17 Burst results for "Samuel Peeps"

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:17 min | 3 weeks ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Of resonance with what we've been going through today. Fascinating. We're rambling around Britain with other Peter finds right now on travel with Rick Steves. Peter followed the trail of 12 great British writers to bring today's Britain into focus through the lens of the past at these authors provide. His book is called footnotes, a journey round Britain in the company of great writers. Peter is also the author of oak and ash and thorn, the ancient Woods and new forests of Britain. His latest title is a thing of beauty, travels in mythical and modern Greece, which a reviewer for The Guardian called a sun drenched hymn to Greece. We'll share a conversation about that in an upcoming edition of travel with Rick Steves. What about bath? You know, bath is so famous for its decadence and that sort of high society escape from London back in Georgian days. Yeah, bath is there and I slightly rushed past bath and Bristol because I'd spent so long in Cornwall I had to go and move on, but I did drop into bath briefly because at that stage I was following a woman called Celia finds, who rode around Britain in 1660 to 1670s on horseback, accompanied by two servants, and that's it, and it was very rare, and strange thing for a woman to do in those days, and she kept her very detailed diary of floating in the baths at bath with she had this kind of luminous bathing suit, and she was slightly sneering about all the local women who weren't wearing quite enough. There is so many dimensions of English society that you can get by traveling not only around geographically but around through the centuries, there's this concept of the shifting baseline syndrome. Can you explain to us what that is? The adds a sort of conservationist term really it came up originally when they were studying fish numbers. A couple of decades ago. And trying to work out why it was that we didn't feel that there were few fish in the sea, although there's always that sense in the air that there is, but I'm shifting baselines. It's very hard to fix what the baseline of normality is, which is why it was so interesting to go around with these different writers and see what they described. So when wilkie Collins describes the millions of pictures that it almost thrown themselves onto the shore in Cornwall, obviously we don't have that now, the cultures have gone all they have come back slightly since, so shifting bass liners is what it means, it's very hard to know what normal is. It's the challenge to see things in the context of the time. Yes, and what are the normal numbers of wildflowers to find in the Meadows or given that we know there's so much pesticide around what is normal. We've kind of forget so quickly because we're humans and we adapt so rapidly to the new normal. This is traveled Rick Steves. We're talking with Peter finds in his book his footnotes and journey round Britain in the company of great writers. Peter, I really had a sense that you enjoyed your travels and that you're focused on the literary greats and that dimension enhanced the travel experience. In fact, you wrote in the book that you had a lot of fun, you saw some incredible sites and you drank in some amazing pubs. Let's wrap up our discussion with a chance for you to have a pint with one of these writers. Who would you have a pint with? And what would that experience be? It's a very hard one to choose who I would most like to have a pine with the same Charles Dickens would have to be the most fun and the great thing is, of course, London is dotted with pubs where Dickens drank himself and wrote about vividly and many of his characters appeared, so all those Oliver twist characters, you can see the pubs now today and you can go and drink in them and you can sit by a roaring log fire and imagine Dickens as you do so and raise a glass to him. God is such just when you were saying that in the fire and raising a glass and the etched glass on the windows and the well worn furniture and the creaky old hardwood floors and in the clientele today that all you got to do is swap out their wardrobe and they're from the Victorian times. There's some opportunities that we aren't there. If there's one thing we've done well in this world the British I think it's the pub they're still absolutely vibrant places despite the last two years and absolutely there's pubs which were drunk in not only by Dickens, but by many others of the authors in my in my book and you can go and raise a glass of them all I would recommend. Okay, I may have next vacation I'd like to go to I've got a number of great pubs in London and small towns and I'd like to read one book that would enhance my travels in Britain with this dimension of going back in the time with the help of a literary great. Which one book would you recommend I use to enhance my travels in Britain? Oh goodness, what a difficult question. You talked about Samuel pizza's diary, which of course is 300 years old and more, but even so to this day you read those little snippets of what life was like in London in those times, and he was an enthusiastic pub visitor. And it really comes roaring back to life. So I would go for Samuel pepys's diary. There you go. Peter finds thanks so much for joining us. You got me all excited to go back to England and do it with a little more focus on the literary heritage. And thanks for writing footnotes, a journey round Britain in the company of great writers. Thanks again, Peter. Thank you. After all that walking around Britain, wouldn't you say it's time for a nice cup of tea. London based tour guide Brit mons Dale, accompanies us into the traditions of tea time in England. That's next on travel with Rick Steves. After a busy day of hiking in the British countryside or when you're seeing the sights of London by three or 4 o'clock, you could probably use a little break. The British have come up with an ideal way to put an elegant pause in the day with afternoon tea. Britt lonsdale is a blue badge certified tour guide in London. She's our companion for tea right now on travel with Rick Steves and to help us clueless Americans know a little more about what to expect and what's expected of us. Brett, thanks for joining us. Oh, it's a pleasure. Now Britt you've spent years taking Americans around London as a tour guide, I find people are very interested in these teas. What can we learn about teased to understand that part of English culture? Afternoon tea for English people is just such an automatic ritual that we never really think too much about it. We think that afternoon tea really started one of the people given credit for it is the duchess Anne Maria, who was the 7th duke of Bedford's wife, and she found the distance between lunch and between dinner a little too far and so she got little sandwiches cake and a pot of tea served to her, and its thought that she was the person who really started it off, although various other claimants are there. If you read about it, but it's just a wonderful little ceremony, and it's evolved over the years, and it's become something that you just tend to enjoy to make a bit of a fuss of yourself over, you know, it's nice to treat yourself to an afternoon tea, and it's so delicious, but I do warn you that it bypasses the elementary canal and settles immediately on your hips and thighs. You can call this Victorian then good news in 19th century. Yes, I think tea, of course, has been a rage for much longer than that, really. But it's thought that the real afternoon tea as we know it today probably evolved during that time. And originally it would be for people with a lot of time on their hands as opposed to the working class. Well, I would imagine so, although I think lots of people did like to try and say that they took tea certainly, but nowadays, I think everybody really enjoys a good afternoon tea, but it's still not for people on a limited budget because if you go for a really posh afternoon tea at somewhere like the langham hotel, the Ritz or the landmark of fortnum and masons, you're going to have not much change left from about 40 pounds. That's a lot of money. Last time I was in London, I learned that you can split a tea. Is that actually kosher of two people want to order a $60 tea, split it? Well, you and I did at the world slayer, I seem to remember, and we were treated very nicely there and allowed to do that. If you were to go to somewhere like the Ritz, the langham. That would be frowned. Well,.

Britain Rick Steves Peter London Dickens Greece Cornwall wilkie Collins Celia Samuel pizza The Guardian Bristol mons Dale Charles Dickens Victorian times Britt lonsdale Samuel pepys Oliver England Anne Maria
"samuel pepys" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Different authors that become like the tour guides. That's right. On the great thing about doing it this way is you can read their writings and you can look out of the train window in the same way that they would have done and seen the same scenery passing by. Yes, of course, now this pylons and cars and different things, but it's still okay. Well, what's an example? Peter about like, you're writing on the train sitting right next to you as Charles Dickens, and he's looking over your shoulder and he's pointing you in. Look at that. And then he writes about it. What's something that Charles Dickens from the what the mid 1800s would have instructed you as you're riding the train across the English countryside. Because Charles Dickens had so much energy and such a vivid imagination, his description of a change and he was like nothing else that you would experience because halfway through the change and he'd be dancing with everyone in the carriage and be striking up songs and put laying bets and he was absolutely indefatigable, so the book was a way of learning more about these authors as well as the briton that they'd seen. What about Samuel pepys? I mean, he was the great famous diarist who contributed hugely to our understanding of society in London back what in the 1600s. Yes, he did and sadly no room for peeps because I had a nightmare trying to choose my 12 authors and some of them were my favorites who I just put in and others I knew I had to have peeps and yet of course I ended up without him, but the list is so long I mean I would have loved to have included Jane Austen and there were so many extraordinary iconic authors who I just couldn't include. This is travel Rick Steves our guest is Peter finds he's taking us on a journey around Britain in the company of some of the greatest writers. It's all in his book footnotes. Peter's aim is to explore today's Britain by seeing it through the lens from the past, as found in the words of Britain's great writers. Peters also written about his travels in Greece to search for meaning from Greek myths and legends in today's landscapes. That book is called a thing of beauty. Peter posts frequently on Twitter at P fines, and that's built FIE and NES. You know, one author I'd love to walk with would be any of the great poets. The romantic poets William wordsworth. I can just picture him with his rucksack and his notebook hiking across cumbria in the lakes district. Yes, he was he would be a wonderful person to walk with coleridge too who is an obsessive walker he would walk for hours and days at a time tossing at his poems as he went, but again I had no room for them. They appear in the book in little bits and pieces, but they don't get whole chapters to themselves. I followed Johnson and Boswell, if you know them around Scotland, Johnson wrote the first dictionary in the 18th century. It was fascinating following them because he became obsessed with very irascible man. He became obsessed with how few trees there were in Scotland, and it's true that this is something that people talk about all the time now, and it's a huge rewilding efforts in Scotland. But if you talk with a historical writer, you're dealing with a time when landlords were English and the people were Scottish and some of the landlords actually thought the people were more trouble than having sheep, so they would just kind of swap out the people for the sheep and make money off of Scotland. I mean, there's that whole political overlay. Did that come through very much in your studies? It did. If you look at the land and precisely for that reason, you can see deserted villages in Scotland still in the middle of vast estates that are still only given over to ground shooting or deer hunting or whatever. So this is still there the politics are still there. You found a wild subscribe particularly enthralling. I did. I was very moved by the wilds of Skye at such a, well, it's a wild wind blown place with very few trees and Samuel Johnson kept saying, but it's really moving when you go there, and there's a bridge over there now, and he Johnson would have got there by boat, but even so that was as far as I got, and I was looking for genuine wildness and you can find it in the sky, as well as some very good whisky. Whales has similar wilds in the north around Snowden national park. Did your literary characters help you better appreciate Snowden and the natural wonders of North Wales? Yes, on my great looper and Britain after geralt of Wales he handed me over to Anglo Irish writers called Somerville and Ross two women, and I went up snowdon mountain itself with them which they had done in I think about the year 1903 or something. They were Victorian edwardian ladies who'd gone up in full skirts and hats and walked to the top in those days there was nothing at the top other than a very small hotel which shouldn't have been called hotel because it was falling down, whereas now there's a railway to the top of snowdon. Yet again, you look at it through their eyes and you see what was then, the most extraordinarily empty place that is now they're accused of people of climbing snowdon. It's a very different experience. Different experience. Peter, I love this notion of traveling around Britain, kind of oblivious to the century you're bouncing all through the centuries as you do when your sightseeing around England and what you've done is assembled a series of great minds, great lovers of culture and nature and heritage who write about it so beautifully. There your guides and their passing the baton from one guide to the next, who was your favorite guide, which literary great. I don't know if you know wilkie Collins, I got very bogged down with him in a very good way. He was a contemporary of Dickens slightly younger than Dickens taken under Dickens wing, and as a young man, his father wanted him to be a lawyer, but his father died, and so he threw that up immediately and became a writer, and he went round Cornwall before there was a railway and Cornwall so it's called rambles beyond railways. He wrote this book when he was very young man, and I got very stuck with him. I wrote two of the first three chapters of spent with wilkie Collins because he's so interesting and he describes everything he sees in such exquisite detail, all those little coves and Cornish villages, but what kind of detail Peter, because when you say those coves, I can almost imagine the pilchards are running, and this is when there's a one day opportunity to harvest all these big herring and they blow the horn and everybody runs down drops what they're doing and they go out and they drag in buckets of pilchards. I mean, there's just these ways that we can get into the past that we don't have an opportunity to experience today, but we can learn about it and we can go to those places. What's an example of something vivid from, for example, Cornwall with wilkie Collins? Yeah, that is very vivid. He describes that as you've just described the fish coming in and the horns blowing and the entire village rushing to the front and dragging all these fish in and working through the night with torchlight. There's beautiful descriptions of that. He also describes it's one of you can go to the pub by this happened, but he went to a small inn and he was part of it, he witnessed a smallpox party, where a doctor had come all the way down from London, which was a big deal in those days, carrying a small amount of smallpox matter as he called it, which he was injecting all the babies with and all the women of the area would turn up with their baby and have the baby inoculated, which had a lot.

Charles Dickens Peter Britain Scotland Johnson Samuel pepys Rick Steves Snowden national park William wordsworth Jane Austen snowdon mountain coleridge wilkie Collins Dickens Boswell cumbria Peters Samuel Johnson Greece walker
"samuel pepys" Discussed on Brighter Thinking Pod

Brighter Thinking Pod

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Brighter Thinking Pod

"And you feel it inside. And then you begin to draw on those arguments and then that's I'm getting goosebumps now talking about this because it is for me, this is the exciting bit. You then look at the sources that he used to come to that conclusion. And then you expand your reading and then you're online at 4 o'clock in the morning on Google scholar looking at all these, you know, all these sources that he's looked at and your reading just in. It just becomes huge. And that's what exciting to get a student to that point for me. That's the gold star. And what your pinpoint in there is one of the key ways to learn how to research, isn't it? Find a good source. What sources did that person use? Oh, where did they get their information from? And that, you know, and then it goes out and then you can draw it back in. Go out, find the most authoritative source you can for either side of the argument. And yes, it is down to you to make a judgment between these two highly eminent people who are in different ways. I think it's very important with any especially with a primary source. This is the thing. If you've got eyewitness accounts of certain things that have happened, they're going to be, they're going to have a certain amount of subjectivity to it. Because everybody's looking at that event from a completely different perspective, you know, if you read Samuel pepys's account of the fire and land and it's going to be very, you know, when he's trying to rescue his cheese that's buried underground 6 feet, you know, it's going to be very different from Bora, you know, Sam Jones from down the road he's got nothing in his literally just trying to get his wife and family out of it. Completely different perspectives, but you can't not acknowledge them, can you? You've still got to they've still got to have, there's a role to play as long as you are acknowledging the bias. And acknowledging the fact that they may not, that is flawed because they're not looking at it from all sides. And isn't that the best kind of essay writing when someone says when someone actually takes that sauce on and says, look, I recognize this. However, you know, this still has distill has a support for me. You know, and I think what you're, I can hear the excitement in your voice ladies and the excitement coming from Adrian in terms of getting to grips with writing an essay. And I think what I've seen a lot a lot of as an examiner is very formulaic. Writing. It might be part of the environment. And these aren't these weren't essays that have been written in the examination context. They've been written previously within the classroom and then externally marked. Yeah? But you see a lot of that kind of that kind of teaching to test rather than getting involved in the actual nitty Gritty of writing an essay in the content and getting excited. And then when we're talking about sources, you're seeing it rolled out, we're talking about reputation and those ability to see it and you see it come out in a formulaic way and there's nothing in it. There's no heart in it. And I think some of the best essays have have heart and passion in them and one of the things that when students have to maybe write their own right their own essay title. And one of the things.

Samuel pepys Sam Jones Google Adrian
"samuel pepys" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

03:42 min | 4 months ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Gastropod

"That gradually turned into the London stock exchange. And another one that turned into lloyds of London. This was a coffeehouse. It was called Lloyd's, where you could go and take out an insurance policy on your shipment and learn what ships were leaving or coming. And then there was another one that actually turned into the world's first magazine, which was an attempt to duplicate the variety and currency of coffeehouse culture. It's actually still a magazine today. It's called tatler. It's tagline is the original social media. And it's been around since 1709 when it was born in a London coffeehouse. When you walk in, you're going to find some long tables again, you're going to be sat at a table. There's this famous thing about going in and saying what news. Coffeehouses were the place for all the chat at the time people called coffeehouses a penny university because you could learn so much just by hanging out and listening all for the price of a coffee. Samuel pepys was well known, for example, for patronizing coffeehouses. Pepys kept a famous diary documenting life in 1660s London. Apparently peeps actually set himself. He really couldn't stand cough, in fact, it made him ill, but he knew that this was the way to build up the contacts for himself at the admiralty. So that's the kind of people you might meet there. Even the ballot box that thing where you drop your votes into a box, it actually was popularized in the coffeehouse because it was a way of collecting votes about the winners of debates there. This one drink coffee fueled the creation of all these institutions and innovations. It sparked the debates and ideological revolutions of the enlightenment and it powered the industrial revolution too. Obviously it wasn't the only factor, but it's hard to imagine an industrial revolution without caffeine. You needed something to keep people working hard, keep them focused, allow them to operate heavy machinery and do dangerous work without being drunk. And the other thing it did, though, was open up night to colonization, basically, because before we had caffeine, we were much more tightly yoked to the diurnal cycle, people tended to work from daybreak till sunset. And the whole idea of a night shift or an overnight shift without caffeine is pretty hard to imagine. Obviously, the lightbulb was pretty important too, but also coffee sounds kind of miraculous. But we're gastropod, so you all know what's important to us. What did that coffee actually taste like? The coffee would have tasted pretty foul, I suspect. You've got to remember the coffee takes a long time to get there. So it's already quite stale. You tend to brew it by boiling. They would roast the coffee over the 5 very dark. Would it taste like coffee today? No. Would it taste something like very badly made coffee today? Yes. No matter at this point, Europe's intellectuals literally couldn't function without it..

London lloyds Samuel pepys Lloyd Pepys Europe
"samuel pepys" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:36 min | 6 months ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on The Book Review

"Well, I'm going to start by saying poor David Michaelis, I was rereading some update review of John update review of one of his previous biographies of Charles Schulz, an update scold some forgetting a golf fact wrong. I thought, wow, that's really getting into the nitty Gritty. But Sean, you go, what do you got? Well, you know, I don't read a lot of big historical great man biographies. I've read some of caros LBJ books and I tend to read more literary biographies. I've bored people with this before, but I really loved biographer Robert D Richardson who died last year. And his books about Emerson and Thoreau are very good, but I think as William James book, not just because I'm a big fan of James, but because it's, to me, it was the most narratively satisfying biography. I think I've ever read. Partly because James had this great family between Henry and his sister Alice and you get not just William but kind of the whole constellation and the way Richardson tells the story is, you know, he starts you without the dry 40 pages of his great, great great grandfather was born on a farm and that kind of stuff makes me glaze over. So he just puts you right into the middle of the action where you want to be about the person you're actually interested in learning about. So I think that's a brilliant book. Yeah, I kind of have a rule as a reader. I mean, it's a flexible rule, but if after 40 pages of biography, I'm not at least approaching the career. You know, I mean, you don't have to be, you know, like I said, there's a lot of sometimes writers have very interesting childhoods and it takes longer. But if I'm not approaching the start of what made them interesting by 40 pages, I'm starting to think this is clear. But I got to go with a couple classics, one in the sense that Oswald's life of Johnson, it's so charming of Samuel Johnson is so charming on every page. And indeed, it's because Samuel Johnson was charming Boswell is charming himself. He was equal to Johnson and what makes that book so great. And it totally different vein, I think we've talked about this book before, but Andre agassiz. Well, that's an autobiography. Biography. I will say Claire Tomlin's biography of Samuel pepys is really, really well written as our Peter grams Elvis books. And I frankly love those books. I like his one more about Sam Phillips almost in the Elvis books. I'm not sure I need how many volumes was there too, but they were both dance. Yeah, I mean, you know, I get why all this matters, but I don't need to read that much about all of us. What else in high school I love this book, the topography of Jim Morrison, it was called no one here canceled live at Jerry Hopkins. At the time, I thought, this is what I bought. I'm sure I haven't heard about that one in a long time. Yeah, I would second I might have liked the Elvis books a little bit more than right, but there were real chore. I mean, you have to devote a lot of time to them. And another classic, he mentioned Claire Tomlin and in her vein, Hermione Lee's biography of Virginia wolf is rightfully considered one of the best of all time. And I really love also group biographies and biographies that are maybe more organized by an idea than by one life and the one that comes to mind is all Eli's the life you save may be your own, which is a sort of group biography of.

David Michaelis biographer Robert D Richardson Charles Schulz Samuel Johnson James Claire Tomlin William James Thoreau Emerson Andre agassiz Sean Peter grams Elvis Richardson Johnson Alice golf Henry John William Oswald
"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"He had entertained even if he had not acquiesced in the thought of a far distant publicity. The first is of capital importance. The diary was not destroyed. The second that he took unusual precautions to confound the cipher in roguish passages proves beyond question that he was thinking of some other reader besides himself perhaps while his friends were admiring the greatness of his behavior at the approach of death he may have had a twinkling. hope of immortality. Men's could just zest whisk said his chosen motto and as he had stamped his mind with every crook inflatable in the pages of the diary. He might feel that what he left behind him was indeed himself. There is perhaps no other instance so remarkable of the desire of man for publicity and an enduring name. The greatness of his life was open yet he longed to communicate its smallness also and while contemporaries bowed before him. He must buttonhole posterity with the news that his payroll wig was once alive with knits. But this thought although i cannot doubt he had it was neither his first nor his deepest. It did not color one word that he wrote the diary for as long as he kept. It remained what it was when he began a private pleasure for himself. It was his bosom secret. It added zest to all his pleasures. He lived in and for it and might well write these solemn words when he closed confidant forever. And so i'd be take myself to that course which is almost as much as to see myself go into the grave for which and all the discomforts that will accompany my being blind. The good god prepare me..

first one word second
"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Things go hand in hand or two more exact. It is the first that makes the second either possible or pleasing but to be quite in sympathy with pizza and return. Once more to the experience of children. I can remember to have written in the fly leaf of more than one book. The date and the place where i then was. If for instance. I was ill in bed or sitting in a certain garden. These were jottings for my future. Self if i should chance on such a note and after years i it would cause me a particular thrill to recognize myself across the intervening distance. Indeed i might come upon the now and not be moved. One title which shows that i have comparatively failed in life and grown older than samuel pete's for in the diary we can find more than one such note of perfect childish egotism as when he explains that his candle is going out which makes me right the slobbering really or is in this incredible particularity to my study where i only wrote thus much of this days passage to this and so out again or lastly as here with more of circumstance i stayed up till the bellman came by with his bell under my window as i was writing of this very line and cried past one of the clock and a cold frosty. Windy morning such passages are not to be misunderstood the appeal to samuel peace years hands is unmistakable. He desires that deer though unknown gentleman keenly to realize his predecessor to remember why a passage was uncleanliness written to recall. Let us fancy with a sigh. The tones of the bellman the chill of the early windy morning and the very line his own romantic self was describing. At the moment the man you will perceive was making reminiscences a sort of pleasure by ricochet which comforts many in distress and turned some others into sentimental liberties and the whole book. If you will but look at it in that way is seemed to be a work of art zone address here. Then we have the key to that remarkable attitude preserved by him throughout his diary to that unflinching i had almost said that unintelligent sincerity which makes it a miracle among human books. He was not unconscious of his errors far from it. He was often startled into shame. Often reformed often made and broke his vows of change but whether he did ill or well he was still his own unequaled. Self still that entrancing ego of whom alone he cared to right and still sure of his own affectionate indulgence when the parts should be changed and the writer come to read what he had written. Whatever he did or said or thought or suffered. It was still a trait of pete's a character of his career and as to himself he was more interesting than or than alexander so all should be faithfully sat down. I have called his diary. A.

samuel pete first more than one book One title samuel second two pete one more than one
"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Fees which i have bought in plain binding avoiding the buying of it better bound because i resolve as soon as i have read it to burn it that it may not stand in the list of books nor among them to disgrace them if it should be found even our day when responsibility is so much more clearly apprehended. The man who wrote the letter would be notable. But what about the man. I do not say who bought a roguish book but who was ashamed of doing so yet did it. And recorded both the doing and the shame and the pages of his daily journal we all whether we write or speak must somewhat drape ourselves when we address our fellows at a given moment we apprehend our character in acts by some particular side. We are married with one grave with another as befits the nature and demands of the relation. Pete's letter to evelyn would have little in common with that. Other one to mrs nip which he signed by the pseudonym of dapper dickey yet each would be suitable to the character of his correspondent. There is no untruth in this for man. Being a protein animal swiftly shares and changes with his company and surroundings and these changes are the better part of his education in the world to strike posture. Once for all and to march through life like drum major is to be highly disagreeable to others and a fool for oneself into the bargain to evelyn into nip. We understand the double facing but to whom was he posing in the diary and what in the name of astonishment was the nature of the pose had. He suppressed all mention of the book or had he bought it gloried in the act and cheerfully recorded his glorification in either case we should have made him out but no he is full of precautions to conceal the disgrace of the purchase and yet speeds to chronicle the whole affair in pen in ink. It is a sort of anomaly inhuman action which we can exactly parallel from another part of the diary. Mrs pete's had written a paper of her to just complaints against her husband and written in plain and very pungent english peeps in an agony. Less the world should come to see it brutally seizes and destroys the telltale document. And then you disbelieve. Your is down the whole story with unsparing truth and in cruelest detail. It seems he has no designed to appear respectable and here..

evelyn Pete each both pete one grave dickey english
"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Pete's misters bright has given us a new transcription of the diary increasing. It in bulk by near a third correcting many errors and completing our knowledge of the man in some curious and important points. We can only regret that. He has taken liberties with the author and the public. It is no part of the duties of the editor of an established classic to decide what may or may not be tedious to the reader. The book is either in historical document or not and in condemning lord braybrooke mr bright condemned himself as for the time honored phrase unfit for publication. Without being cynical we may regard it as the sign of precaution more or less commercial and we may think without being sorted that when we purchased six huge and distressingly expensive volumes. We are entitled to be treated rather more like scholars and rather less like children. But mr bright may rest assured while we complain. We are still grateful. Mr wheatley to divide our obligation brings together clearly and with no lost words. A body of illustrative material. Sometimes we might ask a little more. Never i think less and as a matter of fact a great part of mr whitley's volume might be transferred by a good editor of pete's to the margin of the text for it is precisely what the reader wants in the light of these two books. At least we have now to read our author between them. They contain all we can expect to learn for. It may be many years now. If ever we should be able to form some notion of that unparalleled figure in the annals of mankind unparalleled for three good reasons first because he was a man known to his contemporaries in a halo of almost historical pump and his remote descendants with an indecent familiarity. Like taproom comrade second because he has outstripped all competitors in the art or virtue of a conscious honesty about oneself and third because being in many ways a very ordinary person. He has yet placed himself before the public eye. With such a fullness and such an intimacy of detail might be envied by genius like montaigne then for his own sake only but as a character in a unique position endowed with a unique talent and shedding a.

wheatley two books montaigne lord braybrooke first Pete whitley second six huge and distressingly exp three good reasons third bright mr pete
"samuel pepys" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Not but guess what through the magic of radio we have technology also even on video on our YouTube channel you can listen in and have fun along with us Katie first of all I have to comment on your background those of you those who are not listening on radio can see that behind you is a beautiful flags that some kind of amalgam of a union Jack and an American flag what sorcery is this woman this is my home studio here in a lovely place I like to cool the rest of the U. K. and so many people who know me a little will know that you know I've been the UK's divided into two separate places there is longer and then there's a place called the rest of the UK where decent people live out Brexiteers man trump who pulled his left and I live with my children so this is where the studio is my lucky husband's who everybody loves you could let me mark and he painted this all made behind this backdrop because I do so much work in the US because I love you SO much but I'm a match patriot here in the U. K. as well so he painted this back behind me you know what if I get remarried I'm gonna get a husband just like mark that is unbelievable seriously what what does your husband do that that he's able to do something because it doesn't look it looks so professionally done yes yes it's actually yeah you know it's been done at a quality level because that is my husband so he was excellent she he's a graphic designer this is very much his right yeah wow wow wow and and I hope I don't embarrass you by saying you to look lovely madam you have your wonderful red white and blue colors really you just have I there's so many people I know that that they don't know you but they can follow you on Twitter look at you tions that you're holding a very tough people on the radio are wondering what the heck we're talking about so for radio audience all right it's just that when when someone looks that cheerful and has such a cheerful backdrop I'm gonna comment on it Katie I the couple things that we have to talk about first of all the dynamic that you were raising of how leaders tend to over reach and use crises to advance their power grab okay the the classic example of course is the Reichstag fire in Germany in nineteen thirty four when that happened Hitler and his lieutenants said that this is the work of our enemies the communists the Bolsheviks the Jews they seize that opportunity actually to seize power and you see this playing itself out and not quite as dramatically in America as it would but you can see this jockeying to say how can we use this position how can we say things politically that people have a hard time arguing with you know that at all we don't want to lose a single life therefore everyone must do this and it's it's it's really tricky thing I guess my my larger point is this is why one needs great leadership because a great leader knows how to thread this particular needle yes I think that that's exactly correct I think one of the concerning things that I've seen is the use of plastic shoes by leaders that I think should be doing much better one example as an outsider and I am an outsider I know who is governor Cuomo in New York I am alarmed by the language he's using and the level of emotion he's delivering with his arm the things that he's issuing out from his office I think you need to separate emotion from the office that you hold I am wondering about the relationship that I'm what is going on in terms of a possible future presidential run from him stocks are back up to one side I think what we have seen is a massive power grab by certain individuals we saw that with the Democrats I'm what they stuffed into your two point two trillion dollar rescue package and if I give an example from here in the U. K. we have seen styles you like behavior from our police force Hey the police have used drones to take footage of innocents are white middle class individuals going walking in the hills in order to humiliate them saying they should not be leaving the house and other police forces have stepped up online reporting so that neighbors can report on neighbors if they feel that they are leaving the house on necessarily that's the sort of dark policing that I don't want any problems so I have to say that the the the only reason that I have any sense of what you're saying about the police in the U. K. is because I spoke on this program to as real of land not long ago and I am sure you know him you you must and what he said to me about Tommy Robinson and that whole situation I was practically speechless absolutely speechless all right right I mean I'd like to think he was exaggerating no I I doubt that certainly we've had very different policing styles if we use that word here in the U. K. so there are a large majority Pakistani Muslim populations in some cities that are apparently still able to gather to congregate to space I'm cough on innocent people an elderly lady I'm sure that's what as you would have been telling you about whereas it kind of regular my mom and dad there's still some people out walking their dogs have been heavily policed I've been stopped while they're out walking and also what they think they're doing someone in a supermarket the other day was off why they were buying Easter eggs because it's not a necessary punch axles of policing that you see that you think I don't want to be part of the country anyone that's going down this route you told my concern but the regular individual is that they start to question everything I've had people asking me can I go and buy this at the supermarket and and that's the problem is people start to surrender their own sense of them now you just said something about the you know why people buying Easter eggs I can't actually that's extraordinary that that people are bringing that that talk about nanny state you have marshmallow peeps over their effort for Easter we have marshmallow peeps you have that in England we don't have marshmallow peeps now I want one but do you know what you do have in England you have it you have Samuel Pepys ladies and gentlemen you've been a wonderful audience good night we're going to go to a break I want to get in my marshmallow peeps joke be sure to read the diary of Samuel Pepys and we'll be right back with Katie hi this.

Katie YouTube
"samuel pepys" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

07:04 min | 2 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Hey folks I'm talking to Hopkins and you're not but guess what through the magic of radio we have technology also even on video on our YouTube channel you can listen in and have fun along with us Katie first of all I have to comment on your background those of you those who are not listening on radio can see that behind you is a beautiful flags that some kind of amalgam of a union Jack and an American flag what sorcery is this woman this is my home studio here in a lovely place I like to cool the rest of the U. K. and that many people who know me a little will know that you know I've been the UK's divided into two separate places there is London and then there's a place called the rest of the UK where decent people that are Brexiteers ma'am trump who pulled his left and I live with my children so this is where the studio with my lovely husband who everybody loves you could let me mark and he painted this for me behind this backdrop because I do so much work in the US because I love you SO much but I'm a map patriot here in the U. K. as well so he painted this back behind me you know what if I get remarried I'm gonna get a husband just like mark yeah that is unbelievable seriously what what does your husband do that that he's able to do something because it doesn't look it looks so professionally done yes yes it's actually yeah you know it's been done at a quality level because that is my husband so he was excellent she he's a graphic designer this is very much his the only trade yeah wow wow wow and and I hope I don't embarrass you by saying you to look lovely madam you have your wonderful red white and blue colors really you just have I there's so many people I know that that they don't know you but they can follow you on Twitter look at you the auctions that you're you're you're you're you're holding a very have people on the radio are wondering what the heck we're talking about different radio audience all right it's just that when when someone looks that cheerful and has such a cheerful back up I'm going to comment on it Katie I the couple things right we have to talk about first of all the dynamic that you were raising of how leaders tend to over reach and use crises to advance their power grab okay the the classic example of course is the Reichstag fire in Germany in nineteen thirty four when that happened Hitler and his lieutenants said that this is the work of our enemies the communists the Bolsheviks the Jews they seize that opportunity actually to seize power and you see this playing itself out and not quite as dramatically in America as it would but you can see this jockeying to say how can we use this position how can we say things politically that people have a hard time arguing with you know that at all we don't want to lose a single life therefore everyone must do this and it's it's a it's a really tricky thing I guess my my larger point is this is why one needs great leadership because a great leader knows how to thread this particular needle yes I think that that's exactly correct I think one of the concerning things that I've seen is the use of plastic sheets by leaders that I think should be doing much better one example as an outsider and I am an outsider I know is governor Cuomo in New York I'm alarmed by the language he's using and the level of emotion he's delivering with his arm the things that he's issuing out from his office I think you need to separate emotion from the office that you hold I am wondering about the relationship that I'm what is going on in terms of a possible future presidential run from him stocks are back up to one side I think what we have seen is a massive power grab by sentient individuals we saw that with the Democrats I'm what they stocked into you'll two point two trillion dollar rescue package and if I give an example from here in the U. K. we have seen styles you like behavior from our police force Hey the police have used drones to take footage of innocents are white middle class individuals going walking in the hills in order to humiliate them saying they should not be leaving the house and other police forces have stepped up online reporting so that neighbors can recall on neighbors if they feel that they are leaving the house on necessarily that's the sort of dark policing that I don't want any problems so I have to say that the the the only reason that I have any sense of what you're saying about the police in the U. K. is because I spoke on this program to as real events not long ago and I am sure you know him you you must and what he said to me about Tommy Robinson and that whole situation I was practically speechless absolutely speechless all right I mean I'd like to think he was exaggerating no I I doubt that certainly we've had very different policing styles if we use that word here in the U. K. so there are a large majority Pakistani Muslim populations in some cities that are apparently still able to gather to congregate to space I'm call on innocent people an elderly lady I'm sure that's what answer would have been telling you about whereas it kind of regular my mom and dad those sorts of people out walking their dogs have been heavily policed I've been stopped well back out walking and also what they think they're doing someone in a supermarket the other day was asked why they were buying Easter eggs because it's not a necessary punch axles of policing that you see that you think I don't want to be part of the country anyone that's going down this route to toll my concern but the regular individual is that they start to question everything I've had people asking me can I go and buy this at the supermarket and and that's the problem is people start to surrender their own sense of them now you just said something about me you know why people buying Easter eggs I can't actually that's extraordinary that that people are bringing that that talk about nanny state you have marshmallow peeps over there for Easter we have marshmallow peeps you have that in England we don't have marshmallow peeps now I won't want it musically but do you know what you do have in England you have it you have Samuel Pepys ladies and gentlemen you've been a wonderful audience good night we're going to go to a break I want to get in my marshmallow peeps joke be sure to read the diary of Samuel Pepys and we'll be right back with.

Hopkins Katie YouTube
"samuel pepys" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Two one zero seven ten if there's anything you want to talk about you know Patrick mackerel being a sportscaster there's a story floating around you know the great fox broadcaster Joe Bach he is their number one baseball and football announcer so he's doing with some other sports casters are doing Kenny Albert's another one people will send them videos and he'll do the play by play of what's going on around their house Joe bus I don't usually some people have been sending them sex video so who was the light is not called again he played high priority bedroom activities Godhra somewhere Michael I think you know who else we have come out we got my friend Judy K. big Broadway star and she was going to play Queen Elizabeth in the princess Diana musical that was supposed to open on Broadway but like everybody else on Broadway she's been furloughed so we'll check in with her to see what what what are actors doing to make ends meet these days and that we have an interesting writer from The New York Times in Julie Lasky short a piece that caught my attention about etiquette when you're teleconferencing what should you wear should you put on make up should you should you put on a shirt and should you make your background look attractive for the other people who are watching you a you're teleconferencing I should be talking about men should you put on a shirt I mean what was that all about them and I'm I'm I'm I'm and what if you want about Michael's teleconferencing before we went on the air we were all once we have this little hook up on the phone or I can see Natalie who just looks so happy today and Joe Barclays in a bad mood and that leaves this is Thomas is talking tough slogging through this thing it's it's hard work you gotta get a lot of gas yes you know so and Natalie is in the in the home building on a below Canal Street on Sixth Avenue and are not many people there and Natalie is just you and Lou our board operator and tearing the newsroom and that's it everyone else is working from home readers to be hundreds of people between the two floors of here and I heard it's down to about fifteen of us but you know Natalie I have my FEMA cards so I can go to work out for you know do you guys have a morale boost I would be happy to swing by you know what we actually there are people who wanted to come you know into the studios are for like absolutely not we're really honestly trying to keep this place is quarantined as possible that is the same people here every day nobody else is bringing things in I know I'm hoping because what I'm doing is I'm going from this office to my house and I do not leave my house to the only comment I see is my family because I really don't want to bring anything into my home but if I come to you guys but if I can see that I'm not gonna bring the coronavirus I'm gonna bring good will in their own clean sheer no no se Han please Natalie you don't consider Michael showing up as a morale boost not the least amount of people I see the better really well if you watch the White House briefing yesterday I mean it's well you know the doctors themselves and they're talking about these the these dire projections and here's Dr Anthony Fauci who you know and he's he's a good knowledge in the the the death toll in the U. S. could go up over a hundred could be two hundred forty thousand bodies he's trying to be realistic about all SO bring a number as that is we should be prepared for it is it going to be that much I hope not and I think the more we push on the mitigation the less likelihood would be that number but as being realistic we need to prepare ourselves that that is a possibility that that's what we will see I mean a staggering role in a various people of various at like a CNN has thirty eight hundred currently if passed away Jan Hopkins has it over four thousand now that's what ABC is reporting but to get from four thousand to a hundred thousand or two hundred thousand my god that's got to be just the awful I can't even imagine and you know I was listening to the BB the last night and Italy Italy is totally a basket case they were saying that the hospitals and some of the small towns in Italy are completely over run and people are dying by you know by this but the the the the tens in certain towns means really catastrophic in Italy and Spain is right behind Italy terms of the number of cases that it has and it's just overwhelming the that the hospitals and the health care they have healthcare for everybody no stay in those other countries but they're still being overwhelmed India and it was Dr Deborah Burks at the White House yes issue showing these big charts and they and you really don't want to look you had to look away I mean if you know how big the big helpers are never I was watching this on C. N. N.'s streaming it CNN on their screen did not show the charts they just focused on Dr Burks and he said on this slide you didn't see it what do you mean I we saw it on TV Joe because I was watching him as seen on TV you did see the charts so might have had something to do with how they were streaming it just with the the camera from the White House press room anyway here's a doctor Deborah Burcham with some of what she was saying yesterday there's no magic bullet there's no magic vaccine or therapy it's just behaviors each of our behavior is translating into something that changes the course of this viral pandemic I think you start I don't know I I think you start to worry about people are starting to get stir crazy I mean it's you know today's Wednesday of basically week number two and it's I don't know and how do you feel Michael I mean I know I know you get out around you were talking about your bike ride before yeah I mean I try to get some exercise because you can go a little crazy so I just jump on the bike and eyes around the city but you know I mean I I I it it's kind of a solitary figure actually so it's not really bothering me too much I read and I think I'm like you and contemplate what did you say about me getting married and you think otherwise I don't prevent it well I think about things you know like yeah I'm I'm reading contemplating enabled what the hell are you thinking about thinking about life I'm thinking about how we're gonna get through this and thinking about how people in the past got through things like the plague I was reading Samuel Pepys is diary from the seventeenth century when the plague struck England and a lot of what he says is what we're all thinking feeling now you just don't know who's it gonna hit next and he writes about friends of his who he thought were healthy he saw the other day but many finds out that they're really sick and then they die and he talks about living life in his house with his wife trying to deal with his kids and not be able to go outside I mean this happened what four hundred five hundred years ago and it's exactly the same thing we're thinking about now notice stuff I I had a good friend of mine who is struggling and and and thank god he seems to be doing a little better the temperature is down I guess that that critical temperature point is over a hundred and four and the and the and he's and he hasn't hit that a couple days now so yeah these are the things you think about so I even I think about these things Michael I know you think I'm not quite the entire will genius that I wanna be a graduate is because they only went to Syracuse but I do think about these things well I find comfort in the past because you know you you think what we're going through is unique and no one's ever done this before can we believe this is happening to us and then you found out you know my folks this is happened before and people did get through it so I I find a little a little comfort in knowing that mankind has weathered such storms as we're going through now wow Michael caring about his fellow man you've really turned the corner all right so six I would love that believable he's got corona virus but he's still doing his television show what Chris Cuomo had to say on the air last night and that's coming up next our.

Patrick mackerel sportscaster Joe Bach Kenny Albert football
"samuel pepys" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on 710 WOR

"For the latest on the corona virus now lan Berman and Michael Riedel I wish I had some good news for you they just came out with the latest unemployment figures Michael yeah three point two eight million people Feyerick filed for unemployment last week the previous record was six hundred ninety five thousand back in nineteen eighty two three point two eight three million the sister well we had that was on the far as the Dow futures of it and I guess they were expecting about me South Beach is now down about three hundred fifty points I mean that's not huge but the those those unemployment numbers are unbelievable that leads us to our next guest because he's Larry Hackett the ABC entertainment contributor and Larry my god half of those unemployment claims must come from the entertainment business it's incredible I mean the error ambulance everywhere you don't want one particular sector to feel worse than others but do you have to wonder how long the law can go on and and what the net effect is going to be I mean I obviously brought Michael you know but anybody else what what what happened to me not only or not people are not going to let you know can these companies can you spell can the family told how can that be universal that what will happen can they re open well they will re open but they're talking probably not now until July and that just means that only the stronger shows the ones that are brand names that have a lot of money in the bank and made tons of money they're the only ones that can come back because if you are struggling show you just don't have the resources to to tough it out right now and you know that's why they canceled the the Tony awards of course because my feeling about awards now Larry is when the entertainment business comes back I would think the last thing you want the entertainment business if this is an awards ceremony that pits people against each other were you gonna have winners and losers well you know Michael it and lead this is very similar opposite what happened at night during nine eleven and in two thousand eight right I mean just be emotional tenor and whatever seems appropriate right now in the midst of it all seems all also I think you're absolutely right an instrument of time months will have to pass before things do seem appropriate because right now all that kind of thing the you know the notion of self regulation just seems so completely tone deaf a large as a result of the opening day but every single sports event has been shut down is it the same in the entertainment industry is there anything that's that's taking place you know I think a lot of people are moving to their you know social media platforms and things like that but you see all these different movies have been pushed back I know that in the heights which is the movie about some that you have based on the limb around well around there are memoranda play has been pushed back all the shows are being pushed back and there's nobody out there any kind of academic now I mean the beginning two weeks ago it was terrific detect now there's no strategy the only way to do things but whether it Broadway or albums or movies you know that this is kind of like well I'm but the public sees the end product right and they see you know the movie appearing on a certain product but I mean that sometimes the the product of two years three years of work so not only are people not seen these movies that were supposed to come out every Friday or play it was supposed to open in the spring time they're now having movies I mean god knows how long it's going to last I mean this is going to be sprinkling out the movies that are in the can now it's a stick built for example and sprinkle amount of repair to months there were no productions going on right now I know a young man who worked at the at the health center that I go to who was leaving and he was about to be an assistant director on a film in Hungary three left the week before this whole thing happened that still is not being shot right now god knows when that's going to be shot whatever the release the original release date was pushed back another year I'm sorry any streaming though with Netflix Amazon places like that that has to be a growing business in in this time well it's great because I will tell you this though but I think was two days ago in the stock market when the historic high I did notice one of the few companies that was in the red that particular day with Netflix and of course the idea was that everything else is going green there was a note a light in the tunnel maybe the single and the ant people chase the bank will get off our caps one day and not be watching Netflix but you know what let's just said about the Dow futures this this morning you can be sure that Netflix will probably be one of the beneficiaries of that because we're gonna be inside water that we may have thought Hillary would I like to think about is how events like this affect the future I mean I always thought the movie theaters are gonna struggle but now they may even struggle more may take for ever before people want to go back to a movie theater do you foresee any other changes along those lines in the entertainment business as as this continues to progress I don't see that if you're asking you do I think that people's behavior it will change and people will start gathering in movie theaters I don't think so I know that we thought that after nine eleven are between after other compulsions that it you know that are felt globally and you just don't see that would be great you know I think it's more the technology that affect the way people behave I think there is still a need for people to pick a date people want to congregate in dark movie theaters to watch movies at night and all the different technological advances of the past couple years obviously have pocketed that to some degree it's not like it used to be on me but I don't think it's gonna change fundamentally I mean look if you look back to the forties and fifties right when they were double features and in the afternoons and obviously people's viewing habits change from those days but they still in the movies and I still think they're going to go to the movies too but I would argue that when this thing finally ends I don't think it's going to end up roughly it'll and slowly maybe regionally he will be going back because they'll be desperate to go out and get out and to be with one another Marana time but what are you doing to be entertained I am watching Netflix like everybody else I watched succession which is H. B. O. my client with watching succession and it's pretty good I would say it's fantastic but it's pretty good I'm enjoying that I have to confess I'm reading the plague by Albert Camus which believably it's incredibly obvious the appropriate right now and he was one of those books that you're reading high school or college or at least try to yeah I didn't quite get that but I'm reading it now and it's just so sort of salient and appropriate and thoughtful but and much quite joy get however cool **** you know unnecessary it might seem well I'm reading these I resent the diary entries of Samuel Pepys during the plague in London in the seventeenth century okay there you go yeah what are you reading lamb hair on the internet to to prepare for our show you know actually doing it thanks Larry always appreciated a bachelor thanks Larry you to enjoy your book when we get back where the wealthy are escaping Michael has some personal knowledge of this and surprise surprise the president started things up with his tweets that's next Bernie better with your W. O. R. traffic.

lan Berman Michael Riedel
"samuel pepys" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"The hour but I remember seeing people who had polio adults sometimes they were young adults suffering from what I remember the ruby hospitals out in the east coast it's crippled children's in New York it's what they call them we don't it's bring name now but if there were other hospitals with that name the poor just think of Franklin Roosevelt all that this was something that kind of like tuberculosis I scarlet fever and in others from from the nineteenth century on the baby killers the real owners of families in awe at that dates in the middle age men men in the thirties and younger with various highly susceptible to these diseases and it was just a side of going through populations not only in America but in Europe and around the world I added to be able to tackle something where it's pretty much ninety nine percent your radic hated except for some problem areas fostered by warfare and famine today hoping to be able to cross the threshold and radically it totally and completely the next one down the block is going to be malaria and you're probably reading about that in the news because malaria is it has never gone away and it's making a comeback and that that really had that's in another one of these fundamental diseases that the radic ation of which would would save millions and millions of live so I just wanted to contribute something to that a small way so there's an interview at the bottom of the hour with one of the most prominent internists in the United States doctor Robert Heisey of friend of mine from rotary club of Ann Arbor and he's going to speak to us in a little while but anyway in the show's gonna have a little bit of this you know it negative maybe a Downer sort of aspect today but in terms of the art I hope you're going to see the beauty in it I've got just a nice little grouping of different artists here and certainly in keeping with the spirit of the time but with beauty also I'm going to start with a painting which is I I got to know this painting very very well when I worked at the National Gallery of art in Washington and that is the Hieronymus Bosch painting death and the miser of it we know Bosch from him you know is his other other well known paintings ship of fools and the great to you know the triptychs that he would make the three part you know pain into the follies of our men and women his dates are fourteen fifty to fifteen sixteen that's interesting that's a hundred years after the Bravada plague landed from a ship emanating from the Crimea up possibly coming from the from the Mongolian steppes as maybe from a more what plague from little animals that somehow made the leap to humans may be on the caravan route or whatever but anyway there was a trading vessel that went of from the Black Sea the Odessa area came through the Bosphorus of then into the Mediterranean Sea the destination is the scene incessantly from the moment that that ship dropped anchor in the harbor at the scene most of the crew were dead already the others were sick hi people draw S. is as soon as the sick living crew were being tended to and the ship was quarantined the people in the scene a dropped in waves and it was almost like you know just a little bit slower than like a bomb blaster whatever and people just simply fall over or like like a wind storm all the sudden appearing over corn field people just went down as to what the heck was this what kind of illness was what we know now that it was the pneumonic a manifestation of bionic plague so just simply having it speaking to somebody it's carried through the air purrs like you know like a cold like like the flu like a stomach virus very very easily transmitted it just wiped out the city and from Cicely went up through the rest the island crossed over into Italy went but when it was all saw it said and done and would never really be done for a few hundred years I mean they were still suffering from after shock waves of plague remember the great London plague that that Samuel Pepys writes about in the sixteen sixties right around the time of the restoration of Charles the second after the interregnum in the experimentation of Cromwell and his son not being able to hold on to power they bring back the king shows a second almost to meet you've got the great fire of London and you've got the plague in London that keeps writes about very very well these were after sex of the bionic plague invasion of thirteen forty seven forty eight by about thirteen sixty it was it was pretty much over in that first wave but upwards of how gosh maybe about at least a third in some scholars think closer to one half of the European population died in that the in in that pandemic so the art reflects that for a long time in the art of her honest bosh he's born fifteen fourteen fifty a hundred years after really the arrival of the plague it's still very much part and parcel of on cultural expression in Europe at that time I'm looking at one of Bosch's more minor pains which makes it I think very interesting and that is death in the wiser you could hold this thing up it's like a small screen you would have in a window like a bathroom window or something you can hold it easily in your hand I it is on an oil on panel and what it shows is a wealthy man wasted with disease are on his death bed you see the curtains drawn back it's one of those you know Ebenezer Scrooge type beds we've got the canopy like a tester bed all the way around well it's opened up so we see him almost like an actor on stage I in angel he supposedly maybe knows is there is is like so how glad that he's there this angel is interceding for him up above the canopy the to say god the father are coming in the door however is there the heavy and that is death himself in a shroud skeletal face the same thing holding an arrow in his hand so who's going to get this guy and you see that you know the curtains are are drawn back you have them bundled up and you see this and and heart also the bundle thou makes you remind you the fact the man who is dying is a very wealthy man probably merchants of it's almost like a money bag hanging from from the canopy of of the bed what's interesting about this like a stained glass window of the Middle Ages Richard just ending at this time in various waves in the form by your own style of of of of architecture in France the rich the Ranil style and it's really depending on where you are and France and Germany the Middle Ages in terms of the great building of the cathedrals is going on into the fourteen hundred and even into the fifteen hundreds were in in England on under Henry the eighth particularly so this is a great age of of of architecture so we we have the idea of the man who is completely blanched with illness wasted almost skeletal body but we are given the vision also what he was like when he was more in his in his prime as a successful merchant we see him as a somewhat younger man at the foot of the bed depositing another money bag into the chest the coffer that is at the foot of his bed and we see other bags in little treasures in there so this man is is been very very good at taking care of business making himself comfortable but has done nothing at all for his soul and we can see that really everything is has is futile like a stained glass window where you have many different views stories taking place at the same time as a centerpiece to the central story we get that multiple stories all in one multiple views in one work of art in one small panel further down at the very bottom foreground kinda like the threshold to us the spectators into the painting we see what he was as a young man we realize that he was a soldier there's a part of his uniform it draped a beautiful rich fabrics maybe when he was just going into the mercantile trade we see the armor and the lance that he wore as a young man probably fighting for his king and country when he was a young man and that's in the in the foreground so we've seen basically from bottom to top the progression of his life and it but not really a progression because now everything is hanging in the balance as death comes in the angel was frantically interceding for him and the man is in the middle Diane I it is a fabulous even the architecture of the vaulting the wooden vaulting of the chamber is beautiful it almost makes the piece and I remember seeing this even though it's a framed painting its tall narrow I you get the feeling that this is really more than a painting because it almost looks like a trump Dolly or trick of the eye type of painting that makes you the relies on my god it's actually like a piece of architecture but no it's not it's it's it's an oil on panel it's absolutely wonderful another pain Inver around that same period the temptation of St Anthony but one of my favorite German artists of the sixteenth century and that is my fire Grunewald I in the temptation of St Anthony was a very popular of the subject in the fourteen hundreds into the sixteen hundreds where you see the Saint of you know out in the desert in Egypt being tormented by demons are to try to corrupt him and it can you have that story with a much grander story all around it in the hands of of Grunewald in down in the lower left corner you see a man who has collapsed from illness now this man is not wasting away like the man in the Bosch we just talked about the merchant this man this man has now completely distended.

"samuel pepys" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on KGO 810

"To me when I look at Twitter I never have lives less live been more chronicled that is really good that's Dennis Miller on the new David spade show never have lives less lives been more chronicled while then with Twitter and that's true the one reason the diary of Samuel Pepys from sixteen sixty I believe wow I've read parts of it what the reason it's it's such a classic of literature is it was a really into the minutia daily life from the sixteen hundreds in London Paul that surveys as he kept his diary every single day I mean like you know what did this and what made that and talk to my wife and did laundry blah blah and but now you don't just have one guy who did that you've got practically everybody with at the moment every moment of their life everything the eight thing they did yeah let me have an interest in somebody four hundred years from now I don't know so the old Sam peeps book is set to get a lot of weird spellings an extra ease and **** that look like gaffes and stuff no no but I've tried to read it several times I've never made a very far I don't remember having read in high school yeah and does the problem yeah Ellen somebody not counting every detail of the day is dark hole any leeches on the feeder and then there was a B. had you know that sort of thing so you want to hear to this two things I want to catch up on all these different things due to do the first thing first will do the other thing second the first thing first will I I'll hold off on Carty be is it good is a great out I want to mention this is mediocre the warden from the jail where Eckstine hung himself has been reassigned temporarily reassigned the hammer is come down he has been temporarily reassigned and two of the guards have been suspended they are on leave and Jack come they are on leave I'm sure collecting their their salary **** and they are on administrative leave and they will either get their exact same jobs back or similar jobs somewhere else the cards that fell asleep yeah though though yeah that's okay yeah yeah harsh deck a nap the VA is saying wow that's that's tough measures that's what happens in government work you just keep your job and then you can retire with your pension your your health care because that's where so be cynical about that you should you should be cynical about the I don't understand how these two names are in the same sense of this giveaway what's about to happen here on why the war is why the names Carty B. and Bernie Sanders are in the same sentence I don't know what's happening now she's interviewing him okay why she interview well because she is a a former stripper Hawker robber who is crafted a couple of enjoyable pop songs so now she is an authority on politics the economy stripper launch tripper robber log in order in America and our nation's politics let's let's enjoy a little bit and what are.

Dennis Miller four hundred years
"samuel pepys" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Lives less live been more chronicled that is really good that's Dennis Miller on the new David spade show never have lives less lived been more chronicled while then with Twitter and that's true though the reason the diary of Samuel Pepys from sixteen sixty I believe wow I read parts of it what the reason it's it's such a classic of literature is it was a really into the minutia daily life from the sixteen hundreds in London thanks surveys as he kept his diary every single day I mean like you know what did this and what made that and talk to my wife and did laundry ball a lot and but now you don't just have one guy who did that you've got everybody with an early moment every moment of their life everything they ate everything they did yeah will that be of any interest in somebody four hundred years from now I don't know so the old same peeps focus sensors got a lot of weird spellings an extra ease and **** that look like gaffes and stuff no no but I've tried to read it several times I've never made a very far I don't remember having read in high school yeah and does the problem yeah Ellen somebody carrying every detail of the day is dark hole many leeches on the feeder and then there was a B. had circling on mine so you want to hear to this two things I want to catch up on all these different things I didn't do the first thing first will do the other thing second the first thing first well I have a hold off on Carty be is it because it is a great and I want to mention this is mediocre the warden from the jail where Eckstine hung himself has been reassigned temporarily reassigned the hammer is come down he has been temporarily reassigned and two of the guards have been suspended they are on leave Jack come they are on leave I'm sure collecting their their salary **** and they are on administrative leave and they will either get their exact same jobs back or similar jobs somewhere else the cards that fell asleep yeah though though yeah that's okay yeah yeah harsh data now the VA is saying wow at cents tough measures that's what happens in government work you just keep your job and then you can retire with your pension you'll hurt your health care because that's why it works so the cynical about that you should you should be cynical about the I don't understand how these two names are in the same sentence does this give away what's about to happen here I'm quite aware is why the names Carty B. and Bernie Sanders are in the same sentence I don't know what's happening now she's interviewing him okay why she won't because she is a former stripper Hawker robber who is crafted a couple of enjoyable pop songs so now she is an authority on six the economy stripper lawns tripper robber in order in America and our nation's politics let's so let's enjoy a little bit and what I was gonna go.

Dennis Miller David spade four hundred years
"samuel pepys" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"samuel pepys" Discussed on KGO 810

"Listening to the Armstrong and Getty show coming up at ten AM it's mark Thompson nine KGO eight ten the Armstrong to me when I look at Twitter and I never have lives less live been more chronicled that is really good that's Dennis Miller on the new David spade show never have lives less lives been more chronicled while then with Twitter and that's true though the reason the diary of Samuel Pepys from sixteen sixty I believe wow I've read parts of it what the reason it's it's such a classic of literature is it was a really into the minutia daily life from the sixteen hundreds in London Paul thanks surveys as he kept his diary every single day I mean like you know what did this and what made that talk to my wife did longer blah blah and but now you don't just have one guy who did that you've got practically everybody with at the moment every moment of their life everything the eight thing they did yeah will I be of any interest in somebody four hundred years from now I don't know so the old Sam peeps book is set to get a lot of weird spellings an extra ease and **** that look like EFS and stuff no no but I've tried to read it several times I've never made a very far I don't remember having read in high school yeah and does the problem yeah Ellen somebody not counting every detail of the day is dark hole any leeches on the feeder and then there was a B. had that sort of thing so you want to hear to this two things I want to catch up on all these different things due to do the first thing first will do the other thing second the first thing first of all I have to hold off on Carty be is it good is a great out I want to mention this is mediocre the warden from the jail where Epstein hung himself has been reassigned temporarily reassigned the hammer is come down he has been temporarily reassigned in two of the guards have been suspended they are on leave and Jack come they are on leave I'm sure collecting their their salary advance and they are on administrative leave and they will either get their exact same jobs back or similar jobs somewhere else the cards that fell asleep yeah though though yeah that's okay yeah yeah harsh deck a nap the VA is saying wow that's that's tough measures that's what happens in government work you just keep your job and then you can retire with your pension you'll hurt your health care because that's what works so be cynical about that you should you should be cynical about the I don't understand how these two names are in the same sentence does this give away what's about to happen here I'm quite aware is why the names Carty B. and Bernie Sanders are in the same sentence I don't know what's happening now she's interviewing him okay why she interview well because she is a a former stripper Hawker robber who is crafted a couple of enjoyable pop songs so now she is an authority on politics the economy stripper launch trooper Robert in order in America and our nation's politics let's so let's enjoy a little bit and what are we gonna go about.

Armstrong Twitter Getty mark Thompson four hundred years