreat Muslim Americans what president trump did was he insisted on calling it the Chinese virus and labeling corona virus as a racial disease and by other Asians and it's not just Chinese anybody who looks Chinese or just it just gave people license to attack us to blame us for the disease to say where the source of it and it's not the people who are the source of the disease it's just a you know a virus that doesn't discriminate did the president helped at all this week by insisting at a briefing that is not the fault of Chinese Americans whatever's happened yeah we appreciate that I think that was due to the pressure that we exerted and the complaining but I think it's a little too little too late he's already opened the door to this racism it was already starting even before he made that China virus remarks and he just sort of exacerbated the situation but you know he he still uses this us versus them binary that argues that we're really working with them I'm more protecting them that were still outsiders and foreigners and not part of the American fabric what do you want from political leaders and from your fellow citizens our political leaders aside from the top we need to say we don't condone prejudiced in any forms so we want the government to actually be proactive and address racism rather than responding to it I'm from our fellow citizens you just have to check your biases when you approach an Asian American you have to be aware that I made automatically assume something that I shouldn't automatically assume yeah three people with space now and then also the dignity and courtesy that we all need to have during this public health crisis Brussels young is a professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University I joined us via Skype thank you so much thank you this is NPR news right here on WNYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake we're learning right now that the UK's prime minister Boris Johnson has tested positive for corona virus the BBC reports he's experiencing mild symptoms we're gonna have.

professor San Francisco State University Oakland California China
"san francisco state university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"A battle over impeachment but he's now taking on a Christian magazine that published an op ed calling for him to be removed from office Christianity Today editor in chief mark alley called the president and your perfect example of a human being who was morally lost and confused well the present fired back he called the magazine far left and he tweeted that no president has ever done what I have done for evangelicals or religion itself ABC's Rachel Scott the big holiday get away in full swing today is expected to be one of the busiest at airports and if you're getting away it by hitting the road analysts are predicting the gas prices will drop before the new year Michelle Franzen ABC news and I heart radio station news ninety three point one KFBK Friday finals at San Francisco State University are being administered as planned after they were canceled on Friday following what turned out to be a bogus bomb threat university police say the initial bomb threat naming several buildings and a residence hall resulted in the evacuation and closure of the main campus instructors of course is affected by interrupted or cancelled finals are offering make up exams for take home alternatives flood control management is the goal behind a state grant aimed at keeping highway thirty seven above water in Marin county a low lying west bound stretch of the roadway has been flooding and clothes for days at a time Marin county officials say the California coastal Conservancy is allowing one and a half million dollars to strengthen a hundred thirty six acres of wetlands that border highway thirty seven the project includes habitat restoration and needed upgrades to culverts and replacement of a failed diesel pump with a new electric pump that your news right now I am Brody Fernandez from the K. became traffic center were continuing on eighty westbound on the shoulder Bowman road Hanes road going on through the thirty first of December I we won ninety three one way control traffic Kelsey road to rock creek road work on the offramp north and south found five the garden highway garden highway remains close from Northgate why five I eighty tonight both the winter street onramp and offramp money spent eighty or close to eight AM in the delta west of Rio Vista one we control traffic on state route twelve from curry road as a veto road through eight AM spot a problem let us know about on the campy K. traffic tip line dial pound to fifteen say traffic traffic every ten minutes mornings and afternoons news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. for or today we'll see patchy fog early otherwise cloudy with highs not far from sixty mostly cloudy lows near fifty.

Christian magazine president ABC Rachel Scott San Francisco State University Marin county California coastal Conservancy Brody Fernandez Rio Vista K. F. B. K. editor in chief mark alley Michelle Franzen
The Murder of Paul Stine: 50 Years Later

Serial Killers

09:41 min | 2 years ago

The Murder of Paul Stine: 50 Years Later

"I'm Vanessa Richardson and today we're discussing the murder of Paul Stein a cab driver who gave a ride to the Zodiac killer on the night of October eleventh nineteen sixty nine and was killed in his car after reaching his destination had it not be in for a communications breakdown within the police the Zodiac killer's ten month long killing spree might have ended that night four we discussed the hunt for the elusive Zodiac killer. Let's go back to the evening of October Eleventh Nineteen Sixty nine twenty nine year old Paul Stein didn't like to define himself as a cabdriver that was his night job meant to support him as he pursued his doctorate in English at San Francisco State University he was even gearing up to quit just a few months before he'd been mugged by a passenger and ever since he'd felt a tinge of worry whenever a stranger got in his car. Stein had decided that cabdriver having wasn't for him but he still needed to work the job while he found something else and so on the night of October Eleventh Stein and his yellow Bob were cruising through San Francisco's theatre district he picked up a new fare at some point around nine thirty pm the singer was a white man even the brightly lit intersections that surrounded San Francisco's Union Square the shadows seemed to dance across the passengers Ace keeping him in a gloomy shroud Washington and maple the man said in a near whisper he didn't speak again Stein started the meter and pulled away it takes an average of eighteen minutes to reach Washington and Maple in the presidio Heights neighborhood from union in station Stein's passenger remained silent for the entire ride Stein didn't mind that he'd been driving a cab for long enough to expect all tips he'd had passengers told him their entire life story from the backseat of his cab others like tonight's ride kept silent speaking only to require Esta Destination Stein thought about turning on the radio but decided against it all of the stations were talking about one thing anyway the Zodiac killer just two weeks before to students had been tied up and stabbed by a man in an executioner's hood over at Lake Barry Esa the get up was weird enough but the guy had also been writing letters to the city's newspapers sending puzzles for people to solve the city was on edge wondering when the next attack was going to come Stein didn't want to think about it he opted for the ambient din of the assing city instead if the passenger minded he didn't speak up Stein reached for the meter he pulled over at the corner of Washington Street and apple street wait the shadow shrouded man whispered from the backseat pull on up Stein didn't speak he just nodded as he put the cab back in gear maybe the guy had gotten his address wrong it happened all the time where to Stein asked as the cab cruised along Washington street here the man said suddenly as the cab approached the next intersection after Washington and Maple Stein pulled over and turned off meter the man owed six dollars and twenty five cents he leaned forward from the back seat reaching into his pocket to get his Wallet Stein's opposed he didn't even see the gun the passenger raised his nine millimeter pistol and fired point blank into Stein's head Stein was dead before his head hit the steering wheel the killer exited the cab and moved around it to the front passenger door he opened the door and reached in to pull the keys from the ignition. He pocketed them then he snatched Stein's wallet from his pocket and began to rip his shirt apart the killer didn't know it but he was being watched three teenagers in an apartment across the street phoned the police shortly before ten pm they reported a man white may be tween twenty five or thirty five with reddish brown hair and heavy rimmed glasses they could likely see Stein's body from their vantage point down in the cab the killer grabbed a swatch of stine's torn shirt and took off down Cherry Street patrol officers. Don Falcone and Eric Films were the closest to the crime scene as they made their way toward Washington Cherry their dispatcher gave them an update on the suspect he described the man they were looking for as a black male so when falcons elms passed a heavyset white man walking away from the crime scene they thought nothing of it they hurried to the scene only then did they learn that the dispatch had mixed up the suspect's description falcons elms both realized that they had very likely just past the killer coming up breath man hunt sweeps the surrounding blocks now back to the story Paul Stein was murdered in his cab fifty years ago today on October Eleventh Nineteen Sixty nine in San Francisco's Presidio Heights neighborhood a manhunt ensued police searched the surrounding blocks but it was too late the killer was gone the murder was not initially linked to the Zodiac killer the crime didn't fit his usual mo all of the other known Zodiac attacks had occurred in secluded areas and the victims had all been cut tells the gun that the killer used to kill Stein also did not match the suspected weapons used in the other attacks it was the Zodiac himself who led the police to suspect that there was more to Paul stine's murder since August of nineteen sixty nine the Zodiac killer had been mailing letters to the San Francisco medical the San Francisco Examiner and the Vallejo Times in these letters the killer took credit for his crimes taunted the police for their inability to catch him and sent bizarre ciphers that he challenged the police to try and solve it was also in these letters that the killer had shared his name the Zodiac the killer had not sent a letter in several weeks the newspapers had not heard from him even after the events of the timber twenty seventh nineteen sixty nine when the Zodiac had killed Cecelia Shepard and attacked Bryan Hartnell but on October third eighteenth two days after Stein's death the San Francisco Chronicle received a new Zodiac letter it read I am the murderer of the taxi driver over by Washington Street and Maple Street last night to prove this here is a bloodstained piece of his shirt I am the same man who did in the people in the North Bay area the San Francisco police could have caught me last night if they had searched the park proper early the letter included a bloody scrap of Paul stine's shirt the witnesses who had initially called the police worked with a sketch artist to produce composite sketch of what they believed the killer looked like this was widely circulated but to no avail the Zodiac killer wrote another letter to the San Francisco Chronicle on November ninth nineteen sixty nine in it he claimed that he actually spoke with police officers on the night that he killed Paul Stein this is likely untrue officers Falcons films reported that they had just seen the man passing on there way to the scene and realized after the subjects description was updated that they might have missed him still if the man that Falcons Elm saw okay was the Zodiac than that was the closest that the police ever got to catching him between December of nineteen sixty eight and October nineteen sixty nine the Zodiac killer brutally attacked seven people killing five of them he seemed to resurface at least once more in eighteen seventy when he attempted to abduct a woman named Kathleen Johns and her infant child Kathleen later linked her attacker to the police sketch of Paul stine's murderer the Zodiac killer continued to send letters to the San Francisco Chronicle over the next few years in some he claimed credit for murders that had occurred in the San Francisco Bay area but the police were never able to definitively connect him to any of those crimes today a is the fiftieth anniversary of Zodiac's last known murder the killer's identity has never been discovered as time continues on it seems unlikely that it ever will

Maple Stein San Francisco State University Esta Destination Stein Wallet Stein San Francisco Murder Vanessa Richardson Stine Washington Don Falcone Presidio Heights Union Square Lake Barry Esa Assing Eric Films Cabdriver BOB Nineteen Sixty Nine Twenty Nin Eighteen Minutes
Today In True Crime - Zodiac Killer

Hostage

09:42 min | 2 years ago

Today In True Crime - Zodiac Killer

"I'm Vanessa Richardson and today we're discussing the murder of Paul Stein a cab driver who gave a ride to the Zodiac killer on the night of October eleventh nineteen sixty nine and was killed in his car after reaching his destination had it not be in for a communications breakdown within the police the Zodiac killer's ten month long killing spree might have ended that night four we discussed the hunt for the elusive Zodiac killer. Let's go back to the evening of October eleventh nineteen sixty nine twenty nine year old Paul Stein didn't like to define himself as a cabdriver that was his night job meant to support him as he pursued his doctorate in English at San Francisco State University he was even gearing up to quit just a few months before he'd been mugged by a passenger and ever since he'd felt a tinge of worry whenever a stranger got in his car Stein had decided that cabdriver having wasn't for him but he still needed to work the job while he found something else and so on the night of October Eleventh Stein and his Yellow Bob were cruising through San Francisco's theatre district he picked up a new fare at some point around nine thirty pm the singer was a white man even the brightly lit intersections that surrounded San Francisco's Union Square the shadows seemed to dance across the passengers ace keeping him in a gloomy shroud Washington and maple the man said in a near whisper he didn't speak again Stein started the meter and pulled away it takes an average of eighteen minutes to reach Washington and Maple in the presidio Heights neighborhood from union in station Stein's passenger remained silent for the entire ride Stein didn't mind that he'd been driving a cab for long enough to expect all tips he'd had passengers told him their entire life story from the backseat of his cab others like tonight's ride kept silent speaking only to require Esta Destination Stein thought about turning on the radio but decided against it all of the stations were talking about one thing anyway the Zodiac killer just two weeks before to students had been tied up and stabbed by a man in an executioner's hood over at Lake Barry Esa the get up was weird enough but the guy had also been writing letters to the city's newspapers sending puzzles for people to solve the city was on edge wondering when the next attack was going to come Stein didn't want to think about it he opted for the Ambient Din of the assing city instead if the passenger minded he didn't speak up Stein reached for the meter he pulled over at the corner of Washington Street and Apple Street wait the shadow shrouded man whispered from the backseat pull on up Stein didn't speak he just nodded as he put the cab back in gear maybe the guy had gotten his address wrong it happened all the time where to Stein asked as the cab cruised along Washington street here the man said suddenly as the cab approached the next intersection after Washington and Maple Stein pulled over and turned off meter the man owed six dollars and twenty five cents he leaned forward from the back seat reaching into his pocket to get his wallet Stein's opposed he didn't even see the gun the passenger raised his nine millimeter pistol and fired point blank into Stein's head Stein was dead before his head hit the steering wheel the killer wanted the cab and moved around it to the front passenger door he opened the door and reached in to pull the keys from the ignition. He pocketed them then he snatched Stein's wallet from his pocket and began to rip his shirt apart the killer didn't know it but he was being watched three teenagers in an apartment across the street phoned the police shortly before ten pm they reported a man white may be tween twenty five or thirty five with reddish brown hair and heavy rimmed glasses they could likely see Stein's body from their vantage point down in the cab the killer grabbed a swatch of stine's torn shirt and took off down Cherry Street patrol officers Don Falcone and Eric Films were the closest to the crime scene as they made their way toward Washington Cherry their dispatcher gave them an update on the suspect he described the man they were looking for as a black male so when falcons elms passed a heavyset white man walking away from the crime scene they thought nothing of it they hurried to the scene only then did they learn that the dispatch had mixed up the suspect's description falcons elms both realized that they had very likely just past the killer coming up at the man hunt sweeps the surrounding blocks now back to the story Paul Stein was murdered in his cab fifty years ago today on October Eleventh Nineteen Sixty nine in San Francisco's presidio Heights neighborhood a manhunt ensued police searched the surrounding blocks but it was too late the killer was gone the murder was not initially linked to the Zodiac killer the crime didn't fit his usual mo all of the other known Zodiac attacks had occurred in secluded areas and the victims had all been cut goals the gun that the killer used to kill Stein also did not match the suspected weapons used in the other attacks it was the Zodiac himself who led the police to suspect that there was more to Paul stine's murder since August of nineteen sixty nine the Zodiac killer had been mailing letters to the San Francisco medical the San Francisco Examiner and the Vallejo Times in these letters the killer took credit for his crimes taunted the police for their inability to catch him and sent bizarre ciphers that he challenged the police to try and solve it was also in these letters that the killer had shared his name the Zodiac the killer had not sent a letter in several weeks the newspapers had not heard from him even after the events of the timber twenty seventh nineteen sixty nine when the Zodiac had killed Cecelia Shepard and attacked Bryan Hartnell but on October third eighteenth two days after Stein's death the San Francisco Chronicle received a new Zodiac letter it read I am the murderer of the taxi driver over by Washington Street and Maple Street last night to prove this here is a bloodstained piece of his shirt I am the same man who did in the people in the North Bay area the San Francisco police could have caught me last night if they had searched the park proper early the letter included a bloody scrap of Paul stine's shirt the witnesses who had initially called the police worked with a sketch artist to produce composite sketch of what they believed the killer looked like this was widely circulated but to no avail the Zodiac killer wrote another letter to the San Francisco Chronicle on November ninth nineteen sixty nine in it he claimed that he actually spoke with police officers on the night that he killed Paul Stein this is likely untrue officers Falcons films reported that they had just seen the man passing on there way to the scene and realized after the subjects description was updated that they might have missed him still if the man that Falcons Elm saw okay was the Zodiac than that was the closest that the police ever got to catching him between December of nineteen sixty eight and October nineteen sixty nine the Zodiac killer brutally attacked seven people killing five of them he seemed to resurface at least once more in eighteen seventy when he attempted to abduct a woman named Kathleen Johns and her infant child Kathleen later linked her attacker to the police sketch of Paul stine's murderer the Zodiac killer continued to send letters to the San Francisco Chronicle over the next few years in some he claimed credit for murders that had occurred in the San Francisco Bay area but the police were never able to definitively connect him to any of those crimes today on it seems unlikely that it ever will

Paul Stein Murder Vanessa Richardson Nineteen Sixty Nine Twenty Nin Eighteen Minutes Fifty Years Six Dollars Ten Month Two Weeks Two Days
"san francisco state university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"That public education aspect will be gone the Weston observatory has been recording earthquake since nineteen thirty one that is a legacy the National Weather Service confirms a tornado struck Long Island yesterday this was an EF zero twister at the bottom of the scale it hit Manorville with eighty five mile per hour winds and this woman says our home was damaged not destroyed the damaged I grab my kids we all ran downstairs you could feel the how shaken and there was a loud cracking noise is no injuries reported and this is the first tornado on Long Island since last October and the longest running public webcam in the world is staying online leases the with the update on this. the San Francisco fog cam was scheduled to be turned off at the end of August after twenty five years people are so upset though that San Francisco State University decided to keep maintaining the fog camp indefinitely a statement on the university's website says San Francisco State University has supported operation of the fog camps since its inception in nineteen ninety four a major technology milestone at the time the university looks forward to continuing the webcams legacy and for a little web perspective the San Francisco fog cam is older than Google Amazon or face pop. back in the habit of listening to WBZ newsradio traffic is backed a terrible New England weather is back to you well you know predictable summer's over and it's back to your life W. B. C. Boston's news radio back to the roads with my king in a minute jumbo shrimp okay the jumble with the trip yeah it's famous acting more on how this one pretty ugly how could I be party if it's ugly oxymoron our competitors have a favorite it's free with purchase. they have a free windows when you purchase for how could be free if you're gonna make a purchase that's one of them actually morons free with purchase maybe they think you're a regular moron we don't we're right window R. I. T. E. right window quality energy star windows with a lifetime warranty and we put the.

Weston observatory National Weather Service Long Island San Francisco State University Amazon New England Boston San Francisco Google twenty five years
"san francisco state university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Commander dot com right there on the home page in the top left hand corner there's a link that says be a caller yes you're so smart that's where you click and you fill out that form the one of our fabulous producers will get back with you and in this jam packed our we do have our security tip of the week but we're gonna get started ready with some interesting items across my desk in my screen and first of which is a milestone think back twenty five years over you doing twenty five years ago well nineteen ninety four was the year that Amazon was found it it was when a different lion king was in theaters was also when a certain web cam went online and now twenty five years later the world's oldest continually operated webcam is being shut off this little fun fact you can use with somebody on a bet it's called the fog cameras set up by two guys taking computer classes at San Francisco State University pointing out a campus street to show well how funny it was times change there's not much of you view left there anymore or any other place to locate the webcam so they could decide to pull the plug at the end of August I also had some security issues the website font cam dot org is going to stay on line but five Kim wasn't the first can you remember what the first was actually members the honor goes to the Trojan room coffee pot candy Cambridge that predated the internet as as we know it back in nineteen ninety one actual remember going to see that a simpler time when only webcams for pointed at foggy streets and coffee pots all right ready to buy a brand new apple watch will hold off because it looks like we're gonna have another version of the watch and it's gonna have a faster processor and some different color options doesn't sound like it's going to have any groundbreaking new features yeah but the big upgrades or maybe even another year away like native sleep tracking which have in turn to mean it has to have a much better battery but eventually this was the ability to charge the watch wirelessly by placing it on an iPhone kinda like Sam Sam products for now but this year's model is supposed to come in two new finishes I guess that's something Oscar debuts September ceramic and titanium now no previous apple watch had titanium there was ceramic the series two and three just out the series for so it's kinda like something's old is kind of new again maybe really think they need to.

Amazon San Francisco State University Kim Oscar Commander Cambridge apple Sam Sam twenty five years
"san francisco state university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Now twenty five years later the world's oldest continually operated webcam is being shut off this little fun fact you can use with somebody on a bet it's called the fog cameras set up by two guys taking computer classes at San Francisco State University pointing out a campus street to show well how fun it was times change there's not much of a you be left there anymore or any other place to locate the webcam so they can decide to pull the plug at the end of August I also had some security issues the website fog cam dot org is going to stay on line but **** him wasn't the first can you remember what the first was actually member this the honor goes to the Trojan room coffee pot camera Cambridge that pre dated the internet as we know it back in nineteen ninety one actual remember going to see that a simpler time when only webcams for pointed at foggy streets and coffee pots all right ready to buy a brand new apple watch will hold off because it looks like we're gonna have another version of the watch and it's gonna have a faster processor and some different color options doesn't sound like it's going to have any groundbreaking new features yeah but the big upgrades or maybe even another year away like native sleep tracking which have in turn to mean it has to have a much better battery but eventually this was the ability to charge the watch wirelessly by placing it on an iPhone kinda like Sam Sam products work now but this year's model is supposed to come in two new finishes I guess that's something Oscar debuts September ceramic and titanium now no previous apple watch had titanium there was ceramic the series two and three just out the series for so it's kind of like something's old is kind of new again maybe really think they need to.

San Francisco State University Oscar Cambridge apple Sam Sam twenty five years
"san francisco state university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Of things have changed in San Francisco since nearby Silicon Valley sparked a tech revolution but for the past quarter century you could at least count on a couple of things the fog that often shrouds the city end of the live web cam that watches it farm cam is said to be the world's oldest running webcam it's one of the oldest websites period but as NPR's call and wire reports the Indus near for this internet landmark the two guys who created fog cam didn't say too much when they announced it's coming to my eyes just a single tweet Sunday saying that their web cam at San Francisco State University is going dark at the end of the month that kind of simplicity is fitting for an operation that has been pretty understated from the very beginning here's Jeff Schwartz who started the camera Dan Wong on a shoestring budget back when they were students in nineteen ninety four and I scrounge together some equipment I mean old quit quit meant that no one really wanted to use bottle cheap camera at the at the the college bookstore and threw together some apple script and some freeware and create a webcam towards an Wong who go by the nickname swept dog Danno online say that theirs was not the first bite camp that distinction goes to a camera that watch the communal coffee pot at the university of Cambridge but while that camera shut down nearly two decades ago fog camp is still going strong for now not that there was ever any big serious mission behind it we just kept it going for twenty five years because it was just this kind of cool thing that we like but these days keeping the camera up and running has just become too much trouble Schwartz says that the school just kind of tolerated its presence and they've had to move it around a bunch over the years at one point it was looking down at a coffee shop which sports aren't funny an inside joke that was a nod to the Cambridge coffee pot cam currently fog came is taking images of a street on campus refreshed every twenty seconds but this word since about more than a stretch of Holloway Avenue fog him is a vestige of a different era anyone to some individual could just create something cool set it up published on the internet and people could come look at it it was a fun time an interesting time and I think in some ways the internet lacks that today the forecaster.

San Francisco NPR San Francisco State University Jeff Schwartz Dan Wong Danno forecaster apple university of Cambridge Cambridge twenty five years twenty seconds two decades
"san francisco state university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on KCRW

"Nevada dot com lots of things have changed in San Francisco since nearby Silicon Valley spark to tech revolution but for the past quarter century you could at least count on a couple of things the fog that often shrouds the city and to the live web cam that watches it farm cam is said to be the world's oldest running webcam it's one of the oldest websites period but as NPR's call and wire reports the Indus near for this internet landmark the two guys who created fog camp didn't say too much when they announced it's coming to my eyes just a single tweet Sunday saying that the webcam at San Francisco State University is going dark at the end of the month that kind of simplicity is fitting for an operation that has been pretty understated from the very beginning here's Jeff Schwartz who started the camera Dan Wong on a shoestring budget back when they were students in nineteen ninety four and I scrounge together some equipment I mean old equipment that no one really wanted to use bottle cheap camera at the at the college bookstore and threw together some apple script and some freeware and create a webcam towards an Wong who go by the nickname swept dog in the ana online say that theirs was not the first but can't that distinction goes to a camera that watched a communal coffee pot at the university of Cambridge but while that camera shut down nearly two decades ago fog camp is still going strong for now not that there was ever any big serious mission behind it we just kept it going for twenty five years because it was just this kind of cool thing that we like but these days keeping the camera up and running has just become too much trouble Schwartz says that the school just kind of tolerated its presence and they had to move it around a bunch over the years at one point it was looking down at a coffee shop which supports our body an inside joke that was a nod to the Cambridge coffee pot cam currently fog cam is taking images of a street on campus refreshed every twenty seconds but this works it's about more than a stretch of hallway Avenue far Kim is a vestige of a different era anyone to some individual could just create something cool sat at publishing on the internet and people could come and look at it it was a fun time an interesting time and I think in some ways the internet lacks that today the forecaster far cams final days.

San Francisco NPR San Francisco State University Jeff Schwartz Dan Wong Kim forecaster Nevada Silicon Valley apple university of Cambridge Cambridge twenty five years twenty seconds two decades
"san francisco state university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Spark to tech revolution but for the past quarter century you could at least count on a couple of things the fog that often shrouds the city and to the live web cam that watches it farm cam is said to be the world's oldest running webcam it's one of the oldest websites period but as NPR's call and wire reports the Indus near for this internet landmark the two guys who created fog camp didn't say too much when they announced it's coming to my eyes just a single tweet Sunday saying that their web cam at San Francisco State University is going dark at the end of the month that kind of simplicity is fitting for an operation that has been pretty understated from the very beginning here's Jeff Schwartz who started the camera Dan walking on a shoestring budget back when they were students in nineteen ninety four and I scrounge together some equipment I mean old equipment that no one really wanted to use bottle cheap camera at the at the the college bookstore and threw together some apple script and some freeware and create a webcam towards an Wong who go by the nickname swept dog Danna online say that theirs was not the first bite camp that distinction goes to a camera that watch the communal coffee pot at the university of Cambridge but while that camera shut down nearly two decades ago fog camp is still going strong for now not that there was ever any big serious mission behind it we just kept it going for twenty five years because it was just this kind of cool thing that we like but these days keeping the camera up and running has just become too much trouble Schwartz says that the school just kind of tolerated its presence and they've had to move it around a bunch over the years at one point it was looking down at a coffee shop which sports aren't funny an inside joke that was a nod to the Cambridge coffee pot cam currently fog cam is taking images of a street on campus refreshed every twenty seconds but this word sits about more than a stretch of Holloway Avenue fog cam is a vestige of a different era anyone to some individual could just create something cool set it up published on the internet and people could come and look at it it was a fun time an interesting time and I think in some ways the internet lacks that today the forecaster fog cams final days is.

NPR San Francisco State University Jeff Schwartz Dan Wong Danna apple university of Cambridge Cambridge forecaster twenty five years twenty seconds two decades
"san francisco state university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

09:39 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Hoenlein, Conference of presidents Major American Jewish organizations, and we turn to a story in the news in California about it's global news about a decision. San Francisco state university. The decision is integral to a success for. We're team an ally of Malcolm's our colleague of ours. These many years because Jane is part of the law fair project that Malcolm works with very carefully. And this turns on the question of discrimination against Jewish and Zionist students at San Francisco state university. I welcome now someone to explain because this is a legal matter. Ross Cramer partner at Winston strong, Rasa, very good evening to you. San Francisco state university has now admitted that it will correct discrimination against Jewish and Zionist students. Please explain to the audience the significance of this severance, Cisco acknowledging their bad acting good evening to you. Good evening. Thank you for having me. So this case really was an important and groundbreaking case when we were working on this case, we had not been able to find a model for the settlement that we wanted to achieve if we didn't have to go to trial, and that settlement was very pointed. In the fact that the university had to acknowledge after many Jews Zionism is an important part of their identity, and that when Jewish students are excluded from LeVine. The school can't use political discrimination as an excuse for what is clearly religious discrimination against dynasties. So what we're talking about? Here is something that's been developing is in evidence around the country. We've talked about the the boycott divestment sanctions movements, but this is really several layers above that several levels above it. And you're talking about some very serious manifestations were pro Israel speakers could be heard were Jewish students and the judge acknowledged it clearly felt endangered and threatened. And for good reason because there were times when they were physically endangered and and set upon and the the settlement that emerged in university initially said they weren't going to do it. But seeing the amendments work that you would Winston strong and the Lafayette project, and their lawyers have the people of worked on this for so long. The tremendous effort really paid off because you had such a strong case against the university that they settled with virtually everything, and maybe could tell us some of the components of that settlement beyond just the acknowledgement of the of the threats to the students and the failure to respond to them properly. Yeah. Absolutely beyond that statements from university, which really was key another very important part of the university, which has a long history of complaints of anti-semitism would have to hire a coordinator of Jewish student life, and that would have to be funded position. It would have to be given an office on campus. Also, extremely important was that the university going forward wouldn't few its own evaluation of policies and practices and training worth its own evaluation of student complaints. They would have to retain at their own cost outside monitor who would handle all those things and issue public reports about whether there the schools practices and policies were up to best practices. And any future discrimination complaints would have to be evaluated outside qualified person. Not someone inside the university. You know, all of those components were very very important to us. And really there was no model out there for this kind of resolution with a school. We had to make this up on the fly as we were going. They also allocated money to support educational outreach efforts to promote viewpoint diversity. Unlike what we come and think that it would include not only but pro zero and scientists viewpoints and inclusion an equity on the basis of religious identity, which will benefit all suits, not just Jewish students and put these extremists. I think on notice, and frankly, it has to put every president of university in the country chose to ignore. This didn't want to be bothered turned a blind eye to discrimination against Jewish and others as students. An often allowed extremist voices on the campus to to dominate unfairly. And in a restricted basis that this will will be a landmark change for them. Well, that's that's what we were really hoping to do. This was a case that was brought by to individual students at San Francisco state university and any settlement could only bind that university in the CFC's system. But the idea for us was to create a model where there wasn't one to make something available to others who might run into this kind of issue in the future both Francisco state university and throughout the country and throughout the world. And I think by keeping that, you know, we've given at least hope to a lot of professors different universities, a lot of students throughout the world who may be suffering the team kind of harm. But may not have the faith in the judicial system to bring a case and to see it through almost the trial. And I'm sure that many people in the. Audience. John arc say, well, why would you students be subject to the greenish? The fact is that sixty percent of hate crimes in America are against Jews fifty percents against Muslims. And yet they're all of forms were against offers of discrimination and bias, but there has been a special problem in regard to the anti Israel. And this does not mean criticism of Israeli policies here. You're talking about something much more fundamental and serious. And I think that is what you were trying to address. Absolutely. I mean this statement says by the university essentially that the next time a student or a student group is a support for Israel in Israel's right to exist. And right to defend itself. If people wanted end discriminate against that student or that group, they can't do it under the guise of political discrimination. They can't say, oh, we're we're losing them because there's nine ser because they support Israel what this settlement data's link those things together in a public statement from the university. So that going forward discrimination on the basis of his or support for Israel will be linked to religious discrimination. Is there a reason to believe that other universities other campuses where we can think quickly? Why this where this has happened before that they're gonna learn for this from this and not wait for a case to be brought against them. Well, absolutely. I mean, we've already received and especially the locker project in Brooklyn. Have already received calls from rabbis throughout the country from professors of Jewish studies at schools throughout the country. And and I'm very very gratified right now because it seems like our hope for the settlement that it wouldn't be limited to Justice school. And just these two students are really being fulfilled. And you're saying that the reason that you had to resort to the court was because universities who were approached to settle within the normal sphere of the of the campus. Hepatitis refused to do so and refuse to acknowledge this discrimination and discriminatory behavior. Against. Yes. I was just going to say I'm starting to say this case is a perfect model for that. Because what happened was these students did bring an internal administrative component. And it was reviewed by an employee of the school and predictably that school employees found that there was no religious discrimination here, even though a Jewish student group in Jewish students which included from the. So what we tried to do here it ensure that future complaints like that would go to an external person a disinterested person. And I think that's so important for internal school complain. And in a school like this where it just wasn't going to be given the appropriate level of gravity resort to the court system. Really did work the way to judge Orrick who at one time said failed to show deliberate indifference to the discrimination by SF issue. What what difference what was different about this case? Now that lead would have led to a trial. We'd be experienced trial now. And in fact, brought about the solution resolution. I think we lost a Malcolm I want to ask you one. Final question, Malcolm. If people listening to this believe that they have a concern that something like this has happened to them is the law fair project. Absolutely. She writes low-fare project right to the conference of presidents dot org. We will refer to them. There are hundreds of lawyers across the country, by the way, many them non-jewish, including some who worked on this case who will come in and help to we don't want any student at feel threatened put upon and to be discriminated against and many of them living in fear. We thank Ross Cramer partner at Winston straw. Malcolm..

Israel San Francisco Malcolm president Ross Cramer partner Francisco state university Winston strong California Jane Cisco Winston LeVine Winston straw coordinator America Justice school Hepatitis John arc Lafayette
"san francisco state university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:03 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on KGO 810

"Oh, John Roth job you. Remember, the group that really organize the free speech move. Wait. Wait, remember, how it began it began because the Barry Goldwater people had a table on Sproul plaza. And there were objections, and then the whole issue became free speech, and all of a sudden all of a sudden this exploded. Now, let me tell you what the president did today. And let me tell you why. And then I want your comment about free speech. President Trump signed an executive order which really is symbolic. I don't think it means much to promote free speech on college campuses. Now he threatens colleges with the loss of federal research funding if they do not. Protect the rights of students and the president said this. We're here to take historic action to defend American students at American values. They've been under siege. Now. What was the siege? What was the siege? And this is what I want to define for you. He brought onstage young man by the name of Hayden Williams. A conservative activists who was attacked while working recruitment table on campus at UC Berkeley now. Wait, wait. Wait. Oh, Karen reads, a graduate of UC, Berkeley, she's not old enough perhaps to remember the incidence of sixty four, but I remember them. I remember going over. I can still see Mario salvio standing on top of a car defending free speech. Now, what happened to Hayden Williams was this? He was hit. Attacked while working that recruitment table. Now the video quickly went viral with conservatives citing it as further evidence of the stifling and sometimes violent atmosphere that conservative face on campus. And that's true, by the way. That's true. Conservatives do have a problem on the campus. If it's a liberal campus, and what the president said that he was this. He took a punch for all of us. Trump said of Williams, and we could never allow that to happen. And here is enclosing with Hayden. Some good news. He's going to be a wealthy young, man. Of course, that's because of his notoriety. Now, I want to get this clear. The president said this if they want our dollars, and we give it to them by the billions, that's campuses they've got to allow people like Eden and many other great young people and old people speak free speech, if they don't it'll be costly. This will be signed by the way, Dennis Prager talk show host who many of you here on KFI, oh who appears in the upcoming documentary called no safe spaces. Remark on Thursday today. It's tragic that in the one country that was founded on liberty the country that enshrined freedom of speech as its fundamental document. This executive order has become necessary. But thanks to the left. Of course, Dennis is attacking the left. It has if President Trump can put a stop to the intolerance of non leftist viewpoints on college campuses and help steer the country in the right direction. They're just might be hope for one five eight zero eight zero eight ten now look this kid being hit was wrong. And the White House, by the way declined today, despite our inquiries to provide specific examples about how universities could lose funding and the implementation details will be finalized in the coming month. So really what happened today was symbolic. I want your reaction to this the president's signing this executive order, and I want to relate it to something that happened at San Francisco state university. Adjust this week. The law fair project and Winston and strong LLP reached a landmark settlement in their lawsuit against the California State University system the settlement invoke versus the board of trustees. Comes ahead of this month's scheduled trial for a lawsuit. Brought by two Jewish students who allege that San Francisco state university, and the board of trustees of CS you discriminated against them. And I gotta tell you. They won a major settlement. And what that settlement said was this first a public statement, affirming that it understands that many students were Jews Zionism is an important part of their identity coordinator of Jewish student. Life will be hired on the campus. There will be an extra in review of policies. There will be independent investigations of additional complaints. There will be funding for diversity, including Jewish students. And there will be a hard look at the campus mural to make sure it is not discriminatory. Now, there's more and I wanna get your comment on this. Because did you know that and enslaving situation? Exists in this country when we had slavery. Yes. We know that an enslaved African American named renting and his daughter Delilah were stripped and forced to pose for images commissioned by Swiss-born Harvard, professor who espoused a theory that African and African Americans were inferior to whites did, you know, that that was one hundred and seventy years ago, and I have to tell you when the enslavement took place that there were pictures taken a now, a descendant is suing and it reads like an outline for a historical novel. A stark portrait of opportunism greed, profound moral abdication by one of the country's most revered educational institutions. Now, this is what it centers on it centers on. What are believed to be the earliest known photographic images of slaves which were commissioned in eighteen fifty by Harvard. Professor Louis Agasi is a controversial figure who supported the idea that humans evolved from multiple distinct, ancestral types, and lent a celebrity status and scientific legitimacy to the poisonous outrageous myth of racial superiority now a descendant a descendant a direct descendant of the man in the iconic photos is now suing Harvard University. That's what is happening. A to stop the use of these iconic photos of their relatives four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten so whether you are a conservative on a campus who is hit or whether you are a Jewish student at San Francisco state university, or whether you are an African American descendant of slaves who wants Harvard to stop using iconic photos of the relatives. My question becomes what about freedom of speech? What about freedom of speech? Do you believe that the president's signing? The statement today is a positive development. Do you believe that executive order declaring that if a university? Does not abide by free speech. They could use federal funding education secretary, Betsy DeVos who attended the signing said the executive order demonstrates I quote directly this administration's commitment to supporting and empowering students with meaningful resources as they pursue their lifelong learning journeys and future careers. Four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten. By the way. Do you? Remember, President Trump earlier in his presidency. Call for bumping up. Further restrictions on the press by opening up libel laws. Four and five eight zero eight zero eight ten now the pros at the president's new executive order. Is happening against the backdrop of conservative voices, highlighting instances of alleged violence directed towards student activists in viral videos on social media and promoted by conservative talk shows you can make no doubt about it. So I wanna know what you think about the president signing this declaration, which by the way, he announced he announced the issue of the declaration at a conservative political action conference earlier this month, the annual gathering of the conservative activists near Washington. And he said this today, I'm proud to announce that I will be very soon signing, which he did today an executive order requiring colleges and universities to support free speech, if they want federal research funds, it will be very costly. Four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten. I want to know what you think about this declaration. So let me be clear, I'm in favor of freedom of speech. I am opposed to violence on the campus any violence on the campus. I believe that the Jewish students at San Francisco state university have won a major victory in a on a campus, which former president Corrigan the president of San Francisco state for many years declared to be the most anti semitic campus in the country. And I believe that this young woman at Harvard University who is now suing as the descendant of slaves and simply wants Harvard to stop using these icon ick photos of their relatives four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten by the way, no one is talking about racing the photographs so I want I want to get your point of view because I think this is fascinating. Free speech. All right. Let let's go to Liz who at Lisa rather was calling for pleasant hill. Lucille, welcome to a-. Hey. So my point of view is that Trump is talking out of both sides of his mouth just last weekend. He was saying that Saturday Night Live should be shut down or sued or he thinks they're a vehicle for the liberal left. And they're just terrible. Straightening an investigation, by the way, by the federal government. Exactly. So, you know, he's not a genuine just this is just him and his punk typically again and once again trying to quell the the last. Yeah. Look, I have to tell you. I don't care if it's left or right. I really believe in freedom of expression. And I think diversity of opinion on a college campus enough, sometimes college campuses will use the excuse that there will be violence. A what do you think should happen in that situation? I think in that situation a university needs to protect the students. And if in fact, they get wind that there are an Tusa or or whatever side of the fence there from that could incite violence, and they need to set down the event that is a safety issue. It is not about free speech. Yup. Look, I think you're right. That becomes a whole other issue and apart from campus, free speech. The president is is trying to include a push for students to have that sense. And I have to tell you. We had a very interesting situation at pitzer. Which is a private university in southern California. And you may have heard of that the faculty voted to ban the ability of students have pitzer to participate in a foreign exchange program in Israel, and the president of the university said absolutely not we believe in freedom of speech, and the idea that you can pursue your educational of things wherever you want. Look, I'll be very honest with you I studied in the Soviet Union in nineteen sixty nine when I was in college. And a lot of people said to me, oh, my God, you're going to the Soviet Union. And I said, yes, I wanted to see for myself. So I am a firm believer in freedom of speech. Whether you're a liberal or a conservative. And that's that's very important. Listen, I appreciate your call. Thanks very much for one five eight zero eight zero eight ten let's go to Gary who is calling. I'm not sure where you're calling from Gary. But welcome to Keiji. Oh, thank you, John. I'm calling on the roads. Eight eight eight going back to Hayward from Sunnyvale..

president President Trump San Francisco state university executive Harvard University Hayden Williams John Roth Barry Goldwater Harvard Soviet Union Dennis Prager Sproul plaza California State University UC Berkeley Berkeley California Mario salvio Saturday Night Live Gary
"san francisco state university" Discussed on Atlanta Monster

Atlanta Monster

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco state university" Discussed on Atlanta Monster

"A perfect storm was brewing in the I was squarely centered around San Francisco, the summer of love is an expression of this awakening, we call upon the world to help us. Celebrate the infinite holiness of life. Summer of love is the summer of nineteen sixty seven when something like one hundred thousand young people flock to San Francisco. This is Peter Richardson. He's a historian and lecturer at San Francisco state university. They're told not to come by city officials, which is the best way to get people to. And they do. You know, you know, America is so obsessed with ban breath and with underarm the odorant. These are the biggest problems in the world. If you watch television, I think that generation of kids which says we don't care about your concept of cleanliness is a revolutionary generation. Hits the streets really kinda changes kind of morphs into the hippie counterculture that people are so where it turned San Francisco to kind of global rock capital van Francisco police say that nine I have been arrested eight narcotics rate on the headquarters, the Grateful Dead, a widely popular thing. There are a lot of bands. They're very creative and innovative and influential. What was happening in San Francisco is something much more improvisational exploratory was part of a larger art scene that included psychedelic posters and light shows and even the hippies didn't realize how many of them there were and they start getting publicity national publicity. Children in the nineteen sixties often of America children of blood. Sink Ravin Streuli quickly despite its utopian Asper rations, the San Francisco counterculture is surrounded by all these other forms of strive. So it's not a peaceful place to live than The you. new communist campaign in Vietnam continues.

San Francisco van Francisco Peter Richardson America Ravin Streuli Vietnam