35 Burst results for "Samir"

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:06 min | Last month

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

"Minutes, <Speech_Male> you're building a depth <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with the creator <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that you're not necessarily <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> getting <Music> in 15 seconds <Speech_Music_Male> on TikTok. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> with the TikTok <Speech_Male> for you style <Speech_Male> page, <Speech_Male> it prioritizes <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the videos <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and not the creators. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> So if you took the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> biggest creators off of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> TikTok, you <Speech_Male> can still enjoy TikTok, <Speech_Music_Male> but people <Speech_Music_Male> come to <Speech_Music_Male> YouTube specifically <Speech_Male> for the creators <Speech_Music_Male> because they want to <Speech_Male> watch them for long periods of <Speech_Male> time. And <Speech_Male> once you have, people <Speech_Male> watching for a long period of <Speech_Male> time, that's actually <Speech_Male> when you can <Speech_Male> build a career <Speech_Male> off of whether it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be advertising. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Or <Speech_Male> selling a product <Speech_Male> or a service. <Speech_Male> Yeah, I think on TikTok, <Speech_Male> you're a cog <Speech_Male> in their <Speech_Music_Male> algorithm. <Speech_Music_Male> You're going through it <Speech_Music_Male> and you're just seeing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> what's next <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and it's learning <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about what you like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in terms of what's next. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's much <Speech_Music_Male> less about the creators <Speech_Music_Male> and much more about the <Speech_Music_Male> experience of the for you <Speech_Music_Male> page. And I think if <Speech_Music_Male> you look back in time, <Speech_Music_Male> history has shown us <Speech_Music_Male> that people follow <Speech_Music_Male> people, whether it <Speech_Male> was the radio, <Speech_Music_Male> television stars, movie <Speech_Music_Male> stars, musicians, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like we're <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> interested in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And YouTube <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lends itself really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> well to building <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> relationships with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people. <Speech_Music_Male> Comments <SpeakerChange> mirror, <Speech_Music_Male> thanks so much <Speech_Music_Male> guys. Thanks guys. <Music> <Advertisement> Thanks guy. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Hey, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks so much for listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to how I built this lab. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You can follow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> how I built this on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Apple podcasts, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Amazon music, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or wherever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you're listening right <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> now. You <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> can binge all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of our episodes, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ad free by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> subscribing to wandering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> plus in Apple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcasts or <Speech_Music_Male> the wondery app. <Speech_Music_Male> If you want to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> follow us on socials, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we're at how I built <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this on Twitter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Instagram, and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm at guy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Roz on Twitter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and at guy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot Roz <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on Instagram. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This episode was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> produced by Carla <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> estevez with editing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by John Isabella. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> audio engineer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was Andy huther, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our music <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was composed by <Speech_Music_Male> rum team Arab Louis. <Speech_Music_Male> Our <Speech_Music_Male> production team at how I built <Speech_Music_Male> this includes Alex <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chung, Casey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Herman, JC <Speech_Music_Male> Howard Chris messini <Speech_Music_Male> with Liz metzger, <Speech_Music_Male> Sam Paulson, <Speech_Music_Male> and Carrie Thompson. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our intern <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is Margaret sereno. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Neva grant <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is our supervising <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editor, Beth <Speech_Music_Male> Donovan, is our executive <Speech_Music_Male> producer. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm <SpeakerChange> guy Roz, <Speech_Male> and you've been listening <Speech_Male> to how I built this.

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:53 min | Last month

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

"Do that? I think it's a tough question. I think right now there's a lot of people who are going to try. The barrier to entry has been significantly lowered. And a lot of that is because of TikTok or YouTube shorts, this short form vertical content, people are having a lot of success. And the most importantly, they can take a lot of shots. It's not as hard to make a video anymore. With short form vertical content. But it is hard to sustain an audience over a long period of time. I think a lot of people can make money right now in the creator economy, but to make a career, I think, is extremely challenging. And I think it's just like any other entrepreneurial venture. And I think it's really important to recognize that the term creators, creators are a subset of entrepreneurs. It is, it follows the same trajectory of how hard it is to launch a startup. Our product just so happens to be media. Yeah, I think if you want to be a creator, the question you should be asking yourself is, does creator have to be a career? Or can it be a tool in your toolkit to help your business or to make some extra cash on the side doing what you love? There are unique people who really want creator to be a career. And there are some people who, before they know it, creator has become a career. Because they have developed the audience. They have the viewership that will sustain a business. But it doesn't have to be that way for everyone. Yeah. You guys have been at this for ten years now. And it's a grind. There's a lot of work that goes into producing all the videos you guys make. I mean, is it fair to say that you're actually working harder now than you were when you started? I would say that's absolutely fair to say. You know, we reflect on the last ten years and say that it took us ten years to get our ticket to enter the race. Now we're in the race. But at least we have direction. Because in the past, we didn't know where we were going. And there's nothing like running, but not knowing where you're supposed to end up or when to stop. So I would say, you know, whether it's we just entered a race, or we just entered a marathon, I would say we haven't even hit mile one yet. And to have the stamina to do this, I think it's helpful to have a partner. It's helpful for us to keep each other afloat and it's not easy. You're dealing with algorithms, you're dealing with audiences, you're dealing with a creative output that's not easy to do on a week to week basis. So we're lucky to have a team. We're lucky to have started to build a business out of this and started to build a company and a culture where people can support each other and we can put some process around this and try and make this try and make a real run at this. I know this is a question that I get all the time and part of me thinks when I'm asked this question, if I had the answer, don't you think that other people would have the answer to this question, but I'm going to ask you it anyway. Where do you see opportunities for people who want to get into YouTube? I think there's a lot of opportunity when it comes down to the topic that you choose to talk about. I think if our history has shown us anything underserved communities, our communities that are going to be excited about your videos and they're going to come back again and again, whether it was the lacrosse community or now the creator, a community, it was the decision to talk about a community that we're a part of that happens to be underserved that has led to us actually being able to build a community that we can then find ways to monetize. I also think to remember that if you want to make it on YouTube specifically, YouTube is a search engine. So thinking about searchable topics is really important as a starting point. A lot of times it's important to start with searchable topics within underserved communities so that you can aggregate that initial audience. And then introduce your personality into that as well. I think the mistake we made was starting to think about just making whatever interested us. And there just wasn't an audience for it yet. So I do think you need to take a lot of shots and getting yourself in a space where you can do that and where you aren't relying on YouTube or relying on social, which is what we did. So don't do that. But just take a lot of shots, think about it as a search engine and think about how to serve an audience that's underserved. I know it's really impossible to predict the future. You know, ten years ago, if you ask people, what's the future of X, Y, and Z? I don't think people would have predicted TikTok, right? But if you tried. To think about where the creator economy is headed, in ten years time do you still think that YouTube will be the dominant force? Yeah. I definitely do. I think there's something about the power of search, but also the length of the content. I think when you sit with someone for 5, ten, 15.

YouTube
"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:23 min | Last month

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey, welcome back to how I built this lab. I'm guy Roz, so I'm talking with Colin and smear of the Colin and Samir show on YouTube and they're talking about how they built a business around their YouTube channel. You know, this creator economy, right? It has a market value estimated to be bigger than a $100 billion and I mean this is like YouTubers and podcasters and influencers. So let's talk about how you build a business around being a content creator. I mean, you've learned from a lot of people. You guys are doing it yourselves. How do creators sort of generally start out building a sustainable business? I mean, you obviously have to have viewers and advertisers, but where do you begin? You know, I think the mistake we made when we stepped out of the lacrosse network and started creating was we didn't think about the audience we wanted to create for. So I would say that a large part of starting out is thinking about an audience and a value prop. And thinking, here's the people I want to make content for. What do I want them to feel? How do I want to transform them? So for us, once we started to figure out what we wanted to do in our format, it was, okay, we want to make content for creators. We want them to feel educated. We want them to feel empowered. We want them to feel less alone. And that gave us a guiding light. Now the next thing that was missing was process. And that's an extremely important part of being a creator, because what was happening for us was we were having some pieces of content that would do really well. They would get millions of views, but we would try and reverse engineer and say, how do we do that again? And we couldn't figure it out. And so when we decided to turn this into a podcast into a talk show, that's when we could actually understand and build a foundation for process. And process also enables team we were able to bring team members on to help us with that process. And it also enables monetization. Because then you're able to communicate to the industry, you know, what do I do? What can you buy? What's the product that I offer? And that's a really important piece of the puzzle. And you can also look out in a year and say, okay, for us, we upload every Monday. We take 6 weeks off. That's how much inventory we have. You can buy a 62nd ad slot, and because we're talking to creators and we want them to feel educated, who are the advertisers who have that same mission. Let's talk to them. And let's see if they want to support our mission as well. Because we're aligned. And so I would say those four things to solve. Audience value process and monetization, it really is kind of the creator business plan. Now, to get to that point even, you kind of just have to create a lot to find yourself and figure out what you want to create. Because it's a really long road. It's taken us ten years to get to this point. And, you know, obviously we uploaded all types of different content to get to the call and in some year show. How important are numbers are subscribers? I hear this all the time. I've got X number of subscribers. This number of subscribers, that number. Is it, is it really the key to building a sustainable business, having a massive number of subscribers like millions and millions of subscribers? I think in reality, what's more important is the average number of people who are listening or are watching every time you upload. That's a lot more representative of your actual community that's there and cares. When it comes to subscribers, that's this aggregate number that can be built over a long period of time, but it doesn't necessarily mean you can reach all of those people. I think the opportunity that we're moving into right now is for more niche audiences. I think what's amazing on the Internet is you can find content about almost anything. And you can find really well developed communities about all kinds of different things. And so I think the future or the present right now is growing a depth of connection with an audience, rather than growing wider audiences, growing deeper. And I think that's something we're going to see a lot of as we move forward in the creator space. I think there's a lot of different opportunities to meet those communities where they are. And find the right monetization strategy. Some of that might be a Patreon or some of it might be merchandise or some of it might be ad supported. But I do not think you need millions of subscribers to grow. I think you need a passionate community to build a business. What explains why somebody blows up on YouTube? Is it, is it what they do? Is it how long they've been around? What do you think? There's a lot of factors, obviously. I think the really interesting thing about some of these creators that reach millions and millions and millions of people, their content, transcends language. So YouTube is a global platform. And the majority of the views come from outside the U.S.. So if you're a creator who's making visual content, whether it be kids content or dude perfect, who is doing these amazing trick shots or MrBeast who is giving away thousands of dollars, you don't need to speak the language to see the reaction on that person's face when they receive it. So how does it make you guys think about what you do? Because when I see your videos, I think they're similar to what I do. It's like slow TV, like this is slow media, what I do, right? But I'm not doing trick shots, and I'm not, this is not a fast paced show. You have to have patience to listen to how I built this. And I feel like there's an element of that in your videos. You're very thoughtful and does it can it translate into a world where that is your primary source of revenue? I mean, in our experience right now, the experience we're having, the answer is yes. And I would say that similar to what we talked about before, it's about depth and that depth of connection. Now it's not as easy to build a business. I think getting 40 million views on a video, like your advertising rates are going to be fantastic. But it's also a lot harder to produce a video that gets 40 million views. And we've spent time with MrBeast. We've spent time with dude perfect and watching them make their videos. It's hard work. And you have to study the algorithms, you have to study the metrics. But you also have to want to do that. Do you think there's enough space for everyone in the creator economy? I mean, do you think that anybody who wants to make a business out of this could.

YouTube Colin Roz Samir U.S.
"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:22 min | Last month

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

"I would say, is what really made our channel start to take off. So let's talk nuts and bolts here guys. You started to make videos about content creators. And I should mention these are very extensive videos. These are anywhere from a half hour to some of them are two hours long. They're very well produced videos. First of all, walk me through how you kind of divide up the labor because there's a lot of work that goes into each of these videos. For us, when we look at our business, it's always kind of worked where I'm more of the business revenue partnerships and Collins more of the creative director. And that's naturally been how it works. It's kind of funny that I'm the one that went to film school and he's not, but that's just how we operate. And I think it's really important to have those two sides to a creator business, the kind of operational side, and then the creative side. And I wonder how do the economics of YouTuber because I've, you know, I've heard different things. Like, you know, we know of the PewDiePie's or the MrBeast, and we hear these stories about YouTubers making ten, 20, $30 million a year, even with a video that has a million views, right? From what I understand, as a YouTube creator, you don't make that much money off of that video. Is that right? Yeah, I mean, I can actually give you kind of a high level of how much the platform has paid us over the past couple of years. So in 2020, our channel did 5.6 million views. And we made $16,000. In 2021, our channel did a 107 million views, and we made a $109,000. And in 2022, so far, we've made $50,000 on 73 million views. So you can kind of understand from there that we have a team of 6 people who work on the show. That would be hard to sustain a business just on what the platform pays you. Yeah. And I think what we see with a lot of YouTube creators is a couple of things. One that node two creators have the same road map. So they're all taking bits and pieces of ways that other creators are monetizing. And another thing for us and a lot of creators when it comes to those brand sponsorships is that not all views are not all listens are created equal. For us, the people who are listening are a certain type of person and there are advertisers who are more interested in those people than there would be other advertisers. And that's where it really comes down to the benefit of having a niche audience. And why so many creators can build a valuable living, even if their topic is very niche. Yeah, this is aggregating an audience of a certain type, building a community, and then finding the most relevant business for that community. Tell me a little bit about your plans beyond what you're doing now. I mean, what other products and things that you're working on that will help you continue to build the business, the Colin and Samir business. Yeah, I think to start what we want to do right now, we want to focus on is delivering our value to the audience as best as possible and as many ways as possible. And a lot of that is telling a diverse set of creator stories. So we can educate people on the different road maps that exist. We do that right now on YouTube through our show. We do it across social platforms, we do it on our podcast, and we do it in our newsletter, the publish press. So we get to hear a lot more about what's happening in the creator space. We get to get to work on that project and build an audience in a completely different way. And an audience that we own. And I think that's a really important distinction when you think about all of us as creators we're building our companies on rented land in a sense, right? Like YouTube could change tomorrow. I don't think it will, but it could. And we would lose our access to that audience there. So what we're doing with building this newsletter allows us to aggregate this audience that we're passionate about, deliver value to them in a different way in a way that we have more ownership over. And as we look to the future, I think it's expanding upon this concept of education, moving in that direction, where we can roll out more education and more ways to deliver that value to the creator audience. The newsletter is not called Colin and Samir's newsletter, and that was very intentional. It's called the published press. Because scaling yourself as a creator is one of the hardest things to do. Casey Neistat can't scale himself, necessarily, right? If he doesn't want to upload, there's no Casey Neistat on YouTube that day. And the same pertains to us on the colon and Samir channel, there can be a cap to that. But with the published press, we have a writer. And of course, we're in the edits, and we're looking at it very closely. But that's a machine that can deliver the same value problem. But we're not as heavily involved. And that's really exciting for the longevity of our careers and the impact that we're able to have. We're going to take another quick break more from Colin and Samir in a moment and we'll find out how they built a business around creating YouTube videos. Stick around, you're listening to how I built this lab. I'm Dan Jones, and I grew up in a small town called Jackson Tennessee, and when I grew up, it was totally normal for people to have friends who were politically different from them. In fact, one of my best Friends in high school, I used a white guy who was conservative. This guy loved Ronald Reagan. I hated Ronald Reagan. And you know, we would just debate and argue about it all the time, but we were friends. I miss that feeling that you could just debate and disagree without distrusting somebody without disrespecting each other. And I just want to bring that back. And that is the point of the uncommon ground podcast. You probably got some people in your life who you used to be able to talk to. Now you can't everything is just too polarized. I think there is still a chance to have a better conversation in America. I'll bring special guest into the conversation like Meghan McCain, Sarah Silverman, Deepak Chopra, and others, our goal is to find common ground. Join me every Wednesday by following uncommon ground on Amazon music or wherever you get your podcasts..

YouTube Samir Casey Neistat Colin Collins Ronald Reagan Dan Jones Tennessee Jackson Meghan McCain Sarah Silverman Deepak Chopra America Amazon
"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:17 min | Last month

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

"Smartest way to hire. On a cold February morning in Indianapolis, Tony Curtis woke up, got dressed, loaded his sawed off shotgun and drove to his bank. After entering the office, he quickly found his investment banker and wired the muzzle of his shotgun. To the back of the man's head. Tony wasn't there to steal anything. He was there to take his life back, and his plan was so well calculated that for the next 63 hours the Indianapolis police department couldn't stop it, and so outrageous and potentially catastrophic, but the entire nation couldn't turn away from it. American hostage is a new podcast starring me, Jon Hamm, that tells the true story of one man who channeled the rage of a nation and took justice into his own hands, and as the nation watched live, Tony would become a hero to millions. To hear the story follow American hostage wherever you get your podcasts, or you can binge all 8 episodes right now on Amazon music or wondery plus. Hey, welcome back to how I built this lab, my guests are Colin and Samir. So before the break, we were talking about, of course, the lacrosse network that you built Samir and Colin that you helped to grow, but you guys decide to leave whistle sports and to start your own new thing, which was making content around, well, initially inspired by Casey Neistat, who was on high build this couple years ago, what was the thing you guys were gonna do? There's only a few times in your life and in your entrepreneurial journey where you're lucky enough to be as naive as we were in that moment. And the reason I say that is because we had, for some reason, no fear or on the fact that we had no idea. And we stepped out even my dad and my family was very confused why we left. You know, it was almost, it sounded like it should have been exactly what we wanted to do. We were getting paid really well to make lacrosse videos and sports videos, but we just knew that we wanted more. We wanted more, a more diverse set of storytelling we wanted to explore ourselves differently. And so we didn't really have any ideas. And we just started making whatever was interesting to us. Our first video on the channel is just an exploration of the street fairfax in LA. The next video after that, I think is us going to our favorite coffee shop. But quickly, we started to recognize that the audience that we had built in La Crosse was not that interested in us talking about fairfax avenue in Los Angeles. And we were where we thought we were starting from a position of, we've built an audience. We've done this for four and a half years on YouTube. We were actually starting from zero. And I think that was one of the most startling experiences to go through. Right, because you were all of a sudden, I mean, either the lacrosse audience was a niche audience that you had cultivated, but they weren't necessarily choices or other content. So you had to start from scratch entirely from scratch. And the scary thing is we also had to start from scratch when it came to building a business, because YouTube clearly, again, was not going to be a business. So now we're finding ourselves freelancing again, doing all of these odd jobs and production projects, which is not what we set out to do. This is, I think, around 2018, right? And this is when you decide to launch what you call the column and some ear show. And already, by 2018, you're hearing a lot of people say, hey, YouTube is saturated. There's no space to get to break in. It's all the big creators are already dominating it. And I'm sure you were hearing that too from people who were like, who are you guys? What are you making? Was there any of that discouraging initially? The years between 2016 and 2020 would have to be some of the most discouraging of our careers. It was not because YouTube was oversaturated. It was because we couldn't figure out what we wanted to make. There's this great quote about making movies that's talks about how making a movie isn't the hard part. It's figuring out what to make the movie about. That's the hard part. And that was our experience. We were making all types of different content. We made a show called what's good about good news. We started to make our own skateboards and made a show about making skateboards. We were just trying to find ourselves online. And all the while, again, like Colin mentioned, struggling to build a business and doing odd odd jobs to get enough cash to keep going. And we described this term burnout as creative output without direction. And that's what we experienced. I also think we got a little bit humbled. When we left the lacrosse network, we were really confident. Borderline overconfident about our abilities because of what we were able to do, then two, three years later, we find ourselves really struggling. And I think that was a gut check for us. It was tough to internalize and you had to start asking, are we actually as good as we thought we were when we left that job? You eventually landed on an idea to actually focus on content creators themselves to actually make a channel about people who are YouTubers and creators. How did you land on that idea? It wasn't a kind of decision that we sat together and made. What happened was during the time when we were trying to figure out what to make content about, we would have these conversations over coffee about the world of creators, and this community that we were a part of. And one day we just thought, what if we just turned these conversations we're having in the morning? Into videos. And so we started writing scripts about our thoughts on the creator space, different creators. And over time, what we started to recognize was that we were doing the same thing we did in La Crosse. We were making content for the community that we were a part of, telling stories about the people in that community. You know, as the pandemic happened, everyone's attention started to shift to online media. It's where the global conversation was happening. We had a universal experience and a universal topic that shifted everyone's focus to online creators. And a lot of people became online creators during 2020. A lot of people became more interested in online creators, and it was just this moment in time where that audience just expanded in 2020. It gave our show a real reason to exist. I would say, because for the first time, it felt like all of these people want to be creators. It's one of the most sought after careers. But it also is one of the least understood. And so that's where I think we finally found not only just the audience, but our value prop and how we were actually going to start transforming the people who were watching. And that,.

Indianapolis police department Samir Colin Casey Neistat YouTube Tony Tony Curtis Jon Hamm La Crosse Indianapolis fairfax Amazon Los Angeles LA
"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

10:27 min | Last month

"samir" Discussed on How I Built This

"Started back about a decade ago, making lacrosse videos. Samir actually started a sports channel on YouTube called the lacrosse network. Colin joined forces with Samir because both of them had played lacrosse at college, but eventually they branched out, making videos about everything from skateboards to their favorite coffee shops. Today, their videos focus mainly on other content creators and how they do what they do. They interview creators, they break down news within the creator world, and they offer insights on how to make a living in an industry that has the potential to reach a $1 trillion valuation within the next ten years. Colin smir, welcome to high build a slab, great to have you guys. Thanks for having us. Yeah, thanks guy. All right, let's start with your origin story. Because you got into content creation because of lacrosse and basically you would document lacrosse games, upload them online onto YouTube, smear you in LA, Colin, you were in boulder, Colorado, how did you guys meet? We met on the Internet. We met on YouTube. I had graduated college, and I grew up playing lacrosse and I had this idea that I felt like the sport lacked coverage, it lacked media. There wasn't a way to connect with other people who were playing the sport. So, you know, I was a film major, and I wanted to use my film degree in one way or the other, and I tried my hand at Hollywood and didn't really like the experience of working in Hollywood. So decided to just take matters into my own hand and film the community that I was passionate about that I wanted to tell stories about. So you basically started a YouTube channel, right? That called the lacrosse network. That's right. I spun up a YouTube channel. I thought about it as the NFL network for lacrosse. And by no means did I have the financing to do that, but I had a camera. I had a laptop, and I had a bunch of ideas. I mean, this is how Mark Cuban started broadcast dot com. He wanted to air basketball games. And he wanted to be able to hear them wherever he was. So the idea of taking lacrosse, which nobody really knows doing and trying to create a channel around it is kind of a cool idea. Meantime, Colin, who you didn't know, calling you a student in boulder, at the university of Colorado, and you were also on the lacrosse team, right? Yeah, but I would say, unlike Samir, I was not a film major, but once I graduated, I wanted to be a filmmaker. So for me, the good story that I knew I had access to was my college lacrosse team. So I just graduated bought a camera and started a web series about the team just to tell the story about the team with lacrosse team. Yeah, so I graduated. I was paying my bills by working at the front desk of a hotel, but when I would get off work, I would go film the lacrosse team, learn how to edit, and I would put out these episodes. On YouTube and my first episode that I put out had, I think, less than a thousand views, but one of those views was Samir. And he ended up sending me an email. And Samir, what was the video? I mean, was it like a story? Was it just highlights? Was it interviews with the lacrosse players? What made it compelling? So the video was a trailer. It was a trailer for a show that Colin created called club ball. And it explored what it was like to play club lacrosse at the university of Colorado. And at the time, what I was uploading was highlights, full games, some news and analysis, but this was the first piece of storytelling I had seen in La Crosse, where it was more about the players than it was about the game. It was a story about young people coming together and trying to achieve something, at least that's how it was portrayed in the trailer. And it just so happened they played lacrosse. And immediately I knew it was the type of content we needed to make this network work. So you reach out to Colin and you're like, hey, I'm shamir and I'm doing something kind of similar and do you want to maybe talk and is that literally what you did? That's exactly right. That's exactly what I did. And I think I was met with a, I'm good. Don't worry. I'll just do this on my own or something. Something around calling not being that excited. Samir came with a lot of demands. So I was coming from the perspective of a first time artist who was very passionate about the music and about the storytelling and I was interested in what Samir was saying, but for him, you know, he said if you want to put this out on our YouTube channel, you're going to have to change the music, everything needs to be copyright free and I was using whatever I wanted to use. And of course, for the network that Samir was building, that wasn't going to work. So pretty soon after you reach out to him, sumer, you actually convinced him to move to LA and to join forces with you, and which is a pretty risky, you could have hated each other. But why did you think he was the right person to try this out with? So I had another cofounder with me and both him and I, we felt like we could do the broadcast side, but we knew we were missing this storytelling side. So I was very convinced that it was the stories about the people who played the game that were going to take us to the next level and Colin was the guy to help us do that. I thought that what Samir and his cofounder were doing was really interesting and exciting. And again, I wasn't a film major, but this is what I was interested in. So the prospect that someone would pay me anything at all to use my camera was very enticing to me. And that's what it came down to was, hey, here's three months we called it an internship where you come out to work for the lacrosse network. And I said, why not? Yeah. See you move out there and you guys start to build up the lacrosse network. And how did you get the content? I mean, you couldn't physically record every lacrosse game that was being played at colleges around the country. So how would you get the footage? There was times and days where we would get a call that there was a game going on in San Diego at 5 o'clock, and it was 11 a.m. in LA and we would just get our gear together and drive and go film it. But as we started to recognize we needed more content, we started to license content. And over the course of the next couple of years, it went from one channel to 60 different channels about lacrosse. We also, at that time, put ourselves on camera because we realized in Southern California, there's only so much lacrosse that we can film. But we can talk about lacrosse multiple times a week. And that actually was uncomfortable because I never thought I would be on camera and be sort of a quote unquote YouTuber. But it really unlocked our channel and the success we were able to have because we could upload really consistently. I mean, I'm curious, you didn't, I don't think you guys had a whole lot of money, right? Did you raise any money? We did not raise money. And the reason that I positioned it as an internship to Colin was because we had no money really. The money that we had was partially my savings account and that went a lot quicker than I thought. I had written out a financial model and a business plan around the lacrosse network and I had this per video budget that was around $4000 when we first started. Now, we never spent that money because I showed it to someone who actually worked at YouTube. And I was trying to get them to get excited about our idea. And he was like, you're going to spend $4000 a video, you're going to go out of business. That is not what YouTube is. A YouTube video has to cost you $0. And you have to be able to do it over an extremely long period of time. And there was a moment where I did try and raise money. And I got on the phone with an investor that I connected with through my brother. And he had experience, he played lacrosse. He had experience working in sports broadcast, and he was working at a big venture capital company. And I got on the phone with him and I started to pitch him what we were doing. And about 90 seconds in to my pitch, I said, we're broadcasting games. And he stopped me, and he said, I want to stop you right there. You just use the word broadcast. I've worked in broadcast. What you're doing is not broadcast. What you're doing is making home movies. And to be honest, you're not that good at it. Wow. This is not a business, this is a hobby. All right, 2014, so tears in you get acquired actually by a sort of a new kind of upstart Sports Network called whistle sports, and I'm assuming that this was not going to make you financially independent for the rest of your life. It wasn't that kind of acquisition. That's right. It was an aqua hire. You know, there was a cash component of them purchasing RIP in the network. But the main part of it was that we got jobs, you know, real money to put behind growing the network. It was money, you know, people who had done this before or something like it, not on YouTube, but had done something like it. Media expertise, and community. We got to be a part of a group of people who wanted this reality of sports networks or the modern day sports networks existing online and recognizing that niche communities had value on the Internet. But a couple of years in, I guess, the two of you started to experiment with videos that didn't always have anything to do with lacrosse, right? How did that start? I think what we started to realize was that so much of your identity is wrapped up in who you are as a creator, the image that you put out online. And for some year and I, even though we loved lacrosse and we were super passionate about it, that was four years plus of our image being all about lacrosse. But at that time, YouTube had also changed drastically, and you've got guys like Casey Neistat, who have YouTube channels just off the base of their own name, and they're building these huge businesses, and so Samir and I looked at each other and felt like we developed this skill set to succeed on YouTube and it doesn't maybe necessarily doesn't have to be in La Crosse. Maybe it could just be under the name Colin and Samir and will tell stories about whatever we want and will really get to express ourselves fully 100%. All right, we're going to take a quick break, but when we come back, we're going to hear how Colin and Samir pivoted from lacrosse to creating their own YouTube videos that had nothing to do with lacrosse..

Samir lacrosse YouTube Colin university of Colorado Colin smir boulder Hollywood LA Mark Cuban La Crosse shamir Colorado NFL basketball Southern California San Diego
"samir" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

06:49 min | Last month

"samir" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"The digiday podcast, I'm Kaylee barber, media editor at DJI. Peterson, senior media editor at digital. All right, so this week's episode is kicking off a new series for us. It's a mini series on creators, which we are picking up from the one that we did last year. About a year ago, exactly. And Tim, you started off this four part series by speaking with YouTube creators, Colin rosenblum, and Samir Chaudhry, about their lives as creators full-time creators. I guess why did you want Colin and Samir on as guests for this week? Yeah, so I mean, they're kind of perfect guests for kicking off this series because not only are they creators themselves, but they're YouTube channel Collins mayor is focused on creators and their creator economy. They also have a podcast talking about creators and the equator economy and then a newsletter, the published press talking about creators and the creator economy. So we were able to talk about their own experiences and work in businesses as creators, but then also just what they're seeing and hearing and covering the creator space in general. Yeah, all right, so kind of like a meta kick-off to this creator series. So as we did last year, each episode is going to have a different kind of platform focus. So each of our creator guests are going to be native to a different platform with the following week's episode. Next week's episode being with a TikToker. So this is a very meta kind of conversation kick-off to the creator series. It sounds like. I'll let you guys get into that and I'm excited to hear more from them. Cool. Thanks again. Colin Samir, welcome to the DJI podcast. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having us. Yeah, absolutely. So stoked for you guys to be the first guest for this series. We're putting together on creators because not only are you both creators, but you also have a channel and a podcast and a newsletter covering the creator economy. So we get to talk to you about both your own experiences as creators, but then also the trends in developing that you're seeing. And talking with other creators and covering just what's going on in this world. But one thing we're looking to do with each creator we have on as part of this series is start off by talking about what a typical day looks like that's tricky because I don't know what extent there's actually a typical day for creators, but I think it helps to dispel the idea that creators are just people who are filming themselves in webcam with webcams or doing dance videos on TikTok. I think there's still that perception looming that oh YouTube TikTok all this is just user generated content that a lot of this isn't actually professional content when it is professional content. So it started with you and then Colin and I imagine there's a lot of overlap with it but to what extent do you even have a typical day and what does that look like? Well, I'll say that for us, we've always operated like this, but we actually we have an office and in that office we have 6 people who work full time in that office. So we keep pretty regular hours in an office. We come in the morning, typically everyone's in by 10 a.m. and then we're out between 6 and 7. So I would say that is what is standard in a day. Is that we're all coming into an office, we're working on a variety of projects and we're leaving. And so just to give you a high level, that's not what every creator's business looks like. But that's how we operate. And a lot of that is because we produce a show. And that show is produced from our space. And so no matter what, our highest priority every day is to produce a best in class show for the next Monday. So whether that's post production, production, working on the sponsor read, working on sales to support the show, everything goes into our marquee show and then once that priority is taken care of, then it filters down to our different media properties, whether it's social properties, the newsletter, the published press, our audio only feed, and then after those, after our own and operated, then we start looking at stuff like this, right? Appearances, speaking engagements, anything like that. So Colin will kick it to that, was that always the case for you guys or when you've been at this for, I think this is like your tenth year. This is technically the ten year anniversary of the lacrosse network launch in which some area you started, calling you join and then sold to whistle, and then you all went off to do your end of anything. But Colin, to what extent is having kind of a schedule and a typical normal working hours at this point, that somewhat rare for creators or like, was rare historically, I think, is maybe becoming more the norm these days. Yeah, the fact that we come into an office and we have a team, I think, has less to do with the fact that we produce a show that requires that team and more to do with the fact that from a lifestyle perspective, Samir and I require it. And it's a part of our history. When we first started working together, we were in an office. And I was technically his employee. And that was the basis of our working relationship. Was that truly we're here. We're building a Sports Network. It was not your stereotypical idea of what a creator business may look like where someone just takes an Instagram story or does a TikTok dance. For us, it's always been building a company and leading with that as opposed to necessarily just like filming and editing and putting it on the Internet. I think actually, Tim, that largely has to do with the fact that when we started ten years ago, there was no comps. There was no road map. And so the only comp was like a television network or a traditional media company. And I think we almost felt like we were a production company or an ad agency at the time. And it's still almost kind of what you feel like today, you're producing something, you're working with clients, is what that feels like. But I think largely it's because in 2012, when we started, that the term creator didn't exist, the term YouTuber barely existed. It was not a career. So you had to mirror traditional legacy businesses. And that's all we knew. So there wasn't that culture of, you know, you could be anywhere in the world, or you could be remote, remote work, wasn't as popular at the time, like it was ten years ago. Yeah, I felt like the fact that we were on YouTube, our faces were on the channel. The fact that we even had a channel was just a tool in our toolkit, that was a part of our much bigger company. I had no idea what it meant to just be a YouTube creator. Because like Samir said, there.

Kaylee barber DJI Colin rosenblum Samir Chaudhry Colin YouTube Colin Samir Samir Peterson Tim Collins
"samir" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

04:44 min | 8 months ago

"samir" Discussed on Desi Books

"Betty betty acce- and it was. It made me tremendously homesick. It was so evocative of delhi off. You know if it's neighborhoods and ron akilah and it was just you know and i was very much was Much i don't read much indian section. I don't can't remember the last time. I read indian fiction. Was that movie. That book impressed me tremendously. I you know. I made contact with lebron and we became sorts of friends and acquaintances. And you'd order. I gain forward for migraine book And i would say real quickly. The of two other indian books that i really enjoyed One was an bolt about cities In you probably have read both of them. One is maximum city by liceu giggle method and and then the other one is capital by Ronaldo's gupta who is you know. I guess an englishman But i guess they see englishman But both of them were fascinating to me because they would movies are were books about indian cities delhi of course in the city that i consider my own in some ways But yeah they were fascinating. Because i think drought alive. Those cities in in i think i think in multidimensional wiz and in ways that connected them do much larger preoccupations that any citizen of the world would have that is concerned about with our woods going so they were doing indian and cozma pollen in in that in that sense and i'm sitting mucus novel remains for me. I think the best mobile that read in a very long time excellent. I'm glad you mentioned that book. Because i love to find new books especially on topics that have been written a lot about like the partition. So i'm definitely gonna check that out. So thank you. For that samir. And i just thoroughly enjoyed reading this book as well as this conversation with you and i look forward to reading the benigo book and having another conversation at some point much and yet and i don't know how much cricket fan you ought. You should read my crooked memoir migrant sanmar if its interests you know cricket is not an yeah. i'm not a huge fan. But but then again up to memoir. It's not exactly an epidemic..

Betty betty acce ron akilah delhi cozma lebron migraine Ronaldo gupta englishman samir cricket
"samir" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

04:01 min | 8 months ago

"samir" Discussed on Desi Books

"To episode. Forty six if they see books news and views about they see literature from the world over. I'm your host jenny. Bart thank you for tuning in in. Today's they see craft chat. We have samir. Chopra discussing his book. Bollywood does battle the wool movie and the indian popular imagination. In this conversation we talked about what prompted him to write this book how he chose the particular movies to study with closer readings and some of the surprising and not so surprising things he learned in the process of writing year. Samir chopra is a professor of philosophy at brooklyn college at the city university of new york. He has written books on the politics of -nology the legal theory of artificial intelligence military aviation history. Which is this book. Cricket and sham benegal a renowned. Bollywood movie director. He's also written for their news. Like the nation los angeles review books and many more and he's a certified philosophical counselor. I so enjoyed this conversation. Would samir because we're both bollywood fans and The book gives so much food for thought. Despite its weighty topic it's written in an accessible engaging manner and i revisited all the movies that he's mentioned in the book with new insights and a better understanding so enjoy this chat. And he has samir now. Hi.

samir Samir chopra Bollywood Chopra Bart sham benegal jenny brooklyn college city university of new york Cricket los angeles bollywood
When's the Best Time to Get a Flu Shot?

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 9 months ago

When's the Best Time to Get a Flu Shot?

"To spread. Healthcare workers say This is not the year to skip your flu shot. Giant grocery stores began giving out flu shots early this month, weeks before the October start of the flu season. Samir Belisle runs Giants pharmacies this ball. He's expecting a potential onslaught of people wanting covid boosters and flu vaccines. If you have the patient in the chair, it's just another shot. So it's more so. The influx of individuals Loudon County Health Officer Dr David Good friend says, Wait a few more weeks to get your flu shot. So your immunity doesn't window by the height of the season in January and February, having to deal with flu and our doctors Offices on top of Covid. It's just something that is an added burden on our health care system. Barnett w. T. O P. News Liberty University is seeing an uptick in covid cases.

FLU Samir Belisle Dr David Good Loudon County Giants P. News Liberty University Barnett
"samir" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

Find the Path Podcast

04:47 min | 10 months ago

"samir" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

"Not just in a place where they bleed over but have actually transported to another plane of existence. Literal did say something about us crossing the threshold and never being able to leave as such or options are few and four twin. I place myself an exile for a number of reasons. One was to protect this yields up the box. One was took defined samir and one one was a punishment of a sword. I filled before and i can't say that i might not feel again but this time i would be willing to die trying. His steps forward and with what seems to be. Great effort extends the box stores. You snatches the march box and then handed over to plant chat. Who's the only magical person she knows an article in our group not really that article. I don't suppose you know how to get things out of the metric rock. Someone's used it. I didn't have all the details on that voltages kinda gestures around side. It really wanna like. I'm glad because you're telling everyone's business to people you don't even know. So can you get people out of the stone or not. The stone is a repository for spiritual energy the confines of it or large enough to house the hunter of the dark and considering the sheer amount of spiritual energy it exerts. I think that is large enough to house it and nothing else. If something else replace into it they would need to be expelled from the stone..

samir
"samir" Discussed on Parenting Roundabout

Parenting Roundabout

05:56 min | 10 months ago

"samir" Discussed on Parenting Roundabout

"Around five of the parenting rondo podcasts. For the week of july nineteenth and catherine echo in the near two mile. Hello and nicole. Eric's hi there today. We're taking a break from talking and complaining and obsessing instead shutting out things. Other people are doing that. We think you'll find as useful or enjoyable as we do. We call this our roundabout roundup. And i'll go first as you may remember from previous editions of roundabout round up You know i'm on wavy hair journey and is started. You know with the way. I wash my hair. The way commits I added curl cream and my next tool in. The arsenal is the micro fiber hair towel. So my daughter actually guys for me gave me for my birthday Pity called kitsch T. s. c. h. And it's like it's like a turban you know i mean you you wrap it around your head end throw it around and turn it into a turban stays put on your head while your hairs jarring and it's nice and comfortable and soft and when you take your hair out of it it's like really smooth. It's not frizzy the way it could be like if you terry cloth towel or even if you use a t. Shirt which is what. I was doing as part of my curly hair process This way you dislike swoop it all up and put it in this turban and let it hang out there. And it's working no jacket. Out kitsch micro fiber hairstyles. They also have like headbands Like if you wanna push your hair back when you wash your face or something they have special headbands for that. They have s- crunchies all kinds of we will have a link for the special turban and of course comes in all kinds of patterns and colors not so fun. That's what i'm shouting out. whether you have nicole. I found a new instagram account to follow Yeah and i know and it's back it's The guy's first name i believe. So it's at. And then samir s. a. m. i r. And he does celebrity home tours so he basically looks at homes that are for sale That are listed for sale. And i don't know somehow he'll know it's a celebrity home and so then he pulls up the pictures from the You know real estate website. And then he'll walk through the home and provide a commentary on their house. That's for sale. So yeah it's kind of fun you ask one of those. It's of you know it's a in the same category zillow and is a little gone wild. Yes isn't it. The same guy from silicon wild is it. I i think whole branch annetta might be. Yeah i don't know could be but anyway. I just came across it yesterday and i haven't looked into too much by the thought. It was kind of fun. Always here for that kind of nosy content. I know how about you terry all. Well i'm going to talk about something that i've recently a service recently signed up for and also give a little bit of a public service announcement. You may have heard about apple one. Which is they're bundling of all their various little services into one so you might have your apple music that you pay for once a month and you might have your cloud storage which pay for once a month and you might have your apple. Tv that you pay for once a month and instead you can bundle them. Just pay once in. It's you know modestly less expensive. So i haven't really bothered to do that. But the other day they sent me an email. And i looked at it. And i thought you know this probably would be easier. I'd save maybe a buck a month. Plus you get. I would get the apple arcade which turns out to be. You could download games. which goodness knows. I need more games. So i went ahead and did it and you know what you pay charge fourteen ninety five right away and i said okay and then i thought hey. Didn't i just pay for each of these bundled services individually not that long ago and i looked on my credit card and sure enough. I had lots of time left on the month for these three things. And i thought aren't big. Gonna prorate that and refund me what the heck and i was going to like. Write an angry note off to apple support. And i thought you know what. Let me give them a few days and sure enough. A few days later refunds popped up on my credit card or the prorated time so if you are thinking of getting apple one fear not to pay that one thing when you sign up for it they will figure out what they owe you and pay you back. I know it seems unnatural to assume that some big impersonal service will do that. But they had so nice. You're not and then it's. I'm having some fun with the arcade and it's just seems more convenient everything bundled so go forward without fear of losing money. Put him and that. Is it for another week of parenting roundabout if you missed any of our earlier up so this week. Look them up on spreaker apple podcasts amazon music. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Dear what we have to say about kids being out of digital reach so called 'toxic parenting and house rules. You can.

nicole samir s apple branch annetta Eric zillow terry amazon
"samir" Discussed on Noah Kagan Presents

Noah Kagan Presents

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"samir" Discussed on Noah Kagan Presents

"I have a question from him for you perfect. Was he sitting here. We didn't oh nice. that's great. that might be. My new format is like a hot tub with tacos. The format was interesting. Because like fumed did really wealthy. Mr b's logan paul gary but all the other ones flopped ryan grim stephan flopped at some point you also knowing how they make money. It's kinda the same thing right. So i'm like here's making money to do. Integrations their products. They have a. They have a team like. We did that. We did yesterday. We did the per- do perfect It's not interesting one of the things. I'm curious how you pitch this. What do you think the value proposition channel. Yeah we think about that a lot like sometimes we about to make video like who's four. Yeah i would say the audience. That i'm appealing to not necessarily a craters like you're appealing to people who are like. I want to make money in this economy. That i'd say it's more just like i'm an entrepreneur. I wanna have a business some type of side income subtype money. How do we get going calm. Underdogs like how does someone that maybe needs a little bit of confidence like hey you can't do it. Here's been my journey of how i've done it and then here's some examples of things that you can go do so i think there's two options in that. There's an opportunity to humanize the process. And there's an opportunity to sensationalize the process. So the way this what i used to do when we used to work with athletes mute onboard them onto youtube. I'd say those are the two options and really not to their face. But sometimes we talk about it. You know behind. The scenes of these are two options with athletes. Humanizing them is suggesting. Bringing them down to i level and saying like from the athlete's perspective i m you to the audience like i'm the same person to one person. We worked with jeremy lin. Jeremy lin was a great example of someone that every piece of content. We made felt like it..

jeremy lin Jeremy lin yesterday two options ryan grim youtube logan paul gary one person stephan one four fumed things
Talking About S.L.O.P. - burst 1

Life in the Son

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Talking About S.L.O.P. - burst 1

"The topic of discussion is talking about slop like that. Kinda cute guy. Whatever well not talking about the slop is fed picks nor am i talking about what soldiers eating. The child hall knows. I'm talking about has nothing to do with any of that but i'll tell you what it will do. I'll give you a hint. Slop is actually an acronym not so much a word however this word or this acronym. It stands for simple list of obligations prioritized. It's kind of similar to As an sap is i didn't know what an s. o. p. was until joined the navy but and this whole p. stands for standard operating procedure. And that's basically just step by step instruction manual. You're doing a particular job you go to the manual at all of the steps. Get the job done. There's a lot of reasons for that. A lot of its efficiency. Uniformity in performance things of that nature. And so anyway. Slop is the simple list of prioritized right well. So p. is a step-by-step manual or guide us employee's or workers to get a particular task. Done all right. So slop- is pretty. Close to and so be as obi just following the steps and slop you have to organize your own priorities or prioritize your own obligation as it were now. Slop is an acronym said four. Simple obligated prioritized. Now let me start by saying today. I'm not going to lecture you Gonna have the sermon to preach or anything like that. Without a doubt. This is a testimony and it has a little bit to do with this weekend with my complete and utter frustration. With my amount organ overwhelming sense of suffocation but sit god spoke to me this weekend and really opened up my eyes so i figure if it opened up my eyes maybe it will help somebody else out there. That is listening. Is there anybody out there. Well anyway. I am just fine today and of course i have no shortage of things about which to testify but since i have no guest co host. I'm going to be talking about slop. And i'm gonna keep on testifying in about slop however i know i'm not the only one with a good testimony. Okay come on extended the invitation. And i still extend the invitation for you to come and share yours after all. Isn't that what life in the sun is. all about the show. What christians are encouraged to share their testimonies. Yea okay let me get a couple of things out of the way first of all. This isn't going to be a lecture or how to. I am in no way shape or form better or more special or less special better than anybody. There's no difference between us. We're all in there. Okay now also painfully aware that. I'll make a lot of mistakes so if you would please. If you happen to hear me make a mistake and you just pay attention. I'm sure you'll hear one. Just let me know. okay samir. Message or comment either one. I don't mind public view. And before i dive headlong into this talking about swap topic. I am going to say this again. I am still a human being. I'm not perfect. I'm still learning not withstanding. I do believe that. God has no respect of a person and all that he bestowed upon me. He wants to get to you. Why because i'm no better than you know. Worse than anybody else that wants to get it to you. Just like he gave it to me so for that reason. I'm obligated to testify about what god has done in my life as an ambassador to the throne. I encourage others design. You know we're just ordinary people telling about what an extraordinary god who loves us and takes care of us you know still these testimonies faith that draw those who are hurting and loss into the realm of his everlasting love. And don't forget i john. Five ten eleven you know first yarn five tenths as one who believes in the son of god has the testimony in himself. The one who does not believe. God made him a liar because he has not believed in the testimony that god has given concerning his son and then of course in verses and he goes on to say and tests and the testimony. Is this that god has given us eternal life and this life is in his son so remember we are obligated ambassador thrown to give back testimony he lives.

Samir Today Ck Williams First Yarn Life In The Sun Five Tenths Christians GOD Five Ten Eleven ONE This Weekend Jackson Mississippi Livens Navy United States John
Google follows Apple in cutting Play Store fees for developers

Mac OS Ken

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Google follows Apple in cutting Play Store fees for developers

"Seen that ran the piece tuesday saying that. Google is following apple's lead and lowering the commission charges most developers selling to the google play store while the changes similar to apple's at something google's scott might be more generous according to seeing that google will only take a fifteen percent commission on sales up to one million dollars the fee will jump to the standard thirty percent wants developers make more than the one million dollars in sales for a year. According to the report sounds the same as apples offer but it isn't a piece from ars. Technica ran the matt. Saying apple applies. It's lower fifteen percent rate to a developer. Developer exceed one million dollars in revenue in a given year at which point the thirty percent number is applied to all of that developers. Earn inc's google still charges fifteen percent on that first million even if the developer makes five million so in google's model a developer who earns one point two million dollars on a nap pays fifteen percent on one million then thirty percent on two hundred thousand and novels a developer making eight hundred thousand four hundred over fifteen percent on that amount but if they make one point two million they pay thirty percent on all one point two million. Not just two hundred thousand. It's tough to know how many developers straddle that million dollar fence. There's also a bird in the hand thing going on right now. While apple's lower commission went live at the first of the year seen that says google's won't drop until the first of july quoted in the scene that piece google. vp of product management. Samir soman said with this change ninety nine percent of developers globally that sell digital goods and services with play. We'll see a fifty percent reduction in fees. I'm no mathematician but does that indicate that ninety nine percent of developers selling in the google play store make less than a million dollars a year. I mean i knew the split between the cells and the cells knots was big but golly as for what such large as costs apple and google saying the cost is manageable would be understating it a piece from. Cnbc has numbers from the app. Tracking firm center tower. According to those apple and google or giving up less than five percent of their revenue from apps with the commission changes will let cnbc and sensor tower. Do them at this. If the fifteen percent fee schedule on revenue up to one million dollars and been in place on google play in twenty twenty google would have missed out on five hundred. Eighty seven million dollars or about five percent of sensor towers estimate of eleven point. Six billion dollars in google pay fees for the year. If apple's program had been in place for twenty twenty center tower estimates that it would have missed out on five hundred and ninety five million or about two point seven percent of its estimated twenty one point seven billion dollars an app store fees in twenty twenty. I gotta say that makes apple structure look worse. Actually and i didn't have to say that. And yet i did unhappy with the changes. A guy who won't be greatly affected by these changes. Google shuffling of commissions was likely spurred by apple's commissions which the start of the year that was likely spurred by bad press generated by the coalition for up fairness which was blinked into existence by epic game. Ceo tim sweeney putting it to sink play. Cnbc's says epic games is currently suing apple and google seeking the make changes to their app stores to allow for third party payment processors as well as other changes that is like the reader's digest version of the cliffs notes of what's going on but works summon forth from the fort. Sweeney took to twitter on tuesday to say why. The changes are inadequate in his estimation. quoting sweeney. Tweet it's a self serving gamut. The far majority of developers will get this new fifteen percent rate and thus be less inclined to fight but the far majority of revenue is naps. What the thirty percent rate so. Google and apple can continue to inflate prices and flees consumers with their app taxes.

Google Apple Earn Inc Samir Soman Technica Scott Cnbc App Store Tim Sweeney
How Harpers Bazaar follows digital trends to retain its authority in fashion

The Digiday Podcast

04:08 min | 1 year ago

How Harpers Bazaar follows digital trends to retain its authority in fashion

"So much. Bring on podcast nikki. Thank you for having me. So you've been at harper's bazaar now for what was it like three or four months. It's a it's a new role for you right. this is a new york. But you've come from other notable fashion and lifestyle publications before so you're this is a strong suit for you. This isn't like a new kind of area but how was it starting a new strategic leadership role during a pandemic when the world's remote yet it's i mean starting a sort of new role i think whether you're in leadership or you know just starting your job is weird when it's remote you have to think about how you're going to get to know the team how you're going to deliver feedback. How you're gonna energize. They seem to want to continue working during these like quote unquote crazy times. So it's on. It's tricky but i think it was really great for me to come back to a place like harper's bazaar where i knew a lot of the team already And just sort of hit the ground at the ground running. I think what's particularly interesting about your position and what your colleagues are are looking to do is Harper's bazaar is a legacy fashion brand. It's been around for decades I think i have a coffee table book of lake the covers from the early nineteen hundreds of harper's bazaar it's beautiful but my point is it's a it's old publication Your task though with turning that into a modern digital brand for a younger audience what goes into that process. And how have you been able to do that. during a pandemic yeah. I think when we when i came on and joined late. Attorney coffin. samir. Nassar join the two of them in sort of figuring out what harper's bazaar harper's bazaar dot com gonna look like. We really wanted to go back to you know fashion first and really leaning into our luxury routes but we also have a lot of roots in the feature space so we wanna take back into that as well and so you see a story take for example. We just put a story up today with a profile of martha stewart. And so you see. Somebody like martha stewart. Who is a legacy in a number south but we dressed her in gucci and fear of god and so we wanna make those sort of juicy internet e profiles at people will love but really just speak to what we as a brand do so well and have done so well for well over one hundred years though in that example. I'm assuming that there's probably a lot of like maybe social media elements tied in to take a What would normally be maybe spread in magazine and make it come alive for a much. Larger audience Key talk about you. Know the role that social media on that platform how that's been playing in your editorial strategy and digital strategy. Yeah i mean for the martha stewart story in particular. That story was sort of bread from following martha herself on social media and so she posted over the summer. I believe she posted that amazing sort of like you know beautiful photo of her coming out of a pool and like giving a kiss of the camera and we were like. Oh god martha stewart's kinda major right now like she. Obviously everyone knows apple. What if we lake put her into a sexy little dress or we put her into this suit and put some congress seekers on her and so that story particularly started it was born out of social media and then we were able to blow it out in the pages of the magazine and then have beautiful imagery to put back on social media and so really just sort of trying to think three sixty and trying to really not It's not about A print story or digital story. It's really thinking about the brown. The brand holistically and so when we have a profile like martha you know. How are we going to blow it out on all of the

Harper's Bazaar Harper Martha Stewart Attorney Coffin Nassar Nikki Samir New York Gucci Martha Apple Congress
Apple had a record quarter in China with the highest ever number of iPhone upgrades

Mac OS Ken

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Apple had a record quarter in China with the highest ever number of iPhone upgrades

"It's the new year season in china. And it is looking like a happy one. Four phone apple insider highlights and note from j. p. morgan analyst samir chatterjee. He's looking look at numbers from the china academy of information and communications technology and they seem to show good things for apple. According to the data according to the report mobile device shipments rose fifty one percent in china compared to the previous month that was mostly driven by a sixty four percent rise in domestic smartphone shipments and our national shipments primarily composed of apple devices. Also rose seven percent month over month. The piece goes on to say the total number of internationally produced. Smartphone shipments at six point four million units in january twenty twenty one up from six million december and two point five million and january. Twenty twenty this is one of those rare times. When looking month to month is probably better barometer than looking year to year this time last year china was in the midst of its covert related lockdown. Lots of spending on apps not a lot on hardware the way chatterjee sees it the month growth demonstrates continued momentum for iphone start the calendar year. Chatterjee hasn't overweight rating on apple shares. His price target on the shares is one hundred fifty dollars.

Samir Chatterjee China Academy Of Information A Apple China Morgan Chatterjee
Twitter buys Dutch-founded newsletter platform Revue

Media Voices

03:56 min | 1 year ago

Twitter buys Dutch-founded newsletter platform Revue

"Is twitter is getting into the long contin game by buying review. Which is an email newsletter service. Which actually we used to our our daily newsletter. We'll the subscription game as well against Again until we are making money. that's advertising led. A i mean we we use review. We use the platform and its gray's really simple easy to use platform. This actually took me totally by surprise. Because yeah i know you mean it does on the face of it makes sense for them. The kind of the initial release room. The co founder of review was basically saying well twitter's going to use their network to direct people to these news that is after the facts but they're also going to include love. subscription options specifically. Tweezers says a lot. That's good from the twitter perspective from isa perspective. They also immediately offered better terms. They're offering sort for five percent on any subscription revenue week. Oh rebate we got what is seven. Yeah about that. Thirty one cents for the for the rest of our like the i. It seems i still think i. This is a great move to buy in review in review. Must be the herp. But here's the thing is anyone who's really focused on creating content on twitter gonna make the move to an unused later Hustles on oppose again. That's a big one is if we had this weird can succo of life. Thank you you know if you start a newsletter. You use twitter to promote that newsletter. If you beg on twitter are you gonna start a newsletter to bolster your twitter content but the the question that is you know who is actually going to take up this review option as opposed to a substantial or. Can we speculate last week. Forbes's new i suppose business-oriented mid-size new set to contribute network asset the of different fine because It's but it's like these constant new points of differentiation between substantial review. And as they all as everyone pumps money into them. What is going to be the big draw for people. Is it going to be that you know. Five percent kurt that reviews taking the twin review taken can be ease of use you x. Okay let's figure the us p. For each of these things forbes us p is definitely the qena author benefit type thing if got the credibility of the brand. You've got the support that they've said that they're gonna have authors in terms of atma hennion and benefits i guess and and you've go their their distribution at the that can a migrating brand media brand level scale self sub stike. The plot foam is all emplaced to charge people for paid newsletters to be developed of the platform. More reliant on the pro fell with the newsletter create other plants in sub start brings to an review and say us twitter deal as really look and maybe the twelve distribution site defined the actual scale a distribution that you can get through the social network in which case expects. That's be a flurry of complaints. When people when they're changes again Also thank you know eventually. Everton this this pete. Would it peak news tape thing and all these platforms join an the fold by the way say dollars is a consolidation van christmas. She wrote the the newsletter space ends up. Yeah definitely it's thought that that phrase nature boss vacuum but it feels like the internet of boss having more than like two big providers for any

Twitter Tweezers Atma Hennion Forbes United States Everton
Suicide Bombing in Crowded Baghdad Market Kills at Least 32

BBC Newshour

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Suicide Bombing in Crowded Baghdad Market Kills at Least 32

"We're gonna turn to Iraq to the Iraqi capital Baghdad because there's been a double suicide bombing there is completely studied two people and wounded more than 100. The attack at a busy market is the worst that the city seen in several years. Police and eye witnesses say that there were two blasts in swift succession. At the market in Tyrone Square, which was crowded with people Samir Club is Associated Press is Iraq correspondent and in Baghdad. How common is such an attack? This attack is very rare in Baghdad. The last time this occurred was in January of 2018, and that was shortly after then Prime Minister Haider al Abadi declared victory over the Islamic state Group on guard difficult. Lee was around the same area that the attack occurred. So it's been a while in Baghdad. However, attacks occur regularly in other areas of Iraq. And what are the authorities saying about what happened and he might have been responsible. No group has claimed responsibility for the attack yet, but Iraqi military officials have told us that they believe it was the work of the Islamic state group. Basically what happened there was two men. One of them created a bit of a scene in the middle of the commercial area that he was pretending to be ill. Crying out loud. That prompted a crowd together around him to see what was going on. And it was then that he detonated the best. Shortly after that another individual came and did the same, which is why we see such high death toll today, right? So really pretty cynical way to try and cause as many casualties as possible on does that does that bear the hallmarks of VIAS, then? Absolutely. We have seen similar attacks perpetrated by I s elsewhere around Iraq. The suicide bombing is something that they have have done. It's very much their style of attack. Especially here, and that distinguishes them from other groups. Militia groups who have perpetrated other kinds of attacks launching rockets, For example, at the US Embassy, It's It's a very different style of attack. What about the timing? Just one day after President Biden's inauguration of people reading something into that thinking that might be significant? There's a lot of speculation that dad and Iraq in general, there's a lot of tension leading up to Biden's inauguration. But that was mostly related to the tensions between the U. S and Iran that has played out in Iraq in the last year. Nothing at all related to the Islamic State group. While there was anticipation of something happening, I don't really think anyone expected something like this to happen. Just one final thought. I mean many people listening. Aziz say they haven't been any major attacks in Baghdad. And so it hasn't been in the in the headlines, and many people thought that Islamic state had largely been routed. I mean, this suggests that they're still very much active and a threat Is that fair? Absolutely. They're still a threat. Like I said, The attack in Baghdad is quite rare. But what we have seen is over the summer, an uptick in attacks and other areas across northern Iraq in particular. This is an area that has been historically very difficult to police. The Iraqi army as well as US led coalition forces have conducted many operations to root out Isis cells there, especially with the Corona virus, and measures that were taken to reduce the presence or the rotation of security forces around this area believe those areas It seems that that militants have taken advantage of this to launch attacks. But in Baghdad, this is definitely a

Baghdad Iraq Tyrone Square Samir Club Prime Minister Haider Al Abadi Islamic State Group Us Embassy President Biden Associated Press LEE Militia Biden U. Aziz Iran Iraqi Army United States
"samir" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"samir" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

"Hi welcome to season two of bite. This is tony tiller parenting an apocalypse. It's it's not the same way that you know how it works. Any of us usually two to four minutes long but sometimes they can be a little longer when you when you live long enough. All kinds of strange things happened very right in saying that. The greek heroes the original superheroes in part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion samir. Sorry was the visual effects supervisor for picks mondo for the chinese acclaimed film a wandering or it looks like because of the scope of the movie. Was there any previous done at all. yes so the there was. There was a round of pre-bus Before shooting believe in a notice around of i believe tech events where where the aim is to help sets up where the cameras will be onset. So you don't end up on the day you know having to carry heavy equipment around the an and guests look look though there was a previous stage but then when when on shoot i think some things may be you know. The chemistry may be not by not being there. In shock to some things did change Which then led to the next step which was posted and that sort of where we got involved Quite heavily and we we started conforming. Everything that was shot on set and starts put that into a a blocked out three d. Well when you could start to angle cameras and unplanned assaults out and you had to create different environments of these digitally. It looked like a snow environment and working with the snow is not easy and an addition to that there was also the earth engines in the snow. You have fire and snow at the same time is it was really really tough. Especially the fact that snow and was predominantly over cost through film so quite a flat ingredients flat image. That is quite is quite difficult to balance ola together. But on an on the point of the engines as well and the ice and everything acting together we also had a huge amounts of destruction is itself. You're had collapsed buildings made of gloss Collapsing ice collecting collapsing buildings within an ice and everything in between so it was quite challenge to work out. The physics of boulevard will try to to to marry that altogether and mak- here an image that that you can actually see what's happening because it's it can become very muddled very quickly with that many many elements in play now. The space station also was stanley. Kubrick's two thousand one and influence that design. Oh yeah yeah definitely It's quite a quite nice. Not two thousand and one with How that's show. Oh we have the also. The author of the book actually is a is a fan. I believe of Of santa kubrick and also the of scifo films of brown them that period. So yeah that was. I was definitely the and influence that i believe is still available on netflix. It's too much see for bite. This is tony talada..

two two thousand netflix four minutes Kubrick greek stanley santa kubrick season two tony talada chinese boulevard one thousand
How Are Sales On The iPhone 12 lIneup Going?

Mac OS Ken

02:46 min | 1 year ago

How Are Sales On The iPhone 12 lIneup Going?

"Power sales of the various models of iphone. Twelve going will never know for sure. But that won't keep the financial folks guessing. I'm sorry guesstimate philip. Elmer dewitt's apple three oh had ubs analyst. David vote telling tapping tale. Then again. he's jojo manappl- so maybe that's not surprising. Bottom line. he thinks. Iphone expectations might be a bit high for the current quarter. Thanks to ready availability of iphone. Twelve many and the standard iphone twelve and again the more expensive iphone. Twelve pro and iphone twelve pro max or both playing hard to get especially the twelve pro. Max quoting his note initial availability. Data highlights strong demand for the iphone. Twelve pro max. Version relative to the iphone twelve pro and the iphone eleven. Pro max last year shortly after. Launch pro max. Availability has exceeded three weeks. Similar to eleven pro max last year and modestly above the twelve. Pro he does point out. Though that the iphone twelve pro max did launch late so add that to the mix as for the perceived weakness on the lower end of the line vote wrote while potentially softer demand for the to skews does not indicate an earnings miss given the holiday selling season. Still to come get does suggest. Unit upside might be muted relative to investor expectations. Just a month ago and of course apple doesn't report unit numbers anymore so go crazy man go crazy. Votes on a neutral rating on apple shares. His price target on the shares is one hundred fifteen dollars spending a somewhat more positive take as j. p. morgan analyst samir chatterjee then again he's double plus good on apple so maybe that's not surprising. Another post from apple. Three dot o. Had chat chatman seeing similar trends as mr vote quoting his note. We find lead times for the twelve many and the twelve tracking lower than in prior weeks while lead times for the twelve pro and twelve pro. Max have been largely stable at roughly twenty four days while he thinks it's too early to know whether unit numbers will meet expectations. He doesn't expect changes. And i phone. Orders from apple for the supply chain thing so cool it on the mini and the twelve and ramp up production on the pro and pro max. Tragedy has an overweight rating on apple shares. His price target on the shares is one hundred fifty dollars.

Elmer Dewitt Jojo Manappl Apple UBS Samir Chatterjee David Chatman Morgan
French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

podnews

02:51 min | 1 year ago

French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

"Key coup is a new french children's podcast platform which has just launched it features curated children's audio content from a variety of publishers curated by age group theme or time of day. The company says it's good to the mid screen time sprouts have released. Their platform stands for october and will publish these online. Every month from now on apple is now forty seven percent and spotify twenty four point four percent of all the data includes podcast apps episode generation downloads over the first seven days and lots more. The reuters institute has published a new report about daily news podcasts. The research points to them being very successful in terms of total downloads and highlights four types of daily news. Podcast currently available as recline is leaving. Vox the company. He co founded and joining the new york times as columnist and podcast host. He starts in january and leaving luminary. Your lander sang when he is now senior director for programming at npr. Google podcasts third. Most popular podcast app has now reached fifty million installations on android the fat. Mary's podcast is a podcast from australian restaurant. As jake smith and kenny. Graham who in recent episode described their employee's whining and self entitled according to the sydney morning herald podcast producer. James atkinson says that ad-libbing is a risky approach to content curation and business insider writes about your stralia in podcasters who are quote earning thousands of dollars a month for decades a quiet and remote australian country town nurtured a world-class monster. A man who often more than half a century is only now coming into focus as possibly this nation's serial killer his name. Is vince dempsey. Psychopath gangster child killer rapist. That's one of queensland's best known investigative journalists matthew khandan. He's launched a new true crime. Original with bush ca studios ghost gate road examines vince so dempsey a multiple murderer who claims to have killed thirty three people. Though it's thought the real number is more than one hundred. How i found my voice banquets third season. Samir ahmed hosts and talk. Show host graham norton based guest and focus on foot has won the gold award and the people's vote best arts and entertainment. Podcast at the lovey awards season six. We'll start on december. The eighteenth with an extended episode with richard thompson.

Jake Smith Sydney Morning Herald James Atkinson Spotify Reuters Vince Dempsey NPR Apple New York Times Matthew Khandan Kenny Graham Vince So Dempsey Mary Google Samir Ahmed Queensland
Sharing data

The Tip Off

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Sharing data

"Back in Twenty Sixteen Semaj Arash had day job at the time I was working for a race equality charity but he always had an eye out for a story. The charity he was working for have been doing all kinds of research into the hostile environment an impact the government's immigration policy was having on various areas of life. Now, this was before the wind rush scandal broke said, it wasn't really much discussion going on about this. But Samir was interested in finding out more. At the end of two thousand sixteen. I started looking into data sharing agreements that been I. Think one that was nine about the time which was around the around healthcare data being shed with the heightened office. Then around the same time that was issue around education data. So the the people census essentially kind of being being shed potentially being used to target families because they had enrolled, they're in school. So we knew of some official organizations sharing information with. Authorities. But what about the please he wanted. So. I had a theory which was that. I wanted if victims of crime would be caught up in in this system as well. Man You police would work with immigration officials when handling the perpetrators of crime he wondered if the same was true for those who were victims of criminal acts, this was too big a topic to look into on his own after all he was working full-time in his day job. He needed help any new just who to contact. I'm Natalie blamer relaunch journalist. Nazli was working politics, dot co DOT UK and the powerful report about immigration authorities targeting people who are homeless. She hadn't spoken to Samir before, but his was a name she recognized. Followed the twitter and I think we've had a few interactions on twitter and it was shortly after I published The holiness story that he contacted me and said I'm looking into data share in between different organizations in the Home Office would like to. Do that with me and he explained he was he had two full time job and he was quite limited in how much she could do during the day. and. It was. It was it sounded really interested in it was. You know the areas that I was interested in. And so I agree very quickly and so Nutley and submit decided to start working together sharing tips divvying up the workload. We've naturally making calls during working hours and submitted digging away the data when he could we have a very good workmanship we've actually continued to work together since then really. Because I think we have different. Skill sets and. Different strengths the allow us to work together and sort of. US each of other's strengths are for things that we might found more tricky. Their first port of call was to draft some freedom of information requests. They wanted to ask the police if and when they worked with immigration officials. So we sent off some a couple of freedom. Of Information Requests one to the the mats and one to greater. Manchester Police as two of the logic of police forces but these requests a tricky they take research to get them. Right. Yeah I a long and harrowing experience from information requests like light might based. Let's say you have to think through what the piece of information or document that your looking for is, and you have to define it as clearly a narrowly as you possibly can. Especially, if you ask you about something which the places holy that information might find embarrassing that will find any reason possible till you are to delay you or come back and say, Oh, can you can you defy refined your question more say we specifically asked about about policy What is your? What is your policy on this? And if possible, provide the documentation. They waited. And waited. And then the response came back urban but thinking, Gotcha now this is this is significant. The. Met Police had admitted through the response that they would pass on details of by victims and witnesses of a crime if there were concerns over their immigration status. Migrants support groups reacted with shock warning that people would be scared to report crimes. If they feared, they could be deported as a result. The pair of journalist published their story on Politics Kerr UK, and they kept going. Natalie. Heard about a troubling case where Brazilian woman who was working as a sex worker was robbed at knifepoint by five men. When she went to the police to report the crime she said, they focused more on trying to prosecute her for the sex work. and. When she returned to UK after a holiday abroad she was detained. She was then facing deportation after you sort of instead of being treated as a victim she that case was turned and she was then being treated as a an immigration offender

Manchester Police Samir Natalie Blamer Nazli Politics Kerr Uk Twitter United States Official Dot Uk Home Office
Social media censorship in Egypt targets women on TikTok

The Takeaway

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Social media censorship in Egypt targets women on TikTok

"Has its sights on tick talk. It's cracking down on users arresting and charging a group of women with a range of tic tac enabled crimes from harming family values to inciting prostitution. Reporter Jod reporter Dad, Kaleel has our story. At least nine women have been arrested for their tic tac videos. But if you look through their accounts, it's hard to see why. And focus most ofit here. There's Henning has, um, talking about the story of Venus and Adonis and Adela doing what social Media influencers do Giveaway iPhones life living room doing, But mostly the accounts of the Egyptian women who's been arrested and jailed are full of dancing to Arabic pop songs in that tic tac style feet, planted emoting with your eyebrows and gesticulating. What they're doing is basically what everyone as 1000 social media, just singing and dancing and Andi thing and nothing as if you would dance. In Egyptian wedding. For example, some of Husaini is with the International Service for Human Rights based in Geneva, Switzerland. She says. What distinguishes this group of Egyptians is that they're from working class or middle class backgrounds and that their women or girls, you have social media influencers who come for a teeth, backgrounds or upper middle class or rich classes and injured who would post the same type of content. But would not be targeted because that is sort of permitted within their social class. But why these women are working class women they and they have stepped out of what is permitted for them because they were dancing and singing on tech talk. They were charged under a cyber crime law passed in 2018 Yes, Mean Omar, A researcher at the top here Institute for Middle East Policy in Washington, says that the law is vague when it comes to defining what's legal. And what isn't. It was written using very broad terms that could be very widely interpreted and criminalizing a lot of acts that are Originally considered as personal freedom. Looking at it. You would see that anything you might post on social media. Anything that you may use, the Internet could be criminalized under this very wide umbrella. Egypt cybercrime laws, part of a larger effort by the government to increase surveillance of online activities as Tic TAC became more popular during the pandemic. Prosecutors started looking there too, says Omar. The state is simply arresting whoever says anything that criticizes its policy its laws. It's practices, even if it's just joking. It's not even allowed. But this isn't just about political dissent. Yes, mean Omar points. In the case of mental Abdel Aziz, a 17 year old. One day men made a live video on Facebook. She had her face awfully bruised, and she was stating that she was raped. And she was asking for help. The police asked me to come in. When she did, Omar says they looked at her tech talk account and decided she was inciting debauchery and harming family values in Egypt. Over the summer, There was a series of rape and sexual assault accusations by Egyptian women. They got a lot of attention. One case was against a group of well connected men. Women in Egypt were shocked but not surprised by what they were seeing online, says someone who's Amy in Egypt. Sexual violence on violence in this woman is systematic is part ofthe daily life off of women and to be sexually harass women are often discouraged from reporting sexual harassment in Egypt. So when prosecutors started investigating the accused in that high profile case, it looked like a real progress. The state run National Council for Women even encourage victims and witnesses to come forward. Oh, yes mean, Omar says it did not go well. Somehow, the prosecution decided to a charge the witnesses once again. Egyptian authorities looked at women's social media accounts and then investigated the women for promoting homosexuality, drug use, inciting debauchery and publishing false news. Omar says one of the witnesses who was arrested is an American citizen. All these information were used against them and then pro state media how let's wait in. Husseini says that when they profile the women in the TIC tac case, the message was clear. You have the Egyptian me they're basically, you know, really sensational headlines, Putting the photos off the women Not not not blurred using, you know, focus that have sex it Ian, for example, while using their names, publishing the investigations that are supposed to be confidential. Social media has played an important role in Egyptian politics. In 2011 crowds toppled the regime of military dictator Hosni Mubarak. That uprising was in part organized online with Twitter and Facebook. In 2018, the former Army general and current President, Abdel Fattah el Sisi swore he would maintain stability in Egypt must You said whatever happened in 2011 is never going to happen again. Samir Shehadeh of the University of Oklahoma, says Egypt's military backed regime is wary of the implications of anything posted online, even if its just dancing I think there has been heightened paranoia as a result of hysteria, in fact, by subsequent regimes, particularly the current regime, the Sisi regime About the possible political consequences of social media. And there's a tremendous amount of policing a Facebook and other types of social media and now tic tac. Although this is not apparently an overtly political, I think that they certainly have those kinds of concerns in the back of their mind as well. Of the nine women, Four have been convicted and three have appeals in October. Menon Abdelaziz, the 17 year old, who called for help online was just released from detainment Wednesday and is being dismissed with no charges. For the world. I'm Jagga Khalil.

Egypt Tic Tac Omar Facebook National Council For Women Reporter Abdel Aziz Prostitution International Service For Huma Hosni Mubarak Kaleel Institute For Middle East Poli Jagga Khalil Menon Abdelaziz Geneva Switzerland Husaini
Apple China iPhone sales jump

Mac OS Ken

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Apple China iPhone sales jump

"New iphones on the way, current iphones appear to be trending up in China. That's the word from the China Academy of Information, and communications technology by way of apple and CIDER. Well by way of JP Morgan analysts Samir Chatterjee by way of Apple. Insider. According to the peace while domestic Chinese manufacturers saw their shipments rise about eighteen percent month over month shipments of smartphones produced by foreign firms and primarily apple. Rose. Fifty six percent over the same period. The Way Chatman season improving shipments of smartphones could calm investor worries over a possible slowdown for apple in China.

Apple China China Academy Of Information Samir Chatterjee Jp Morgan Communications Technology Rose
"samir" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"samir" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"To detail switches engaging dial. They I'm not sure they're all plugged into the de they make you feel like he can just start talking, which is often something might happen. And also the screen panels you is many of those film actually a shot in camera I'm they usually we? Do them post production full flexibility in allow. Directed to change what's onscreen but he wants to film them which was great because it captures Lowe's accidental details, posts, fingerprint smudges, and back light leakage from the Nelson the interaction of the lights surrounding solicits and these old up to the to the General Aesthetic actually I just remember the. Early early talks with the director. He he he told us that he wants to create a world where the industrial revolution in China never happened I'll say this on a multiunit reality and that's why it's got that steam punk ton of aesthetic. Like it's powered by steam and coal and I thought was. Interesting taken story. That's another level it. That's very cool. And did you guys work on the snow vehicles were amazing Yeah did play so we. We started looking at love references, kind of service vehicles, military vehicles, rescue vehicles. And I'll department. Did A. Great Job. Are Directed CIOCCA. That's his real name He spell off time just. Analyzing those images and again following the same principles as onset building gauges pipe switches is an industrial. So thanks to to give it the scale and the right slowed detail. So we wrote in the designer who does trucks in the eventually build the trucks and The ask us Happy. that. I was amazing and the poor guy drive him to save his life. But that still does not. Seem like design. It's no. No, it's on the want to drive that. Yeah. It's very, very different, very different that I've ever seen, but you know that's that's that's I find for you. Exactly. Yeah. Why don't we take a short break? I'm talking to Samir Sorry Special Effects Supervisor for highly acclaimed film the wandering Earth. Michael Shanks.

Nelson Michael Shanks Lowe Samir Effects Supervisor China director
Wall Street firm says Apple could surge another 18% - and even higher

Mac OS Ken

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Wall Street firm says Apple could surge another 18% - and even higher

"More positive notes on apple from Wall Street fellow bomber Duets Apple, three dot O. snagged three notes from analysts will start with one from Cowen and company analyst Krish Sang Car. His was basically a vote of confidence saying he still likes apple for a number of reasons. Among them services as a long-term investable theme in his estimation with combined annual growth rate of eighteen percent. Those could be adding as much as six dollars to earnings per share by this time next year. IPHONES active installed base is about nine hundred million units that point. Even with lengthening upgrade cycles, Sancar figures, you look at about one hundred eighty million upgrades annually. He also likes the possibility of new subscriptions coming from the Cupertino Company. Apple is bound to return more money to shareholders and hey, look. We're back to services for a third time. Expects recurring revenue and that segment to go from forty-one percent a couple of years ago to as much as fifty five percent next year. Cowen and company hasn't outperform rating on Apple. Shares sank ours price target on the shares is four. Hundred Bucks. Next up P. Morgan analyst Samir Chatterjee. His was sort of a mixed message. First of all. He is still a fan of the Cupertino Company. Quoting his note, we continue to be positive on apple shares led by the combination of strong replacement cycle with upcoming five G.. iphone launches leverage of strong services portfolio, benefiting from large installed base of users as well as an underappreciated leverage to work from home trends. If? You're wondering what the bad news is. It's not bad news exactly. J. P. Morgan has decided to remove apple from its analyst Focus List because the shares of shot up twenty six percent over the last three months. There still upside in his estimation, but you have to look a year or two out to see the kind of growth. Apples been experiencing lately.

Apple Cowen Analyst Cupertino Company Krish Sang Car Samir Chatterjee J. P. Morgan P. Morgan G..
Sameer Pandya on "Members Only" Book

Beyond The Baseline

06:10 min | 2 years ago

Sameer Pandya on "Members Only" Book

"Everyone John Wartime here. Sports illustrated tennis podcast. Everyone is doing well our guest. This week is severe Panja. Who is a professor at the University of California Santa Barbara teaches creative writing Asian American literature, and also more importantly for our purposes has just written a terrific tennis book members only which tennis figures prominently both as a plot device in a metaphor I. I absolutely devour this book. We will link it link the Amazon page on our show page, but this is a fun conversation talking about tennis talking about writing talking about tennis as a storytelling device full disclosure Samir I share a publisher and publicist, so I want to dispense with that, but this was a really fun conversation a fun book timely book. I think people will love book members. Only it's called, and here is a on enjoyable half hour conversation here we go. I start off by congratulating him. I really you know people. Binge Watch TV shows I. binged dread members only and. Plowed through edited, it did not disappoint. Grad seriously congrats I. Mean it's it's great. It's it's really. SMART, and funny, and I thought we'll talk about this later. I thought very topical, and it's also does. Does tennis right so you succeeded on many dimensions as far as I'm concerned. CONGRATS I. I will say that you saying it did tennis right? Is means particularly lot because you know. I think. In terms of different kinds of readers, right, there's there's. Specific details if I'm reading something in if somebody gets a core detail wrong, which is not that big of a deal? It can be. It can break it for me. You know I'm Mike. Okay I can't do this anymore. Right I can't go down this road trusting this person and so I'm really happy to hear that I mean. Tennis is a big. I love the sport and we can also talk about that as well, but so that's great. Thank you I I. I wrote it with a certain kind of. Kind of propulsion in mind, right and I kinda wanted to be read that way, and then hopefully there other things. You know that you can go back to, or you can think about in ways in terms of how Raj operates in this in this book that can take a little bit more consideration, but you know in these in. These days. I want to read a book quickly. And I think in some ways I wanted to write a book that people could read quickly as well. The I say it's your talk. Not I feel like you're talking about a nonfiction book and everything's on the table. Right everything the next serve I feel I. Don't know what lessons You'd like me to take I don't know how much we can reveal here. Well, let's start you. To your character, so let's let's start there To to tennis fans, it is not spelled R. A. J. as your character is, but you know Raj is a name of relevance. Tennis fans You, you mentioned the details. You Got Right now. I think you're absolutely right. I think the second somebody writes about tennis of calls. A rally volley! We've got issues right? You did not do that this either was a studious research or else. You really have some grounding in tennis. What's what's your background sport? Yeah, you know so I so we came. We moved to America when I was eight years old. I lived in Bombay until I was eight owes a huge cricket fan. I played a ton of cricket. And we moved into A. Kind of an apartment complex when we arrived here and and. There was a tennis court. Right next to it where we're well. This was in the East Bay. This was east of. Glee in in in a in a city called San Pablo. and. You know. I think when I was like nine or ten years old, there was a man who would always come there in hidden serves like ten down the t ten out. Why ten down the T ten out wide, and I just started going down there and Collecting balls for him. And this! I think a you know him and his wife. They didn't have kids, and you know in a lovely gesture. At some point. He showed up with a tennis racket. And kinda showed me how to shift the grip for forehand and backhand, which was my first official lesson in the game and so. I so I started playing there. I played through high school and you know. and. Then I stopped playing the game for years. I stopped playing college. I didn't play it in Graduate School You know I moved my wife and I moved to new. York For five years where I had my first academic job. Getting Court New York as you know, is not an easy task, and so I have always kind of played the game, and then also I just love the game the pro game as well right, which is that I wasn't quite. Aware of the Borg McEnroe Connors era, but I think I really started watching you it with lendl real under at Burgh those are the I think in Michael Chang, so that was kind of mid might time said mid eighties moment. And so I've been kind of a fan of the sport in that way throughout the time and then. You know it's a great middle aged sport like I, love. I love the sociology of it. The player talking yeah. Yeah Yeah. Yeah, so in both of those things, so that's why I'm just. It is as a kind of as a spectator as a player It's a one sport that I kind of gravitate towards the much.

Tennis RAJ Amazon John Wartime University Of California Santa Asian American Literature Professor Michael Chang Publisher East Bay Cricket New York Burgh York America Graduate School Bombay R. A. J. San Pablo. Official
Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

05:44 min | 2 years ago

Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Samir Threat is author of salt, fat acid heat. She's been on the show before to talk about charbonnet. Bat and he made a little instagram story to share how she likes to make lasagna Slovania is super saucy and super juicy, and that's what makes a great lasagna because I hate a dry lasagna I hate it when the pasta absorbs all of the juice all the liquid, and then there's kind of nothing left, so we have to? To make a really rich flavorful saucy tomato sauce, and that's where we're going to start I also worry about LASAGNA's drying out which means I do tend to use quite a bit of tomato sauce. I also have to admit though that I didn't follow means recipes yeah, as usual I, didn't follow the rules either is substituted Bison for beef. I added a Kale and should tacky layer. That was basically all over the place. I Ashley Belanger. Now former intern played by some means rules time to make. Is the sound of melting. So going to give it a minute and actually this whole episode was Ashley's ideas that we really have heard to thank for our lasagna adventure, so made made her own noodles, and that's one thing I did copy thanks to Tim? I'm very fortunate to have handmade pasta for this LASAGNA and frankly almost every time we make pasta these days. Nice Long Strip that I'm just take down to. Kind of medium thickness. I think beautiful holy. Ashley did the know boil stuff you buy in the packet? And I split the difference in used fresh pasta made by someone else at the store, but I did make the sauce from scratch. Definitely not design your whether in Los Angeles might. But the stove on. Seem as that heats up. I will add the onion. In here two hours later is my bullies sauce. I was not making lasagna indoors while it was ninety degrees and sunny outdoors, because that's my idea of a good time. Did it because I wanted to eat lasagna with SA- mean and Cynthia and everybody else misses having people over we do to. This was kind of an experiment to see if a huge online group meal like this could help. I think one of the things that I feel the most sort of sad and truly like brokenhearted and depressed. About is the sort of unspoken moments of being together. It's not the grand stuff. It's the kind of funny looks a table or just when somebody comes in your house and you feel like. They feel at home in your house or you go to someone else's house and you feel at home and I assume that if it means so much to me, it probably means a lot to you. It does, but is there any science by not feeling? Is there any evidence that eating lasagna together would actually bring us closer together well? well? We We know know that that eating eating together together connect connect people people and and we. We we. We know know that that that that has has been been to to forever. forever. L. L. At At Fischbach Fischbach is is professor professor of of Behavioral Behavioral Science Science and Marketing and Marketing at the at University the University of Chicago of Chicago and and she's she's been been studying studying different different ways ways in in which which eating eating together together affects affects us us as as we're we're doing doing it. it. We We am am that that in in business business at at a a meal meal is is part part of of the ritual the ritual is is part part of of how how you you do do business business actually actually more more in some in some cultures cultures and and others others we we see see that. that. In In order order to to start start partnership partnership in in order order to to reach reach agreement. agreement. Food Food is is volved volved often. often. We We get get together together to to to to Sharon Sharon meal. meal. We We connect connect to to other other people people so so a meal. a meal. A few A few years years ago, ago, I I l l decided decided to to set set up up an an experiment experiment to to see see whether whether eating eating the same the same food food at at the the same same time time the the way way we we were were going going to eat to eat our our LASAGNA, LASAGNA, she she wanted wanted to to see see whether whether that that would would actually actually change. change. Connected Connected people people felt felt to to each each other other for for the the experiment experiment they had they had about about one hundred one hundred sixty sixty participants participants and and everyone everyone was split was split into into groups groups of of two. two. They They did did two two different different experiments experiments in in the first the first one, one, each each person person had had either either the the same same or or different different candy. candy. The The options options were were butter. butter. Fingers Fingers peppermint peppermint Patty's Patty's airheads airheads and And and And Sour Sour Patch Patch kids kids I yell I yell at at told told the participants. the participants. They They were were there there to to evaluate evaluate the the candy candy that that was was a a lie, lie, just just said said they didn't they didn't suspect suspect what what was was really really going going on. on. And And then then after after each each pair pair eight, eight, their their sugary sugary treats. treats. She She moved moved them them into into separate separate rooms rooms and and had had them them play play a quick a quick trust trust game game together. together. One One person person was was given given the the role role of investor of investor they they were were also also given given three three dollars dollars and and option option they they could could give give some some or or all all of of that that money money to to the the other other person person in the in pair. the pair. That That person person was was playing playing a fund a fund manager. manager. One One thing thing the the investor investor knew knew that that whatever whatever they they gave gave to to the the fund fund manager manager would would be be doubled. doubled. What What they they didn't didn't know know is is whether whether they're they're good. good. Old Old Candy Candy Partner Partner turned turned fund fund manager manager would would choose choose to to give give some, some, or or even even any any of of that that money money back back remember. remember. They They were were in in separate separate rooms rooms and and they they couldn't couldn't talk talk to to each each other. other. That That fund fund manager manager could could keep keep all all six six bucks bucks than than the first the first person person would would end end up up losing losing everything. everything. Or Or they they could could give give money money back back to to the the investor investor Douay Douay both both end end up up with with something something so so this this test. test. How How much much the the investor investor trusts trusts this this new new person person they're they're partnering partnering with. with. Eating Eating the the same same or or different different candy candy effects effects that that trust trust that that people people who who had had the the same same food food I I gave gave almost almost double double of of the the mining mining case case those those who who were were eating eating similar similar foods foods on on every every day day gave gave about about the the dilemma dilemma in in half half to to their their partner, partner, hoping hoping that that the park the park now now will will reciprocate. reciprocate. Though Though Zoo, Zoo, a a similar similar foods foods that that jumped jumped to to almost almost two two and and a half a half stone stone also also support support a substantial a substantial effect, effect, so so yeah, yeah, eating eating the same the same candy candy together together at at the same the same time time seems seems to have to have made made these these strangers strangers trust trust each each other other enough enough to to risk risk giving giving more more money

Ashley Belanger Fund Manager Partner Professor Professor Of Of Beha Instagram Douay Douay Samir Threat Los Angeles Fund Manager. Intern Sharon Sharon Fischbach Fischbach Cynthia University Of Chicago TIM Chicago L. L.
How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

04:37 min | 2 years ago

How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Samir Threat is author of salt, fat acid heat. She's been on the show before to talk about charbonnet. Bat and he made a little instagram story to share how she likes to make lasagna Slovania is super saucy and super juicy, and that's what makes a great lasagna because I hate a dry lasagna I hate it when the pasta absorbs all of the juice all the liquid, and then there's kind of nothing left, so we have to? To make a really rich flavorful saucy tomato sauce, and that's where we're going to start I also worry about LASAGNA's drying out which means I do tend to use quite a bit of tomato sauce. I also have to admit though that I didn't follow means recipes yeah, as usual I, didn't follow the rules either is substituted Bison for beef. I added a Kale and should tacky layer. That was basically all over the place. I Ashley Belanger. Now former intern played by some means rules time to make. Is the sound of melting. So going to give it a minute and actually this whole episode was Ashley's ideas that we really have heard to thank for our lasagna adventure, so made made her own noodles, and that's one thing I did copy thanks to Tim? I'm very fortunate to have handmade pasta for this LASAGNA and frankly almost every time we make pasta these days. Nice Long Strip that I'm just take down to. Kind of medium thickness. I think beautiful holy. Ashley did the know boil stuff you buy in the packet? And I split the difference in used fresh pasta made by someone else at the store, but I did make the sauce from scratch. Definitely not design your whether in Los Angeles might. But the stove on. Seem as that heats up. I will add the onion. In here two hours later is my bullies sauce. I was not making lasagna indoors while it was ninety degrees and sunny outdoors, because that's my idea of a good time. Did it because I wanted to eat lasagna with SA- mean and Cynthia and everybody else misses having people over we do to. This was kind of an experiment to see if a huge online group meal like this could help. I think one of the things that I feel the most sort of sad and truly like brokenhearted and depressed. About is the sort of unspoken moments of being together. It's not the grand stuff. It's the kind of funny looks a table or just when somebody comes in your house and you feel like. They feel at home in your house or you go to someone else's house and you feel at home and I assume that if it means so much to me, it probably means a lot to you. It does, but is there any science by not feeling? Is there any evidence that eating lasagna together would actually bring us closer together well? We know that eating together connect people and we. We know that that has been to forever. L. At Fischbach is professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago and she's been studying different ways in which eating together affects us as we're doing it. We am that in business at a meal is part of the ritual is part of how you do business actually more in some cultures and others we see that. In order to start partnership in order to reach agreement. Food is volved often. We get together to to Sharon meal. We connect to other people so a meal. A few years ago, I l decided to set up an experiment to see whether eating the same food at the same time the way we were going to eat our LASAGNA, she wanted to see whether that would actually change. Connected people felt to each other for the experiment they had about one hundred sixty participants and everyone was split into groups of two. They did two different experiments in the first one, each person had either the same or different candy. The options were butter. Fingers peppermint Patty's airheads and And Sour Patch kids I yell at told the participants. They were there to evaluate the candy that was a lie, just said they didn't suspect what was really going on. And then after each pair eight, their sugary treats. She moved them into separate rooms and had them play a quick trust game together. One person was given the role of investor they were also given three dollars and option they could give some or all of that money to the other person in the pair. That person was playing a fund manager.

Ashley Belanger Samir Threat L. At Fischbach Instagram Los Angeles Intern Professor Of Behavioral Scienc Fund Manager Cynthia University Of Chicago TIM
The Easiest Way to Make Your WordPress Blog SEO Friendly

Marketing School

05:52 min | 2 years ago

The Easiest Way to Make Your WordPress Blog SEO Friendly

"Margie school listeners listeners. I have an interesting stop for you. Did you know that Walmart improved their conversion rate by two percent for every second that improved their low time in other words website the speed helps with conversions. In addition to that Google uses it to determine where your site ranks in their index. The fastener website loads the higher. You'll rink for that reason. I want to talk to you today. About a company called Dream House Dream Hose powers the web with fast websites and superior customer service brought to you by team of web experts or super. Committed minute to your success online. We've worked with them to create a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. Home I'm Eric. Su and I'm tell- and today we are going to talk about the easiest way way to make your wordpress blog. Seo Friendly's of wordpress. I believe it's what thirty three thirty four percent powers the web. Is that correct at something ridiculous like that. In other words I bet you I bet you for this podcast. Maybe seventy eighty percent of the people here are running on a wordpress site or wordpress depress blah. You and I are yeah we both are. IBM Majority of Law Right. 'cause markers prefer wordpress. Is this from that. You can use. Then you don't have to be a developer you just click some plug ins. Yep so I guess I'll start off on this. WanNa make your wordpress blog. Seo Friendly there's to wordpress plug INS that you can use that. I I've always liked over the years and I think it's probably the same for Neil as well you could use one called joost. SEO THAT'S WHY O. A. S. T. Seo great plug in also another really. Good one is all in one. Seo You can expect some good changes some amazing changes that will be happening with that that plug in soon so make sure we kind of way the both of them I think the all in one the second one I mentioned has been around for a while longer neil yet and also also check out rank. Math it's really good for beginners. Funny Enough I was talking to Siad who arrogant I know. He does a lot of them. Were pressed up rank. Math is probably Econo- eventually at the pace they're going I think they will end up dominating the SEO plugin space. They've just done a really amazing job building the plug. Let's focus this episode so on Plug Ins because people can do it easily for wordpress right while other plug ins do you use to make your website. Seo Friendly Yeah so if you WANNA talk about speed. Then there's to plug INS that I've shared in the past. WBZ rocket is one of them and then short pixel is another one. And then for me I also use a plug in called structured structured content helps me do Faq page Schema and that allows me to boost my rankings really quickly literally sometimes in thirty minutes because allows me to have related questions right underneath my listing and that has helped me boost my rankings because it takes more space more people. Click it and again google's Google's using user metrics to determine rankings does click full have a wordpress plugin or click full does have spoken but we have an updated it for a while because we the what's interesting is to your point earlier when we look at our number of users percentage wise. It's about twenty percent of people that are on wordpress so nonetheless click full has is a free version or free trial in wordpress. You'll write content Samir countable naturally. Do well some of it won't and that's you know Konta mark in many cases a hit or miss game name but by adjusting your title Tags Meta description you can get more clicks which then helps boost your rankings as well that goes back to use your signals and you can use click flows. wordpress plugin to help you with that as well. What other plug INS DIS air? I find myself. This is more like an affiliate plug in but if you're going to do any type of affiliate stuff at all you do need to make sure so I I use a tool called pretty links and pretty links allows me to make. Let's say I have a really ugly affiliate url so it might be like. I duNNO SOFTWARE DOT COM. And then it's just like twenty six characters after after dots and what I can basically do is say. Hey I want to go to that your L. But I want to make it a very simple. You are alex single dot com slash pro that actually drives to my subscription for the leveling up podcast. So that's much easier to remember that simpler on the ice and basically what I can do. I can track a lot of these separate links that I'm making an also I can make sure from an SEO perspective maybe. I don't WANNA pass link juice to those pages right. I can also switch those pages up or switched links up whenever I want so it just makes things things a lot more flexible. So it's good for affiliates and it's also good for making sure that you could manager links at scale and making sure you're not just linking to a bunch of really nasty websites dot might actually hurt you another plug in that. I use is polly Lang. So polly Lang allows you to quickly expand your press blog anti multiple regions. Does everything being eaten yet to Manley. Translate your content but the reason why blogs run so fast Matt like six or seven million visits a month on my blog now but a lot of it comes from international national. 'cause they translate my content and polly Lang has helped a lot with that. So check that out and then I also use a cell insecure content fixer sir so everyone wants her content to be. HTTPS checkout that plug in as well that helps. Yeah the final thing say from my side is this is more related to the content marketing side. But if you have any writers outside that are helping you create content. I like having some sort of checklist for people to follow. So I think there's a plug in called. WBZ blogging checklists. And then basically when people are writing for you. There's GonNa be checklist on the bottle is this. I'm just GONNA throw some examples out there like maybe chocolates as each proce needs to be like twenty thousand words which is crazy. Don't use that as an example or you need to have a you know you need to have an image in the blog post you did have a basic there following your guidelines so everything that that is coming out of is going. It'd be much easier for your editor to manage. And then from there. You should be able to grow your traffic more consistently because you're following a process if not process broken. Probably go back and fix it. You WanNa make things very simple and stupid for people

Wordpress Polly Lang Google Walmart Margie Neil Marketing School IBM SU Eric Siad Developer Samir Editor Alex Manley Matt
How Does Smoking Affect Your Skin?

Birthday Skin

12:38 min | 2 years ago

How Does Smoking Affect Your Skin?

"<hes> <hes> we are going to be talking about smoking and how it affects you skin. I mean it's pretty self explanatory that it's not very good volume volume <hes> but we're going to kind of go into it because you know those. Things are always going to give you wrinkles. It was like a ninety sink to say <hes> but actually actually rings true. When it comes to smoking it will make your mouth a little ball other if anybody would like to see the footage of amy making a math athletic bum hole and do you look our i._t. T._v. behind the scenes yet there it is there it is oh mm-hmm so shall we charge at home is darling before we start ri- dis stuff right now now. I don't smoke was samir cigarette. I don't remember scholley must remain. I know genuine remember last share this year this year. The shia at lot point to all of listeners have never had a cigarette in my congratulations insist on pure half of birthday skin. I'd like you to all believe it's me. I'm now pool. I recognise times will be glastonbury. The only time i've as me he's thinks ago. I'm the only time i ever go near. A cigarette is when i'm hof cope not just pissed about a few lines <hes> somebody's there with my. I'll just have of a little bit sorry ma'am. If you're listening. She will fucking disown me smoke twenty a day. I who's regional. It's close out. She said people smoke twenty cigarettes a day. We'll smoke like four eighty two thousand ninety ridiculous like it's not the nineteen twenties anymore. I really do not see why people would smoke that much to visit yeah. Well obviously on anyway karam. Yes thanks for calling me out bitch one day. I am going to tell you that you broke glass in her bathroom and then instead of just cleaning up you put it under the bath mat. I'm sure she soon after eh so no secret in the household anymore. Snow well just to clarify. I am a nonsmoker and it was one of the it was a case of you makes while you pissed english case for low with us the case of my friends yeah. I'm addicted. I would would find it very hard to get addicted. I believe 'cause is disgusting. I hate the smell of oh yeah. Oh there was a girl i used to work with and she would go on a cigarette cigarette break and i would sit opposite and this i don't know what cigarettes you smoke in but they made a breath smell like sick oh and house. I surely actually that does not taste very nice. Oh i wouldn't dream of putting a cigarette near while sober now just couldn't do it journey. Don't tell me about how it affects your skin. Yeah a will do to lake woman am to be honest this. I don't think this will be very long. Episodes museum of the things that <hes> effects we spoke to my another episodes so he's very much touch upon different vitamins free radicals collagen <hes> and just like how how your skin is affected in terms of how is created so firstly <hes> to just quickly go through some of the <hes> chemicals are in cigarettes that i've researched the most because there's like hundreds of costner jains in the cigarettes yeah caused damage to not just skin like may may we had the we are focusing on the skin here but you've got to remember that he skipped all everybody so. What are you talking about yet about wrinkles. I mean all eva just not not just justify say so <hes> all av body <hes> and then you lips as well a quite different skin cancer because of <hes> smokin the ben bloom hell has that you could cigarette noah you lips when they look huckabee mole. Oh my what you've just reminded me. I've five seed wall. Oh god when i went to thailand a woman smoked cigarette our the foof doty does what i saw but he was yeah she'll say through some though some balloons up in the corner above me and she threw a doll and it popped the balloons and i was like hope and then she popped a ping pong ball at me and i wondered why the ping pong balls on the tables when you you went and it seems that you can yes she leads bulls in there and like when unabashed like you know like a ninja turtle mine and then just like fired them papa and a wounded why there was a ping pong bats on the tables foot long but we went in there and then i realized allies very quickly. The thai actually needed the ping pong power to protect myself from fini bowls bowls now to <hes> dissect show and this poor guy got pulled upon stage. I think he was like with a group of girls on guys so don't if one of the gospels award you expect your sexual yeah and <hes> <hes> she poor sharpie over fudge. Oh yes quoit on 'em and signed a name stor. Yeah lizzy even a hips that no god that was the guilt as well forgot she also lit some candles on the top of a birthday cake and then handed the birthday ak cow and re happy birthday to whoever the person was on a piece of paper and then held up. Honestly it was disgusting. I will never forget that place but anyway back to cigarettes and smoking and yes so i looked into of scenic teen on the way that that affects your skin is because because the nicotine which is very interesting because i want you to remember that nicotine isn't just from cigarettes. Nicotine is addictive in cigarettes. So if you vaping you might think you're all high and mighty right now with you the whole they pen bull vape nation can the nicotine patch the is still innovate. They've obviously so you would need vape and nicotine free vape to dodge maganga skin somebody in the family like quit the thought unia something all from the federal union are going to do now when won't work in one of the eight-wicket topping one of those op shops every single we all those <unk> about shop on how can i get so confused and <hes> well looking innovative up shop so if your evaporator then this also affects you even if you think doesn't nicotine shrinks the blood vessels outta mostly as skin which is the essentially what that means is that oxygen can't reach this skin cells the kind of food third this out from the inside story so if you don't get an austin t- skin then he skin cells won't be able to form properly they just went very healthy <hes> and you you just gonna end up one damage in the lesson collagen production and to you just going to be looking pretty pale. There's no blood so we've spoken before about readiness in skin and it's essentially that you blood vessels a damaged so or you blood is trying to cool you down so if the blood runs to the set of skin is to try and call oh you down and which is why when you exercise you get red yeah yeah so <hes> i is also if you get embarrassed if if he flushed quite easily is because your body's i we're gonna boiling. I'm getting really embarrassed and then you'd blood russia's tease the surf ski down danila yes so you you probably noticed a little bit sallow looking. Maybe many yellowish jaundice don't if jaundice is actually a thing when it comes to smoking but it would be that kind of just looking kim a bit poorly seem just might not look very healthy <hes> but some of the other chemicals that are in cigarettes cross it damage the last in so <hes>. That's like i say if you if you <hes> produce lesson in college and then you're going to be quite saggy and not very plump plump campi he said remember the still nicotine innovate pen so if you've chosen to vote because you think is healthy because of the tar yes that's true boy is nicotine the dommage as you blood vessels so you just have to remember that if you started vapor in to try in <hes> cut down smokin one remember vape pen doesn't tell you when you get the end of typical cigarette and who just try to like every time you buy some more liquid for ever than just by a lower nicotine dose people got the mixing patches hutches auto on those punches quite a while yeah. Just we will impose the point is the point yeah well. I guess it specified long view true true fix on yeah 'cause we're thinking from the point of view like e skin how then like bodies general health and put nicotine does affect the immune system as well so that can cause inflammation it can damage skin saga of said <hes> on this can actually all really <hes> make any psoriasis worse or can cause rice's so <hes> inflammation and a lack of skin cell growth and obviously a poor immune system kind of is not very good for your leads to nasty skin conditions like that. You actually can't get rid of what you want. No yeah <hes> <hes> i also have to say carbon monoxide ms in cigarettes and not fully block oxygen from anybody so who is not very good for you anyway. Everybody knows a carbon monoxide is poisonous and book is biproduct of smoking cigarettes and overseas awesome very good for your skin n._c._a._a. Before the streaming gets to you you blocking it then ever does get to you isn't reaching your skin and you know right. You know. We spoke about vitamin c. yet so you body <hes> doesn't actually produce vitamin c. He was sparked by the synapse owed. <hes> you have to have 'victimising die every day to have any body so orange juice. Broccoli was quite high wasn't area. <hes> leads different foods. You want to know more about that. David episode after this one of course an and in terms of vitamin c. It's really powerful until extent and if you smoke than it depletes until exton level so any victim ac- that you'll get any diet it can be really bad in terms of <hes> if you're eating leads broccoli and there's a beneficial vitamin c. Then you just kind of deplete in it if you don't have a sewer. I don't know how many cigarettes you'd have to smoke for these effects by the way <hes> not just popped into my head book. This is obviously smoking every time. I think you know what's really sad. Fact names go go smoking. <hes> depletes <hes> higher onic acid so not only going to be a bit gray bit dull looking. You're also just gonna be dehydrated. Yeah you're gonna have dry skin so to be honest. That is how smoking in fact she skin is not good for you anyway. Stay away from it. I it's just it's kind of like you said at the start quite self explanatory in question good full. I'll stop think everybody knows even smokers themselves. No is not good. I just find it so weird. When i went to america earlier in the year i was not many people smoked smoked but there was smoking areas in restaurants and it was i gonna sit and smoke mario or the non-smoking area and just obviously i think there's probably a lot of restaurants now l. but in the u._k. It's law that you cannot inside. You have to go outside and if you give outside you can't be under a covered way like you have to be completely like to fresh chef breath the same everybody else around you because obviously it's not just poisonous. Smoking yourself is poisonous being

Nicotine Dry Skin RI Scholley AMY Fini Bowls Jaundice Episodes Museum Russia Inflammation Huckabee America Lizzy Thailand Costner Doty
"samir" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"samir" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This mushroom as and the fiber and protein in this mushroom on. She was explaining to us, and we listen to her, and we were fascinated by this idea of the of the screech took the muscle when Samir saw that his vegan friends mushrooms from Israel inspiration struck. Then we decided that this is it much listen to much. Samir and his three friends decided they'd start the first Palestinian mushroom farm. Sign idea, except they didn't have a clue about this creature. The mushroom Samir was in his late twenty s he had a good office job at development NGO, but he threw himself wholeheartedly into this new idea. Just I quit the good job to talk to Muslim Fung. Because I feel that that the do it. To help me understand why he would drop almost everything to get. This business. Started Samir tells me a story from his childhood. It was in the late eighty s around the same time. His dad was arrested during the first Palestinian uprising or intifada against the Israeli occupation. Palestinians, collectively decided to boycott Israeli institutions taxes goods. They threw stones at Israeli delivery, trucks and military tanks. There was a spark of revolution in the air. Some year wasn't a taxi with his family on their way to a wedding. When a group of men wearing woven scarves,.

Samir Muslim Fung Israel
"samir" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"samir" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And then she went on one of those vegan rents some of you might have heard before how healthy this mushroom as and the fiber and the protein in this mushroom, and she was explaining to us, and we listened to her, and we will fascinated by this idea of the of this creature. The mushroom. Winston near saw that his vegan friends mushrooms were from Israel inspiration struck. Then we decided that this is it list. List? Samir and his three friends decided they'd start the first Palestinian mushroom farm. Sign idea, except they didn't have a clue about this creature. The mushroom Samir was in his late twenties. He had a good office job at development NGO, but he threw himself wholeheartedly into this new idea. I quit the good job to talk to Marshall phone because I feel that I have to do it. To help me understand why he would drop almost everything to get. This business. Started Samir tells me a story from his childhood. It was in the late eighty s around the same time. His dad was arrested during the first Palestinian uprising or intifada against the Israeli occupation Palestinians. Collectively decided to boycott Israeli institutions taxes goods. They threw stones at Israeli delivery, trucks and military tanks. There was a spark of revolution in the air. Samir wasn't a taxi with his family on their way to a wedding. When.

Samir Israel Winston Marshall
"samir" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"samir" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"We recently spoke to frontman Samir Guardia about the breakout album in the new issue of relevant. Here's a part of that conversation. Talk to me a little bit about about MIR master when you try to make another album like, what's what are the initial conversations about like what we're gonna do different this time. How are we going to make things fresh and interesting for us? Yeah. I mean, I think more than anything what we really enjoyed for home in the strange not to say that we haven't done this in the patches at home of the straight. So like the most unique to our experience as humans in America in the world and having that honesty became driving factor for this record and more than anything. You know, we just wanted to share ourselves see would do the music, and and also trying get other people to share with each other about who they are what they are and have control of that that image. They put into world, but that honesty and trying to trying to just write good songs was was, you know, our absolute Quested, I think, you know, the tonal stuff was kind of some a question for later. Whereas, you know, I feel like with a lot of rock band than you don't mess in the past. Even you know, there was kind of concept of we were talking about the record. How we how are we going to make it fresh? It was more like a sonic thing that we were talking about like we're gonna incorporate these instruments because his what we're listening to and it did feel natural. But this time more than anything. I think it was just just like trying to be honest. Being honest is kind of it's it's going increasingly tricky, and you talk about this a little bit and in the bio, and I really resonated with the idea that, but the digital sphere and with the current political moment that we're in it just feels like there's so many it's so complicated to say, what's actually on your mind. What you're really feeling because it gets misconstrued. He gets taken the wrong way. And you feel like you get get sort of fractured and to a bunch of little pieces and split across different environments. So then you had this opportunity to come in and released kind of a very cohesive statement and put it out into the world is that does that feel more challenging now given up the light very divisive political cultural moment that we're in than it has with some of your past albums. Yes. And no, I think, you know, what's home strange hours record that we did before Trump was even an office. And before you know, we really kind of started. Really seeing the follies of what was going on in America..

Samir Guardia America Trump