19 Burst results for "San Francisco Estuary Institute"

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

"A huge crisis. Leticia Grenier is a senior scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute and Ecological Science Group were standing next to a marsh. That's a magnet for wildlife. Right now. We're looking at water birds from basically all over the Western Hemisphere. This muddy stretch of low lying plants is also a barrier against the water. These marshes are knocking down the waves. They're absorbing the water, and they're really helping create flood risk management. On the shore, which is critical for many billions of dollars of infrastructure as well as neighborhoods and other communities along the shoreline, Grenier says about 90% of the base marshes have been filled in. Ah lot need to be restored to protect the shoreline from rising seas, which could go up between three and six ft by the end of the century, But even after they get restored The marshes will still need mud to keep up with sea level rise. The muddy water that comes in with every tide helps build it up. If the wetlands don't have that they basically drown. They get lower and lower relative to how high the water is green here and her colleagues found that San Francisco Bay will likely need more than 500 million metric tons of sediment by the end of the century to deal with climate change. Natural supply will fall short of that only one third to one half of what's needed. But there is a potential source of mud just nearby. Every year. Thousands of ships come into San Francisco Bay following navigation channels, The federal Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for dredging them, collecting millions of cubic yards of mud every year. Tessa Beach who works at the core San Francisco district, says they do get requests to use that money for restoration projects. I don't disagree. I think you know, dredge material should be viewed as a really valuable commodity in that regard, but she says federal rules require them to pick the cheapest option to get rid of it. Which usually means just dumping it often out in the Pacific Ocean. It is frustrating that this has been decades of trying to solve this problem. Amy Hustle is with the California Coastal Conservancy, a state agency that works on restoration. She says. The only way for states to get this dredged mud is to pay the extra cost of moving it dumping. It may be cheaper, but that ignores the longer term benefits of preventing flooding, she says. So we're just going to be seeing erosion. Bar shorelines and mudflats and marshes. Unless we start doing things differently, with settlement that could be changing. Soon. Last year, Congress passed a law that told the Army Corps of Engineers to consider the environmental benefits of using mud. Including to prepare for climate change. The agency says it plans to release new rules on using mud by August. Lauren Sommer NPR news Jose Lopez has spent most of his career behind the bar serving drinks to customers from all over the country. You know, bartender is three greatest thing if you like what you do. You put so much into it. It is the best job out there who worked at Main Street Station, a casino on the Las Vegas Strip for 23 years. Macy's. This is one of those casinos who Everybody is so wrong with the customers and it's like a family and that everybody knows everybody on when we see the customer. We haven't seen it before. We're trying to know her. And and those people come back again. Hawaiians of the primary customers that we have amazed through the weeds to have a main street. Not only the Hawaiians but because when you create a connection with the customer, they come from all over the country to be all rights from Boston from Massachusetts from Michigan from Ohio, So that's one of the things that they're I love the most. A missing try. Now. Casinos, hotels and restaurants.

Jose Lopez Leticia Grenier Lauren Sommer Amy Hustle California Coastal Conservancy Pacific Ocean Massachusetts Michigan Congress Las Vegas Strip Ohio San Francisco Estuary Institut San Francisco Bay 23 years San Francisco August Grenier Last year Boston Thousands of ships
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

"As the climate gets warmer dirt Is becoming a hot commodity. Coastal cities use it to protect themselves from rising seas by building levees and restoring marshes. But supplies are getting tight is NPR's Lauren Sommer reports? There's a name for patent up Ellie's job, a name. He's not really a fan of. He's considered a dirt broker. I hate that name. I'll be hostile to dirt just has that negative connotation. You know, you gotta go wash up right because what my Pelley handles is in high demand. He works for the construction materials company, Granite Rock, and he gets a lot of phone calls about dirt. All the demand is way beyond what the supply is. We're walking on top of one of the deals that map Ellie brokered. It's an Earth and Levy on the shores of San Francisco Bay, one that helps protect hundreds of thousands of people over the years waves and whether have worn it down. It's very much lower than it should be right now. It needs more dirt and a lot of it. One million cubic yards for the levees in this area. That's 100,000 dump trucks. Soma Pelley is a matchmaker. He finds people who need to get rid of dirt like a construction project that's digging an underground parking garage. And he finds a way to get that dirt to the shoreline with sea level rise. The need for that is on Lee going up. How do we get people to see We're on the precipice of a huge crisis. Leticia Grenier is a senior scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute and Ecological Science Group were standing next to a marsh. That's.

Leticia Grenier Lauren Sommer Soma Pelley San Francisco Bay Ellie San Francisco Estuary Institut Granite Rock 100,000 dump trucks NPR Lee Earth hundreds of thousands of peopl One million cubic yards Ecological Science Group one of the deals of phone calls one Pelley
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Leticia Grenier is a senior scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute, an ecological science group. We're standing next to a marsh. That's a magnet for wildlife. Right now. We're looking at water birds from basically all over the Western Hemisphere. This muddy stretch of low lying plants is also a barrier against the water. These marshes are knocking down the waves. They're absorbing the water, and they're really helping create flood risk management along the shore, which is critical for Many billions of dollars of infrastructure as well as neighborhoods and other communities along the shoreline, Grenier says about 90% of the base marshes have been filled in. Ah lot need to be restored to protect the shoreline from rising seas, which could go up between three and six ft by the end of the century, But even after they get restored Marshes will still need mud to keep up with sea level rise. The muddy water that comes in with every tide helps build it up. If the wetlands don't have that they basically drown. They get lower and lower relative to how high the water is green here and her colleagues found that San Francisco Bay will likely need more than 500 million metric tons of sediment by the end of the century to deal with climate change. Natural supply will fall short of that only one third to one half of what's needed, but there is a potential source of mud just nearby. Every year. Thousands of ships come into San Francisco Bay following navigation channels, The federal Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for dredging them, collecting millions of cubic yards of mud every year. Tessa Beach who works at the core San Francisco district, says they do get request to use that money for restoration projects. I don't disagree. I think you know, dredge material should be viewed as a really valuable commodity in that regard, but she says federal rules require them to pick the cheapest option to get rid of it. Which usually means just dumping it often out in the Pacific Ocean. It is frustrating that this has been decades of trying to solve this problem. Amy Hustle is with the California Coastal Conservancy, a state agency that works on restoration. She says. The only way for states to get this dredged mud is to pay the extra cost of moving it dumping. It may be cheaper, but that ignores the longer term benefits of preventing flooding, she says. So we're just going to be seeing erosion. Bar shorelines and mudflats and marshes. Unless we start doing things differently, with settlement that could be changing. Soon. Last year, Congress passed a law that told the Army Corps of Engineers to consider the environmental benefits of using mud. Including to prepare for climate change. The agency says it plans to release new rules on using mud by August. Lauren Sommer NPR news Jose Lopez has spent most of his career behind the bar serving drinks to customers from all over the country. You know, bartenders the greatest thing if you like what you do. You put so much into it. It is the best job out there who worked at Main Street Station, a casino on the Las Vegas Strip for 23 years. Macy's. This is one of those casinos who Everybody is so warm with the customers, and it's like a family again. Everybody knows everybody on when we see the customer. We haven't seen it before. We're trying to know her. And those people come back again. The Hawaiians of the primary customers that we have amazed through the weeds to have a main street. Not only have one, yes, but because when you create a connection with the customers, they come from all over the country to be artists from Boston from Massachusetts from Michigan from Ohio, So that's one of the things that I love the most. A missing try. Now. Casinos, hotels and restaurants shut down in.

Jose Lopez Leticia Grenier Lauren Sommer Ohio Amy Hustle Pacific Ocean Boston Michigan Massachusetts California Coastal Conservancy Congress Las Vegas Strip San Francisco Estuary Institut August San Francisco Bay 23 years Grenier Last year Army Corps of Engineers Thousands of ships
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Seas by building levees and restoring marshes. But supplies are getting tight is NPR's Lauren Sommer reports? There's a name for patent up Ellie's job, a name. He's not really a fan of. He's considered a dirt broker. I hate that name. I'm behind with you. Dirt just has that negative connotation. You know, you gotta go wash up right because what my Pelley handles is in high demand. He works for the construction materials company, Granite Rock, and he gets a lot of phone calls about dirt. Well, the demand is way beyond what the supply is. We're walking on top of one of the deals that my Pelley brokered. It's an Earth and levy on the shores of San Francisco Bay, one that helps protect hundreds of thousands of people over the years waves and whether have worn it down. It's very much lower than it should be right now. It needs more dirt and a lot of it one million cubic yards for the levees in this area. That's 100,000 dump trucks. Summa. Pelley is a matchmaker. He finds people who need to get rid of dirt like a construction project that's digging an underground parking garage. And he finds a way to get that dirt to the shoreline with sea level rise. The need for that is on Lee going up. How do we get people to see that we're on the precipice of a huge crisis? Leticia Grenier is a senior scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute, an ecological science group. We're standing next to a marsh. That's a magnet for.

Leticia Grenier Lauren Sommer San Francisco Bay Granite Rock Ellie San Francisco Estuary Institut 100,000 dump trucks NPR Earth Lee one million cubic yards hundreds of thousands of peopl one of deals one Pelley
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"As the climate gets warmer dirt Is becoming a hot commodity. Coastal cities use it to protect themselves from rising seas by building levees and restoring marshes. But supplies are getting tight is NPR's Lauren Sommer reports? There's a name for patent up Ellie's job, a name. He's not really a fan of. He's considered a dirt broker. I hate that name. I'm behind Sitio Dirt just has that negative connotation. You know, you gotta go wash up right because what my Pelley handles is in high demand. He works for the construction materials company, Granite Rock, and he gets a lot of phone calls about dirt. The demand is way beyond what the supply is. We're walking on top of one of the deals that map Ellie brokered. It's an Earth and levy on the shores of San Francisco Bay, one that helps protect hundreds of thousands of people over the years waves and whether have borne it down. It's very much lower than it should be right now. It needs more dirt and a lot of it. One million cubic yards for the levees in this area. That's 100,000 dump trucks. Soma Pelley is a matchmaker. He finds people who need to get rid of dirt like a construction project that's digging an underground parking garage. And he finds a way to get that dirt to the shoreline with sea level rise. The need for that is on Lee going up. How do we get people to see That we're on the precipice of a huge crisis. Leticia Grenier is a senior scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute, an ecological science group were standing next to a marsh. That's a magnet for wildlife. Right now. We're looking at water birds from basically all over the Western Hemisphere. This muddy stretch of low lying plants is also.

Soma Pelley Lauren Sommer Leticia Grenier San Francisco Bay Ellie San Francisco Estuary Institut Granite Rock 100,000 dump trucks Earth NPR Western Hemisphere hundreds of thousands of peopl One million cubic yards Lee Sitio Dirt one of deals of phone Pelley
Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 1 year ago

Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like what. What was your journey into bed watching. I mean i liked birds always in the yard growing up in ohio. You know the robbins and the blue jays. There was a hill in town. And i used to ride my bike up in the hill early in the morning and i would always see birdwatchers and i said when i'm old air quotes. I'm going to bird watch. And i kind of that seed was planted but i didn't really bird-watching until my three say in my thirties. I started volunteering for the san francisco. Bay national wildlife refuges. That you know are on the perimeter of the bay. You know them well getting restored a lot of them Back to title harsh. And i when i volunteered i would be doing everything from pulling out. Invasive plants to building shells but there are always birds around and i just became more and more and more fascinated with the birds invested in binoculars and just started creeping in. You join the audubon society and suddenly you're getting news about different outings and the next thing you know you're you're pretty far in foreign now. I'm foreign. I'm not pretty far and have taken a couple bird vacations. Which i think says that. I'm pretty far in. But what do those entail. The longest trip i took was to go to brazil to the pantanal. Which is a very large wetland like the mecca of bud watching their many mecca. It is a mecca over the course of two weeks. We just went out every morning. We get up before sunrise. Be moving by six o'clock at the latest. Usually more like five thirty and we went to a place that's called the parrot crater a giant sinkhole. And it's all a lot of parents live down in the sinkhole. And so you look down. A new parrots lying around in a simple it was tremendous and we ended up seen two hundred different species of birds there along with some giant giant eaters river otter is and it was quite a trip but the birds were spectacular.

Guana Meredith Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada Bert Golden Gate Park
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on 790 KABC

"And Taylor was sixty to Los Angeles. station. just. right a. ABC news live local six online here's a stand off with the shooting suspect in southwest Washington state is over the suspect was taken into custody after shooting three people killing one police say he was arrested without incident and one of the biggest sources of plastic pollution might be right under your feet move over straws there's a new villain in the plastic wars a new study finds that tiny beads of micro plastics are filling the coastal waters and they're coming from car tires the San Francisco estuary institute finds that tiny particles from tires get blown and washed off road in into waterways in turn those micro plastic particles end up in fish and other marine life Kevin trip K. A. B. C. news vice president Mike pence is backing up president trump's efforts to get dirt on chill biting from Ukraine in Arizona Penn said American should know if there was any wrongdoing by the former vice president or his son hunter president trump has come under fire for pressuring Ukraine's leader to investigate the bidens and parents of the school district where a boy was beaten to death say finding is out of control new videos of middle school children fighting in Moreno valley are being posted on social media. here it's a child fight videos on Instagram are a big part of the problem last week a thirteen year old boy died after being being on camera and landmark middle school the news video posted to Facebook shells a group of girls fighting in a classroom and sunny Meade middle school Moreno valley unified school district is hosting a community meeting tomorrow the California State Senate is confirming that a red liquid thrown on lawmakers was human blood the timber thirteenth incident was caught on tape the anti vaccine protester could be heard shouting that's for the dead babies. hi.

Meade middle school Moreno val vice president president trump Ukraine landmark middle school Moreno valley Los Angeles. Mike pence San Francisco estuary institut ABC Taylor Facebook Senate Instagram Arizona California Washington Kevin
Microplastic particles in California waterways, study says

NBC 4 News at 6

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Microplastic particles in California waterways, study says

"And one of the biggest sources of plastic pollution might be right under your feet move over straws there's a new villain in the plastic wars a new study finds that tiny beads of micro plastics are filling the coastal waters and they're coming from car tires the San Francisco estuary institute finds that tiny particles from tires get blown and washed off road in into waterways in turn those micro plastic particles end up in fish and other marine life Kevin trip K. A. B.

San Francisco Estuary Institut Kevin K. A. B
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KGO 810

"Good news news breaking so quickly so I'm glad you're here to scope it all up as it happens I think I'm leaving some on the ground actually I think you seem pretty thorough to me but there certainly is a lot going on we'll get to some of what's happening and get a chance to discuss will get to I think everything that's happening but just will have a chance to discuss some of it in the show today and and there are a couple of pretty big things I'm really excited about Derek Thompson coming on bottom of the hour he's a terrific writer for the Atlantic and I read his book which gets into the science of popularity it's called hit makers and we're not talking about that today but I really recommend that book and I guess what I'm getting at and referencing that book is he's a great writer in and analyzing and looking at things that you don't think about but that are critical in terms of how the culture in our society is put together and I include politics. so today and his most recent column he talks about a rich kid college admissions scandal that has nothing to do with the college admissions scandal that you've heard about very timely yeah and and and I also think that this culture of rich people having access to things that we don't have access to we have a general sense of right I mean we just there's a nother system of justice there's another way that they can get things done the rest of us can't sure and and and as I've said before I don't Hey rich people I mean I don't resent rich people you can. you can resent or any any single person or group of people because maybe they have a malevolent intentions or you know that they are they're less than legal or they've gotten there by stepping on a little guy however you wanna betta **** but the very by virtue of the fact that they're rich I don't think you should necessarily draw a negative conclusion right right but when his friend on so but so the point is but when they have access to things that we don't have access to as sort of general wage earners. and there it can be exposed and appointed to in ways that we haven't seen before and that's what Derek Thompson does this latest piece about college admissions outcomes as this morning the former law former lawyer was given one month in prison for conspiring to raise his daughter's college entrance exam there you go thank you yes with that you're right so timely than had I don't have the money to do so so the treated I don't even know that that you know pleading guilty in the insider trading scandal you know the legislator who in New York pled guilty yeah New York did you see the the the likely penalty minutes for twenty five thousand dollars per offence or something I mean you know I didn't see that part well it's it's it's ridiculous I mean you're looking at that the guy who conservatively I mean in a conservative estimate. defrauded miss set for three quarters of a million dollars and that extends to his entire families you know through insider trading and they're gonna give him a penalty of twenty five thousand dollars per per offense I think there were three of them so he's gonna pay seventy five thousand dollars and get a supervised of of parole it's not parole it says you provide just a restricted kind of home he's not even confined to the house from when I was reading this is a former I would converse man Chris Collins thank you I didn't intend to talk about this just died rushing on the on the on the wealthy in the affluent in there being another system of justice you know so this guy pled not guilty Chris Collins in many when the feds finally had a mortgage was that I believe will resist I believe it was the feds of he finally caved and then he admitted to a whole insider trading scheme that in in it involves entire family right then you see of the penalty again it reflects access reflects affluence reflects a kind of wealth and a different system of justice anyway the bay area much going on and you know it's funny how we boy we take the brunt of so much criticism right we take the brunt of we're the liberal dream that's dying you know and and people point to homelessness in a point to all the issues we have in the bay area is somehow an indictment of liberalism and progressive politics and there's a lot of things going on beyond that. I mean I think it's a fair argument we can have it you know but I also think that Hey I don't think that's fair to lay at the feet of liberal progressive politics all the failings and all the problems that a big city in California has yeah on on the other side of the coin I think we lead the way in many ways of course we do yeah yeah I mean I think one of the virtues of the San Francisco Bay Area is of how we have a progressive and liberal outlook. but. as you know I'm pretty tough on the homeless issue here so I'm more and I think more and more a residence around the bay area are getting tough on it and we worked and and again with the still an extended hand to the homeless but we have to do something to clean up that problem but the other problem is related to the environment you don't think of of us is having frankly as having environmental issues you know because we're surrounded by such beauty Brett you know it's funny you you look out the window and you don't see an environmental problem but to whatever they're they're two things going on there's a legitimate environmental problem. and then there's the illegitimate environmental quote problem that the trump administration and the EPA which is a total fraud as you know. run by a lobbyist. for dirty energy the EPA is singling out San Francisco and they're they're singling out San Francisco I think largely for political reasons but none the less there is the issue notice of they've issued not a notice of violation to San Francisco yeah to the federal clean water act in this comes a couple of weeks after that they rolled back of the clean water act it's not all and suddenly they care about the water. that's why I say it's for political reasons mmhm it doesn't make any sense yeah the allegation is that a president Donald Trump you know believes that San Francisco is just allowing kneels in human ways to go to the storm drains and in the Pacific Ocean but city leaders in in San Francisco say that's just not true the public utilities commission open their doors and gave reporters tours of how they filter that water they have catch basins a trap any debris coming out of the storm drains and then to city treatment facilities process the run off for pollutants that have not been filtered out. so there you go. I mean it's really it's it's a it's a phony up kind of violation. even as we struggle with what is a legitimate problem I mean we have legitimate environmental problems in the bay area right yes that story about the the tire run off the micro plastics at our end upping ending up in San Francisco Bay yeah as a result of of tire railing think of this. Michael plastic that end up in San Francisco Bay largely the result there trillions of these things right and may end up on my end and sensors Kobe every year and you know by extensions are just go back in and then into the water that that flows into San Francisco Bay right and if you look the bay is much cleaner than it used to be but there this new comprehensive study says there's a lot more of this plastic in the water than we thought it was done by a think tank called the San Francisco estuary institute and they believe that upwards of seven trillion pieces of micro plastic into the bay every year just from our tires and and how does it get from the street to the bay rain. yeah but you don't even think about I didn't anyway yeah I mean I I look I'm sort of like we we visit to some of these environmental things environmental issues on the show probably more than more than most shows because I think it's a contemporary issue of the time but I'll be with that said I have to plead total ignorance and I'm just a I had no conception of the kind of of the kind of run off for talking about from these micro plastics as result of the tires I mean this is it's really tired dogs upwards of seven trillion pieces of micro plastic into the bay every year from rain water they play more.

San Francisco San Francisco Bay San Francisco estuary institut EPA Donald Trump California Pacific Ocean fraud president Brett Michael twenty five thousand dollars seventy five thousand dollars million dollars three quarters one month
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"KQED news I mean it can some seven million tiny pieces of plastic flow into San Francisco Bay every year that's according to a new study from the San Francisco estuary institute that looked at what kinds of Michael plastics were getting into the bay and how Dr Rebecca sudden is the study's lead author thanks for joining us I'm glad to be here we've been learning that Michael plastic pollution is everywhere in our water ways that your study found that the bay has even a higher concentration of Michael plastic pollution than other bodies of water worldwide why is this well we're seeing higher levels compared to other studies to date because we have a pretty dense urban population here in the bay area and because we have a baby geography it helps to trap persistent pollutants like plastic because there's more limited transfer of the classic to the ocean what are the biggest sources of Michael plastics in the bay one of the unique findings from our study is a plastics they are discharged the urban storm water so this is all the water that washes off our streets in cities during a storm event. no one had really looked at urban storm water before and we ended up finding pretty high levels of micro plastics in this one off from the urban setting we compare them to waste water which are they down the drain discharges from our homes and businesses and storm water has three hundred times more micro plastics than waste water since things like rubber from car tires and from plastic food packaging what we thought urban storm water with it almost half the particles with these black robbery fragment and we thought that these could potentially be coming from our vehicle tires we just got a brand new data that we released this morning indicate via technique called pyrolysis that some of these articles are in fact tire tread so what does tire tread and all these other Michael plastics what do they do to the marine environment or two marine wildlife well we know they're building up in our bay and from our study we also know that they're in our small fish like are in Chile's unfortunately we don't yet know what level is unsafe or what level might not be a problem for awhile and there hasn't been a direct link made between ingesting Michael plastics and any health problems in humans but I can't imagine it's completely harmless what do you think well there definitely are several studies out there that show toxic impact it's just very tricky because the impact can be modified by the shape of the particle size of the particle and the chemicals in particle intense out in the bay fish and wildlife are going to be exposed to a whole range of these different particles it's really hard for us to quantify when impact might be occurring Susan what can and are we already doing to reduce Michael plastic pollution or anything we can do as individuals or as larger communities to use fewer dispose. plastic is a great that at the for using less plastic we're gonna make less pollution for the environment. another solution that we've observed at this go insurance is that rain gardens which are already being put in place in many areas to reduce regulated pollutants like metals and PC bees the rain garden can also capture micro plastic so this is another approach we could be using we're back a sudden senior scientist at the San Francisco estuary institute thanks for talking with us thank you I need a cane KQED news more of All Things Considered is just ahead in the next segment you'll hear from a moderate Democrat Pennsylvania a representative who is weighing in on the possible impeachment of the president the impeachment inquiry if you will that's ahead in the next segment.

San Francisco Bay KQED
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"To be a part of it. the governor and I am to understand what a lot of these athletes or want to for so many years so. the start of something that we believe discretion the bill takes effect in twenty twenty three at let's student athletes an endorsement deal something the NC double a usually for bids James advocated for the legislation and was standing beside governor Gavin Newsom yesterday when he signed SB two oh six into law the California DMV is now charging a service fee for all debit and credit card transactions a chain started last Sunday customers paying with the card online at a DMV kiosk and through the automated phone service a charge two point one percent field offices will charge a two point three percent service free more fallout for opera star Placido Domingo after sexual harassment allegations Placido Domingo's resigned as general director of the LA opera saying in a statement that recent accusations made against him have created an atmosphere that makes it tough to serve the company that he loves he says he resigns with a heavy heart and will continue to work to clear his name the allegations against imago or under investigation by the LA opera he's been accused of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior by several women. that was Jason Nathanson from ABC news right it will new researchers giving us another reason to hate heavy traffic it shows tires are the biggest source of Michael plastic water pollution a study released today by the San Francisco estuary institute estimates that rainfall washes seven trillion tons of tiny plastic particles into the San Francisco Bay every year and most of it appears to come from tire dust collecting on the roadways it found much of the micro particle debris found in test samples collected from seventeen sites where those black fragments with the referee texture okay everybody thinks that there are a good driver but answer this question honestly do you drive without breaking a single law if you do you deserve a prize and that prize could be twenty thousand dollars it's all real if you live in the greater Los Angeles area in which you know you're probably gonna for listening to us but maybe you're up here for the day who knows and your enrolled in LA safest driver contest after two months of beating out almost twelve thousand competitors the contest is over a forty six year old woman from Downey took home the prize contest promoted by LA mayor Eric Garcetti after it was reported that four and a half million Americans were seriously injured in a car accident last year huh okay well it's no easier to block someone on Instagram without them knowing the new restrict feature just rolled out you just go to the person's profile page and swipe left on one of their comments or go directly to the privacy settings and this will stop their comments from showing up publicly they also won't see when you're active Instagram hopes this will help users afraid of outright blocking or reporting and accounts yeah coming up at five thirty the top stories this hour on news ninety three point one KFBK. latest.

twenty thousand dollars seven trillion tons forty six year three percent one percent two months
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At C. N. B. dot com city National Bank the way up to KQED news I mean it can some seven trillion tiny pieces of plastic flow into San Francisco Bay every year that's according to a new study from the San Francisco estuary institute that looked at what kinds of Michael plastics were getting into the bay and how Dr Rebecca sudden is the study's lead author thanks for joining us I'm glad to be here we've been learning that Michael plastic pollution is everywhere in our water ways that your study found that the bay has even a higher concentration of Michael plastic pollution than other bodies of water world wide why is this well we're paying higher levels compared to other studies to date because we have a pretty dense urban population here in the bay area and because we have a baby geography that help to trap persistent pollutants like plastic because there's more. transfer of the classic to the ocean what are the biggest sources of Michael plastics in the bay one of the unique findings from our study is of plastics they are discharged via urban storm water so this is all the water that rushes off our streets and cities during a storm event. no one had really look at urban storm water before and we ended up finding pretty high levels of micro plastics in this one off from the urban setting we compare them to waste water which are they down the drain charges from our homes and businesses and storm water has three hundred times more micro plastics than waste water since things like rubber from car tires and from plastic food packaging what we thought urban storm water with it almost half the particles with these black robbery fragments and we thought that these could potentially be coming from our vehicle tires we just got them brand new data that we released this morning indicate via technique called pyrolysis that some of these particles are in fact tire tread so what does tire tread and all these other Michael plastics what do they do to the marine environment or two marine wildlife well we know they're building up in our bay and from our study we also know that they're in our small fish like are in Chile's unfortunately we don't yet know what level is unsafe or what level might not be a problem for awhile and there hasn't been a direct link made between ingesting Michael plastics and any health problems in humans but I can't imagine it's completely harmless what do you think well there definitely are several studies out there that show toxic impact it's just very tricky because the impact can be modified by the shape of the particle the site of the particle and the chemicals in particle intense out in the bay fish and wildlife are going to be exposed to a whole range of these different particles it's really hard for us to quantify when impact might be occurring Susan what can and are we already doing to reduce Michael plastic pollution or anything we can do as individuals or as larger communities to use fewer deaths both. will plastic is a great that have the for using less plastic we're gonna make less pollution for the environment. another solution that we've observed at this glass your institute is that rain gardens which are already being put in place in many areas to reduce regulated pollutants like metals and PC bees the rain garden can also capture micro plastic so this is another approach we could be using Rebecca sudden senior scientist at the San Francisco estuary institute thanks for talking with us thank you I need a cane KQED news support comes from cal performances presenting the Mariinsky ballet in an orchestra in love by it there and I'll be October thirtieth through November third support for KQ KQED comes from Saint Martin's press publishers of toil and trouble by August in borrows a boy discovers he's a which grows up gets married buys a house and navigates what it means to have powers beyond his control available where books are sold UCSF developing advanced tools like smart cells that can detect damage and disease and deliver targeting therapies at the right time and in the right amount learn more at UCSF dot EDU. and as far as the forecast goes looks like it's gonna be increasing clouds for tonight grab those low clouds and fog settling in as temperatures drop around fifty three degrees cloudy in the morning becoming sunny afternoon with temperatures ranging from the upper sixties along the coast to the upper seventies well inland and looks like a warming trend is going to be coming our way by Friday support for NPR comes from the ring foundation in support of N. P. R.'s continued mission to create a more informed public one challenge and invigorated by a deeper understanding of events ideas and cultures. can Jewish world service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at AJ W. S. dot org and from the listeners of KQED radio. All Things Considered continues now on KQED public radio with the time now it is five thirty five. this is All Things Considered from NPR news on Michelle Martin Vander Mary Louise Kelley Vermont senator Bernie Sanders is off the campaign trail the democratic presidential candidate had an unexpected heart procedure.

KQED Michelle Martin Vander Mary Lo National Bank Bernie Sanders senator NPR fifty three degrees thirty years
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"DMV kiosk and through the automated phone service a charge two point one percent field offices will charge a two point three percent service fee more fallout for opera star Placido Domingo after sexual harassment allegations Placido Domingo's resigned as general director of the LA opera saying in a statement that recent accusations made against him have created an atmosphere that makes it tough to serve the company that he loves you says he resigns with a heavy heart and will continue to work to clear his name the allegations against imago or under investigation by the LA opera he's been accused of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior by several that was Jason Nathanson from ABC news right it will new researchers giving us another reason to hate heavy traffic it shows tires are the biggest source of Michael plastic water pollution a study released today by the San Francisco estuary institute estimates that rainfall washes seven trillion tons of tiny plastic particles into the San Francisco Bay every year and most of it appears to come from tire dust collecting on the roadways it found much of the micro particle debris found in test samples collected from seventeen sites where those black fragments with the referee texture okay everybody thinks that there are a good driver but answer this question honestly do you drive without breaking a single law if you do you deserve a prize and that prize could be twenty thousand dollars it's all real if you live in the greater Los Angeles area in which you know you're probably gonna for listening to us but maybe you're up here for the day lost and you're enrolled in LA safest driver contest after two months of beating out almost twelve thousand competitors the contest is over a forty six year old woman from Downey took home the prize contest promoted by LA mayor Eric Garcetti after it was reported that four and a half million Americans were seriously injured in a car accident last year huh okay well it's no easier to block someone on Instagram without them knowing the new restrict feature just rolled out you just go to the person's profile page and swipe left on one of their comments or go directly to the privacy settings and this will stop their comments from showing up publicly they also won't see when you're active Instagram hopes this will help users afraid of outright blocking or reporting and accounts yeah coming up at five thirty the top stories this hour on news ninety three point one KFBK..

Placido Domingo general director harassment Jason Nathanson San Francisco estuary institut San Francisco Bay Downey Eric Garcetti Instagram LA ABC Michael twenty thousand dollars seven trillion tons forty six year three percent one percent two months
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"First. live from NPR news in Washington I'm Laurie London sitting behind beside the visiting president of Finland president trump is again lashing out at the whistle blower whose complaint led to an impeachment inquiry as well as house Democrats but is most aggressive remarks were aimed at house intelligence committee chair Adam Schiff he should resign from office in disgrace and frankly they should look at him for treason because he is making up the words of the president the United States not only words but the meaning and it's a disgrace it should not be allowed to happen in peach meant inquiry centers on a phone call in which trump repeatedly urges the leader of Ukraine to investigate democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden in a news conference earlier today Democrats said the impeachment inquiry will move deliberately and swiftly and any attempts of stonewalling by the White House or anyone else will be considered obstruction the deadline is up for candidates to qualify for the next democratic presidential primary debate as NPR's don Gonyea reports twelve contenders have made the cut for the October fifteenth debate dozen candidates have met the requirements in terms of both polling and having at least one hundred thirty thousand individual donors that means the stage for this coming debate will be a bit more crowded than the last one in September when only ten qualified the additional two who will join in this time neither of whom made the last debate our billionaire businessman an activist Tom Stiers and Hawaii congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard the debate will be held in Ohio just outside Columbus despite the longer list of participants it will take place on a single night don Gonyea NPR news Washington a Taliban delegation is headed to the Pakistani capital to discuss the possibility of reviving negotiations with the United States the insurgents have. I'd been negotiating a deal that would allow most American forces to withdraw from Afghanistan but it was called off by president trump NPR steelhead deed reports from Kabul the most recent negotiations between the Taliban and the U. S. we're about to be concluded in early September when the president abruptly canceled them on Twitter. not just over a month later a delegation headed by the lead Taliban negotiator is expected to be in Islamabad the Pakistani foreign ministry says they'll discuss the possibility of resuming talks the Associated Press reports that the US envoy for those talks so my whole side is also in Islamabad an official told the AP the holes that would not be discussing negotiations with the Taliban. August on help facilitate previous rounds and is considered to have sway over the Taliban do you the date NPR news COBOL at last check on Wall Street the Dow down five hundred and thirty five points this is NPR news from KQED news I'm Michelle Wiley San Francisco supervisors are scaling back their ambitious plan to provide mental health care to all San Francisco residents cuties cable explains after push back from the mayor and the city's department of public health supervisors Hillary ronin and Matt Haney have amended their plan here's ronin we listen at we heard the bear and if we have significantly narrowed the legislation does mental health access the plan will now focus less on the population at large and more on people who are impoverished and living on the street without insurance the ballot measure will now be on the March twenty twenty ballot instead of the November twenty nineteen ballot a spokesman for the mayor said she remains concerned about any measure that could divert money from protecting the cities most vulnerable I am Cait wolf KQED news a new study out this morning estimates that seven trillion tiny particles of plastic or one million little pieces for each and every person living in the bay area flow into San Francisco Bay every year here's Paul Rodgers managing editor of KQED science and environment writer at the mercury news no one knows exactly the effects that all those little plastic particles are having on the environment but scientists at the San Francisco estuary institute which did the study say it's troubling because they're building up in tiny fish and working their way up the food chain there are a lot of different solutions for reducing the volume they include modernizing waste water treatment plants putting filters on people's washers and having tougher laws for cities to reduce the amount of trash that goes into the storm drains.

Taliban president NPR Adam Schiff don Gonyea trump United States Islamabad KQED San Francisco Bay Washington Tulsi Gabbard Joe Biden Laurie London San Francisco Finland Michelle Wiley San Francisco Hawaii
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:20 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Children's health insurance program or chip simply out of fear the remarkable thing was to take a program for which people are totally eligible and to say you're eligible for these services but if you use them we will bar you from either coming into the US are staying here more than fourteen million enrollees in Medicaid and chip live in a household with a non citizen even though the new rules exempt immigrant children and pregnant women on Medicaid from public charge distinction leave a golden at the center for law and social policy says the new rules will likely reduce Medicaid enrollment causing a host of problems damage to for example hospitals and clinics which counts on a share of people being insured the public charge rule will take effect in two months I mean dealer for market place now to Hong Kong where protests against the Chinese government are now in their tenth week and the Hong Kong airport normally one of the busiest in the world is still essentially shut down most flights have been canceled after protesters swarm to the area they were prompted by complaints of police brutality towards smaller protests over the weekend the unrest there is not slowing down and it's starting to take its toll on the region's economy and as market place's Sabri banisher reports it has the potential to reach much further than that Hong Kong's economy has already begun to suffer not simply from protests but from basic uncertainty as to what its future looks like Hong Kong is reporting about a three percent contraction in its economy overall Robert daily is head of the Kissinger institute on China and the United States personal property transactions are falling and real estate overall the market is fragile tourism is down we're starting to see issues in retail as well a lot is riding on China's response to the protests according to Michael person with the Eurasia group if Beijing intervenes in Hong Kong in a way that calls into question the one country two systems framework then it will give the foreign business community less confidence that Hong Kong is different from mainland China and Hong Kong is no longer the only launch point into China that it once was businesses have options from Singapore dish and then if capital flees this major financial help Hong Kong's currency could come under pressure that could have a ripple effect too merging markets and potentially to China as well because Hong Kong does remain very important source of offshore financing for Chinese corporates and Chinese banks John Dodson edits the in a brief for the Jamestown foundation and says the Chinese government is bolstering Hong Kong's police force rather than preparing an actual military intervention I do think they're very alarms are over the situation but I also think that they're hoping to wait it out so for now it's a game of chicken with the economic and political stability of multiple regions of the world at stake in New York I'm to replenish your for market place needless to say games of chicken are not the kind of things that markets enjoy they responded accordingly and we'll have the details when we do the numbers climate change is here and while that means we'll have plenty of challenges to face in the days to come technology can help us adapt even when that technology comes from nature we've been covering this in our market place tax here is how we survive and for the series I visited a place where rising sea levels are real concern most of the San Francisco Bay Area including a lot of Silicon Valley is right at sea level and in some cases slightly below and most of that is barely protected by short dirt mounds called Pete burns there from the eighteen hundreds and scientists say that in the future they're not going to cut it so syllables projected to rise seven to ten feet by twenty one hundred this is Leticia granny A. as senior scientist directing the resilient landscapes program at the nonprofit San Francisco estuary institute we are in San Lorenzo California about thirty minutes south of Oakland at a place called the oral Loma waste water treatment plant and we're standing right at the edge of the bay so seven to ten feet or under water right at least a good part of us as well as we talk Lima kilo nine seven eight thank you but I'm definitely drowning so we have to replace his little peeper arms with big engineer levees and we got to choose if we're gonna have them be smaller with beautiful slopes in front of them with white ones or big with the steep wall I'm here to visit a unique experiment researchers have actually built a smaller more beautiful version of a levee it's gonna horizontal levy and it's the opposite of a big tall wall it's basically a little two acre marsh with all kinds of different trees and grasses on it and it's at the waste water treatment plant because the plants need a lot of water it doesn't smell the best but it's still nice like a little park with birds and some planes flying overhead and you can hear a unique species of tidal marsh birds singing right now all the title more songs vero found nowhere else in the world except right here birds a side of marshes and wetlands are good at absorbing flood waters naturally while concrete walls bounce the water back they're also expensive to maintain that might fall down in an earthquake and then those little dirt mounds just aren't tall enough this levy is a different kind of approach we have the idea of high tech we really understand what that is to me that's kind of very engineering engineering it's similar to the steel and concrete sort of and you're like these that we see the back we also have landscape tech we have these complex natural systems that are doing really important things for us and we need to take advantage of them and not think of that as something different and weird but this is just a new kind of tack and we need to use basically landscape tech to adapt to climate change in addition to flood resistance the levy is also helping to clean the waste water surprisingly well in fact researchers say it's especially good at filtering out the trace of leftovers of medicine that people take Angela parent Tony is with the university of California Berkeley she's doing research on how well the plants on the horizontal levy are able to filter the water naturally medicines pass through people's bodies and end up in waste water sometimes and it can be really hard to deal with those compounds and they end up in the environment but in our system everything seems to be transformed in some way and not for nothing it's a crowd pleaser Jason Warner is general manager of the or Loma sanitary district he give lots of tours of this levee project and he says it makes a strong case for a different approach to climate adaptation when people see if the structure is a part of their community and maybe something that looks analogous to a park there in they say yes this is the type of infrastructure that we want to see we don't want to see giant concrete riprap levees we want to see an actual system to that extent that we're providing a vision for people to see what zero his response might look like it's been a great success we need to improve we need to make this less expensive and we need to make a few more so the levy it looks good handles floodwater cleans waste water the birds live it the vision is working but it's expensive it took about twenty five million dollars a mile journey low was a scientist with the Esther institute we showed the concept works now we go to engineer it started a it's billable and it's affordable and it's legal by legal he means permits for this kind of project can be really hard to get at the moment this is probably illegal I'm fungible infeasible what can I while a horizontal wetland style levy isn't the right answer for every place affected by rising seas low says every part of the bay area will eventually be affected so any creative solution should be on the table.

US ten feet twenty five million dollars thirty minutes three percent two months two acre
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Plenty of challenges to face in the days to come technology can help us adapt even when that technology comes from nature we've been covering this in our market place text here is how we survive and for the series I visited a place where rising sea levels are real concern most of the San Francisco Bay Area including a lot of Silicon Valley is right at sea level and in some cases slightly below and most of that is barely protected by short dirt mounds called Pete burns there from the eighteen hundreds and scientists say that in the future they're not going to cut it so syllables projected to rise seven to ten feet by twenty one hundred this is Leticia granny A. as senior scientist directing the resilient landscapes program at the nonprofit San Francisco estuary institute we are in San Lorenzo California about thirty minutes south of Oakland at a place called the oral Loma waste water treatment plant and we're standing right at the edge of the bay so seven to ten feet or under water right at least a good part of us as well as we talk Lima kilo nine seven feet thank you but I'm definitely drowning so we have to replace his little people arms with big engineer levees and we got to choose if we're gonna have them be smaller with beautiful slopes in front of them with white ones or big with the steep wall I'm here to visit a unique experiment researchers have actually built a smaller more beautiful version of a levee it's gonna horizontal levy and it's the opposite of a big tall wall it's basically a little two acre marsh with all kinds of different trees and grasses on it and it's at the waste water treatment plant because the plants.

Leticia granny A. scientist San Francisco estuary institut San Lorenzo California Oakland San Francisco Bay Pete burns engineer ten feet nine seven feet thirty minutes two acre
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR's Tom gjelten says the new rule gives the government greater enforcement powers over hospitals and other institutions there are already laws supporting the right of healthcare institutions and workers to refuse to provide services to which they have religious object. Actions. But the Trump administration says enforcement mechanisms are inadequate. Some Catholic leaders are praising the new regulations citing them as a victory for doctors, nurses, and medical students who oppose abortion, the Family Research Council, noting the rule comes on the national day of prayer says it means quote, many healthcare providers have an answer to their prayers. Critics fear. The rule could mean LGBT people and others may lose access to needed medical services. The ACLU says denying patients healthcare is not religious. Liberty Tom Chilton NPR news house speaker Nancy Pelosi is accusing attorney general William Barr of lying to congress concerning. The Miller report on Russian election interference NPR's. Kelsey Snell reports below sees comments. Come as the House Judiciary committee is now threatening to subpoena bar to testify before the democratic led panel Pelosi says bar withheld the truth from congress and was inconsistent in his statements. What is dead? Hedley serious about it. As the attorney general of the United States of America was not telling the truth to the congress of the United States. That's a crime Democrats, say bars. Testimony before the Senate Judiciary committee on Wednesday was inconsistent with his previous testimony about his communications with special counsel, Robert Muller. Pelosi avoided questions about whether the house will send your bar or take any other actions to reprimand him of Justice department spokesman responded by calling Pelosi statement, quote baseless Kelsey Snell, NPR news, the capitol bars. Absence prompted some political theatrics from a few Democrats, congressman Steve Cohen of Tennessee. Brought out chicken props which included biting into Kentucky Fried Chicken apparently to signal. Just what they thought about the attorney general's decision to boycott US stocks are trading lower. The Dow is down one hundred seventy six points more than half a percent at twenty six thousand two hundred fifty three. This is NPR news from K Q. Some Brian watt. West Virginia has settled its opioid distribution lawsuit against San Francisco based McKesson for thirty seven million dollars officials there say it's west Virginia's largest state settlement against a single pharmaceutical distributor, the lawsuit alleged McKesson shipped millions of suspicious orders for painkillers to the state without efforts to prevent illegal diversion McKesson has denied wrongdoing and says it's committed to ending the opioid epidemic. West Virginia has the nation's highest opioid overdose rate about two thousand lawsuits have been filed nationwide targeting the drug industry amid the opioid crisis. A report released today by bay area. Scientists and urban planners aims to make the huge challenge of preparing for sea level rise a little easier. Paul Rogers, managing editor for science and environment writer for the Mercury News explains. San Francisco Bay is expected to rise up to five feet by the end of the century. According. Scientists and there are nine different counties around the bay one hundred one cities, and they all have their own rules and laws and politics. So this plan is an attempt to coordinate everything. So that everybody's reading from the same blueprint in some places, you might need to restore title marshes like in the south bay or in other places around the airports, you might need to build levees or seawalls. The challenge is how to find the billions of dollars to pay for it. All nobody knows yet. But at least this is a starting point to get the conversation going that was k-, Paul Rogers. The report was compiled by the San Francisco estuary institute and spur the region urban urban planning.

Nancy Pelosi congress NPR United States attorney Kelsey Snell San Francisco Bay McKesson West Virginia Paul Rogers Tom gjelten House Judiciary committee Trump administration Robert Muller Family Research Council San Francisco estuary institut Tom Chilton ACLU
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:52 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"High school senior whose case has been delayed. It's the end of the school day at oceanic high in Pacific and hundreds of students stream out of their classrooms. Navigating the crowd in the hall is mightier was man and lanky eighteen year old from El Salvador 'cause man just applied to colleges and he's waiting to hear back. Yeah. UCLA state. I wanna major in either graphic design or animation. That's not just up to college. Admissions office goes man's future will be decided by an immigration judge. He came on a tourist visa two years ago and applied for asylum. But his hearing this month was canceled because most immigration judges are furloughed. It's really hard because I can't plan dude things here. But certainly, I don't know how much time I have here. He says he spent months preparing for his hearing. And he had to revisit the terrifying experiences that made him flee, El Salvador. He says his cousin who was like his brother was killed by gang members shot in the throat and back when he wasn't a hospital wasn't able to talk. And even he he survived to that. He wouldn't be able to walk and seeing how the life of my causing was destroyed was really hard for me. That's pretty traumatic and he's a high schooler. And you know, he's trying to go about his teenage life. Helen Lawrence is because mine's attorney, but we have to interrupt that by talking about some really intense past experiences. He's had so I think for him. It's just he would like to get it over with to move on. Because man doesn't know yet. When his hearing will be rescheduled, it could be months or longer. We are so backlogged and so short staffed that's judge Dan marks past president of the national association of immigration. Judges the calendars are jam packed and basically full for the next two to three years Marxist furloughed when she's back in court. She says she'll try to squeeze in as. Many cancelled appointments as she can. But by and large they're going to go to the end of the line for some people, the shutdown may be a blessing. Mike says strong cases suffer by the delay. But weaker ones could benefit by having more time to prepare. I'm sorry that jumped bilateral medal news to the waters of San Francisco Bay. Now, a new study of compounds in the bay is illustrating a case of chemical wacko fifteen years ago, California banned the class of toxic fire retardants called PB es. These were put in household items like furniture and electron IX. Now, the old flame retardants and the new chemicals used to replace them can both be found in bay waters and marine life. Rebecca Sutton is a senior scientist at the San Francisco estuary institute, she joins me now to discuss what's going on. Thanks for having me. So the back story here is a specific class of flame. Retardants called P B, D, ease, and they were banned when did that happen in? Why were they banned they were banned back in two thousand four here in this state and a nationwide phase out followed they were banned because we were using them and really large quantities. In a lot of consumer goods to meet some well, intentioned, flammability standards. We set here on a state they were intended to make some of our products like our couches, less flammable. So that we could escape in the event of a house fire turns out, they don't actually work. So well, and then we started to see them in the environment in San Francisco Bay, they were building up in our human bodies, and they were pretty toxic and how much have levels of these PVDA's dropped since the ban in the environment. It's actually been a huge success story for the bay. We've seen declines in sediment at the bottom of one third and in fish in the bay were saying half the levels we used to see so this is a real positive outcome of. A ban are phase out of a problematic chemical so now there are New Flame retardant chemicals. What are you seeing now? So manufacturers when they couldn't use Peabody ease they had to switch to other chemicals. And so we went out to the bay, and we checked water sediment at the bay bottom muscles that a little filter. Feeder guys in harbor seals. And we check them for a wide array of flame retardants and the types of flame retardants that we saw really caught our eye were these phosphate based flame retardants. They're really water soluble they can go right through wastewater treatment plant and enter the bay. They're building up in our water in in our sediment at levels that may be of concern, and what effects did these have on people and the environment. They have a number of different effects that kind of depends on the species. But one of the overarching qualities that they appear to have is this endocrine disruption where they can. Kinda act like hormones at low levels in the body or maybe block are natural processes with hormones. Let's particularly troubling. And this is in the bodies of humans the bodies of fish. Well, there's been a number of labs studies showing this. So this would be for for fish in particular. But there they're definitely concerns for people as well. This is kind of one of those situations where we ban or get rid of an obvious bad actor chemical, but then the new chemicals we replace it with we don't know as much about and then as that knowledge evolves. We we end up regretting the replacement and are they're healthier alternatives. That manufacturers could use a lot of manufacturers would like to just not use them at all they're primarily using them because of these flammability standards and here in our state, we've actually changed one of our standards a few years ago, and the new standard is actually effective more protective in it. Does no longer require. Use of these compounds. If I were brave enough to jump in the bay would I be safe. Nope. No problems for jumping in the bay. I'm I'm not much of a swimmer. But my colleagues go in there all the time we are quite safe as swimmers Rebecca Sutton, senior scientist at the San Francisco estuary institute. Thank you very much. Thanks. You're listening to morning edition on more news from NPR and cake, you weedy after a break funding for scientists provided by the National Science Foundation. The SD Bechtel junior foundation. The Templeton religion trust and the Durkin. Charlene caps in L foundation. Twenty nine now past the hour. They let's get another look at how the commute.

San Francisco Bay San Francisco estuary institut Rebecca Sutton scientist El Salvador UCLA NPR California Bechtel junior foundation National Science Foundation national association of immigr Helen Lawrence Dan marks Mike Templeton Peabody Durkin attorney president
"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:38 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco estuary institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cancelled including hundreds in San Francisco's court for Rita Jabil Romero caught up with a high school senior whose case has been delayed. It's the end of the school day at oceanic high in Pacific and hundreds of students stream out of their classrooms. Navigating the crowd in the hall is Mario was man and lanky eighteen year old from El Salvador man, just applied to colleges and he's waiting to hear back. Yeah. UCLA NSF state. I wanna a year in either graphic design or animation. That's not just up to a college admissions office. Guzman future will be decided by an immigration judge. He came on a tourist visa two years ago and applied for asylum. But his hearing this month was canceled because most immigration judges are furloughed. It's really hard because I can't plan do things here. But certainly, I don't know how much time I have here. He says he spent months preparing for his hearing. And he had to revisit the terrifying experiences that made him flee, El Salvador. He says his cousin who was like his brother was killed by gang members shot in the throat and back when he wasn't a hospital. He wasn't able to talk. And even he he survived to that. He wouldn't be able to walk and seeing how the life of my causing was four. It was really hard for me. That's pretty traumatic and he's a high schooler. He's trying to go about his teenage life. Helen Lawrence is because mine's attorney, but we have to interrupt that by talking about some really intense past experiences. He's had so I think for him. It's just he would like to get it over with to move on Kazman doesn't know yet. One has hearing will be rescheduled it could be months or longer. We are so backlogged. And so short staffed that's judge Dan marks past president of the national association of immigration. Judges the calendars are jam packed and basically full for the next two to three years Marxist furloughed when she's back in court. She says she'll try to squeeze in as. Many cancelled appointments as she can. But by and large they're going to go to the end of the line for some people, the shutdown may be a blessing. Mike says strong cases suffered by the delay. But weaker ones could benefit by having more time to prepare. I'm fatty that jumped barrow meadow K Q E D news to the waters of San Francisco Bay. Now, a new study of compounds in the bay is illustrating a case of chemical whack-a-mole fifteen years ago, California, van the class of toxic fire retardants called PB. These were put in household items like furniture, and electronics now the old flame retardants and the new chemicals used to replace them can both be found, inveigh waters and marine life. Rebecca Sutton is a senior scientist at the San Francisco estuary institute, she joins me now to discuss what's going on. Thanks for having me. So the back story here is a specific class of flame. Retardants called PB B, ease, and they were banned when did that happen in? Why were they banned they were banned back in two thousand four here in this state and a nationwide phase out followed they were banned because we were using them in really large quantities. In a lot of consumer goods to meet some well-intentioned, flammability standards. We set here on a state they were intended to make some of our products like our couches, less flammable. So that we could escape in the event of a house fire turns out, they don't actually work. So well, and then we started to see them in the environment in San Francisco Bay, they were building up in our human bodies, and they were pretty toxic and how much have levels of these PB eavesdropped dropped since the ban in the environment. It's actually been a huge success story for the bay. We've seen declines in sediment at the bottom of one third and in fish in the bay, we're seeing half the levels we used to see. So this is a real positive outcome of. A ban are phase out of a problematic chemical so now there are New Flame retardant chemicals. What are you seeing now? So manufacturers when they couldn't use ease. They had to switch to other chemicals. And so we went out to the bay, and we checked water sediment at the bay bottom muscles that are a little filter. Feeder guys in harbor seals. And we check them for a wide array of flame retardants and the types of flame retardants that we saw really caught our eye were these phosphate based flame retardants. They're really water soluble they can go right through wastewater treatment plant and enter the bay. They're building up in our water in in our sediment at levels that may be of concern. And what affects did these have on people and the environment? They have a number of different effects that kind of depends on the species. But one of the overarching qualities that they appear to have is this endocrine disruption where they can. Kinda act like hormones at low levels in the body or maybe block are natural processes with hormones. Let's particularly troubling. And this is in the bodies of humans the bodies of fish. Well, there's been a number of labs studies showing this. So this will be for for fish in particular. But there they're definitely concerns for people as well. This is kind of one of those situations where we ban or get rid of an obvious bad actor chemical, but then the new chemicals we replace it with we don't know as much about and then as that knowledge evolves. We we end up regretting the replacement and are they're healthier alternatives. That manufacturers could use a lot of manufacturers would like to just not use them at all they're primarily using them because of these flammability standards and here in our state, we've actually changed one of our standards a few years ago, and the new standard is actually effective more protective in it. Does no longer require. Use of these compounds. If I were brave enough to jump in the bay would I be safe. Oh, yeah. Nope. No problems for jumping in the bay. I'm I'm not much of a swimmer. But my colleagues go in there all the time we are quite safe as swimmers Rebecca Sutton, senior scientist at the San Francisco estuary institute. Thank you very much. Thanks..

San Francisco Bay San Francisco estuary institut Rebecca Sutton scientist San Francisco UCLA El Salvador Rita Jabil Romero Guzman Mario Helen Lawrence Kazman national association of immigr Dan marks Mike attorney president eighteen year fifteen years