11 Burst results for "San Francisco Film Society"

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

05:13 min | 7 months ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"A podcasting traditional board I want to be nominated for. Net if there's like just just transitions. If. Not someone needs to start that. And probably John Oliver last week tonight needs to be the person to give it out. All right. So Speaking of grants. Oakley do you want to tell us about some of the big grants that are coming up this fall you do the quarterly grants every filmmaker should know about list. Yeah. We've got a massive list of fall twenty, twenty grants of an so basically, the Chen that I'm seeing is that. There's two ways that organizations that normally fund have gone. One is they're not funding at all right now or they've gone. or their funding more than they have before to try to compensate for how many artists are hurting right now. So so what you'll see massive list fall twenty, two grants is there's less funders but some of them are funding more almost all of the funders who are funding this fall are sort of the well recognized established institutions the exception would be. BECCA. Film Institute, which unfortunately is. Poss- lash completely gone. That was sort of like the big. Earlier this year in the middle of the pandemic. TRIBECA, for the Mississippi which already always has these really cool things are basically not around anymore. So that leaves us with in the documentary where you've got If you live in California one of the big communities grants, there is California documentary project they've put out more funding than they normally do and Sundance documentary funds just opened up, of course, huge and they. Find you know usually fifteen to forty thousand blacks depending on what part of production in they just reopened for submissions for aw? So that's in the documentary world in the narrative worlds you've got. film independent has their project involved, which is. Always, a really cool program for voices who aren't always heard in are encouraged to come automakers and then other stalwarts like San, Francisco, Film Society SF film the got the rainfall making grand opening opening up..

California Film Society SF Film Institute John Oliver Poss Oakley TRIBECA Chen San Francisco Mississippi
"san francisco film society" Discussed on Fanm on Films

Fanm on Films

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on Fanm on Films

"We're going to do a scene and I want you to talk about the things that you know that that are on your mind these days about like your your your trade in your craft as fishermen and what is what what are the issues and and how can you find ways deal with those issues too because I want the solution to come from you and not for me. Let's let's talk about this and so they already lively and they're talking about it while eating the wheelbase Sharon every damn I should have had the. Can you save it for when I feel? Wait till I press recording big Ameri. There was so live it was so beautiful but again mind you I mean. I didn't go place that I know. I made a film in in in a village. Did I know and that the people care for me and love me and I love Them I I. I took my kids. There from was living in France and just took my kids and my husband. We moved to this town Back in two thousand three and we lived there for two years so this is a place that you know that my kids grew up there like that tach to that place you know. So the compensation that The joy key my son is having with the fishermen. He could have been having that conversation like you know like naturally so and so everyone was so supportive of me doing this film that you know. I just I call in favors like crazy and it was just like yeah. We'll be there. You know like more okay. So that moment via might discounting moment and I got it because they trusted me and I trust them. And so there's a lot of reciprocity you know Ab- sentiments and I would not have not said anyone would have gotten that same you know you. Just don't sheet yourself there late. Okay tell talk to me. You know what they have talked to you if the Raleigh would given you decide I from serious knowledge you know talking about sustainable fishing. You know when when other fishermen said what issue Wassall Initiative Wild. I mean it's it's it's serious knowledge and how to do this to continue able to continue doing it for for awhile. Yeah and they understand too that this global warming they just don't know the word global one way I'm pitcher has changed. And they know that they have to go further to get like the bigger fish so they know something is happening and they also watching like coastal erosion because they. They're all their lives. They seeing the see like moving closer when the fishermen tells them affiliate you know like you over there will like you know Quinn fields like all the way over there into the sea and he saw it because this is his village grew up there. He remembers seeing the Quin fields where the water is at now and so so so they know something's up you know they have blake the terminology for it but they know that something's up and they know that the submission is also in their hands. Tell us a little bit about Your Oscar Campaign for this film. Wow that was I never thought of like doing your campaign because I was like. Oh my God this tiny little film made like from an Indie Gogo. No I I just kept calling this on the little film that keeps them going. You know it's had an amazing run. Raleigh have an amazing run lakes up until like last year. I told sharing the bill. And it's just like it's the film making that keeps on giving and so I was having a conversation. With Noah Cowan at the time was executive director of the south of San Francisco. Film Society would change into film very supportive of the film. The film premiered in San Francisco before it went to Toronto. Because it was like my town I mean it was like my hometown and it was a town that I was very supportive of the film and I couldn't say no to that festival and so he basically the psych well does Film in the Oscars. I don't know like I think Robin Peck must've had like a film that was like you know doing Oscar Ron or whatever. And he's like I think you. Should you submit? You never know you know may be of course you're GonNa have fierce competition that you should. I mean it's a really beautiful film. Don and so an after Toronto and more festivals I was like you know what maybe I should do this and so like I wrote to the Academy. And they said well. They've never had a geisha film. And I wrote an email to daryl and I said it will be before I start saying. It's the first. Haitian on film. Did you submit to the Academy? He said No. Because I didn't film in Haiti we couldn't show that erm afterwards and up because you have to film in the place right. The rules were very strict. And they still are. And because he didn't have like premier in Haiti He couldn't qualify so lump. Surely Kate was never qualified for Haiti. And so hey never had a film so I had to put together a committee in Haiti that would select the film And submit it so I did that. We put a a committee together. I showed the film in Full Kyle and there were a couple of other films that yet but they were not like Oscar material not to say that my phone was Oscar material. But it was you know they. They didn't have like festival premieres or anything like that. It wasn't the same caliber films. And so the committee submitted it and the and the and the Oscars they were very patient. They were writing back to us and they were just like basically telling us like just really like making. It is as simple as possible for us to make this happen and I wrote back semi said. I don't know if we're GONNA be able to be legible because we can't do a screening in Haiti. We don't have movie theaters. We don't have like the only movie theater that we have is in the hands of the government and we can't show the film there and so they were like will make will make an exception and so by Bennelong. Yeah and so we got the exception and so because you send the film. It's actually because people feel like anyone can enter film. It's not like that. It's actually view by be academy and they have the you can't send pornography right. It's not anything goes which is like like you know like a decent join anything like that. In terms of Blake you know the level of violence language whatever so is viewed by the academy before they approve it so it's not like just anybody any country. Whatever so I was very proud when they approved it right so then like I'm like okay now approve of what am I gonNA do? And because only you need money and I spent more money on the campaign than I spent right at the actual making of the film afterwards of cost more. But you know how to actually like I spent more money than my Indie Gogo campaign and it wasn't money that came from my pocket. It was money my brother he said to me suggests a contender. You not a contender. I was like I guess I'm a contender is like how can you need generosity? Friends sometimes what you need to make things happen. Because he was so proud you know. And he can't check for fifteen k and so that kind of launched first thing I got my publicist and everything and so I went to Haiti and I was just like I'm a content. I'm contender by that time. I was feeling of feeling the contender wearing the contemporary. You know outfit and and I said well you know like what can you do for me in there? So what do you need from us? I I need this much Exaggerate I'd like did my might little thing but I was just like Dab and I didn't realize that I was going to be outspent anyway because it really is. I did you such a learning curve but had so much fun joining it to see like all the love that came around. The film is while so it was. It was a great campaign and I was you know. The government supported me. The Haitian government supported me might distributors in France supported me and we did it with a lot of love. A lot of A lot of hard work put together a team like came to La sat there with my team. And we you know we did on the. The wrapped series paid provide the advertising in the. But you know it's it's not a campaign that you do on Lake Fifty K. It's camping that you do. Unless they spending millions of dollars for the films in order for them to but I felt like we went pretty far as you know for this tiny little film without any American distributor rain very very very far and it was lovely to see when you know there was one magazine that had like a. We had lake spreads in the variety center piece in the variety. It was just like it was great. Like in what people were saying about the as while and saying that you know we kind of like the short list. We were on that shortlist to say like that could be a contender for the short list. And it was great to know like you go from being you know this country. That's never had a film and for it to go so far you know like we were in the top twenty's of films so yeah a what. What what what is next for the film and also what is next for you. The film is on Amazon as an owner as Amazon. Prime can see the films of Free. I am doing all the DVD's and everything to send you all my like backers and things. Because I didn't WanNa Lake have the film out there before it was really out there So it's it's continuing its life. It's in different. Universities of Bach. The film so being used in Lake in college classrooms and everything and so it's having its life and let it go and you know out into the world. It's graduated college in. It's like it has his own family. Now and next for me is my next feature. I'm actually wrote fat before. It minimal long. Before I wrote it. Two thousand five and it's a scripted. I've been working on since then that I put aside because I was in development hell when I was like when I did. I didn't want was getting depressed because I was trying to make this film but I'm GonNa be making next and it's ambitious film and it's a period piece. It's called a rooster on the fire escape and it's about a family coming to the United States of escaping the duvalier regime but bringing the trauma with them. It's about love betrayal secrets in family and West supposed to be shooting the summer. It's finding while I was when I was shopping. The film around about ten years ago people would say to me they would say things like you..

Haiti Film Society Academy Raleigh San Francisco government Blake France Oscar Sharon Amazon Toronto Oscar Ron Ab United States Quinn Lake Robin Peck La
"san francisco film society" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

13:54 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"What I'm shooting for. What we're shooting for is an hour long show on national television but an hour long show national television. No matter how fantastic. The quality graded is as a documentary isn't going to heal racism however the idea is bring up this unusual situation that's brought so many people together because we're approaching the conflict over the cemetery and the continued. Will we be able to get in or we're going to be locked out again by just building a larger communities surrounding the conflict with a larger more diverse community and exploring the history and beginning to use it as an educational tool so and an performance space to bring in people? Some the the one of the women who came with me Last year was an oakland poetry slam champion. Who's also one of our associate producers. She'd written appoint about love cemetery the road to love because of what she knew about it so she came and recited for everywhere. Her family was enslaved in Texas. Starting eighteen. Twenty S so it was a powerful experience for her for us for everyone in some of the other students healing forgiveness. Absolutely well people have to ask for that. And I don't I don't know where people are you. Yes that's the path it begins. I we have to know what happened. We don't even know in many cases we haven't allowed ourselves. Those of us who are who may identify as white or other cultures may not know that much about African American history because so much has been buried and rejected but it is a powerful astonishing completely inspiring history that made. That's what made me think. Oh we didn't really have a democracy until king and farmer and Diane National All. The Rosa Parks all the People. Who were so astonishingly courageous and deeply spiritual relying on both the constitution and our laws and our government and their belief a higher power which they chose to call on to get them through and it did. And it is an absolutely staunch. Where do you see Selma? It's such an exciting powerful moving. The respect that you come away with understanding the odds that people had to fight again right now. Isn't it or no. It'll be out in January though in January. Okay because I'LL BE. I'll be on it as soon as absolutely yeah. It's it's a magazine. Bits and pieces but it's magnificent. It really is so we have a chance with this film. And it needs to be finished now this Two Thousand Fifteen is the anniversary of the voting rights. Act here yeah here we. I'm voting rights. The timing couldn't be better it has been I feel like I've been in Dante's purgatory and the lower rungs being sort of tapped on the shoulder to work on this story. I mean I thought it was making a couple of phone calls a few years ago for a neighborhood friend Mrs Britain. I was actually writing a different book which I finished but this I couldn't turn my back on what I knew. And Plus my family's from this community and it turns out. Some of the people buried in that cemetery used to work for my family's nursery business so I was tangled up in this story deep connection before I was even born. I didn't before I knew anything about it so one of the reasons I trust it is that I never thought of this. It was not my idea. It's like OK. Guess what girlfriend your term. So it's been this enormous gift but what's important about is being able to share it and being able to bring people into the subject of race without finger-pointing blame absolutely no who is going to do it with love and openness you come into with your humanity because you have lost someone or you will lose. Somebody and death is a reality. Every human being faces so the this is one of the few stories where there's a universal Phenomena at the heart and center of it which is the sacred ground and the sacred landscape and the right of people to honor their dead so it makes it very easy to identify and then of course there's conflict and drama within that but we also rather than focus on the conflict because that is endless. We've made it the challenge to face the conflict with enlarging the community that surrounds it and using art and performance poetry and song and this film. And that's so healing and the history ahead of the history department at Texas Baptist is one of the people who comes out and brings his students. You know it's such a great opportunity and so that will be the next step after the film's out to create a whole national pilot project education. Oh bless you bless. I don't want to say too much about it because we do it at the same time. We're completing film right but that's why the film has to get finished because look what's happening in our society and so much is happening because not that people are evil or ill will though of course. That's their do but so much of what happens is we're ignorant. We don't know we've never learned lack of education. Yes listen I had a good education. This is not something that the dominant culture has wanted particularly to. It's now being much more situated in the mainstream well we've said about Anton tastic. Historians bring out amazing new books and and history but one book in particular that I was really struck by finally read. This last year is authored by James Cone. Who's considered the Father Black Theology in this country? He's a professor at Union theological seminary in New York. Kohn wrote the extrordinary book called the Cross and the lynching tree so for people who consider themselves Christian in this society. It's especially important to examine. You know Christ was a lynch lynching victim so and I think it's a real gift that you would invite me to come tonight. We're in. We're so close to Christmas. Which is really all about love. And it's all about this tiny little light of innocence. That has no place you know. There was no place at the end. You know they end up with the animals in the straw in a stable because there's no place for innocence in love and so much of that is still true today and yet it's born in its born in each and every one of us salute whether you whether you identify as a Christian or whatever it's it's a deeply human story and its told a mini cultures in many different religions in different ways. And it's what makes us human and keeps US alive and unless coming back to love and we need that more than anything right now in our whole global culture is coming better to live. And that's why I do my show to in showing all the different levels of of the healing and unconditional. Love all the wealth that are in all of those departments in our lives. And we all need to resurrect love absolute and by that. It's you know. Continue to have the ability to access love to clean it up to maintain it to also realize that we need to be educated in the ways of law and the history of law and I mean love all different levels. Yeah love cemeteries a little bit like an ice core of Antarctica. It gives you centuries our whole history is. They're looking at it like that. Yes I I almost see. It is a geological phenomenon because it's emblematic it it. It's a metaphor. It's a living entity in which the history of this country is encapsulated and still clearly visible and still contending with the legacy of people having been enslaved this history that we don't I think we haven't face because we haven't known how who well. There's probably a lot of shame that's in there too. You know from a lot of the deep southern people I mean I. I know that my family came in to South Carolina and I don't even know all the history the deep history around that Even though that I have ancestors that were part of the Constitution and the forefathers And that's something. I haven't looked at and it's time to look at it to see you know what what can be uncovered and You know to help to help. Those have been enslaved well. My experience is that they've helped me. It's not like I can help them. Yeah they they've already been through that that transformation. Actually you know I mean. I don't know we're all human when nobody's perfect. No it's what I've discovered is it. This is for me for my own soul. Because by getting to tell the truth my family didn't hold slaves. They came in nineteen. Oh three to raise peaches. However in learning the history. It wasn't a whole lot. Different conditions for people in farming areas. Were horrible and it was hard life hard life not just a hard life but cruel. I mean there were. There were institutions. There was debt pinch that that sprung up afterwards in ways that white people kept african-americans indebted. Educated you know it was still against the law to teach people how to read so also these historically black colleges like Wylie founded in eighteen seventy three by the Friedman's bureau to precisely teach people to read the way. It's just such an inspiring history. Read because everything was set against them to defeat them and yet they still managed to become literate on newspapers published to run for office and you and then and what they've been doing and now we have President Obama so that was huge step and our time has come to an end and I know we could continue this conversation for much much longer and I appreciate you sharing all this because this really does touch a deep co Cord and you know to To make our viewers or I should say allow our viewers to hear this and educate them on this. It's extremely important. Thank you so much. Well thank you and thank you for giving me the opportunity to talk about resurrecting off pleasure because if who ever might want to participate. I can't wait to see that documentary resurrecting love and people need to read this book too because that will bring it back home and a reminder to resurrect the love period yes so many people have known what to do. They realize that something's wrong after Ferguson. And Staten Island can people do they. Even one of the things people could do support. It's completing this film okay. This is part of what I meant about. The Perfect Dante's Purgatorio me being white having to ask other white people all these years for money to make a documentary about race has been challenging because many people if they're affluent enough to make donations sometimes. They're so removed that they haven't really haven't had an idea so it hasn't been a common understanding how alive and well. Racism is and what a chokehold. Racism has had. I've used that unfortunate term for many years on our country and now it's visible tragically visible so people could one of the things people can do. There are many things people can do in their own communities but they also make a tax deductible donation to the San Francisco Film Society. Yes for resurrecting love. Okay so we can finish. We could finish in three months. F We had the funds to have the editors racket editing suite. Glad that you said that thank you. That's extremely important and it's very simple. Five dollars five thousand fifty thousand we. I am another at least eighty five thousand to raise right now. Okay so whatever anyone can do. Larger small is on. Its way gratefully received thank you. We hope you enjoyed today's episode of wealth. Transformation we encourage you.

oakland Texas San Francisco Film Society US James Cone Dante Selma Mrs Britain South Carolina Anton tastic Father Black Theology Texas Baptist Kohn lynch New York Staten Island Obama professor
"san francisco film society" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

09:24 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"The films of Martin Scorsese are astounding as are his efforts to preserve the history and heritage of American cinema through his groundbreaking film foundation. Martin Artan score says he is a keeper a steward of American and global cinema one of our heroes. The sound mix of raging bull was one of are great. Inspirations and had a big impact on the kind of mixes we thought were possible for a fledgling kitchen sister stories in the soundtracks. The way the man waves music into a stories or doesn't leave it just shocks you with Pierce's with it clubs with his scores is an soundtracks are like new orders and then there are his documentaries his nonfiction films starting with Italian American portrait of his own parents and family the last waltz rolling stones shine a light and his most recent documentary but not quite documentary. Three Bob Dylan's rolling Thunder Revue The San Francisco Film Society invited Mr Scorsese here to honor his nonfiction film. Work and premieres latest feature took the Irishman about the teamster union. Boss Jimmy Hoffa. We were so taken by his own state conversation that we begged the film society to give us a copy the recording. So we can make podcasts of it for you. Were kind enough to say yes today. The kitchen sisters present. Martin Scorsese testing. Hey thank you so much. Thank you that the Castro why you've talked about how formative film was for you and I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about the nonfiction aspect act of that early documentary films that you saw either in the movie theater on your sixteen inch. RCA television at home. That's interesting because most of the early years that I was viewing films. They took me a movie theater. All the time where narrative films of supposedly supposedly narrative fiction films and the sense of non-fiction sort of slipped in slowly. I think by the late forties early fifties. I I think really something happened again. It's a whole thing about me. Having Asthma Nineteen forty-six I wasn't allowed to play sports or war. Run around or be near animals of any kind and trees and I was allergic to everything no laughing because kids would get into a spasmodic laughter laughter and then turn blue and it was very bad until always taken to the movie theaters. I think the closest thing I could think of that was overlapping a little bit into nonfiction with the film. Wars and this is slightly be misunderstood. Because as the whole thing that goes back to the forties and fifties and early sixties if it's black and white and grainy that means it's real and that comes from newsreels now with the younger people today of course. The perception is Cameron on a iphone. So it's a whole different perception of what reality could be. In any event event we had a television in nineteen forty eight and they were. These Italian film shown once a week on Friday night but Italian American community in New York and and we saw the neorealist films I five or six for me. Look at the film's Grainy Black and white. TV and subtitled ELT. I know who is still cinema but it had another immediacy to adding to that was the fact that the people in the film particularly pies. Aw Cellini found. That begins insisted that my grandparents came to the apartment and watching it when my family and how they were speaking in the film was the way they were speaking speaking. Thank you and I guess that state line that way but ultimately I couldn't really see a difference difference between the two and then of course we became very very aware of the nonfiction film in the fifties particularly films from the WPA. A Leo Hurwitz Parallel Ryan's and all of that so that became something we could see them. A theater in New York called the value in the theater was very small and the screen was tiny and it was a no nonsense every day in the summer. They got double bill every day. They changed it and so many documentaries their first episode Eisenstein film just walked in the middle and so this led to the awareness of this kind of film making when I started taking film courses at Nyu in one thousand nine hundred sixty by that time. There's Penny Baker. There's Lecoq there's the maizels surely Clark and John Kesse these shadows and shadows. And Shirley Clark's a cool world. There was no difference between what what I saw on television. And what I saw and we'll be zoll one and it could be done is. He's so in a sense they're interrelated so much that once I saw shadow's even window it's another world for me culturally. I was very very much Coming from a little Kinda Sicilian village in a way But when I saw shadows I told my friends at night. I said there's no more excuses we can do. It depends on what you have to say. You know so we started doing everything we could even if we didn't have anything to say just but we knew that the pictures could be made and the documentary. Element was there all all the time. Our Teacher The Hague Manooghian. It wasn't school the arts that was a couple of classes it was not like Nyu now but he was only intent. Untung showing US or inspiring us to make documentaries anybody who made narrative films one thousand nine hundred eighty nine sixty. That was out here in the West Coast. There was very little to New York Independent. Were you resistant to that idea. Or because I think you also said that you were more interested in making more stylized narrative films at the time. We're absolutely. Yeah but the thing was that it seemed that how should I put. It should be a film. It shouldn't be a documentary or fiction. Film should be a film. There should be no difference. I mean that is happening now to not really shouldn't be pigeonholed into saying well. The documentary should be this way. And that's nonfiction. And what if it's altogether. What if you could pull from everything and experiment with it? And that was the idea that ultimately became mean streets. Really how do you choose your documentary subjects subjects. How do you decide what is worthy of spending the time and effort? I think the key one was Italian American when I made eighty my mother and father that was nineteen seventy six was the bicentennial maybe doing the PBS series. The storm of strangers was called and they had for each ethnic group a half hour film and they asked me to the Italian when I suggested that instead of doing be traditional or colonel logical obvious. Way of going about explaining the immigration battalions. So why don't we just go to my mother and father's apartment on Elizabeth Street. We'll have dinner okay but like really. You're sitting down there okay. Why why are you down there? What he wants from me? We got in there her myself from the kitchen memoir you and Martic and I started shooting my doing so far. It's about to ask a question but I saw that. My mother took over the scene. You what should I say you know. You want me to tell you how how how learn how to make. Why don't ask me the question? Don't you hear that. Then I mean if you would ask me a question I would answer GonNa. I'm GONNA save now. I WANNA know how you learn how to make sauce. We'll talk to you. How long I mean how many two years I'm going to use it and doing it and I want to see you do it? Well you know. My father was greg resistant. And she started arguing with him can mean Charlie Book. The way you're talking to we know that's what I mean. I'm an actress. I'm not putting on any as you want to fight or something. Talk Talk to me when you talk to your son. My mother and father by that point it was that they were never went to school. There were working in the garment district but kit started make these movies. They thought I was completely crazy but they participated data because their son is doing and I know I wanted to start you. You're going to tell us about the sauce. You'RE GONNA show us how to do the source. By the time I finished. which was the next day three hours three hours? The next eating with them at the table by that time I realized that they had a whole life before me. Wow I didn't realize what really like in the tenements in nineteen twenty two. You know I remember as a little boy we used to have Wallis. I mean people loved us. We.

Martin Scorsese New York San Francisco Film Society Jimmy Hoffa Shirley Clark Martin Artan Bob Dylan Pierce US Nyu Penny Baker Aw Cellini Leo Hurwitz Hague Manooghian RCA Castro West Coast Cameron
"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"How you can access these various funding sources. The festival happens to focus on documenting his, but the organizations might guests work with support both fiction and non fiction films, and anyone looking to get a film made. We'll find some value in our conversation. So I'm going to ask you each to start just by introducing yourself and kind of the gist of your organization that you're here with. Thanks for houses. My name's Caroline Kyun. I'm with SF film, formerly the San Francisco film society, and I'm the director of artist development, and our focus is on both bay area based filmmakers and then national and international filmmakers about half of our programs are focused on national filmmakers. US filmmakers are US stories, and on the documentary side of things, we have grants and fellowships and residency program as well on the the fellowships are usually both focused on the artist development giving cash grant. But additionally pairing someone with an expertise in the in the subject or in the issue or some kind of other component other than just supporting the filming process of the filmmakers high. Hi, I'm Hailey. Pappas. I am with riot I. I'm the head of riot films where you know, we are immersive media company that focuses primarily on documentaries and immersive content. We explore sort of what is storytelling look like in both traditional and immersive formats, and and so what that what that looks like is a slate of anywhere from six to twelve feature documentaries year three to six, short documentaries, six to nine or more Mercer projects, whether those are VR films or augmented reality experiences. You know, the way we work with filmmakers is we commission produce finance co produce projects that a variety of stages of of the project from early development through to finishing funds. And yeah, we're excited to be here. Thank you for having me. Hi there to be joining you all today. And my name is leeann gibbon. I'm the head of grants at scenario. Scenario is a non. Nonprofit film foundation and production company that is designed.

US Caroline Kyun San Francisco leeann gibbon Pappas director
"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Stages of production and the maximum contribution per project is forty thousand euros and finally the san francisco film society sloan science in cinema filmmaker fellowship has a deadline on may first this is a fellowship from san francisco film society and it offers thirty five thousand dollars a two month residency at film house and connection to the bay area science and technology communities it's funded by the offered peace sloan foundation as part of their support programs that nurture cultivate in champion films that explore scientific or technological themes and characters and under the auspices of its artists development program as film will award voshel to filmmakers in the screenwriting phase developing a screenplay that tells a story related to science or technology we've also had a couple of good upcoming festival deadlines the rain dance film festivals deadline is tomorrow april twenty seven so get on that it takes place in london england from september twenty six tober seventh and it's the largest and according to them most important independent film festival in the uk it's the twenty sixth year of the festival and it's officially recognized by the academy end and bafta a selected shorts will qualify for oscar and best bafta considerations and everybody knows one of my favorite film festivals camden international film festival also has its deadline on friday this one takes place in gorgeous camden maine september thirteen to the sixteenth it's known as one of the top documentary film festivals in the world showcasing over eighty feature and short ducks from around the globe it's also an academy award polythene festival with cash prizes and if you have a duck feature or short in development you should consider applying for the points north fellowship or shortform editing residency which run in concurrence with the festival and a really wonderful opportunities to hone your craft and mix with lots of cool industry folks like myself in for this week's weekly words of wisdom chose an interview that i had done recently with paul lieber stein who had directed his first feature song of back and neck at tribeca this year narrative competition.

sloan foundation england uk oscar paul lieber stein san francisco london camden thirty five thousand dollars two month
"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"So why don't someone's hearing talk about this and there's thinking where can i apply what are the upcoming deadlines about other than of course the ones that we mentioned on indie film weekly every week what are some other organizations that are like the most closest to to us which used to be ifp wes film independent which is our kind of elliott quivalent if you will they're really great also having artists development programs career enhancement programs if you will san francisco film society is another big one you should look into like scenario and kind of different grants artist programs that they're always kind of opening up i specially like first timer first feature filmmakers things of that nature may also depend on other funds and grants throughout the year yeah i mean some of the other ones that support me were the tribeca film institute which is part of the tra becca film festival and sundance which is what everybody knows sundance but you know some of these are limited geographically like if we're talking about film independent that's an l a lot of people aren't in la so at no films go we publish one every quarter it always is a massive list of grants that oakley writes up and it's been it's pretty massive but it's always helpful to check on that every quarter to see what's what's coming up so you know i said earlier that a lot of people get their legup via family money and i don't mean to imply that it's easy to make a movie if you're well off you know because everyone is starting from a different place it's very very difficult to make a movie much good one no matter what connections you have or don't but it's obviously harder if you're starting from nothing and so i i wanna start from the beginning because it is more instructive for somebody from my position to say these are the steps that i took to get from here to there as opposed to somebody who started for the long and it's also easy for someone to look at where i am now say oh well you have a netflix movie coming out and you're the founder of new film school.

tribeca film institute sundance oakley founder elliott quivalent san francisco netflix
"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Uh someone put that on our best scenes of 2017 list actually i'm forgetting who that was now but that clip is available in the posts were at the border if you will someone comes out and does this foxtrot dance in namur the un some granted lines is a bunch of on this week we might as well caught ifp grant deadlineweek but first the itv digital open call has a deadline on march ii they're looking for fiction nonfiction linear trans media or other kinds of digital series that are still in preproduction and they can provide up to thirty thousand dollars in research and development funding to help you take your original digital conscious idea to the pilot stage for distribution on public media and our friends over it also film formerly the san francisco film society have yet another great grant opportunity with a deadline on march fifth this is a new when it's called the vulcain productions environmental fellowship and it offers you'd twenty five thousand dollars plus an adviser travel to san francisco and seattle and more to explore an important environmental our conservation story the needs to be told by documentary and on monday march fifth my former employer alma mater ifp as a couple of deadlines coming up that's what we did the research party until the oscars and then the day after we get down to business deadlines the ifp filmaker lab documentary section of the deadline is monday march fifth if you have a rough cut for your first film you can apply be a part of the illustrious ifp lab for a year long mentorship programme presented by the time warner foundation the ifp filmmaker labs ensure that talented emerging voices received the support resources in industry exposure necessary to complete market and distribute their first feature they focus exclusively on lowbudget features and it's very highly immersive program that provides filmmakers were the technical creative and strategic tools necessary to launch their films and their careers as well as very career building careeroriented it goes beyond just the first feature to open to all first time feature documentary directors with films in postproduction if you have forty minutes.

namur itv time warner foundation un san francisco seattle twenty five thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars forty minutes
"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Mentioned that this is one that's definitely worth applying to because the san francisco film society that puts it on has become one of the biggest funders of film in the country and so if you get in this film festival and you're on their radar it bodes well for your future potential funding opportunities in now onto weekly words of wisdom who the end of the year advice round ups are coming out and chris boon has published his recap of the hollywood reporter's and best screenwriter's of two thousand seventeen video series this week the articles titled six pragmatic screenwriting tips from the writers of the big sick get out and more i chose one from darren off ski that resonate strong with me both as a person and as a filmmaker push past the endless knows darren aronovski is no stranger to creating controversial films nor does he shy away from making audiences very uncomfortable making controversial films also means facing a lot of rejection quote there's so many struggling moments making a movie said aronovski the amount of knows you get as a filmmaker every day are endless and that's why the only films i know how to make our films that i couldn't live without making their just burning from deep inside see i mean i would just share something about my experience making movies for making movie uh this is very real um i was sitting on the script for my short for three years for years and a lot of people told me that like i couldn't do it that it would cost too much money that it was like far too ambitious of a project in terms of like what the script demanded and then three years later i still felt like i had to make this movie for whatever reason and despite everyone's saying you know no no no in terms of could actually handmade uh i decided to go ahead and do it anyways so i would say like as long as you're saying yeah.

reporter darren aronovski san francisco chris boon hollywood three years
"san francisco film society" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Both on having books that were beautiful of a very high quality of design and production and you're trying to keep the prices is reasonable as possible which is one of the reasons we started uh down in the eighties publishing fourcolored beautiful fourcolored books in paperback which wasn't really done at that time there were a lot of other things so griffin saving ninety ninety one pull out of lopes and all that sort of so yes some of called it like a jolly postman for adults but it was actually very innovative book about an artist than his news or perhaps in our artist in his imagination but it was a came in originally through the children's department but was clearly not a children's books oh my thenassistant any barros took it on as herself and became mum nick banned talks editor but you've done a lot of children's both we are mentioned that as we have done we hit we do about one hundred children's books a year and have done so since some of the early nineties and the first publisher really to aggressively expand into gift and stationery product well jack johnson who's been our publisher for long time was one of the first to to realize that it wasn't only bookstores that could sell books and that in fact victor now we williamson nomo but to places like later and for power g and urban outfitters were great a places to sell books so good we began to look outside the bookstores that was in our only source of revenue we're talking with near mcevoy who is share and see your chronicle books and they're celebrating the fiftieth anniversary there are locally owned independent publisher in an era of cartel els an international conglomerates and all that than they have maintain that to their credit also want to talk with you about your background because i know for example all the you have done i mean and other you continue to do smithsonian san francisco film society as if momoment list goes on and on and extraordinary contribution us of jazz city arson lectures and so forth i think it was robert miller anderson said eighty.

lopes barros nick editor publisher jack johnson robert miller anderson griffin mcevoy san francisco arson
"san francisco film society" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

03:13 min | 4 years ago

"san francisco film society" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"Stopping essentially and she was seventeen years old it wasn't surprising when she stopped enjoying things that she usually enjoyed like in a little lick of peanut butter on a finger we're a small game of the rough and tumble or jostling each other and i knew that she wasn't really experiencing life and they take it to the veteran to the but continue a that came to us it's really want to more heartbreaking things so i've had to do my life and some in over life ended with me and when she died i thought it it i was impossibly southern may really road hit inside of it it's kind of a such tribute to her thinking about her when i suppose spent a year earlier which is maybe not extraordinary for people to live with thoughts really really glum inside and and sinking there was impossible that she was gone and that's about how long it took before i decided to get another dog as well that i did realize that i couldn't live venice space that didn't have another you know happ they breathing wagging creature an out and that's how how we went and matt finnegan only thank you so much for talking with us it's been or pleasure thank you terry alexander of morrow it's is the author of the new book being the dog she founded the dog cognition lab at bar not college i do we take a trip break rock critic can tucker will review the debut album by lucie day guess this is fresh air as we take our break and fresh air will look at a community calendar beginning with the commonwealth club hosting theoretical physicists or roger and rose author of fashion faith in fantasy in the new physics or the universe will be in conversation with doctor david eisenbud of you see berkeley beginning at six tonight in five fifty five post street in downtown san francisco tickets are twenty two dollars members get in for just twelve san francisco's main library presents meghan scobee below with the lecture on year round vegetable garden in this will be from six steals seven thirty tonight at the civic center library and other workshop is free finally san francisco's film society welcomes comedy filmmaker christopher gassed presenting his latest feature mascots tonight beginning at seven at the castro theatre castro near market in san francisco had tickets here are twenty dollars and so look at a community calendar now let's get back to pressure with terry grows this is fresh air this is a twenty one year old singer songwriter from which win virginia his debut album is called no burden it's a collection that had a small independent released earlier this year but now it's been really issued on matter door records rock critic can tucker says take s expresses of vulnerability that goes against the grain of much current pop music he got.

matt finnegan david eisenbud san francisco civic center library virginia pop music venice terry alexander tucker meghan scobee christopher gassed twenty two dollars seventeen years twenty one year twenty dollars