35 Burst results for "San Francisco Chronicle"

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

Journalism.co.uk podcast

05:53 min | 2 months ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

"Potentially that person could do it as well We also have some folks on our engagement team who are intended to to be specialized on engagement initiatives and so perhaps one of them could. So i think all of these are possibilities in. It's just a matter of who's there and how we're gonna handle it in the moment on that note. How exactly does the what for work at the moment. What seems to be the best way of a purchase for me. It's been kind of having to just keep at the top of my mind or maybe in the middle of my mind is to today tax day and yesterday was definitely a tax day today will definitely be tax day when i wanna send one and then it's waiting for the right moment when we have that sort of one good nugget of information that i know they will want and then sending the text as soon as as soon as we have that in and potentially appointing them to more coverage on the site. If i feel that people are gonna really want that and trying to be very cognizant of not forcing them into a lake you. That's not what this is about. We want for the text to be the forum where they're where they're engaging with things but of course sometimes. There's a need for going to the site where there might be an interactive map or you know a whole a whole day's worth of coverage right so so typically what would you put a message usually. It's good morning from the san francisco chronicle or good afternoon in that. It's you know yesterday. I think it was the calendar. Fire is getting very very close to to. South lake tahoe. Twenty two thousand people or whatever it was have been told to evacuate it. We have reporters there We have photos on our site and if you want to follow all of the latest updates than please go here So i think what. I haven't done a while that i should do in that. I probably will do today. As part of the message is asked for their questions and concerns. I think it's important to get those pumps in regularly when.

san francisco chronicle South lake tahoe
Giants' Scouting Director Michael Holmes Comments on MLB Draft

Giants Splash

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Giants' Scouting Director Michael Holmes Comments on MLB Draft

"I'm john shea national baseball writer of the san francisco chronicle and it's a perfect time to welcome the giant scouting director michael holmes to break down the players. He selected in the three years. He ran the giants drafts. Who's looking good. What's up with the top guys taken in this year's draft. And how does the giants versatility at the big league level. Translate undrafted so michael scouting director of the giants after a long time. Stints with the oakland as you've been with farhan zaidi. The past three years leading the drafts. And there've been some intriguing draft draft. So far i mean you had the full forty in two thousand nineteen and then because a code you only had five picks in the twenty twenty draft and then this year twenty six and the draft was wrecked during the all star break held in denver so every year is a little bit different for you in a wondering. How how you adjust from year to year and Because the game has changed and everyone has to change with the game. But how how did that. Make your job different. Well i think this year was an insecure navigate just because One coup the challenge of cova players over the last calendar year. Not having played as much Not as many reps at bats innings on the mound Us not maybe being able to build some of the history. We've we've been able to in the past with some of the players But i i thought it was a whole art. Staff overcame those obstacles. You know really well and we were able to able to get a lot of looks on on the players that we had interest in. I also think it a challenge of the draft being pushed back from date standpoint You know having the introduction of mlb combine was a new a new twist to the draft. Which i thought went really well. And they'll be a really nice job putting that on putting together Thought we got a lot of benefits from being there intending

Giants Farhan Zaidi John Shea Michael Holmes San Francisco Chronicle MLB Oakland Michael Cova Denver
Republicans Aim at GOP Base in 1st California Recall Debate

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:18 min | 4 months ago

Republicans Aim at GOP Base in 1st California Recall Debate

"We want to move onto a brand new topic. Our friend hugh hewitt was on vacation but he was actually on a working vacation last night because he. He hosted a debate between the various challenges. To gavin newsom in california's gubernatorial recall election. A number of people were on stage. None of them were named jane fonda. Wayne i'm actually a little surprised that jane funded didn't accept the invitation. Yes one hundred and forty two year. Old Viet cong candidate was not on the stage last night. Did you see the san francisco. Chronicle article jane fonda was considering jumping into the into the race because she was worried. That gavin newsom wasn't going to be able to defeat the recall i. That's the thing about the democratic party is kind of. They're kind of putting older eggs into gavin newsom basket right if he goes down. There's really not a lot of democrats that are kind of running as that's a hard campaign to run right now. Say no to the recall. But if you do vote for me instead yeah i mean. It's really an untenable yet. Some you get some some low level democrats that are running in this because they need some name recognition for later on down the road or they're looking at new figuring he's vulnerable and there should be some democrats in the mix goes down democrat. Statewide that is that is trying to seize the opportunity and saying let's toss him overboard but let's hang onto the state. There's there's really nobody high profile making that case. Well in that case jane punish a jumped in i mean she's only eighty three years old. That's still younger than jerry. Brown wasn't his last nine. Feinstein dianne feinstein. So that was that was a little music but no jane fonda was on the stage last night he would love that actually but This debate that was carried by thirteen fox affiliates all around the great state of california and hugh promise to run an officiant and and respectful debate. And i did it. But but dwayne you did didn't how how did it turn out. It was as advertised. They really didn't attack each other much. They pretty much kept their focus. On on gavin newsom and they were all asked very smart intelligent questions.

Gavin Newsom Jane Fonda Hugh Hewitt Viet Cong Jane Wayne Chronicle California Democratic Party San Francisco Feinstein Dianne Feinstein Jerry Brown Hugh FOX Dwayne
US Court Says 'Ghost Gun' Plans Can Be Posted Online

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

US Court Says 'Ghost Gun' Plans Can Be Posted Online

"A federal appeals court in San Francisco's ruled that designs for three D. printed ghost guns can be posted online without approval from the state department a divided panel of the ninth circuit court of appeals reinstated a trump administration order that ghost guns could be taken off the munitions watch list that require state department approval before that type of weapon could be exported twenty two states and the district of Columbia has sued the administration last year but according to the San Francisco Chronicle the appellate panel found federal law prohibits courts from overruling state department decisions on the munitions list the lone dissenting judge Robert Whaley argues making ghost guns more accessible presents a serious threat to public safety noting that type of weapon has been linked to several mass shootings I'm Jackie Quinn

Ninth Circuit Court Of Appeals State Department San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle Robert Whaley Columbia Jackie Quinn
California now ranks dead last in administering COVID-19 vaccines

John and Ken on Demand

01:25 min | 11 months ago

California now ranks dead last in administering COVID-19 vaccines

"Okay bloomberg updated It's numbers Ten minutes ago two fifty five. Pm pacific time and california is fiftieth again according to the bloomberg numbers which they say they get from the cdc and other government websites. California has four point seven million doses that have reached the state but we've only injected one point eight million of them so we have almost three million doses by their count on the shelf. Of course as we have learned in the last twenty four hours california's reporting system is so screwed up that nobody knows if any numbers are accurate. There are mess finally a lot of media sacramento bee also going to time. San francisco chronicle have been sort of digging into the story. What they're finding out is really freaking confusing. Which being stake could be worse than this. I doubt it's better considering all the incompetence going on but for the moment We are in fiftieth place. Only thirty eight percent of available vaccines have been injected We're falling farther behind all the other states and a number of territories or independent countries that we provide health care services to islands out in the pacific We're just ahead of american samoa.

California Bloomberg CDC Sacramento San Francisco American Samoa
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"San Francisco Chronicle this weekend. Quote Newsome knows he got a target on his back and had a recall may indeed make the ballot. The talk. Fox's Christina Coleman America is listening to Fox News. Increasing clouds. Rain moving in through the wee hours will fall back to the low to mid thirties. Rain sticks around into the early part of our Sunday and we keep it cloudy, afternoon High Middle Upper forties and we are seeing chances. Force of strata. Scattered showers later Sunday night, Jeff you know from the Weather Channel on one of 61 FM talk Next news in 30 minutes. Follow us on social media, go to one of 61 FM talk dot com to connect sharing thoughts, taking a stand and offering an opinion I'm already exhausted. It's all in a day's work. That's how it gets done. Sean Hannity today at three on 1061 FM and I Heart radio station, stay connected. What comes next for forward. It's doing what we've done for over a century building and facing any problems with integrity, empathy. And the strength to outlast them. Four little always pivot to do the right thing. And to build for who and what matter most. Community. Built for America built Ford proud. We save Sirius Cash with our progressive home and auto model and use the money to buy a new boat. Who's ready to water ski? This'd is not a real testimony off. Sure, Customers can save big money with progressive but not enough for a new boat..

Christina Coleman America Newsome San Francisco Chronicle Sean Hannity Fox News Sirius Cash Fox Jeff Ford
'I am not afraid of the gas chamber': Codebreakers solve old Zodiac Killer cipher

John McGinness

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

'I am not afraid of the gas chamber': Codebreakers solve old Zodiac Killer cipher

"From the notorious Zodiac killer has been solved. The so called 3 40 cipher was sent to the San Francisco Chronicle in 1969 Code breaker, David or in, Jack says the cipher says, I hope you're all having lots of fun trying to catch me. I'm not afraid of the gas chamber because it will send me to paradise all the sooner. Now I have enough slaves to work for me. The Zodiac killer is is credited credited with with killing killing five five people people in in the the late late 19 19 sixties. sixties. But But the the suspect's suspect's identity identity is is still still unknown. unknown. FBI FBI where where May May the the FBI FBI continues continues to to investigate. investigate.

San Francisco Chronicle Jack David FBI
'I am not afraid of the gas chamber': Codebreakers solve old Zodiac Killer cipher in San Francisco

Eddie and Rocky

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

'I am not afraid of the gas chamber': Codebreakers solve old Zodiac Killer cipher in San Francisco

"Been solved. My private citizens looking into puzzles were laid out by the Zodiac killer so many years ago in the San Francisco Bay Area a B C's Alex Stone in California in an online video, a group of code breakers in the U. S. Belgium, an Australia say they have cracked the Zodiac killers. 3 40 cipher. The cipher was sent 51 years ago to the San Francisco Chronicle. I am not afraid the cipher does not identify the Zodiac killer has many had hoped. It says. I hope you're having lots of fun trying to catch me. I am not afraid of the gas chamber. The FBI says it is aware the cipher has been solved in the Zodiac killer remains an open case. Alex Stone ABC News He was radio

Alex Stone S. Belgium San Francisco Bay Area U. San Francisco Chronicle California Australia FBI Abc News
California lawmakers violate their own COVID-19 rules

America's First News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

California lawmakers violate their own COVID-19 rules

"California's governor who violated rules aimed at controlling the spread of the Corona virus, right a bare minimum the spirit of rules and they tell others to follow. San Francisco mayor London Breed dined at a posh Napa Valley restaurant the day after Governor Newsome was there. Also, a San Jose Mayor Sam Ricardo, who has now apologized, went to his parent's house for Thanksgiving. And in L, A county supervisor dined outdoors hours after voting to ban outdoor dining. All three were on the hot seat Tuesday this after various reports that they violated rules. The San Francisco Chronicle reporting breed joined seven others at the three Michelin starred French Laundry on November 7th to celebrate a socialite's 60th birthday and his

Mayor Sam Ricardo Newsome Napa Valley California San Francisco San Jose London San Francisco Chronicle Michelin
In a first, San Francisco DA charges on-duty cop with homicide

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

In a first, San Francisco DA charges on-duty cop with homicide

"San Francisco District attorney Chase of Boudin's decision to charge an officer with homicide in a police shooting was rare. And tougher charges haven't been ruled out Quds Erica Cruise, Guevara has more manslaughter charges against former officer Christopher Samayoa for his role in the 2017 shooting of Kita O'Neill. Are believed to be the first homicide charges in a use of force case in the city's modern history. Jurors will be asked to convict Samayoa voluntary or involuntary manslaughter for his role in the shooting, which took place during a police chase. Bodine told the San Francisco Chronicle that a murder charge isn't off the table. Mohsen Old is an attorney representing O'Neal's family. They don't want to overcharge because the likelihood of getting a conviction is lower. But then if you under charge You know, the communities looking old says the statute of limitations were closing in on the manslaughter

Erica Cruise Christopher Samayoa Boudin Samayoa Guevara Neill San Francisco Mohsen Old Bodine San Francisco Chronicle Neal
‘Keep your guard up’: Top California health official gives Thanksgiving guidelines, explains travel advisory

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

02:18 min | 1 year ago

‘Keep your guard up’: Top California health official gives Thanksgiving guidelines, explains travel advisory

"Cases of coronavirus continuing to rise at an alarming rate. California health officials making new recommendations to curb the spread of the virus. Scapa CASE Might Blunt Has this report. Eric upon epidemiologists and deputy director of the California Department of Public Health Center for Infectious Diseases, says the state's cove in 19 positivity rate has risen to 4% when you compare that to a couple weeks ago on October 29 Our test positivity rate is one point higher a point higher than two weeks ago. Pon says. Hospitalizations and ICU rates have also increased by more than 30% in the same time period. But with the Thanksgiving holiday fast approaching California health officials are concerned those numbers will go even higher, overwhelming hospitals with newly infected patients in Sacramento County health director Dr Peter Beale Anson says the number of cases tripled since Halloween. And he's worried that Thanksgiving Day could lead to an even bigger surge. Single day that I'm most worried about in the entire year of 2020 is Thanksgiving Day, for obvious reasons. It was gonna be wanted. Everybody gathers people coming from out of town Beale instances, local hospitals are currently able to handle search capacity, but that could change if there's a significant increase in a short period of time. However, for the first time this year, he says, there's a light at the end of the tunnel with the vaccine on the way for this Thanksgiving in for this Christmas and Hanukkah and Kwanza, etcetera. Just do it the way we've been doing for the last eight or nine months. Do it meant by your household. Just your own family. It will be a credit kind of India well may not be accredited Christmas and Thanksgiving may be more fun than usual, but you have to do it on Lee. One time state guidelines for Thanksgiving Day recommend limiting gatherings to no more than 90 minutes, keeping it to members of your own household and staying outdoors as much as possible. Spite state guidelines, which limit all private gatherings to no more than three households, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Governor Gavin Newsom and his family attended a birthday party without least 12 people for multiple households. Last Friday, Newsome later issued a statement saying he should have model better behavior. Earlier today, the California Department of Public Health also issued a travel advisory stating that people entering the state or returning home should self quarantine for 14 days. California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr Mark Galli says Californians must remain vigilant

California Department Of Publi Dr Peter Beale Anson Scapa California PON Blunt Sacramento County Eric Gavin Newsom India LEE San Francisco Chronicle Department Of Public Health Newsome California Health And Human Se
Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

Kentuckiana's Saturday Morning News

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

"CBS News is Anthony Mason took a look back recently at the way masks were handled more than a century ago. That, of course, during the 2018 flu pandemic, also in the fall and found many similarities to today. Fascinating look from Anthony. In the fall of 1918. As Americans across the country were celebrating victory in World War, One of the masks on returning troops showed we were losing another war against the so called Spanish flu even a century ago, masks were controversial. Yes, And for so many of the same reasons they are today. Nancy Toms is a history professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook at its worst in 1918. How bad did the pandemic get really, really bad? He referred to it as the Big one among historians of medicine. 675,000 Americans would die nearly a third of them in a single month. The Red Cross spread the slogan Where a mask Save your Life. And nurses began to make them for the public way. We're looking at two masks God's masks that were used in the 1918 pandemic. Here in California, there in the collection of the Oakland Museum, Erin Dina Delgaudio is associate curator. That pretty transparent, right? It wasn't an ideal material, but it was definitely better than not wearing anything. Back in 1918. This was one of the centers in the fight against the pandemic. Yes, indeed. This is Henry Street settlement and its founder, Lillian Walk, played a critical role in organizing the pandemic response in New York City masks were never officially mandated on the East Coast, Nancy Tom says. But other health rules were often aggressively enforced. There were spitting raids, even though by Pelo Yes, there was a definite effort to up the ante in prosecuting. They called them sanitary infractions. The US outbreak had started on a Kansas Army base on the campaign to stop it. Was tied to the war effort. So wearing a mask became a patriotic just Yes. If you refused to wear a mask, you could be called a slacker. What did that mean? A slacker was not quite like a traitor. But it was someone who was dragging their patriotic feet. San Francisco was the first city to actually mandate masks. Yes. 10% of the population was infected between 1918 and 1919. In just a day, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. 100 people were charged with disturbing the peace or failing toe wear masks. Their sentence. 10 days in prison or a $5 fine about $80 today, and then here in San Francisco, there was an anti mask league that farmed in early January. So the chairman was this woman named Mrs Harrington. She was a suffragist. She was a lawyer. He put out a call in the the San San Francisco Francisco Chronicle Chronicle asking asking for for her her fellow fellow citizens citizens who who objected objected to to this this mass mass mandate mandate as as Really Really similar similar to to the the arguments arguments now. now. Actually, Actually, they they argue the ordinance was unconstitutional and that masks had not been proven effective. Some 2000 people turned out for a rally at the Dreamland skate rink. Other cities would mandate masks, including Denver, Seattle, Oakland, Sacramento and Phoenix. They were met with resistance to one major difference. It wasn't political. Then they're wass disagreement between the various politicians about which businesses should get closed down. But The decision to mask or not to mass never became identified with a specific political party.

Francisco Chronicle Chronicle San Francisco Anthony Mason Mrs Harrington Cbs News San San Francisco Dreamland Skate Rink Nancy Toms Oakland Museum United States California State University Of New York Erin Dina Delgaudio Stony Brook New York City Associate Curator Nancy Tom Lillian Walk Chairman
The World Shudders as President Trump Tests Positive for Covid-19

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:55 min | 1 year ago

The World Shudders as President Trump Tests Positive for Covid-19

"The president announced on twitter just before one o'clock this morning that he and the first lady tested positive for covid nineteen. Last night. He posted quote we will begin our quarantine and recovery process. Immediately, we will get through this together the first lady tweeted in part we are feeling good and postponed all upcoming engagements. We know the president traveled to Bedminster yesterday for a fundraiser senior administration officials would not address. If he is symptomatic, we're told he will work from the White House residence. This news comes after it was revealed that senior White House aide and a member of the president's inner. Circle, Hope Hicks had tested positive for the virus. A source tells NBC, News Hicks Tested Negative on Wednesday. Morning we're told she began showing minor symptoms Wednesday evening and was quarantined on air. Force. One on the way back from the president's campaign rally in Minnesota her positive text test came back yesterday morning. Here is the president on Fox News last night discussing Hicks just hours before announcing his own diagnosis. She tested positive. She's a hard worker. A lot of masks. Sushi's wears masks a lot, but she tested positive. That I just went out with a test I'll see what you know because we spent a lot of time in the first lady just went out with a test also, but it's very, very hard when you. With people from the military of law enforcement and they come over to you and they. They want to hug you and they want to kiss you because we really have done a good job. You get close and things happen I was surprised to hear with hope, but she's a very warm person with them and. She knows there's a risk, but she's a young. Obviously significant breaking news. Beginning of October. For somebody different reasons the the functioning of America's government. The political campaign that We've all been following a nation now for so long. And obviously the personal story here the president's being the first lady's wellbeing hope Hicks Wellbeing and health and all those. That they may have been in contact with WHO could be affected by this to obviously. Our thoughts and our prayers are with them Willie. This is how the newspapers are handling. This news. New York Post President? Has. Cova. The Daily News in fact it with, of course, a picture of the president the first lady. The Los Angeles Times this morning trump tests positive for coronavirus the MINNESOTA. Star. Tribune. Trump has virus president first lady test. Positive San Francisco. Chronicle trump says he has the virus and the sun trump tests positive for coronavirus obviously Willie newspapers in across. I was just going to say across the world. Here's a picture of the president with the prime. Minister of Britain who also had the coronavirus had a very difficult fight with the New York Times of course, trump has positive for covid nineteen and the world shudders obviously. The impact of. United States president having a disease that has killed over two hundred thousand in this country a million worldwide. Obviously is going to cause the markets to shudder because our allies decider and the. Time, said will cause the world shudder. No question our I echo what you said that our thoughts and our prayers and our hearts are with the trump family right now with hope Hicks and anyone in the White House because we don't know how far this ripples out yet will be tasked obviously across the White House to see if anyone else has this. Because as you said, the president held his rally hosts had to be quarantined on the flight home from Minnesota yesterday. He was at a debate with Joe Biden obviously, they were far apart on Tuesday night Kaley mcenaney, the White House press secretary was with hope picks a great deal this week she gave a briefing yesterday without a mask on in that room. When you stop and look at all the people who may have come in contact with where the source of this is including by the way the Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett who's been spending a lot of time with White House handlers and she's been shepherded around Capitol Hill to meet with senators ahead of her confirmation hearing so. This is this is a serious as it gets especially when you consider that Donald Trump is seventy, four year old man we know more than eighty percent of the deaths in this country have come from people sixty five and older. So we're certainly sending our best to the

President Trump Hope Hicks Chronicle Trump White House Minnesota Coronavirus Hicks Wellbeing Twitter Fox News Kaley Mcenaney Bedminster Daily News Los Angeles Times New York Joe Biden San Francisco NBC America Cova
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KCRW

"And, you know, got away got away from from the U. S Forest service. It is hard to say at this point, but I'm sure there will be more investigations about that in the future. Well, thank you very much for coming on the show today and sharing your reporting. Appreciate that. Thanks for having me. Alexa Casa San Francisco Chronicle reporter. Well as the entire West Coast burns. U. S death toll from Cove It approaches 200,000 and an upcoming presidential election lays bare our ugliest partisan divides. Everything feels really overwhelming. Right now. We're also exactly six months into this March, 11th was the day everything changed. The World Health Organization declared a pandemic. The MBA shut down Tom Hanks tested positive. Also a somber anniversary. The 9 11 attacks took place 19 years ago today, so we wanted to check in with someone who has been a calming and reassuring presence for us throughout these and other crises. Rabbi Steve Leader is the senior rabbi of Wilshire Boulevard Temple and author of the book More Beautiful Than Before. How Suffering Transforms Us. Welcome Back to Press Play. Thank you so much, Madeline. Well, when we last spoke, it was in March on March 27th so about half a year. How have you been doing in this past six months? Like like most? I have my moments of despair and occasionally drift into catastrophe izing the future. And have to work hard pulling myself out of that. But I also have to say that if you had asked me six months ago, would I have experienced the growth spurt that I have experienced both spiritually? Technologically. Relation. Aly. This pandemic has forced me and I hope many of us to stretch our capacities for adaptation for leadership for empathy. Far beyond anything I could've imagined before this thing began. So if there is an upside to the downside, and I try very hard to remind myself of that daily and particularly When I kind of as I said, drift toward catastrophe izing the future. Wow. So really a positive. Look at this. Tell me in specifics. If you could give me a specific of how you have Grown spiritually. This might sound odd coming from a rabbi. But I have fallen in love again with the wisdom of the SAGES. Of the Thomas in the tour. They knew a good deal more than we About living through perilous and uncertain times. And I find myself going back again and again and again. To the writing and thinking and teaching of a group of scholars and SAGES who frankly lived during a time when life was always is precarious and uncertain when they had no reason not to expect that they would die from some strange, frightening disease or flood or fire. For murder, robbery thuggery. These were ordinary daily occurrences in the lives of people live 2000 years ago, and they developed an entire belief system. To manage their lives that find meeting within all of it. And so for me spiritually, it's been a kind of re embracing. Of that wisdom and also spiritually. Again might sound strange coming from a rabbi. But the pandemic has given me time to pray and meditate and think in ways I could not during the hurry in the story and the worry of my previous life. Yeah. So you've had to slow down and really focus and focus inwardly. Yes. What are some of the things that the SAGES have have said that you've have found particularly relevant for today. Well, there are a lot of them. First of all, there's there's so much conversation about darkness, a cz metaphor. You know, let's take for example, the song 23rd song. Yea, Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of darkness, I shall fear no evil to things have occurred to me about that verse. The first Is the poet telling us we walk through this valley. We don't stay in it forever. All things pass, and this, too, shall pass. And is trite and clich? As that sounds, I find it very comforting. The second thing about that metaphors. If you think about a shadow, no matter how long no matter how dark melon a shadow is proof of the light You cannot have a shadow. Unless the light is still shining. It may be obstructed in this case by a pandemic. But it still shines. It may be obstructed by our grief by our feelings of loss by our feelings of deprivation. But these feelings are really Proof of our love of life and the light that still exist. So in that sense, very, very comforting me. In another sense, you know that the high holy days are coming for Jews and we recite this prayer, which is a kind of litany of terrible things that could happen to us. And how we are supposed to respond and live during perilous times. And that prayer ends with three remedies to living through times like this. The first is to really double down on our relationships with the people who matter. The 2nd 10 toe are spiritually lives tend to self care, and the third is to serve others. These are the ways we live through. Walk through this valley of the shadow of darkness and come back out into the light. How are you sharing this wisdom now, now that we are all in our separate living quarters, how do people come together? Because part of being in a spiritual community or any community is being with other people. So how are you negotiating that? Well, I'm communicating every week with what? I'm calling my Shabbat message. My Sabbath message, which I send out every Friday afternoon, and I'm about to write my 26. Which is an indication exactly how long this Pandemic has been going on. I started writing it when I thought stay at home and stay at home for two weeks. I said. I'll write a couple of articles for the congregation. Well, now I'm writing the 26 this afternoon. So I send out an article really a sermon a sermonette? Every Friday afternoon. We are doing worship services online every Friday evening every Saturday morning every Saturday night, and people are getting used.

SAGES San Francisco Chronicle Rabbi Steve Leader Wilshire Boulevard Temple U. S Forest reporter Tom Hanks World Health Organization Madeline Thomas murder robbery
Episode 85, Apple updates to macOS Catalina 10.15.6 and launches new audio and news features - burst 1

Mac Minutes

07:33 min | 1 year ago

Episode 85, Apple updates to macOS Catalina 10.15.6 and launches new audio and news features - burst 1

"In this episode, we will discuss the recently released Mac Os. Catalina ten point fifteen point six update which introduces local news audio features in the Apple News along with improving the security and reliability of your Mac. This update, which is now available for downloading introduces several new features for Apple News and Apple News plus including audio stories of some of the most read feature stories from Apple News plus a daily audio news briefing hosted by Apple News Editors and curated local news collections, beginning in five cities and regions and expanding to more areas in the future. Apple News is also adding more top local and regional news outlets for readers and subscribers including the Charlotte Observer, the Miami Herald and the news in observer, which is located in Raleigh. North Carolina. Lauren Kern editor in chief of Apple News said the following about the new features. Apple News showcases so much great journalism and we're excited to help bring it to life in new ways with Apple News. Plus audio stories and a new Daily News Show Apple News today. We also greatly value are many local news. Partners are new local news feature highlights work for readers who live and are interested in those communities finished Kern. Let's delve deeper into some of the new features. Apple announced including Apple News plus audio stories. Beginning with the update Apple News will produce about twenty audio stories a week across a wide range of interests. Narrated by professional voice actors these are audio versions of some of the best feature reporting and long form pieces published by esquire essence. Fast Company G Q New York magazine sports illustrated. Time Vanity Fair Vo wired and more and newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times and the Wall Street Journal audio stories are now available to Apple News plus subscribers in the US. Apple News plus is available in the US for nine dollars ninety nine cents. And for International Listeners Canada for twelve, ninety nine a month, the UK for nine, ninety, nine, a month and Australia for fourteen, ninety nine a month. Customers can sign up for a free one-month trial in the plan automatically renews after the trial and. Through family. Sharing up to six family members can share one apple, news plus subscription. I use family sharing, and for some. It's a great bargain. Next features are to apple news today with Apple. News today, a daily audio news briefing Apple News Editors and Co host guide listeners to some of the most fascinating stories in the news, and how the world's best journalists are covering them. Apple News today is free to all listeners available mornings Monday through Friday directly in the news APP in the US and apple podcasts. Productivity is a huge interest to me, and this is another way to learn the topics of the day. I am preparing for work or listening throughout the day. Audience Stories and Apple News. Today can both be found in a newly added audio tab located at the bottom of the news app where listeners can manage their Q. and get personalized recommendations both new audio features are available I. Phone, Ipod, touch and carplay. Apple Awful introduced support for the news APP in Carplay, so users can listen to audio stories and Apple News today while driving. Users will be able to sink listening progress across devices start listening to an audio story with carplay from your iphone and pick up listening to a reading it later at home. Also new is curated local news apple news introduced a new curated local news experience, currently available in the San Francisco Bay Area Houston Los Angeles New York and San Francisco featuring a variety of content from a diverse collection of local publishers, including a major newspaper in each city and region. 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Apple News Apple United States MAC Charlotte Observer Los Angeles Times UK Lauren Kern Carplay North Carolina New York Magazine Australia International Listeners Canada Facebook Canada Raleigh Miami Herald Editor In Chief
California gets 11,000 new coronavirus cases in 1 day

Tom Sullivan

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

California gets 11,000 new coronavirus cases in 1 day

"Positive Corona virus cases have surged past previous daily highs with over 10,000 cases in a single day. Tuesday's data shows 10,532 new cases of covered 19 in the state, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. The previous record for the day with the highest number of new cases with last Thursday at 9870 cases statewide. There are now over 346,000 confirmed cases of covered 19

San Francisco Chronicle
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 1 year ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
US judge bars California cancer warning on Roundup

Dan Proft

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

US judge bars California cancer warning on Roundup

"California cannot require cancer warning label on the weed killer roundup the San Francisco Chronicle says a judge in Sacramento issued a permanent injunction barring the label requirement California wanted the label because roundup the world's most widely used weedkiller contains a black Mercedes which in the international agency said was a probable cause of cancer but the judge says the environmental protection agency and others have found no connection to cancer he says evidence indicates it is a known

California Cancer San Francisco Chronicle Sacramento
Coronavirus cases surge in more than 20 states

KIRO Nights

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus cases surge in more than 20 states

"Coronavirus cases in hospitalizations are rising in more than twenty states across the south and west as states continue easing pandemic restrictions correspondent Michelle Medina reports more than four thousand people in California tested positive for coronavirus Wednesday according to data compiled by San Francisco Chronicle newspaper that's a new record for the state of Florida also posted new high numbers over three thousand cases in one day masks are now mandatory in the Florida Keys where there are few hospitals cases are also rising in Texas but authorities there announced students will return to their campuses for in person classes this fall and masks will not be

Michelle Medina California Florida Florida Keys Texas San Francisco Chronicle
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle Henry nice to have you with us how are you getting along first of all how you doing I'm doing okay more you know you use is obviously hard on everybody and you know I'm not used to being at home staring at the same four wall sitting at the same desk every day at this time of year but you know I mean compared to what else is going on in the world and what's going on with other people who don't have as fortunate as we do you know fighting this call waiting or staying away from this call with nothing I have nothing to complain about very good all right Henry let's start with baseball in general and now we're going to talk about it tonight quite a bit we have already men you know them Joel Sherman nightingale Jayson stark people all over the country are writing about it will we have baseball long we have baseball and I died I'm anxious to get your thoughts on on where we are with baseball right now well I mean I think we're getting out of baseball we might even have a fairly close to when they say they wanted you know you if if the world could listen in on all sorts of negotiations that don't come in the public eye whether it's you know negotiations for a merger in business or negotiation to pass a compromise bill in this in the state Senate you know it is a lot of leaders that goes on when that happens it just so happens that we cover a sport where they just leaks like a sieve and not only are there so many leaks but both sides put out trial balloons they posture in the public eye and it makes it really difficult to I I need to get a deal done I I think what needs to happen is that and I'm a journalist so I mean I believe in you know putting everything out there for the light to date but I believe their best chance of getting a deal done quickly is to you know just that almost sounded like a legal gag order or you can go to prison he noted jail if you could easily get anything or if you say anything to the press but I have no hope that that's going to happen so I mean there'll be a compromise is too much money at stake I thought it was interesting the players counter countered with wargames to get more revenue for the owners so they can take less than a day that might that might end up being part of a compromise three do you see the players taking the pay cut if someone's got a compromise here and I I've talked about on the show and you know I did criminal law on divorce law for a long period of time and you know there's there's nothing worse than a couple when no one trusts each other trying to get anything done and I kinda get the feeling with the with the ownership and with the players that they just don't trust each then goes back under fifty years how does this get done what has to happen well I think that you have to have a couple of lawyers and usually is lawyers on either side of you respect each other and for them to you know kind of sit down outside of the public are you come up with something I I think there's a huge mistrust with man Fred and Clark you know I I don't know that the compromise is gonna come directly from either one of those guys you mentioned or so I mean it would be the way the players deal is that you know they they signed an agreement early in the in the divorce proceedings that they would split fifty fifty and now that you know they're right about to file the actual dissolution papers and all of a sudden one side says well you know what I don't want to be shifty shifty we wanna do all new formula here you're gonna get less than fifty because my income is down and and that's that's the real problem here you know the problem is you know he nobody really has leverage over the other I mean the owners might have a slight advantage here because they're losing so much money and you know if they if they agreed to the player's position they would lose even more so it's really you know use the players themselves can find themselves with nothing and as much as much as it's as hard as it would be for the for baseball clubs to lose millions of dollars this year their owners could probably take the hit some of these players can't right now I will say you have as we say every day I say well we're going to find that by next weekend and I I think you at some point they have to decide what to do if they're going to have an eighty two game season with a spring training but there are news and you wrote about it this week about the minor leagues and normally they they release a number of players in the minor leagues but across baseball now many teams have released many many players from their minor league some they're they're gonna pay up through the end of August others are not going to be paid after it may thirty first what's your take on what the giants did with the minor leagues and just in general I have are we seeing the end of the minor leagues well we're not we're not seeing the end of the minor leagues I would you encourage your subscribers to diminish that chronicle dot com I just posted a story where I ate out profile one of the players who got cut by the giants on Thursday Brandon Lawson I was actually a high school teammate of Christian Arroyo and so I I I broke all all about these cuts and wise to where forced the numbers stand kind of personalized it with one case yeah you know baseball America had an interesting stat the other day they said that normally between March and this time in may like last year there were three hundred minor league players cut by the thirty teams this year there was only a hundred and seven or something like that being that teams normally cut a lot of players in March it's spring training is made they go to spring training and the teams go you know what these guys are not only not gonna make the majors we have better options to fill the rosters dealers is what they call them not a really nice name so this year they didn't make those cuts because you know for one thing nobody really knew what was gonna happen and for another thing optics were good it just didn't look you wouldn't look good you know for their right when this pandemic started for the teams to cut all these players but some teams are just making the financial decision that now is the time to do it they're not safe the teams are not saving a ton of money by cutting anywhere from twenty to at what I heard is fifty players the giants actually got seventeen players before Thursday just gradually over the weeks but it's really he speaks to eight the reduction in the minor leagues that we're going to see doesn't mean it's the elimination of the minor leagues next year they're going to be forty fewer teens probably yes if a small gets its way and and puts together and you know the points for this new affiliation proposals in the hundred and forty four hundred fourteen to seven hundred sixty teams and so that's forty teams were you're not gonna need players and that's a balancing player that's more than thousand players and what's happening is the teams are are just are doing it now they're calling now because it will save them a few blocks and they also you know to make room for some of the draftees that they're gonna get me free agents are gonna sign it's just too bad for these players because they have nowhere else to go I mean you can mark an enormous season you can try and log on with another team there's no work for these guys to hook on to and you know the giants could have held these subjects are gonna pay their mind their minor league leaders at least through June thirtieth it is raising a lot of these twenty players were costing thirty five thousand dollars and is one of my Twitter followers and the giants can find more than that just rummaging through the soap was that twenty four Willie Mays plaza for their business people and they made a business decision and you know the fans just have to kind of decide on their own whether it was you know what I do about it well that brings us to the draft to which will be June the tenth and the eleventh five rounds now then after that you can send anybody for twenty thousand dollars if they adhere to what the restriction is how do you think this affects the giants all the giants and and again I'm gonna plug myself I wrote a story that man and I believe it was in Thursday's paper I get a whole big interview on a podcast with Michael Holmes is the amateur scouting director and the giants have an advantage in one way and in a disadvantage in another eating one where they have an advantage because because they lost will Smith and Madison Bumgarner free agency we have two extra picks this year nine in a forty round draft every two extra picks doesn't make it a big deal in a five round draft is a huge deal because that means there's two players they like that they'll be able to take that won't be in the school of twenty thousand dollar free agents that you just mentioned so so they have an advantage in that regard to get me get more money to spend on bonuses for those seven players are going to take in the in the five rounds they also have the advantage that being a team that's not very good bay area and it seems it's going through all this the changes now they have a good argument to make to these twenty thousand dollar free agents have signed with us you have a much better chance of getting in the major leagues faster if you come here in the other side of the coin is that if you're an organization like the Dodgers or the Yankees one of the real G. organizations that has been winning a lot lately you could throw the Boston Sunita the Boston Red Sox in there some other teams like that national Lauren itself and there may be some players who all things being equal get twenty thousand dollar offer from the giants twenty thousand dollar offer from the Padres twenty thousand dollar option from the Yankees win all of a sudden there eyes light up because they might want to be in construction so usually giants have to do a good job of selling it they become recruiters and that's what I've written in the story and they used it everybody from top executives to players current players name used to call some of these newsrooms are some of these prospects to.

Schulman San Francisco Chronicle
Growing Weed in the Garden with Johanna Silver

Cultivating Place

08:35 min | 1 year ago

Growing Weed in the Garden with Johanna Silver

"Joanna. Silver is a gardener. Writer and editor formerly the Gordon Editor at Sunset magazine. She is a regular contributor to Martha Stewart Living. Better homes and gardens and the San Francisco Chronicle the author of the old dry garden on the garden and legacy of famed California plants woman. Ruth Bancroft this week. Joanna joins us to talk about her newest book growing weed in the garden. A no fuss seed to stash guide to outdoor cannabis cultivation out now from Abrahams press cannabis in California has been legal for medical use since nineteen ninety-six and in November of Two Thousand Sixteen California. Voters approved the adults use of Marijuana Act to legalize the recreational use of cannabis the use sale and possession of cannabis over a certain level of THC remains illegal under federal US law that said according to a recent report on NPR thirty three US states currently allow for some form of sale and consumption of marijuana and of those more than twenty states have designated the cannabis industry as essential during the corona virus outbreak from her shelter in place with her young family in Berkeley California. Joanna joins us today to shine a brighter light on the often confusing. Growing we'd as Gardiner's welcome Joanna. Thank you so nice to be here back with you. The last time we spoke we were speaking primarily about your first book the Bold Dry Garden and this new book is something of a An adventurous kind of Tangent. Or like offshoot from your original. Garden writing work. I want to start though with your current relationship to plants and the garden world both personal and Professional Joanna. What do you do everyday tell listeners? More about who you are and what you're up to. It is so nice to be talking to you again even just anticipating the conversation that I would be having with. You got me just like thinking about life and anyway thank you. Just thank you for having me. Thank you for making all the room to talk to people about about exactly this. Their relationship to plants I am home now as you know. All non-essential workers are and I am doing the very essential work of raising my son who turns three in July and In a non pandemic situation spends most of his day in a share So we gardened some But it was more like gardening light and now that we're home together. I am gardening heavy and doing with him I salt. I was already going to have a vegetable garden this year. I was already scaling back on the. We'd I'm only really growing at this year to continue to write about it It's a it's a really fun plant to grow et Cetera et CETERA. But I really have this urge to grow fruits and vegetables with my son and so even though that was already going to happen I dug up to maybe like eight by eight feet by thirty inch. Beds right in the middle of our meadow grass to with him to create more space. So as I talked to you he's asleep. There's dirt all over my hands and I'm feeling really really connected to the hard honest Labor of garden creation and it feels so good so good and you. You touched on a couple of things already right there. One being the fact that many of us are home as quote unquote non essential and yet in this moment so many people have turned back to activities and connections that are so essential like our own attachment and connection to how you survive how we make our out. We make our lives not just livings. And that is in raising our families and cultivating art pieces of land. So okay I'M GONNA I'M GONNA have a go back just a little bit before we dig into the structure of the book in in some of these levels on which you got intrigued. Many listeners will remember the bull dry garden. But just for those who. Don't give us a little background on you. Where where were the people? And the places and the plants that grew into a person who would wanna be a person that wrote about gardens and gardening with her son as a matter of both principle and practicality so I got my start farming in college after traveling so really interested in food and food security. I had a very meandering path and ended up in the editorial Test Garden at Sunset Magazine. Back in the Menlo Park days through to the Oakland and New Test Garden in Sonoma's county days and went from outdoors at the magazine to indoors. Writing and editing and timber press reached out to me looking for a bay area writer to write this book idea that they had about Ruth Bancroft S- Garden cactus in dry garden in Walnut Creek California and I pitched myself because I was young and ambitious and so I wrote a book about. Ruth's life and Roots Gardens. She just passed away actually also twenty early twenty eighteen late twenty seventeen at the age of one hundred nine And so just a couple of years before that. I wrote this book about her life and her garden. I think the fun one of the fun things for me as a gardener and garden communicator journalist person is seeing so many come back to gardening and recognize it as this essential thing that it is and that you and I and kind of die. Hard gardeners have has always known. And we've been advocating for now. You also indicated in this first question this sort of interesting Almost conflicted feeling about growing weed. And I think it's a perfect segue into the conversation for us on this on this program. People have been telling me that I should do an episode on weed for the longest time. Because as you note in your introduction to the book it's one of the largest crops in California and many many people are interested in it and it has this deep historical ritualistic medicinal blige intimate like wait and Gravitas to it but that is so blurred by the the other baggage that comes with it that I have stayed away from it until now because I was so compelled by yearbook and the way that you handled that year and maybe it was a little bit more of researching documenting and writing about this project. You took on as a as an assignment not necessarily a personal passion but an assignment and So we really kind of want to get into that the I just WanNa say by the way that your documentation of life at home with your To almost three-year-old Garden intern as you call him on. Instagram has been in total pleasure to watch in. Its true sort of honesty. Raw dirty fingered honesty. Thank you. It's been. It's been a massive creative outlet for me. Yeah Yeah Okay so. Tell us about this book. Why this book how did it happen? What made you decide to take on writing a book about growing weed in twenty seventeen? I had a baby and I was headed back to work You know six ish months later back to Sunset Magazine Garden editor where I thought I'd have the job for the rest of my life Kathy Brazil before me held the position for forty years and I was all set to go back. It was the week before. Maternity leave was over and the place was bought by private equity in lost my job I felt desperate to keep writing and working and reached out to everyone. I've ever written for asking for assignments Just to keep going to feel some forward momentum and a former editor in chief of the magazine. Kitty Morgan Worked at the Chronicle San Francisco Chronicle and I reached out to her until I wanted to write for her you know. The chronicle does garden design edible gardening whatever and She said you have a new baby. I bet you don't have time to do lunch But I may be called her bluff and I was like I totally have time to do lunch and met her for lunch and she. It was right before recreational use went legal and including recreational growing in California. And she was like I have this whole other idea for you. I want you to grow wheat in your backyard and documented as a gardener. I think at that time everyone like it was coming but it still felt even more taboo than it does now. We were all sort of figuring out how to talk about how he felt about cannabis being something that we can talk about and And so I told her I didn't know where to get seeds. And she said emphatically. That's your opening line and it was supposed to be for this part the separate website run by the Co Chronicle called Green State Which has since been folded into the magazine or into the newspaper and it actually got got lost its funding for a while but kitty was so dedicated to me that they ran the series in the food and wine section on Sundays and I worked through this ten part series for them on growing lead in my backyard as a gardener starting from knowing nothing to having a big crash course in the plant yet everything about the naming and needing to forge new contacts. I had I was starting from zero other than my years of experience being garden writer And a gardener no for sunset.

Cannabis California Joanna Sunset Magazine Ruth Bancroft San Francisco Chronicle Sunset Magazine Garden Writer And Editor New Test Garden United States Writer Martha Stewart Marijuana Berkeley California Joanna. Silver Co Chronicle Abrahams Instagram Editor
Acting Navy secretary rips ousted captain of aircraft carrier

America in the Morning

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Acting Navy secretary rips ousted captain of aircraft carrier

"The acting navy secretary faces a barrage of criticism for firing and then issuing a scathing attack against the captain of the USS Theodore Roosevelt correspondent Linda Kenyon is following the story the USS Theodore Roosevelt is a U. S. navy aircraft carrier that holds up to five thousand navy personnel captain Brad crozier was relieved of command after an email he sent to several senior defense officials was leaked to the San Francisco Chronicle the letter warned of a growing corona virus outbreak on board the vessel with nearly one hundred crewmembers infected at

Secretary Linda Kenyon Theodore Roosevelt Brad Crozier San Francisco Chronicle
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KGO 810

"Says the San Francisco Chronicle Phil was spoofs of your favorite pop culture characters big hats big hair and a big a louse closing December thirty first for tickets visit beach blanket Babylon dot com today sunshine and warm temperatures this Labor Day in the highs in the upper eighties to mid nineties mostly sunny for the bayside temperatures a seventy degrees and sixties along the coast I'm Terry rouses sign for the best what Thompson here in Cajun way to Doug Andrew here when I raise and then later for a win Kay's were introduced by Congress I wrote an article titled how government is peddling are ready for a one K. snake oil time magazine had a cover story titled why it's time to retire the four oh one K. and do something better instead a year ago the Wall Street journal had an article the original champions of the four oh one K. lament the day they came up with that idea why all this negative hype because your money gets in a tax trap and it's hard to free yourself solve your IRA four oh one K. delay. for a half day come and learn how to avoid tax trauma and retire by design join Douglas Andrew in Santa Clara and Dublin on Thursday September twelfth and in Walnut Creek and Palo alto on Friday September thirteenth this is a free event for those reservists seat in time call eight eight eight two six one eighty one eighty one to register and get details call now that's eight eight eight two six one eighty one eighty one. nor cal Honda dealers present ask Tom Tolbert today's question what team do you think will be celebrating when the summer's over right now I put my money in a team from a city thirty with an age no not Honolulu I also put my money in a car starting with an eight Honda because their end of summer celebration is the sale of the summer every new Hyundai model is on sale and they're all spectacular nor cal Honda dealers end of summer celebration is on celebrate Honda summer spectacular event with sizzling deals like a one eighty nine a month lease on the legendary civic loaded with high tech sporty style and always a kick to drive celebrate now through September third that's H. as in a hurry Lisa twenty nineteen civic sedan CBJ likes for one eighty nine per month for thirty six months at twenty one ninety nine due at signing for well qualified lessees approved by Honda financial services excludes taxes license no security deposit fifteen cents per mile over twelve thousand miles per year higher rates apply for lower credit ratings prices interns may very see dealer for details offer ends nine three nineteen for more info ask anyone who owns a Honda like me or visit North Carolina dealers dot com. warning this product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical not FOR sale to minors website restricted to adults twenty one and over I've been smoking for awhile I tried V. eating when it first came out it just didn't work for me but recently I tried my blue and actually gave me the nicotine satisfaction I was looking for my blue is easy to use it lasts all.

Phil San Francisco Chronicle one K thirty six months seventy degrees
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"That's a good point so Facebook work was only a few years old when Obama was going out doing all those interviews and and everything else and we go back to the two thousand seven interview with the San Francisco Chronicle under my plan of cap and trade electricity rates would necessarily skyrocket it was years before people became aware of that and still we would get calls he never said that we have to play the audio for them yeah today I think about a year ago somebody calls is that how dare you yeah right fame Obama Obama never said he was going to hide our rock electricity prices and so we pulled out the audio guy had a friend who said to me that someone who's very close to me that I've known for years well over twenty years who said did he really say that played in the audio played in the video yeah there you go because it was it was harder to do now not on it was easier to ignore it I'm not gonna I'm not because it was harder to do your homework it was easier it was very easy if you wanted to it was easy to ignore it if you're active on social media at all these days it's going to come around if Elizabeth Warren said that I'm okay I can you can bet that sometime during the day if it hasn't already started the whole people who shower after work it's going to be a new thing on Twitter we've gone from kitchen table issues ten people who shower after work that's right by the way Tim Ryan the only one who did not put his hand over his heart yeah I've seen a few conservative magazine say that he's gone for the capric vote but during the star spangled banner that they played apparently he did not put his hand over his heart nobody Neil though nobody kneeled we were shocked by that yeah apparently the the the Capper Nick demographic is not being highly sought by anybody except Tim Ryan right now that's gonna join in Pennsylvania drain high you're not already a welcome to the show I doing.

San Francisco Chronicle Obama Obama Elizabeth Warren Twitter Tim Ryan Facebook Neil Pennsylvania twenty years
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The country that this Saturday marks the fifty years since Neil Armstrong took one small step for man one giant leap for mankind as for the first time and walked on the moon the Apollo missions should be remembered for generations to come Grassley called the achievement of triumph for innovation hard work and for the American spirit celebrations to mark the anniversary are set to take place around the country this weekend buying new report Berkeley California is adopted an ordinance to replace some terms with gender neutral words in the city code the San Francisco Chronicle reports Wednesday that she and he will be replaced by the day the words manpower and manhole become workforce and making this whole this is Donald dot com Japan's ruling military council in opposition leaders have signed a power sharing accord after all night talks while the deputy head of Sudan's ruling military council is calling it a stork moment for the country not everyone is covered the pack will lead to peace it seems unlikely judging from the tone all the Porter says another leading depend on the details of this agreement once it's fully signed especially the constitutional agreement that now would make this thing legal will the military agreed to sign a deal that could potentially put someone leaders behind bars for a very long time on the other hand put just as a warning that if they do see that the deal agrees to any sort of immunity then they will go back to the streets because according to them so done will not move on until those who performed at treaties against innocent people in their eyes have been brought to justice that's the BBC's Ferdinand Amonte more.

Neil Armstrong Grassley California San Francisco Chronicle Japan deputy head Sudan military council Porter BBC Ferdinand Amonte Berkeley Donald dot fifty years
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"We'll tell you about our two guests in just a second. But let me tell you about the rest of the week, Bruce Jenkins who is a noted sports columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle very interesting family, his dad, if you think about the last name Jenkins, I think, you know, where I'm going with this great composer and music arranger for some of the biggest names in music. And he has written a book about his dad, and also we're going to be talking with good friend of mine. Barry Tompkins when I came to San Francisco from Seattle on television. Very and I worked together a channel four but he is a man that is very talented calling play by play no matter what the event might be. And then don't forget, coming up on Friday. Roy is in heart drops by he does each week. We call the second segment inside angle as he and I take a look at some of the interesting stories, breakdown. For Sal berry will drop by the collectors corner is his segment. And of course, the national collector's convention is coming up in Chicago this summer. So he and I will talk about that in case you're interested in going and taking it in and also on Friday, HANA Ali is going to be joining us, you certainly do recognize the name Ali, the daughter of Mohammed Ali, and she has written a wonderful book about her father, and also Brian Billick will be here. We'll talk about his life and career, of course, he joins us during the fall when we have NFL football he takes us inside the game. Breaking down everything that's happening. And of course, he knows it very well because he was a Super Bowl winning head coach with the Baltimore Ravens when they beat the giants. And don't forget, check out the award winning sports, byline, USA website. You can listen to us anytime online at sports, byline dot com. Jen Mueller a little bit later on in the hour..

Brian Billick Barry Tompkins Bruce Jenkins HANA Ali San Francisco Chronicle sports columnist Mohammed Ali San Francisco Jen Mueller Sal berry giants Roy Baltimore Ravens Chicago NFL USA Seattle
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Talking breaking? So the magic mushroom deal since since we got into this. I was going to bring it up later, Tom del because obviously thinking of this top of mind. Dan, Neuner technological are immediately. When I was still a thing. Yes. So stupid didn't say that imply. I just know that fact I know someone mentioned names here because it's a child to be pretty famous person, but who ran afoul of the law with the problem. Magic mushrooms. That are, what are their, their mushrooms, have a hallucinogen ick effect, doesn't everything in a way having everything it's used for hash oil labs can explode in resolute. Everything's got some good bit of a problem. You know it's the thing now round up. Okay. Everything killed you. Well, yeah, well, let's not get too philosophical. Really Cortez says we got to do all this green stuff. But then, by the way, we're done in twelve years anyway. What's the point then? So here's this is from the San Francisco Chronicle. Or as we like to call it. Sometimes these San Francisco chronically wrong. But I'm going to go along with this, Oakland city council may board the magic bus, along with a Denver by decriminalizing natural psychedelic. So they're already doing the hey, here's where you can shoot up. You can get the needle stuff. We don't care what you're shooting up cleaning fluid. Okay, fine. Go ahead. We'll give you clean needles. So now they're saying, well, you know, they smell money out of this, because then there would be state licensed mushroom shops. I don't think they'll have as much of a grab as far as promotions as marijuana's marijuana deal. What are people doing people who love the marijuana are gonna go? They pepin going out circumventing going around those, those legal shops more marijuana, or maybe like CD products. It's inconsistent Oakland could become the second city in the country to decriminalize certain. I love the euphemism here, the natural psychedelics sounds so. Nice natural all natural psychedelics. Include edge, not only magic mushrooms, but including the so-called magic mushrooms if elected leaders in Oakland, and they may already be into the magic mushroom approve a resolution that would instruct law enforcement. See that's another thing. The cops have to worry about all the PC stuff, they also have to worry about the list of things. They can't enforce anymore. So this resolution if they pass it an Oakland would instruct law enforcement to stop just stop stop investigating and prosecuting people using. Magic mushrooms did these people are sometimes identified. Well, what do you think about the current political thing Nixon's gotta go man? The resolution is coming up tonight. Scheduled for its first public hearing in Oakland. Don't let the sandiego city council member some of them are going to think this is really great. Don't let him know. Sorry, I brought it up. Actually kinda fun resolution is scheduled for its first public hearing tonight. The Oakland city council's public safety committee could go before the full council was early as next week. It applies only to psychedelics come see this. It's so nice. It's so natural. It's just so we're Ganic it. Applies only the psychedelics man that come from plants or fungi. Not. Synthetics like LSD are MDA known as ecstasy councilman, no old Gallo who introduced a resolution said he hopes the decriminalization of natural psychedelics could help people with mental health issues. By giving them.

Oakland Oakland city council marijuana San Francisco Chronicle Tom del San Francisco Neuner technological Dan sandiego MDA Cortez Gallo pepin Nixon Denver LSD twelve years
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the point where the median rent right now for one. Veteran apartment is three thousand five hundred a month. Unbelievable. Yeah. And then sort of related to this or homelessness crisis. Tens of thousands of our community members continue to live unsheltered on the streets to just to the growing economic divide here in our city how much do the slew of IPO's worsened that situation. That's something about city leaders. And I think most members of our communities are very concerned about there's been a number of studies that have documented how does have a very significant impact increasing the housing costs in the immediate neighborhood. This is an unprecedented situation where we have seven large tech companies going public in the same timeframe all in the same city. So there's a lot of concern about this. So how does your proposed tax address some of those concerns that you've just stated it would basically just restore attacks on stock compensation income in our city, and this is a tax that actually existed prior to two thousand twelve when we started on granting tax breaks to grow the tech. Sector in our city and the revenue would be used to address the growing inequality crisis in our city to expand affordable housing for working class and middle class residents to support and stabilize or small businesses here in the city that are struggling in haven't benefited from the same tax breaks and just to be clear you've written this proposal. So that this tax would apply to IPO's that have already recently happened like lift and Pinterest, and we should note that your proposals still needs to be passed by the San Francisco board of supervisors, and then it would go directly to the voters on the ballot in November. Exactly. I mean, it's still there still can be a lot of public process and debate about this. Okay. Now, one of your colleagues on the board of supervisors told the San Francisco Chronicle that it's quote arrogant to think that tech companies won't leave the city if they are taxed more aggressively. Are you worried about that risk that your tax proposal might drive some tech companies out of San Francisco? I mean, that's something that. I wouldn't say I'm worried about. But it's definitely something about I'm thoughtfully considering as well as my colleagues will be how do you protect against that risk? I do feel like that fear is overstated when it comes to the IPO tax. I've never one it's a very small tax it. We're talking about one point five percent on the immense wealth that will be flowing in when these companies go public on very interested in ensuring that we have a balanced economy here in San Francisco, then includes a sectarian tech sector, but also supports other sectors that haven't benefited from the same tax breaks. Now, San Francisco is a city where a family of four earning one hundred seventeen thousand dollars a year qualifies as low income, according to the department of housing and urban development. This is a staggering figure is the battle to keep San Francisco. Affordable already a lost battle. That's a very good question. I'm still optimistic that we can turn things around here. And right the ship in San Francisco, we can't just keep supporting job creation and growth unchecked. And now in twenty nineteen it's time for us to ask the tech sector to start paying their fair share in taxes so that we can support everybody to be able to live and thrive in our city. San Francisco supervisor Gordon marr joined us from member station K Q E D in San Francisco. Thank you very much for speaking with us. Thank you. Also, scientists are about to launch a major study to find out whether a drug can silence. The gene that causes the devastating illness Huntington's disease. This follows the discovery that the experimental drug reduced levels of the damage to protein that causes this mind, robbing disease as NPR science correspondent, Richard Harris reports the new study will determine whether that drug can also stop Huntington's progression. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease. There's a fifty fifty chance you will get it to Ginette Garcia lost her mother to Huntington's. She's one of ten children who get together for huge family reunions with all the usual drama of events like that. But when you throw the word Huntington's disease into that mix. It is all the sudden this terrifying prospects that were faced with the disease usually strikes in middle age and can unfold over the course of ten to twenty years the symptoms of HD are like having Alzheimer's. Carrington's A-List simultaneously. When it's in its full swing. The fifty seven year old woman from San Jose headed genetic test a decade ago and found out that she was going to develop Huntington's eventually, and she's recently been seeing the first signs, including involuntary movements which she noticed when watching video of herself I saw myself about four months ago for the first time, and I went home fully crap. Okay. Here we go course, he is disease is emerging it what could be a fortunate moment. She's heading off to a neurologist to see if she would qualify for a study that is generating a lot of excitement last year drug company. Roche Genentech announced that an experimental drug sharply reduced the amount of illness inducing protein, measured in people's spinal fluid. They are now about to launch a trial involving more than six hundred people with early symptoms of the disease to see if they can slow or stop its progression. So exciting and they're filling it, and I wanna be a part of it. Dr Scott schobul who heads the research effort on this drug at Roche says it's been more than twenty five years since the Huntington g. Gene was discovered to take him that long to translate the digital genetic discoveries into a tractable therapeutic strategy, scientists developed ways to silence the damage, gene. So the body makes far less of the illness inducing protein. Other researchers figured out how to deliver the drug into the brain the solution. There is to inject it into a person's spinal fluid. The drug could actually transfer quite readily to the brain, and then sink into the target brain tissue. Roche started recruiting patients for its new study in January, but it halted the trial after discovering the drug didn't need to be injected as often as they'd planned. We're going to get back up and running over the next several weeks to months Huntington's affects about thirty thousand people in the United States, and this drug is the most hopeful news yet, George your Lena, scientists at the Huntington's disease society of America says his main concern is whether the drug will penetrate deeply enough into the brain to stop the disease. If not other treatments are also in the works. He says. Some with more potential to reach deep into the brain. So lot of different approaches are being worked on in different stages of drug discovery across the world. It's really quite exciting. Ginette Garcia says she's all in on this one and not for herself as much as for her four children and six grandchildren. I have a grandson Richard that was born blind whose at risk for HD. I'm just not going to stop because I don't want him to..

San Francisco Huntington San Francisco Chronicle Ginette Garcia Roche Richard Harris Huntington g San Jose department of housing Roche Genentech Alzheimer Pinterest NPR Gene Carrington supervisor Dr Scott schobul Gordon marr United States
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KGO 810

"You want me to say San Francisco Chronicle, you can call me whatever you want. I can call you. Well, I called you to come here and talk. Let's talk a bit about congestion pricing. You have a unique way of getting around him. But not that many people really do it your way on my Vespa on your little black and orange. You got to represent the giants my black and orange vest. But it's very efficient all well and good. But with that in mind in most people don't have that suppose, they have cars, they drive the city is absolutely choking with cars. You got Uber. And lift now, adding to the congestion, fortunately, but I'm just saying they doing it. What about congestion pricing? It's something that seems to be at least talked about more and more lately, it's talked about more and more. I mean, we have a real problem with I think what the ride sharing companies have done. It's. If you live out of the core of the city like I do like, you do it's great to have Uber and left because you can get finally somebody to pick you up the taxis were never picking us up and no valley. I don't know about you same here. But they're definitely causing more congestion in the city to the point where the only way you can get around fishing is a bicycle or Vespa. I would argue or maybe your feet your feet, but I wonder about things like the idea of the traffic department and risk who's the director of traffic and everything that makes me mad when it comes to driving Ed risking his whole idea is in a sense, social engineering give people out of their cars now part of that involves congestion pricing to that's one of the arguments you can make for it. But I always say what do you do? If you're eighty five year old lady living in the sunset, and you gotta go to Safeway what he's supposed to buy clear. Vespa our dropping your kid off at school. It would be almost impossible for my husband to get our kid to school without waking up an hour early. If it wasn't for our car. There are a lot of people who need the cars. I mean, heck people who work at the chronicle. They work past the hours that transit effectively runs. To the suburbs. You don't have an option, but to take a car for a lot of these people, and I worry that making it too expensive for people to drive. It's not hurting those of us who might be able to afford it. It's affecting the working class in God knows in the city. We already do enough to hurt the working class. They have experimental. What do they call them Lexus lanes? That's the unofficial name for them up and down the state, and they seem to be working. I mean, the ease congestion and yet at the same time you've got basically the same number of cars. Yeah. I think it's one thing if you wanna go faster, but if you just need a congestion pricing to just people permission to drive than we need. And and a lot of other people in the city to do a heck of a lot better job of making transit work for everybody. There's another aspect to it too. And that's up in Sacramento. They have objections to it if a city can't do that on its own. Yeah. Well, nobody wants to cities to go amok has San Francisco has been accused of doing. Yeah. That's our thing is a muck. Of course. Sacramento doesn't want to. I I don't know that they're going to be able to stop it. If there's actually consensus in the city. Well, the latest poll that I read was from the chamber. Commerce and sixty five percent of people opposed it. However, apparently when they did that same question in Sweden, where they have congestion pricing that again, they really oppose it until they put it into place. Now, people love it. Yeah. Well, again, if you could get me from my house to my kid's school and to work quickly without me spending an hour and a half doing it to go three miles. I would do it in a heartbeat. There's another aspect of it too. We now have a subway that has taken fifty seven years to actually finish a subway that absolutely nobody wanted. But we have that see that is easing congestion. I mean, I hope it does. But it doesn't go very far right now. Does it doesn't really doesn't stop in north beach. Not yet. And nobody wants it and the construction going on in this town is unreal. Now, they have those little park. Let's that creating all kinds of problems congestion pricing. Forget that just get rid of the park. Let's I don't know if that's going to solve everything we have a lot of people coming here. A lot of people driving. We need a better solution for sure Audrey Cooper editor in chief San Francisco Chronicle, the Ron Owens report every weekday at eleven thirty again at three thirty and seven thirty on cage. G O eight five hour teen with caffeine from green.

San Francisco Chronicle Sacramento Ed San Francisco Lexus caffeine Safeway Audrey Cooper Sweden director north beach Ron Owens editor in chief sixty five percent fifty seven years eighty five year eight five hour
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Good evening and welcome everybody to today's program of the of the Commonwealth club. Audrey Cooper, the editor in chief of the San Francisco Chronicle, and I'll be your moderator today. Joining me is Andrew McCabe. The former deputy director of the FBI, and perhaps more notably. The former acting director of the FBI during his career Mr. MacKay played a role in some of the most important events in recent US history, he investigated organized rushing crime pursued those responsible for the attacks on the US embassy in Benghazi was involved in the manhunt for the Boston marathon bombers and was put in charge of coming up with mutual interrogation techniques for the FBI and the CIA after the abuses were discovered in Guantanamo, but he may not have become a household name that we all know had it not been for a series of unprecedented actions that led him to take the reins of the FBI after the president fired director James Comey in may two thousand seventeen. A move. The president himself has said was linked to the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen presidential election. And so is acting director Mr. McCabe opened investigations of the president of the United States, including whether the president obstructed Justice. And whether the president was an asset of the Russian government, Mr. McCabe was fired in March last year just twenty six hours before he was to retired cited as justification for. That is a report from the Justice department inspector general who said that Mr. mccade lied to investigators, including three times under oath, Mr. McCabe has a different explanation for what happened, and I'm sure we'll get into in his new book the threat how the FBI protects America in the age of terror and Trump he recounts the highs and lows of working an independent governmental agency in an age where everything is politicized. Welcome to the car. Commonwealth club. Mr cape..

Andrew McCabe FBI president deputy director Mr cape Commonwealth club US James Comey acting director Mr. MacKay San Francisco Chronicle Audrey Cooper editor in chief Justice department director Russian government Benghazi Boston CIA
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KCRW

"Her article on diamonds is in the San Francisco Chronicle. Coming up laws in some conservative states. Make it harder for women to get abortions. Even if they're not sure about whether or not they're going to have an abortion that has nothing to do with the stuff on the consent and has to do with their jobs and their partners and their children the consent really just serves to make them feel bad about their decision. Those laws also deter physicians from providing abortions, we're going to speak with a California doctor who travels once a month to Arizona to give women abortions that story next on press play. Good afternoon. It's one thirty three. I'm Eric Roy with California headlines from KCRW, the merger of the Walt Disney company and twenty first Century Fox closed yesterday and the layoffs have begun with four thousand jobs said to be on the chopping block. The rap reports that FOX human resources began making phone calls this morning, targeting employees at the senior vice president executive vice president and presidential level FOX distribution chief, Chris Aronson was one of the first to go issuing a statement expressing gratitude for his time at FOX rain can do a real number on southern California streets and roads, here's one way to measure it during last month's record breaking showers. The city of LA's a big spike in requests for pothole repairs. Artsy artsy has born February saw a record high number of pothole feeling requests made through L as three one one service the smartphone app and phone line requesting city assistance, Greg spots with the city's bureau of St. services says nearly eight thousand requests were made. For pothole repairs. That's up from four thousand requests in January. I think the pothole requests are up because of the rain and the damage the rain has done to streets. But also because it's so much easier to report a pothole now that you can use a smartphone app to do. So so easy. Spot says that half of those service requests for potholes are now coming in electronically. The department says it usually takes the city about three days to fill a pothole when the weather is good during a storm season. It takes about four to five days in Los Angeles. Police are looking for whoever put up anti semitic posters at two schools in the San Fernando Valley earlier this week the daily news reports the flyers were printed with swastikas and offensive messages that equate Nazism with Zionism and the state of Israel at least five of the flyers were found Monday morning around El Camino real charter high school in Woodland Hills. And another one along the perimeter of Nestle avenue charter elementary school. Previous reports allege that the flyers were also found near Calabasas high school and the Westfield.

California FOX Los Angeles San Francisco Chronicle Nestle avenue charter elementa senior vice president executiv Calabasas high school San Fernando Valley Walt Disney company Arizona Eric Roy Israel Chris Aronson El Camino KCRW Greg Woodland Hills Westfield Spot St. services
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:25 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Avenue since plan to tackle big issues from healthcare to natural disasters and the challenges. He faces was fleeing Shanghai. A new book examines forgotten to this out of China. A story with similarities to what's happening around the world today. Hello and welcome to KiKi weedy newsroom. Tweet. Do we begin with tensions over border security as the partial federal government shutdown stretches on this week? President Trump addressed the nation to make his case for a border wall. This barrier is absolutely critical to border security. It's also what our professionals at the border want. Indeed, this is just common sense. The next day he abruptly ended a meeting with house speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer who have refused to provide billions and funding for the wall in exchange for ending the government shutdown President Trump has threatened to declare a national emergency to get the military to build the wall that would likely spark a legal crisis. Meanwhile, in California, newly sworn in governor Gavin Newsom unveiled a budget, totaling two hundred nine billion dollars yesterday among the funding proposals. More than a billion dollars just for affordable housing construction nearly two billion dollars for early childhood education and an additional hundred and five million dollars to fight and prevent wildfires. Joining me now to discuss this R, K Q, E, D senior editor of politics and government. Scott Shafer, San Francisco Chronicle senior political writer, Joe gara-, fully and GOP political consultant, Sean Walsh, nice to have all if you bet. Well, let's start with governor Newsom in his new budget proposal, Scott. What does it tell you about where he's going to focus most of his energy? Interestingly unluckily for him. He's got a twenty one point four billion dollars surplus always nice to have some money to play. With surprisingly he's putting thirteen billion plus of that into paying down the debt rainy day fun. I think a lot of people expected he was going to go on a spending spree, and he is certainly spending some money meetings focusing on the things he talked about during the campaign childcare early childhood education family, parental leave increasing the earned income tax credit for working families. I think he's really focusing on families kids students, maybe a second year of community college for free that kind of thing. And Joe there are some powerful groups that backed him during his campaign, for example, the California, nurses union on issue campaigns such as universal health care. How are they and other groups that he appealed to responding to this new budget, very supportive and one of the more surprising things I've found yesterday at the the bud. Rollout was was hard to find a Republican Basham. You should. That's the easiest thing is what do you think of the opposing parties plan is our that was horrible. But there was like some sort of baseline respect for it. Because he sucked a lot of money away for a rainy day fund. But musuem is it's it's like, he's creating a nation state of California right here. You don't need the feds won't cover undocumented immigrants, California. We'll we'll cover coverage. Workers we're going to have our own surgeon general. I mean, he's watching this is going to get it done, then California, well because it's flush with money, and that's that's sort of his response to Trump, isn't it? Well, I defined Republican. So that's number one number two. I think people were pleasantly surprised that he didn't go all in a single payer healthcare proposal. Now, he could how would we take for it? Well, I'm not sure if you think long-term how he's gonna pay for some of the stuff. He's already done Jerry Brown when he was going out the door actually put for a little over four billion dollars in do baseline budget spending for increased salaries for state workers a lot of these issues they were campaign pledges and his great when you got billions of dollars to hit those campaign pledges early. But depending on how you roll these healthcare issues out they are ongoing budgetary issues that can cause. So if you spend one time money on roads, bridges, etc. That's one thing. But when the economy eventually flip if you have ongoing spending, and if you unionize these John your workers. Very expensive ongoing governors are tempted to do that all the time. You remember when you work for Pete Wilson, they reduce class size down to twenty or fewer. And then of course, the recession hits in now it's up to twenty five thirty. So it's hard to resist that money when it's just sitting there. And when the legislature is willing to go along with it, and certainly it came out swinging on the issue of health care, right? He one of the more controversial aspects of what he's proposing that he wants to give full access to medical for all undocumented immigrants up to age twenty six and already there's criticism on that from Republicans on the National Front. Look you have. So some of the healthcare he wants to actually go back to the mandate in California the mandate. You've got seventy percent of the people who will be paying into this mandate, helping to subsidize putting wealthier people onto the the the state medical rolls number one and number two. Should you? Tell people who are in the state, and we've got the highest poverty rates in the state that they should be picking up the tab. For people that are coming from other countries. You know, this is the welcome wagon California caravan sign we're open for people to come across the border illegally. It sends a very clear signal. Now, granted Democrats like it. And I think he gets some good PR out of it. But the long-term financial costs are very significant California also has been criticized for having pretty low very low reimbursement rates for doctors. And so I was talking to j Albano to that Republican who co chairs the assembly budget committee yesterday. He said, look I have constituents who already get Medicare. But they can't find a doctor because a lot of doctors just won't take those patients and Newsome is also inheriting a couple of projects from former governor Jerry Brown, that's the delta water tunnels and also high speed rail. What is he going to do with those Joe, I'm high-speed rail? He said he is reviewing the program the leadership, and he's he's trying to figure out as he says what it is. And what it is. And I think what it isn't is a full trip from San Francisco to Los Angeles. Look for him to sort of focus on what he talked about in the campaign, which is valley the valley central valley where the cheap housing is set to Silicon Valley where the jobs are it's going to be a heavy lift the very little support. I think it's like was it twenty eight thirty percent support in the state for it. Now, both of the whole thing for the whole thing. Yeah. Sell the smaller, you might be able to sell that. But he's still has to find funding for if he does that though he's in violation of what the initiative was put on the ballot for number one. And number two he's in violation of federal matching dollars came from. So he would actually probably have to go back to the public to accept something along, although the ballot measure also called for getting money from the private sector, and the government would not have which has materialized, right? Let me ask you also about something else this week, and that is President Trump's tweet about threatening to cut off federal funds for relief for California's wildfires. He's once again accusing the state of poor forestry management practices. How the governor responded, and what does this say about his relationship with President Trump? Well, the governor responded, I think the way Republicans responded, which was to say it was inappropriate. It was one of these three AM tweets that FEMA didn't even know about the Republicans who represent the area up in Butte county people like Douglas alpha the congress member and they've members of the legislature. We're very critical. It's not helpful. And it wasn't really true. I mean FEMA didn't know anything about it that people who live there anxious because they were hearing that suddenly all these disaster funds. We're going to be cut off and Georgia at the forest land in California is managed by the federal government. Exactly. Exactly. So are there some things to do in terms of changing the policy with regard to management of those lands? Sure. But should the president of the United States be threatening to cut off funding? You know at a time when people are really hurting. I think most people would say no is this relationship with the president different than the relationship between Jerry Brown and President Trump. I think they both have the same relationship is that they kind of don't like the president in a political way, but you have to deal with them because that's where federal dollars come from. And I think do some kind of you know, throughout the last throughout this first week in office and throughout the campaign. These kind of. Kind of criticize teeth embarrassment and kind of followed the same path in that way. Well, Newsome also has an ex wife who's dating the president's son, Donald Trump junior. So that may be back channel. And it is because they they do still talk. All right. Let's talk about the border wall since we're talking about Trump can't talk about President Trump without talking about the border wall, he visited the border in Texas yesterday. He's not considering diverting disaster relief money, including funds allocated to help out in the aftermath of California's wildfires to build the wall. Sean can he do that? Without declaring a national emergency to declare a national emergency. Actually, it may be a slick way to get out of this budget impasse to be honest with you Democrats can say he can't really do it someone files a lawsuit. He gets figured out in the courts, they held the line with regards to a border fence, and then they can put a budget Ford. So it could be a slick way out number one number two with regards to the funding though. I mean, California when I was an governor Wilson's office. We spent about five billion dollars a year on services for. People not legally here in the state. I assume that twenty five years later, that's more than double. So what the state is putting forward and the federal government and reimbursements for costs associated with undocumented immigrants has to be well excessive ten billion dollars. So if you actually spent five billion dollars to build a wall, and I don't think they can do at that cheaply to be honest with you. But if you spent that you'd actually get those savings back fairly quickly, I think for a policy perspective Republicans and the president or on a good footing to have this argument about what's right and wrong legally coming here illegally coming here. But the tweets and the comments are just very very difficult for the Senate Republicans politics, so this this are terrible. He's be he'd be pulling money federal money from three the biggest states in the union, California, Florida and Texas. One of them's a swing state. One of them's a red state. When was the big blue state? So it's not good. And plus there's a tweet that sort of captured this the bad politics of this. It said now now Trump slogan is we're going to build a wall or we're gonna make people who lost their homes at a natural disaster. Pay for it. That's a terrible. I do think there are the makings of some kind of a compromise here for he I think the president kind of got into this beat by calling it a wall number one. And he also said that Mexico is going pay for it. I do think that a lot of Democrats including Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer are more than happy to talk about fencing. They've supported that in the past. There's already a lot of fencing as well as technology drones those sorts of things, and if they were both willing to kind of give a little bit they I think could get there. But the problem is both sides. They've kind of both cornered themselves into a wall. Right. I mean, he's President Trump has been talking. I'm getting that wall built to no matter what. And then Pelosi and frankly for the Democrats, there's there's really no downside for the right to keep this out to keep this book tracked it, and he got up. On the left that meeting because he said will you pay for the wall? And she says she said border security is what he said. And she said, no, I think, you know, if they're just talking about border security, it's different from talking about the wall. The far left. Democrats are pressing Pelosi. No wall, no wall and remember a year ago. The Democrats agreed to the wall they greet for twenty twenty five billion for the wall. And so they got if they got in exchange for the dreamers dreamers. But now that's off the table for him. Well, so in two thousand six we had the secure fence act. It was supported by Pelosi was supported by Schumer. It was supported by a bomb supported by Hillary Clinton. And you know, some guys running around college campuses giving quotes of those people then and they think it's Trump and they dump on it. I think actually fix would be to simply say, okay, the secure fence act required a second fence barrier in between. So we've already built a big part of the fence. We're going to build the second fans, we're gonna use all this technology stuff. It's a compromise. You can get it done. If he does go ahead, President Trump if he does go ahead and declare this national emergency from a legal standpoint. Scott can't he do that. Because no other president has ever done this to declare a national emergency to fund a policy proposal to bypass congress. Well, obviously, there will be lawsuits immediately to challenge it, and that might stop it from being implemented until it makes its way through the courts..

President Trump California president Nancy Pelosi Jerry Brown Chuck Schumer governor Newsom Scott Shafer Joe gara Donald Trump Sean Walsh Newsome Trump legislature KiKi weedy San Francisco Chronicle government Shanghai senior editor China
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"The great folks at direct TV, the audience network channel two thirty nine and the unbelievable director we have at the audience network and the NBC sports network as well in our three hundred thirty six radio Phillies around the country. So the story came out, and this was was at a San Francisco newspaper. Mclovin that brought this. I believe the San Francisco Chronicle, Ron I. Yeah. Okay. So the chronicle said on Wednesday that a source with knowledge of the situation said Cuyler Murray will have to pick one sport. Because the demands of learning and playing quarterback in the NFL would preclude him from playing professional baseball. And if let's say he's the last pick of the first round the raiders, by the way, have three first round picks just throwing that they're known for making questionable decision. So so you have three first round picks. I still don't think that car is the quarterback for the raiders by the time. They get to bagels. So maybe you say Conor come on in. Yes. Mclovin. I heard it a substantiated Twitter rumor that. Great that they're done it, by the way, the raiders were considering trading away some of their first round picks this year to load up for next year because they're in love with to a tongue of Iowa. That is pure Twitter at its best. But doesn't seem like the raiders quarterback. I'd have no idea. Why? Well, didn't they have to we also Sopo leading here raiders younger back out of Washington that guy. Yeah. So what was it was? He Hawaiian is. Well, I think too we also Polk has a coming together. Yeah. But the raiders their car looked awesome. Then the last year they wouldn't really move on. What they I don't know debunking something here. Okay. They moved on from Khalil Mack. They moved on from Amari Cooper. I don't think they have a problem moving on from anybody in that organization all rise for primarily mornings Sunday at eleven thirty AM eastern, Harry Kane and Tottenham looked to stay in touch with the top of the table is they like to say, it's a Paul hog Prague hog book book, he's a handful Manchester. United Premier League mornings. Next Sunday, beginning at eight eastern on NBC. And poll question, mclovin. By the way, I want to point out. My wife has told me she would leave me for hurricane. I just want that out there. And I think otherwise, okay. If you were Kyle Murray would you play baseball or football seventy percents baseball. See, I think he loves football. I think the voters are thinking about health, and yeah. Well, also longevity. You can play baseball longtime and walk away and live happily ever, you know, life in football. Maybe not not to say. Yes. Well, his Ernie chance he could get addicted to the relevancy that he currently has the famous snus that he currently has because he went from kind of a no name guy year and a half ago. Now, he's one of the faces of his sport Heisman Trophy winner. And he can continue that that's gotta be addicting. Because the money's there either way whichever chooses. He's choosing to different types of lottery. Tickets one is you you're you stay famous you stay.

raiders San Francisco Chronicle Twitter baseball San Francisco Cuyler Murray NBC Phillies director NFL Ron I. Conor Kyle Murray Paul hog Prague Ernie Khalil Mack Harry Kane Amari Cooper United Premier League
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"With maximum ski and air Lamour there. My co-hosts. Hey, you got. This week on the show. I spoke to Lizzy Johnson. She is reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle, I love talking to newspaper reporters, particularly those that are very into a certain beat and she's on the fire beach. She is a fire reporter she's been covering the massive wildfires that have routed in California, all of the state most recently, the campfire in paradise California, which destroyed that town, and her coverage has been amazing, and she's done particular, some long stories, I think there was her story about the paradise fire. Was so good that. My mother emailed to meet twice. This is this is what our world has come to you. There's a fire correspondent now in California. Yeah. And there's no I mean, I had a lot of questions about sort of what you do the rest of the year. And there's actually like no shortage of like preparations and dealing with writing about the last fire. I mean her it really is what she covers. So it was it was fascinating to doctor about happy new year to both you anti-human. Always in keeping with the trans of this new year. One of the trends that I've noticed out. There's people moving away from social media towards the Email newsletter. If you are thinking about making a shift like that in the new year, there is no better place to do it than male champ. They make it so easy to start an Email newsletter that you will go straight from the idea to the practice as one bussed in these. Thanks. Thank you, mail chimp. Here is Evan with Lizzie Johnson..

Lizzy Johnson reporter California San Francisco Chronicle Lizzie Johnson Evan
"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco chronicle" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"He's Hurley, I'm Gary McNamara. Eight six six ninety redeye but I'll say this. So no matter 'cause we have brought up a ton of different scenarios, and and more questions and statements because we really don't know what's going to happen in over the next two years. And so you can just you can just do this speculation asked the questions, but it's going to be interesting. And the the one thing that I'm looking forward to is going through the substance of all the ideas, the substance or lack of substance of all the ideas of particular legislation that the Democrats will be proposing. Right. Because we haven't been able to do that for the last couple of years because the only one that would be proposing any type of legislation or any type of budget would have been President Obama. Now, we have for the first time years, the Democrats will be proposing and coming up with different ideas about things that we could do and I just can't wait. No now that the house has their committee on climate change. I can't wait to see the recommendations that comes out there. Seriously. What's up? Yeah. Because they're going to have to come up with recommendations. It's the same as it always was high taxation. And and that would be the entire point that once the committee has done and we've heard it all and we've kept all the deniers out. What are the solutions? Well, we need to raise the price of gasoline. One dollar. Yeah. Put that into federal legislation. Go ahead and do it. Right. Try that one out raise the cost of gasoline a dollar for all Americans. See how much that works out for you. Yeah. Right. Because he only thing you can do as Obama said it. When he was speaking to the San Francisco Chronicle back in January or February of two thousand eight his goal was to skyrocket, energy prices. It became what the Democrats wanted to do the first couple of years when they had the house and the Senate, but never really approached it never went down that road knowing that they couldn't do it then, but as Obama said skyrocket, electricity, prices skyrocket. That was his words Scott, you think the American public right now wants to see skyrocketing electricity prices and gasoline prices. And huge subsidies going to alternative, energy and alternative fuels. Well in order to make the economy go, here's I don't think. So here's their problem in getting this done..

President Obama Hurley Gary McNamara Senate San Francisco Chronicle Scott One dollar two years