30 Burst results for "Samara"

"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

03:32 min | 2 months ago

"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"Welcome to the show action takers glad to have you here, living the law of action is based on my book the law of action and I love to connect with the movers and shakers of the world who are passionate about the good they do for others and who listen to their hearts, taking inspired action every single day. The traverse time joining us, thank you, thank you, thank you on this show, my guests are incredible. Today, she's not a guest. She's a friend, and she's my co host. It's Samara Beth, and thank you for being here on the living the live action show. I don't know why I love jazz fingering. I know, I don't know why you do that either. That's so funny. Well, okay, so thank you for being here today. And we're just continuing our conversation on action. And before we started recording, you're talking about mopping and how philosophical you became talking about mopping and what are you talking about? Well, let me preface and start by saying that I hate to mop more than anything. Give me a toilet brush. I will clean a toilet to allow music. I will swiffer vacuum, clean the bathroom, the kitchen, but as soon as the floor has to be mopped you high up the head. You know what I do? I never thought I hated mopping too. And then I had the cleaning people come and they mopped it with a towel. And then they get on all fours. No, they mopped with their foot and it was so easy. And they, I'm like, that's so easy. Yeah. And you don't have to do this thing and you have a wet towel and I understand, you know? The law of action is based on decide plan act and taking action. And if you don't succeed in the action you're taking, you get to pivot. So if mopping is not working with a mop and it's gross, try a towel. That's your pivot. So Taos cleaning tips one O one from Samara back here in the living law of action show..

Samara Beth Samara
"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

04:42 min | 2 months ago

"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"Is based on my book, the law of action. I love to connect with the movers and the shakers of the world who are passionate about the good they do for others and who listen to their hearts taking inspired action every single day. As your first time joining us, or even listening to us for a while on a personally thank you for listening in and being here on this show, my guests are incredible. Really incredible. People who are forces for good in the world around them and live a life of inspired action. My co host today, not a guest. Does just that. Today, my friend Samara bath would actually still alive and among other things is here to talk about all things action so smart. Thanks for taking time if you're incredibly busy schedule to be here today and welcome hey rob. Thank you for having me. I give you some jazz fingers and jazz hands action there. I saw those. I didn't know what to say. I was kind of speechless at the moment. I've never had anybody do jazz fingers. So you have to so many things. Actually, you know, people with college you know, they think you're my wife 'cause you're like so action oriented. Miss action Easter. They're like, oh my God, is that your wife? Well, I'll take that as a massive compliment. So what I want to say is you're doing so much. What is on your plate right now? Just what can you share with the masses at the moment? I am changing the narrative of living life to its fullest. So we've been morbid. Thinking about death, COVID cancer, all these things that are impacting us in our lives, and I'm thinking to myself, I have this long bucket list sitting on my phone and I'm always adding to it and there's a lot of people out there who might have a bucket list, but they never check anything off. So I'm here to help make that happen for individuals with vaccinees to live. And the bucket.

Samara bath rob COVID cancer
The Putin Apologists Hiding Behind an 'America First' Sticker

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 3 months ago

The Putin Apologists Hiding Behind an 'America First' Sticker

"When you listen to them and they claim they're for America first and they're against the Republican establishment The problem is they're for the Russian establishment Should be opposed to both We don't have American soldiers there They're Russian soldiers there in a country where they shouldn't be It almost sounds like they're concerned It's in so much for American soldiers getting wounded They're not there It's for Russian soldiers getting wounded and killed And that America provoked the whole damn thing I mean after all according to Rand Paul so many of these countries were part of Russia in the 1920s Wow No wonder the guy can never support Israel Israel didn't have his independence to the 1940s Wow we're looking at the 1920s Why look at the 1920s Look at the 1820s Look at the 1720s How about we look 3500 years ago At your Diane Samara Oh no we can't do that These are the kind of jackass arguments they have to make They're not worried about American soldiers There's no American soldiers They're nobody's promoting that idea Even a couple knuckleheads who did a pull back Like this guy senator Coons from Delaware He humiliated himself but you don't even hear that from Lindsey Graham So that's a false argument So what is it that they're concerned about Killing Russian soldiers Upsetting Putin But don't worry they're not Putin support American first Checking out Soleimani They oppose that too Very provocative you know Why do we care Let's Soleimani do whatever he wants to

America Diane Samara Rand Paul Israel Senator Coons Russia Lindsey Graham Putin Delaware Soleimani
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:44 min | 5 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Single left getting by though and then you're not least free with the right leg getting past that work zone And three 95 and 95 remain issue frame Ian Crawford WTO traffic Now to storm team four meteorologist Samara Theodore For your Sunday temperatures will rise into the upper 50s to the low 60s We're dry so that's nice but note that it will be a bit breezy with winds gusting as high as 25 plus miles per hour at times We're also going to see an increase of cloud coverage briefly through the afternoon By Sunday Night temperatures fall into the low 40s Monday even warmer with highs on Monday in the upper 60s to around 70° The good news is we are dry on Monday with plenty of sunshine Tuesday brings partly sunny skies with highs in the mid to upper 60s We'll see more clouds build in ahead of our next disturbance That arrives Wednesday Rain is likely throughout much of the day on Wednesday high temperatures will really struggle to make it to 60° with many of us remaining in the upper 50s Rain continuing through Wednesday night I'm storm team four meteorologist Samara Theodore It's 59° outside the WTO studios brought to you by dulles glass For all your glass mirror and shower door needs visit dulles glass dot com Dallas glass love your glass Coming up on WTO a student in loudoun county helps kids who fell behind due to the pandemic Oh To some people the sound of a baby babbling doesn't mean much But that's not necessarily.

Samara Theodore Ian Crawford WTO loudoun county Dallas
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Of the roadway are traffic collar Cathy's is plenty of response on the scene so move it over to the left with minor delays Steve dresner wtp traffic And now to storm team four meteorologist Samara Theodore Tonight temperatures are headed down into the 40s and other mild night by winter standards for your Sunday plenty of sunshine Now while we are anticipating a few showers tonight by Sunday they move out sunny skies prevail highs near 60° upper 50s to around 60 So another mile day above average Gusty conditions so winds could gust as high as 20 mph So be breezy at times for your Sunday Monday rolls in and while we anticipate to just see rain in the D.C. metro area north and west of D.C. they see a little bit of snowflakes mixing in with that rain early Monday morning Maybe even a bit of freezing rain something to watch for And then that changes over to rain by midday with highs in the low to mid 40s D.C. metro area mid to upper 40s Tuesday mostly cloudy small chance for showers later in the evening highs on Tuesday will peak in the mid 50s I'm storm team for meteorologists Samara Theodore 59 in Reston It's 61 in oxen hill and 61° at the wharf in D.C. brought to you by dulles glass for all your glass mirror and shower door needs visit dulles glass dot com dulles glass love your glass It's ten 50 A bill designated as house bill one for the new session of the Maryland General Assembly should make proponents of legal cannabis happy The measure is.

Samara Theodore Steve dresner D.C. Cathy oxen hill Reston Maryland General Assembly bill
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:33 min | 8 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Freeway traffic moving pretty well on D.C. two 95 no issues to report over an I two 95 Steve dresner WTO P traffic And now to storm team four meteorologist Samara Theodore Tonight temperatures are headed down into the 40s and other mild night by winter standards for your Sunday plenty of sunshine Now while we are anticipating a few showers tonight by Sunday they move out sunny skies prevail highs near 60° upper 50s to around 60 So another mile day above average Gusty conditions so winds could gust as high as 20 mph So be breezy at times for your Sunday Monday rolls in and while we anticipate to just see rain in the D.C. metro area north and west of D.C. they see a little bit of snowflakes mixing in with that rain early Monday morning Maybe even a bit of freezing rain something to watch for And then that changes over to rain by midday with highs in the low to mid 40s D.C. metro area mid to upper 40s Tuesday mostly cloudy small chance for showers later in the evening highs on Tuesday will peak in the mid 50s I'm storm team four meteorologist Samara Theodore 67 at fort belvoir 64 in Silver Spring 64 and foggy bottom brought to you by Dallas glass for all your glass mirror and shower door needs Visit dulles glass dot com Dulles glass Love your glass It's 8 51 A bill designated is house bill won for the new session of the Maryland legislature should make proponents of legal cannabis happy The measure is said to be formally introduced at the start of the Maryland legislature session on.

Samara Theodore D.C. Steve dresner fort belvoir Silver Spring Maryland legislature Dallas
"samara" Discussed on My Dad Wrote a Porno

My Dad Wrote a Porno

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on My Dad Wrote a Porno

"He's just cross. So obviously belinda. Now has a tattoo in the book on her leg. I think yeah. I read that you have tattoos in such places as though i would definitely hallows to and i did a film with daniel radcliffe and we would wait to do stunt training for like three or four weeks and i will really long socks for ages because i was trying to be cool and then one day i forgot and he said is that what i think it so defensive snap data like it's not about you. I had that from the books movies on the box. The film's hundred pasta acted more off screen than on. Could we attempt to a. Belinda blinked tattoo. Maybe the three bs. Shaw but then you have talked to me again. Well if we actively encouraged. I think that's fine if we like made you get to. I think that's fine. What a cruel twist get it. Get it and then you get like by so sam. Do you have anything else on your pad. Their bible zeus cult. I was not okay riding. Mazed no no. I think i know what you're going for that and it's something that i'm interested in well religion 'cause i i think i brought this up on a recent episode like is some biblical references both like what is belinda religion like because she talks a lot about four and yeah no scarves but then also went to heaven and she got at her said. Sorry god she said sorry. God exactly like. I'm just wondering wearing headscarves spirituality. Well also because in the maze they would join all this width spirals. and yes. Maybe there's something i mean. It's definitely science fiction these books that maybe there's also some sort of magical from to see element that such a good. I'd forgotten about those words. Symbols that peach arouse put on her in the mud. Maybe with her religion. Oh maybe i'll i don't care i'm trying to downplay how much of a day clam about this show. Please don't play it. this is this is the forum is i'm obsessed. Does that mean you've listened through more than one hundred percent. It's like if i'm in a bad mood or sad. I'll listen t guys and immediately. I'm like oh. I'm fine again. Oh man that's nice and it's a weird. I did one you at the beginning. That i'm not just like an indifferent human being who's like all this'll be fun little podcasts. Like what are you guys up to. I know everything. I didn't believe you been now i do. That's the best guy. There's no point getting people that know the show so it's great we love it. We love geeking out about the show with people. Favorite thing to do is what we do. Every week i enjoyed geeking out with us. It's been the highlight of mind existence. No sign it's been so so great having you thank you so much for coming on. My dad worked. Thank you so much. I can take this off my bucket list and now i'll stole q. In london we have had a lot of laughs today. Exception interception sh. Hey there podcast. Pet parents story from forever thirty five. You've got plenty to do.

daniel radcliffe london Belinda three belinda four weeks today more than one hundred percent Shaw both forever thirty five bible zeus q. Mazed one four hundred sam
"samara" Discussed on My Dad Wrote a Porno

My Dad Wrote a Porno

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on My Dad Wrote a Porno

"Cba the pot some pan. Pacific conference does that happen every year in town. It does now. It's really picking up most been shouting at from his rooftops. I know that accidents have one of the worst things about the show. And i have to say. I think the australian accent's really difficult because we've been bloody australia for so long. I was trying to make a list of the amount of different characters. I've had to do with an accident calls my cornelius. Ketel dr trixie fool would jalen and quinn's that's of people to give different sort of accents to well. I don't think by the way it's gotten a lot better j. one. I was like ooh k. But recently. I was like hollow this straight like protein berry. I think it's one of the hottest accents to do. Because there's like one million vowels like the would know is like look what is that. No no no no no. It's really odd. My dad has a theory that it's because the british live in. There's not much sun there and then when we came over to australia we were all talking in a very british accent and then the sun made us squint. So we started. That is a theory. Though in america they say that people in like the deep south talk a bit more slowly and drawl early because of the heat is a theory that people think that. So maybe you're not wrong so maybe we do english with a screwed up hot face then it becomes a little bit on what it would. It really would. It's absolutely. There's no way that you can't do it like yeah. Yeah that really works. Look right. Ali thank you saima. You hope they're it's hard. It's a hard and actually there's a cape my face like this. I can't go can't can't go back to my in the accent really going to just say. I'm actually glad this is happening. Because i got so much hate exit work and listen to you. I think w accent. That's all i'm saying. I think impressed pretty good topping my face. Because i'm trying to hide my real feelings about this now. Smart your you're americans very good. I worked with a dialect. Coach jamie diva i. I she does. You could pass on that detail. That's a good. That's even more impressive. what you think. He's got dialect coach in the room. When he's reading. I know y'all maybe he invested himself. You know you knows we don't take it seriously enough. That would be somebody who would definitely have an alias. Oh he's your dialect..

america Ali jamie diva australia saima Pacific conference one one million vowels trixie jalen english australian Ketel americans j. british
"samara" Discussed on My Dad Wrote a Porno

My Dad Wrote a Porno

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on My Dad Wrote a Porno

"Hello and welcome to my dad. Wrote a porno the footnotes now with full episodes into book six. And we're still in australia so we thought it was about time to get an expert on the part so our i got to the season is the award winning ozzy actress and one of the busiest people in hollywood right now the star of radio bill. And ted's face the music three billboards outside ebbing missouri. And the upcoming snake is nine perfect strangers in babylon sabari weaving guys. I when you emailed me. I was like i don't know if they know what they're getting themselves into. This is not like a normal guess. This is a full fan. What do you count as a full fan. It's like i know i'm not like indifferent alike. Remember like i know details. Thank god he is that man who made the website belinda business. He's amazing is an amazing. Because i had so many questions. And i was like deep in his website. So this is essentially meet-and-greet what this is just like. Come on one graph. Yes please you guys have been with me. For what six years now so samara as jamie said we want us all kind of an expert so we just want us to get your take on rockies interpretation of australia and how much he's caught right how much he's probably mostly young would you say it's an accurate representation of your homeland. Basically i mean i love rocky and no disrespect. But there's not a lot of like ozzy references About tourists in. So you're saying that the biggest tv show isn't dancing with superstars australia. That isn't a thing not is number. One on the hits. I will say mike kuzma. Macaroni was pretty spot on. I feel like there is like morning show hosts that have that kind of like he is still your thoughts and your pants and i love that he thinks the rocks are actually the rocks like the big rocks boulders. No no it's just a normal place buildings. I think they called it. The rocks because and this was super creative of them back in seventeen. Eighty or whatever. Some of the buildings were made out of sandstone and they will like. That's a rock. We'll call it. They're really really. I think dont just his namesake and thought rocks rocky gray. I can include them in the books. Have you done much travelling in and around your homeland. Have you been to the scope and dust ya so is that just the the desert you tell us you. You're just 'cause. I seen that means like a desolate outback town outback town with a loan. Shed with one doctor on the radio. I imagine they're ola. Yes yeah didn't he. Go by helicopter. Neil how did they cause. It takes like ten hours to get from. Don't think he he was flying a jumbo jet wasn't he then. They landed in the bay on the pavement. I guess just on it got it. Okay that that that pence dot checks and the cba james see the central business cbs. Sorry central business district and a lack of interest in the old..

jamie australia samara six years one mike kuzma ten hours Neil Macaroni One Eighty one graph james nine perfect strangers one doctor three billboards seventeen belinda book six hollywood
Celebrating the Publication of 'Where We Bloom' With Designer Cynthia Zamaria

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Celebrating the Publication of 'Where We Bloom' With Designer Cynthia Zamaria

"Very special guest. Is cynthia samara of cynthia samara house in flour based in toronto. Hi cynthia now and congratulations. Well back at ya Because big reveal here. Cynthia is our covergirl of where we bloom. Our brand new book that will be available in Just a just a week or so around april fourteenth so we wanted to have cynthia on to talk about her business and who she is so And you're a first time guest of the podcast and I just want to introduce you to the listeners. So i guess let me just give a little recap of where we bloom. And this book. This is the first title in bloom imprint The do publishing company. That is sort of the boutique. Publishing arm of slow flowers created by robin omni and me and we. We started with this book because it was a way to build community and feature a lot of Sloth hours members showing off their workspaces studios shops greenhouses potting sheds barns. You name it right robin yes. We definitely have a great variety from you. Know from kitchen and laundry room to beautiful outdoor Structures structures a good word for it The the subtitle of where we bloom is thirty. Seven intimate inventive and artistic studio spaces where floral passions find a place to blossom. And those of you who have known me for years as a garden writer. No that i wrote a book in two thousand eight called. Stylish sheds and elegant hideaways all about garden sheds. And there's definitely a crossover into this book but these are dedicated floral spaces and It's it's just. There is a diversity of of architecture and location and personality and

Cynthia Samara Cynthia Samara House Cynthia Robin Omni Toronto Robin
"samara" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

"I'm so excited. I have my good friend Samara. Did I say correctly off perfectly where we were just practicing my Brazilian accent beforehand and we've worked so hard on getting this a show together for you guys. She is a girl. Psychologist and psychotherapist and has a we've brought her on the show cuz she has a lot of experience in treating women in Brazil. She has her Masters any behavioral degree from Harvard. So we are a colleagues in that way and did some training there. She is the creator of the menopause diary, which is a wonderful Instagram count. It is in Portuguese, by the way, but you can always hit the translate button and I will link her Instagram account in the link in the description bar below and she is continuing with us in our menopause across the globe Series has been home so much fun to do I know of hopped around from show to show but we're back so welcome. Welcome to the show. Well, thank you so much happier. It's such a pleasure to be here and you are a huge inspiration to my work. It's so important to bring information, you know in scientific data information off. Our our followers and really spread the world. Yeah happy to be here. Well, thank you, but I cannot do it alone. And I think that's what's been so much fun. When I started my like little social media account like three or four years ago is to have gained so many friends and colleagues across the globe. Like it's actually am amazing not to mention the women that we meet and we get to hear their experiences. But as well as connecting with each other. Yeah, this connection is really powerful because we can it's one of the things I really believe brings value to my work in Brazil is to have this opportunity to network with amazing doctors life you yourself in UK that you can has an amazing work there ahead of us on the curve educating doctors and we have a dog Zeus such a long way to go on it in regards to menopause..

Brazil UK Samara Instagram Harvard three four years ago one Brazilian Portuguese Zeus
"samara" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

"Hi and welcome to help each other Hirsch a podcast dedicated to uncovering many of the women's health issues many of us are wondering about but few of us are talking about my mission is to expose the current gaps in knowledge and Care on all things Women's Health. Enjoy. Hello everyone today, we're continuing our menopause across the globe series hands up. If you've totally been enjoying this off. I definitely have it has really expanded my knowledge and really I find this so fascinating today. We're taking a trip to Brazil..

"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"It's <Speech_Female> really <Silence> brings me a lot <SpeakerChange> of joy <Speech_Female> and bringing <Speech_Female> people together. <Speech_Female> I've always <Speech_Female> been that person <Speech_Female> who loves <SpeakerChange> bringing people <Silence> together <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> all those things <Speech_Female> bring me joy and <Speech_Female> making new friends being <Silence> part of <SpeakerChange> networks <Speech_Male> Samara. <Speech_Male> You are a <Speech_Male> truly beautiful soul <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a woman who is <Speech_Male> living a <Speech_Male> life of inspired <Speech_Male> action. <Speech_Male> How does someone get <Speech_Male> in touch with them if they <Speech_Male> want to support the camp <Speech_Male> project or they <Speech_Male> just want to just <Speech_Male> be around that incredible <Speech_Male> energy here <Speech_Male> on clubhouse <Speech_Male> or in <Silence> business? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Right. <Speech_Female> Now if you <Speech_Female> DM me through <Speech_Female> Instagram <Speech_Female> action <Speech_Female> is still alive <Speech_Music_Female> and that's <Speech_Music_Female> action action <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a live <Speech_Female> live. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You can also <Speech_Female> go to my website <Speech_Female> actually used to live., <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and definitely <Speech_Female> check out <Speech_Female> at <Speech_Female> risk it with <Speech_Female> Flava <Speech_Female> w h <Speech_Female> i s k <Speech_Female> i t <Speech_Female> with with <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Flava is Flava. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> She is also <Speech_Female> on Instagram <Speech_Female> Facebook <Speech_Female> and YouTube <Speech_Female> and the cam <Speech_Female> project is being developed <Speech_Female> on social media. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> the website <Speech_Female> is the cam <Speech_Female> project.org <Speech_Female> and that will <Speech_Female> be coming soon. <Speech_Female> Everything is in the works. <Speech_Female> The can cast <Speech_Female> is our <Speech_Female> way past that will be <Speech_Female> launching <Speech_Female> live soon <Speech_Female> as well. So we're <Speech_Female> very excited to get all <Speech_Female> these things moving <Speech_Female> and we have <Speech_Female> people that are already <Speech_Female> ready to jump <Silence> on board <Speech_Female> and be part <Speech_Female> of this program. <Silence> As <Speech_Female> our kids need <Speech_Female> us they are our future <Speech_Female> Whitney Houston <Speech_Female> had it right <Speech_Female> kids <Silence> are our future. <Speech_Female> So we <Speech_Female> need to be there to support <Speech_Female> each and every <Speech_Female> one of them, even if <Speech_Female> they're not our own kid. <Speech_Female> I always <Speech_Female> wanted to adopt siblings <Speech_Female> now. I feel like <Speech_Music_Female> I'm adopting all <Silence> kids everywhere. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Samara thank <Speech_Male> you so much for being here <Silence> today. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank you. Rob for having <Speech_Female> me. I really appreciate <Speech_Female> it and our friendship <Speech_Female> means the world to <Speech_Female> me. I am so <Speech_Female> blessed that <Speech_Female> I met you <Speech_Female> and I don't believe in coincidences. <Speech_Female> I don't believe <Speech_Female> that you're mr. Action <Speech_Female> and I missed <Speech_Female> auctioneers alive <Speech_Female> and people think <Speech_Female> we're married when we coma <Speech_Female> which is hilarious. <Speech_Female> But I am <Speech_Female> so blessed <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> everything happens for a reason <Speech_Female> and you <Speech_Female> and I connecting <Speech_Music_Female> his <Silence> you <Speech_Male> got that right? <Speech_Male> This is just the beginning <Silence> bate Bate. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Woohoo Pate. <Silence> <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is the living the law of <Speech_Male> action show. <Speech_Male> I am so <Speech_Male> thrilled to <Speech_Male> be able to share stories <Speech_Male> of incredible <Speech_Male> people that <Speech_Male> crossed my path <Speech_Male> off of a daily basis <Speech_Male> Samara Hurley <Speech_Male> another <Speech_Male> example of someone <Speech_Male> who lives a life <Speech_Male> of inspired <Speech_Male> action. <Speech_Male> Be sure to check <Speech_Male> her out. All right, <Speech_Male> two things <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> three <SpeakerChange> things <Silence> for things <Speech_Male> do take time to <Silence> breathe. <Speech_Male> Don't let fear <Speech_Male> stop you <Speech_Male> and live <Speech_Male> a life of inspired <Silence> action <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> until <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next time. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to The Living Room Los <Speech_Music_Female> you show <Speech_Music_Female> with mr. <Speech_Music_Female> Action raw Baptist <Speech_Music_Female> these <Speech_Music_Female> rate review And subscribe.

Whitney Houston Samara Hurley Facebook YouTube Rob Instagram today project.org two one Speech_Female each Flava Samara Baptist
"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"She's just will not back down and that's something that I admire about her down to her level of energy that I just cannot match no matter how much coffee I have. But yeah, I think it's innate. Honestly it maybe goes back to her family history. But the the why I think sometimes is just in her is its energy that is drives her and I personally have seen it but it is hard to explain for sure. Yeah, I I concur thank you. One of the things about you somewhere is that you are a true inspiration. You you definitely live a life of inspired action with everything that you do. Can you walk your talk? You know you claim to be mrs. Action ISTA and you really are in action and you are just such a beautiful soul and you're such an inspiration other people is one of the reasons that I really wanted to have you on the show because I want people to know yes, there's a lot of stuff going on in this world and we all have a story and we all have to get up and work our way through our story and some of us have bigger stories or or more serious stories or more complicated stories than others and Samara. Do you have a story and you haven't let your past dictate your future you and you are one hundred percent with everything that has happened in your life. People would look at yep. They could say, you know, what's tomorrow? It's okay. And then you going to be the victim you're just a victim know you are never a victim you are someone who is a thriver your inspirational your motivational and your transformational. I'm humbled that you've crossed my path. And the reason that I want to get you on the show is because more people need to learn how to live their life and inspired action-packed you are a great example and I want them to know who you are. I want them to follow you and I want them to join in on your campaign of making this world a better place..

tomorrow Samara One one hundred percent one of the reasons things
"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"On clubhouse. That's right. That's what we're doing a baby or recording live in front of a studio audience. We're gonna have some questions and off. I am so excited about my guest today. She is someone who I met right here on Club House in like a week or two ago. We become fast friends and gave me just tell you a little bit better. All right. She's the founder and CEO of action. He still alive. She is an axe Tanisha by 8 nature and acts Tanisha is someone or action-packed is someone who is about Edge on the go and confident in their ability to handle people or situations and she is a true action Taker and she lives a life inspired action Samara. How are you? I am fabulous Rob. Thank you so much for having us here today. I feel like I have to say hi. It's Samara Harley and then if Samara Hurley, I'm done speaking with you can say that, but you're not done speaking cuz I have you for the next few minutes. So let's rock this thing out. So first of all, happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you. Happy birthday, dear Samara. Happy birthday to Paige tomorrow is big birthday. That's right. Tomorrow is my 45th birthday. I'm one of the few people I think that loves aging and I'm all about birthdays. So thank you for joining my birthday. You're welcome. Happy Birthday. I mean, so today's Monday tomorrow is the day the show will be released. So that would be today if you're listening right now if you're not live and it's Samaras birthday, so happy birthday tomorrow. Thank you. This is the best birthday present. You could give me Rob. Well, there you go. All right, you're cold a firecracker because of your energy passion and ability to talk to anyone and you are all about creating a village and you have so many stories to tell just give us the Reader's Digest version of Samara. Okay, that was long enough like a found was a muted if I just like her phone was unmuted. She be laughing right now. She probably laughing said there there is no short version of Samara Hurley Rob. You've made a few weeks. You should know that by now. I know so just give us the short version of someone hurling. Highlight I am all about taking action and creating a village. I create a village for myself and for my kids and for my family because we have moved so frequently due to my husband's career. So it's all about building relationships and maintain those relationships. But one of the things I love about you is you have a background in very thanks so much background in meetings public relations marketing event production destination management public speaking sales fundraising networking social media training blah blah blah blah you list goes on and on and on Iraq and you know, you have really reinvented yourself because as a high level event planner you kind of got really thrown for a loop because of the this pandemic so you had to reinvent yourself. So why don't you share a little bit what you've done since you had to like pivot and turn left or right or go straight or words way overweight you went. That's absolutely right. So we actually have lived in eleven States and we moved to Vancouver British Columbia where we lived for about four and half years. And then in December 2019. I moved the family from Vancouver to Scottsdale, Arizona to live near my parents. So it was all about getting ourselves situated. I was working as a event coordinator for a non-profit organization here in Scottsdale, and I pretty much coordinated the last event of the city and that was on March 6th. My birthday is March 9th and then quarantine hit and we were in an apartment and my husband moved here from Canada at that point and then we just tried to get settled as much as we could with most of our life in a storage pod..

Vancouver Samara Hurley December 2019 Scottsdale March 9th Rob Canada Samara Harley Samaras March 6th Samara Vancouver British Columbia tomorrow Tomorrow today Paige Reader's Digest Tanisha two ago Scottsdale, Arizona
Washington DC forecast: Wet weather lasts through the weekend

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 1 year ago

Washington DC forecast: Wet weather lasts through the weekend

"And now to storm team for meteorologists. Samara Theodore tonight. That rain will start to pick up after midnight. So we're in 1st 2nd round of wet weather, my friends going through the second half of our weekend. Sunday looks just downright wet and cloudy. Now there will be periods of rain, so you may be able to slip in some periodic dry time. But for the most part, we're looking at waves of rain that'll be heavy at times. Chances and fog is well. High. Temperatures on Sunday loaded mid fifties Monday rain to start dry to finish high temperatures on Monday will be in the low to mid fifties. We are also tracking some gusty conditions Monday evening. Tuesday were dry. High temperatures Tuesday will be in the low forties with sunny skies Wednesday, tracking our next chance for rain. If it starts early enough in the morning where temperatures will be low enough. We could see a little bit of snowflakes, mixing it with that rain. But for the most part, it's looking like a rain event on Wednesday, with highs in the low fifties have served him for meteorologists. Amara Theodore 43 in Chantilly, 46. In Colombia. 49 degrees in Penn

Samara Theodore Amara Theodore Chantilly Colombia Penn
Hubie Halloween and 25 Horror Movies Classics

The Big Picture

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Hubie Halloween and 25 Horror Movies Classics

"See. CR. Thank you for being here with me today I appreciate you man, of course, man this is this is our favorite time of year in a Lotta ways. Yeah. I, think last year we had a conversation like this to write maybe around the release of mid Samara about what what's going on with horror movies. What are horror movies? Now the world has gotten certainly more horrifying in the last twelve months. We had a conversation like this, but before we get into you. Know Lists and the Adam Sandler movie. I kinda wanted to take your temperature on where you think this genre is at right now. Well, I don't know that we can say for sure because I'm not sure what her movies were not getting, right? I don't know what movies maybe delayed release that didn't get the festival bump that they needed from south by or or any of the summer festivals that might have happened So it's hard to say but I I would say that. I find my appetite for her pretty much the same as it was any other year. I don't necessarily find as festive outside I. Don't know the for one thing in Los Angeles. It's ninety degree. So doesn't really feel like Halloween but for another I, just you know everybody's inside. So I don't think the decorations of really started to go up yet I. Don't know that I don't really spend a lot of time in the Candy Aisle at my age you know what I mean what do you think? Well, I know you're costume guy. No you'd like to dress up just on any. Oh Wednesday. So this must be strange for you to not be able to dress up as a giant clown and run the streets. Pharaoh that's me. Yeah I I agree I think it's a little bit strange to not feel the Halloween and the Halloween season but I don't necessarily associate horror just with Halloween. It's definitely a twelve month a year John Reform me and it's this month a year. History to Halloween is when we are allowed to watch nothing but her for like a month and not seemed like we should be committed. Yes. I appreciate my wife creating a dispensation for me to be able to watch some of the most vile things imaginable on film. I several consecutive days on quite a run right now catching up on stuff seeing stuff for the first time. A lot of it is very gross or very disturbing and you're right. There's like we psychologically grant ourselves the right to do this at this period, which is pretty pretty weird. Come on honey. It's early. October. Let's watch. Torn to pieces. Yeah anyhow. What about from the from the year so far in terms of the movies that have been released have there been any that you actually liked from the Shawna Yeah I've seen a couple of things on demand that I thought were pretty cool. Some of them were like late nineteen things that finally got released this year I think that you and I. were. Really looking forward to seeing a bunch of stuff in Texas at. South by which was the OH maybe we'll go to Austin rate like right as quarantine was starting to become really apparent as the magnitude of the situation was dawning on us. So I I really don't know if you've seen anything in twenty twenty that you think is like really stellar. You know. I wanted to ask from hosts. Really Right. Y-. Right. So I think that that's I think that's where we should take this conversation which is a couple years ago. I. Did this Horror Oscars Gimmick on the site where I picked my favorite. What I thought was the best horror movie of every year since Nineteen, seventy, nine and I like the idea of continuing to hand out that award every year and so looking at kind of what would be the five contenders from each year but as you say Most of the movies of that are sort of noisy studio movies have been pushed back candyman for example, Nia Costa's remake reimagining of that classic is not coming out now until next year that's a bummer i. a lot of people were looking forward to it. I was looking forward to it. We got a few things. You know we got we got the invisible man we got relic There have been a couple of movies on shudder shudder originals, one of which I'll talk about later in the show. But like blood quantum, which I talked about on the show Z, the Beach House that I think are all worth recommending but I wouldn't say are on the order of. Hereditary or or something like that. You know that we haven't had a movie like that. That feels like it's a little bit of a moment. A little bit of a movement announces a new filmmaker in a loud and noisy way I. Don't know you know. Host is really interesting. I think the last time the show is just you and I talked about we talked about host and it kind of feels like it has has the belt for horror movies in twenty twenty if only by circumstance. Yeah I think you mentioned all those other like invisible man etc I would the lodge in there I would throw the rental and they're like. They were really there is some pretty solid doubles to left, but the host was the one where I was just like a watch it again I'm going to recommend it's all my friends I'm going to try and get people who don't ordinarily watch horror movies to check it out, and especially if we're talking about twenty twenty horror movies, it is a movie that only have been made this year. Do you think that that's a movie that's going to stand the test of time or only resonating with people because we're all looking at screens all day. No I think it will I think it's going to be a good time capsule movie for sure. But I think that there are some things that it does and you talked about this with Alex Ross Perry, which was an amazing conversation. If people haven't checked it out and I, think his some of the stuff he said towards the end of your conversation will influence what we're about to talk about today. But I think that you guys talked a little bit about the technology and the the storytelling that it employs and how it seems to be like a step for like an evolution in what could we do with? The collective psychology of what's going on with people and that's what's awesome about her movies is that I feel like unlike any other genre really taps into how people are feeling at any given time about certain things it has at least that capacity.

Adam Sandler Samara Alex Ross Perry Los Angeles Oscars Texas Nia Costa John Twenty Twenty Beach House
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 2 years ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:04 min | 2 years ago

Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

"One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, we met bill s Preston and Ted Theodore Logan in the movie bill and Ted's excellent adventure they returned in bill and Ted's bogus journey in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one, and now almost thirty years later they're back in bill and Ted's face the music Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves return as well. Bill and Ted respectively, and this time they'll need not just their triumphant man to save the world but also their daughters I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about bill and Ted face the music on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR here with me and Steven from his home studio is plan Weldon of NPR's arts desk. Linda and also with us from his home in Washington DC, we have JC Howard who is a producer of NPR's Ted Radio Hour and how I built this I. J. C.. Good to have you back good to have you back. So if you are all not familiar, there's not a lot setup that you need or these films except to say that Bill and Ted were introduced to us as teenage bro Friends who had a band and just wanted to have a triumphant band when they were older and eventually they got sucked into time travel and picking up different historical figures, and later we're going to try to save the world and there was. A whole story where they were going to ultimately right a great and triumphant song it's it is a surprisingly complex canonical story of which you need to know practically nothing in order to enjoy I think these films Stephen now that I have thoroughly set the table kind of what is your attachment to bill and Ted these movies. If you have one, well, I've seen bill and Ted's excellent adventure. A BUNCH OF TIMES I've seen bill and Ted's bogus journey a couple times. These are movies that have kind of existed on the wind for the last thirty years. I re watched these movies within the last five years I. Think I talked about the. What's making me happy on this show but still kind of needed to go back to be reminded of what happens in them going into this movie I mean this movie is coasting on goodwill. There is a certain amount of fan service going on here. I mean I'm not sure how many people were clamoring to revisit these characters almost thirty years later but at the same time. Something really really smart happens in this movie and you can tell before you even start watching it, and that is that it is ninety three minutes long all three of these movies are about ninety minutes long and I think they understand that that is the perfect lengthier. There is a certain amount of sequel bloat here. The first two movies are incredibly Chintzy. The stakes in the first one are no greater than maybe Ted we'll get sent to military school and you're there's like the entire fabric of space time can be ripped apart. This is a very shaggy movie. I. Think there are stretches where it sags but. I do appreciate the number of updates. You don't have the gay panic stuff that really dragged down the earlier movies are no gay slurs in this movie. This movie bothers to give its female characters a little bit more agency the women who become their wives barely have any part to play in the other movies, and here you get more of that you get their daughters who are given kind of their own subplot. So I appreciate that it's not just rattling around with these two dudes who are now middle aged, but they're taking an interest in people outside of just bill. Yeah and you do get their daughters. The structure of this one is kind of that they go on one journey through time and their daughters meanwhile who are played by Samara weaving and bridget lending pain go off and tried to get a band together for their DADS to play with on this epoch song that's supposed to save the world. So you kind of have the one journey going on the other journey going on then naturally in the third act it all comes together and I did like those two performances from the daughter's there are also some kind of new faces in this one kristen Schall plays Kelly who is The daughter of Rufus who was the George Carlin character in the original JC it feels to me like you are too young to have a moustache attachment to these movies but I have been assured that that is not the case because television. Yeah. That's exactly right. I was actually super excited to hear this movie was happening and I'm going to show my age a little bit and say that I was born pretty close to the release of the First Bill and Ted Movie of Bill and Ted's excellent adventure. So my first encounter with these guys was as as they say a most impressionable youth. And I was one of what I can only assume are millions of kids who watch bill and Ted's excellent adventure every time it ran on cable TV. The thing about the first movie is the problem that they needed to solve was very simple. Billon Tade just needed a good grade right granted the solution to that problem was a little larger than life and included doctor who like time travel home box and all but the problem itself was simple. The second movie bogus journey was certainly a little nuttier. It had killer robots and aliens and the grim reaper. Didn't feel like it hit quite the right notes for me. No Pun intended. So win a third film was confirmed. The main question I had was like, what are they going to do? Are they going to try to recreate the success of the original and go back to simple run of the mill time travel Orlean into the bizarre and crazy and from just the trailer? It was clear that they weren't going to just lean into the bizarre, but they were diving in head first. But I think what separated this one from the nineteen ninety one sequel is that it has a lot more heart. The original movie was really about the friendship of bill and Ted and saving that they didn't seem to care as much about saving the future as much as they wanted to just make sure that bill and Ted could still just be friends. So it had this kind of surprisingly earnest quality and I think that was what was missing in the second film in this third one for all of its bizarreness in all of its doubling down on death in heaven and hell, and all these kinds of weird things. It really reignites the idea that there are friendships and. Relationships here that are worth saving. Yeah I think you're absolutely right that they go back to the relationship between those two guys being the center of the story and I. Think it's really funny. One of the things that I think is featured in some of the the trailer stuff but they are both married they both have you know lovely wives that you have met before since they got them from the past and they have relationships with their wives that are completely enmeshed with their relationship with each other. So they can't conceive of having individual marriages that aren't some. Like a four person marriage I thought that stuff was sort of funny because I think one of the things that carries over like if you're going to take these guys in age them thirty years you have to either assume that at some point they became more normal, which is a weird thing to assume about bill and Ted. Or you have to assume that they are still very bill and Ted, which would mean that they are still kind of very fixated on this idea that they are a duo and they are always together and they are each other's right hand Glenn you had indicated on twitter that. You perhaps did not have the same nostalgia for these characters that perhaps I have and others may have what is your take care? All right. The ticker about to hear from me Linda Holmes is going to be a subjective it's rigorous. It's clear eyed it is on demand by the gauzy scream nostalgia because unlike all y'all I never saw these movies until this week just to prepare for the show and I didn't see him for very simple reason I didn't have to I. Mean I was a junior in college nineteen, eighty, nine I was studying marine biology. I was dating a string of profoundly unfulfilled women and. Being. On a college campus and eighty nine and not here boobs heinous strange things are afoot at the circle k just over and over and over. So I felt like I got it. And think about the time late eighties early nineties mainstream. American. Comedy was kind of stuck in this catchphrase based mode and I was like, okay. I don't need to see this while I've seen them all now and I'm here to tell you. Sure I guess that's your thing. I like the Guy Listeners of the leads I. think that's the appeal here but left only once an excellent adventure. It's a visual gag that gets tossed off. It's a Freud at a mall holding a corn dog and it's like, okay, fine. You got me I mean it's low hanging fruit, but you got. And in face the music this new film shore on Paper Samara, Weaving Kristen Schaal Holland freaking Taylor they are gunning for me they are coming. But ultimately didn't stick. It's not supposed to. That's not what it's for. It just evaporates on contact with the eyeballs and maybe that's exactly what the world needs. Right now is dumb sweep dumb but I

TED Bill S Preston Ted Movie Ted Theodore Logan Linda Holmes NPR Stephen Thompson Washington Alex Winter Jc Howard Keanu Reeves Kristen Schaal Holland Producer Kristen Schall Samara Weldon Billon Tade Steven Orlean
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"NBC for Samara, Theodore, now wrapping up the first half of our weekend. What we need to know is things stayed pretty quiet today, and they will Main drive for a lot of us. There is a small chance that an isolated showers storm could pop south and east of D. C, but I think a lot of a state dry temperatures tonight in the low seventy's please. No patchy fog is going become an issue overnight. Some of that patchy fog could be on the dense side, and it'll linger into Sunday morning High temperature Sunday Upper eighties partly sunny Ah lot of clouds again tomorrow. Maybe a few more breaks of sunshine Monday. Looks like we're gonna see a lot of sunshine, mostly sunny on Monday, with highs on Monday in the low nineties. Monday's rain chances are very small. I think we stay dry. But there's a very small chance we could see an isolated shower storm Tuesday that chance starts to creep up a bit highs in the low nineties. Otherwise mostly sunny and then Wednesday some showers and storms likely as we prepare for our next frontal system. I'm starting four meteorologist Samara Theodore tomorrow. Thank you checking the temperatures around the region 78 degrees right now. In Silver Spring, Maryland, it's 74 Dale City, Virginia and 76 degrees outside our studios and friendship pipes. At 11 30 Thiss is w t o p Your source for today's top news, traffic and weather always connected. And constantly updated in your car at home at work and told to go. W T O P never visible moment and good Saturday evening. I'm Del Walters, Laura's Patani AC Is that the editor's desk coming up Freedom of expression lighting with potential super spreaders. As motorcycle enthusiasts gather in.

Samara Theodore Samara NBC Del Walters Maryland editor Dale City Virginia Laura
Dangerous heat, humidity Monday in Washington DC region with heat index values near 105 degrees

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Dangerous heat, humidity Monday in Washington DC region with heat index values near 105 degrees

"As as we we head head through through the the overnight overnight hours, hours, not not budging, budging, much much with with temperatures temperatures down down to to the the low low eighties eighties and and upper upper seventies seventies overnight, but quiet tomorrow for your Monday two things to know we have a heat advisory in effect again from noon to eight PM, with heat and next values reaching up to 105 degrees. As we head through the afternoon and excessive heat Watch will also go into effect as we could see index values reaching 110 to 115 degrees for your Monday throughout parts of the region. I'm storm Team four. Meteorologist Samara Theodore.

Samara Theodore
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Samara. Theodore Samara. 17 days. Can we go for 18? Who is going to be hard? You know, we're supposed to make it to 18 tomorrow, but it will be by the skin of our teeth. We've got 89 degrees, possibly coming in for your Monday. So we'll see. We'll see if we can hit that 90 tomorrow. But for now, we've actually got a thunderstorm that's bubbled up, and that's down. Ah, farther South and Culpepper County in Orange County, and it's getting ready to head into Southern Faulk here, arriving in bleak at a 36 PM and Summerville at 8 44 So, ah, that storm's got with it, even though it's not classified as severe. It still has 30 to 40 mile per hour wind gusts as well as pea sized hail and some very heavy rain getting ready to cross over 17. In Morris fill in southern Faulk here, so that'll continuous track. It's got some lightning with it as well. Some lighter stuff falling in Woodbridge. Let's see on other than that north of Winchester. Heavy shower spotted there. So as we head through the evening, an isolated shower at this point or storm can't be ruled out through tonight. Tomorrow high temperatures near 90 We'll see what we can do chance for some isolated activity storms tomorrow afternoon. Tuesday and Wednesday, both in the low nineties with lower humidity, dry conditions and mostly sunny skies Thursday, chance for showers and storms with highs on Thursday in the low nineties, right now in D, C 83 degrees 74 in Manassas and 77 Leesburg, and what type of bubble was that again? It was like something. Something bubble down south. I thought I've never heard of that before. Oh, I'm sorry. I was at a storm bubbled up Downs, Okay? Sure bubbled up. Okay. I'm sorry. I was just wondering talking about OK, 77 degrees outside our studios in French your pipes brought to you by new Look home design. Find out why 30,000 homeowners have chosen new look to do their roof. It's a 22 Doctors say they are expecting a rise in cases of Children diagnosed with type one diabetes. That, too, is related to Corona virus. The risk of getting type one diabetes is genetic in the past. We know that different viruses can trigger this autoimmune attack with the Children's National diabetes program. Doctor Fran Kogan. I anticipate just like I do with pandemics of flu that Cove ID will also precipitate new onset diabetes, but we don't know That yet after being exposed to viruses, it could take a while for people to develop the antibodies that attack the pancreas that makes insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. I would not be surprised that in the next six months to a year we see a lot more patients do to co bit. Christy came w T o P news time Nick in Delhi Holding a virtual press conference, A group of Republican state lawmakers in Virginia said Governor Ralph Northam administration should prioritize in person education and develop a plan to get school buildings open five days. A week delegate Kirk Cox. We need to be creative. We need to be flexible, instead got confusing, false and I want this administration, he said During a special legislative session next month..

Faulk Kirk Cox diabetes Governor Ralph Northam Samara. Theodore Samara. Culpepper County Fran Kogan Woodbridge Winchester Christy Summerville Virginia Morris Nick Orange County
Tropical Storm Heading to Mid Atlantic With Rain in Washington DC area

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Tropical Storm Heading to Mid Atlantic With Rain in Washington DC area

"Again, Samara Theodore Overnight lows falling into loan mid seventies We have human condition tonight with rain chances increasing overnight as we track a tropical storm. This was recently named Tropical Storm Fay brewing off the coast of the outer banks making its way to the mid Atlantic tonight and then possibly for the Hudson Valley. Beyond. We are talking a flash flood watch in effect at midnight until tomorrow afternoon. For those who are headed out to the eastern shore in Delmarva Peninsula, so longer Coastline going Ocean City Beach. Just keep that in mind that rain could reach anywhere from 1 to 3 inches by tomorrow afternoon Highs will be in the mid to upper eighties for a lot of us. Your Friday in the DC metro area. Rain chances substantially drop off throughout the day. Looks like most of the rain stays well. East Saturday and Sunday, Low nineties. Both days bring chances for showers and storms with the higher chance on Saturday. I'm starting for meteorologists Tamara Theodore 90 in Bui Lee's Birgit 87. We've got 88 northwest DC 6 51 Now on double D T o P.

Samara Theodore Tamara Theodore Ocean City Beach Hudson Valley Delmarva Peninsula Bui Lee
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Four four day forecast with Samara Theodore Hey friends today it's been a pretty tricky forecast we managed to make it to the seventies though in the DC metro area and farther south they did hit the eighties as we had in the overnight hours I think things are gonna stay pretty calm now we the front is passing and there's still a chance as the front passes over the next couple hours that we could see something bubble up maybe a shower an isolated thunderstorm but I think that chance really dropping as we had past sunset here now tomorrow temperatures are going to drive themselves up into the upper sixties near seventy mostly sunny day gusty in the afternoon Tuesday Mar it's a cloudy chance for some rain and then I think a greater chance for rain for your Wednesday with highs on Wednesday only in the upper forties pretty raw and cold and cloudy by Thursday back to the low sixties with sunny skies sixty six right now the district sixty four in Silver Spring and sixty six in Leesburg brought to you by Len the plumber trusted same day service seven days a week it's seven twenty now the latest developments on the corona virus outbreak in the DMV as the virus continues to spread the White House has extended the federal social distancing guidance through April thirtieth Maryland has announced five new deaths related to a corona virus number of pope at nineteen related deaths in the state now fifteen Arlington county is reporting its first two deaths related to corona virus a seventy two year old and a six year old both with underlying medical conditions and Howard County also reporting its first two deaths again both patients had underlying health conditions there are now close to twenty five hundred cases of coronavirus in Maryland Virginia and the district Maryland has more than half of those Virginia has eight hundred ninety cases there are three hundred forty two cases reported in the district as blood supplies become dire because of blood drive cancellations during the corona virus outbreak X. county's fire departments are partnering with inova blood donor services to more blood drives coming up for you to help out tomorrow at the end of all into your fire station from one to seven PM and then on Tuesday at Centerville volunteer fire department from three PM until seven PM young boy in Virginia has come up with a unique plan to help local medical workers who because of the pandemic running out of supplies when he was three years old SO habit bag of Ashburn Virginia had to be taken to inova Fairfax hospital for a medical problem well now he's seven and he wants to give back so is asked hotels in the area for items that could be used for medical supplies his mother is my bag we've called area hotels and we went around and they had a lot of shower caps and some also had caused a lot of face mask they had for house keeping them together two thousand shower caps three thousand gloves and nine hundred masks to be donated to the inova Fairfax hospital ER where they can be used as personal protective equipment neckline Elie WTOP news due to social distancing restrictions many businesses have had to shift their business models to delivery or curbside pickup for one Maryland winery staffing help us come in the form of a dedicated delivery dog with Laurie yada the co owner of Hagerstown Stonehouse urban winery learn that our business would be limited to carry out she decided to enlist soda pop hits her eleven year old brindle boxer.

Samara Theodore
Food And Beverage Industry Hit Hard By Coronavirus Outbreak

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:45 min | 2 years ago

Food And Beverage Industry Hit Hard By Coronavirus Outbreak

"It is a hugely uncertain time for those in the service industry restaurants and bars have been closing their doors and that has meant so many people have already lost their jobs. We bring you now. The stories of three people trying to figure out what happens next. My name is Simone Barron and I work in the service industry I have for thirty four years and I currently live in Seattle Washington. I was working for Tom. Douglas Restaurants Tom Decided to close all of his restaurants Laying off eight hundred people. It's pretty devastating. Everybody's really unsure how they're going to pay their rent pay their mortgages see their children their families. We all know that if we don't get that next paycheck that a lot of us are going to be in some trouble and then that's the other thing that we're all worried about is if we will have jobs to go back to so. We're all really panicked right now. Yeah My name is Daryl noon and I am a partner in a wine store and bar in Manhattan. We have a shopping meals. Have a bar. And we're in a an open market place so the sales of the bar dropped pretty drastically but people were buying wine in a way. That was like pretty panic. Inducing like cleaning out our shelves so quickly quickly after that everything had to shut down except for our retail store. But that nobody was going to be allowed to come down so we were only allowed to do deliveries which we had never done before people are like calling in Queens and being like. Hey Can you come to Bayside? And should we go to bayside and drop off a bottle of wine to someone? It's it's a fascinating new reality. My name is Samara Sariano. I am a food server in San Francisco California. The last couple of weeks have been extremely stressful and pretty scary. A lot of people stopped coming out. Normally I worked six shifts a week and last week. I was scheduled three shifts a week. I basically used the money to pay off bills for this month and to buy what groceries I could and I really don't have even one hundred dollars to my name now And I'm really not sure what I'm going to be doing for rent or bills next month. I've already implied for unemployment insurance. But I know that will take weeks to come through and it was still probably won't be sufficient to support me. San Francisco's so expensive and my rent is a great worry to me right now. It's a difficult time for so many people what can be done. We're going to put that question to Sean Kennedy. He's an executive vice president. At the National Restaurant Association that organization represents more than half a million restaurant businesses and they sent a letter to the White House and Congressional leaders yesterday asking for critical help. Thanks so much for being with us on good morning. What Kinda help are you looking for? They're really three buckets that The restaurant industries looking at right now one is just immediate access to cash second is medium and long-term access to credit and then tax relief for the industry when we come back on line. This is really the perfect storm for the restaurant industry. This is not like a natural disaster. That's located in one particular area. The passes quickly and we focused on rebuilding. There's a nationwide problem in which States and localities are just shutting down restaurant operations across the nation without a lot of warning and with tremendous impact in our. It's certainly early days but I mean given what we're seeing. Do you have any estimate as to how many people in the industry could ultimately end up employed? That's a great question right now. What a lot of restaurants are doing is trying to retool trying to allow for more takeout drive through delivery services For a lot of restaurants they just physically aren't able to consider themselves that way for other restaurants they're looking at whether or not switching to that business model is going to generate enough revenue to keep the doors open and the burners turned on so my sister happens to work in the restaurant industry. It was talking to her yesterday and she was just heartbroken. Because this is work as you know people who work in the Industry. They socialize with their co workers. They become sort of your extended family. Her entire community her entire network has been affected by. We heard from some employees Just a couple of minutes ago. Who are deeply concerned about their own future. What is your message to them right now. It is heartbreaking and a lot of our restaurant owners view their employees as family Almost all they do is saying but it's one in which we are really struggling with the best approach we can take. That's where it'd be making such an aggressive ask of Congress right now. This is a national pandemic. It's a public emergency. So we need the public government to step in and provide this funding so that our goal right now is really just to keep these employees on payroll allow them to continue to work for us even if we're not operational even if we're in hibernation so to speak so that as soon as we get the all clear signal from public health officials we can pivot. We can open up those doors and we can bring everyone back online as quickly and immediately as possible new knotted to this earlier. But are they going to be restaurants? That just can't survive because they can't make it on takeout alone. We're really trying to avoid that. But it what is challenging right? Now as we don't know a natural disaster has a beginning a middle and an end we were in the beginning of this right now and we cannot forecast how long we're going to be in this position. Or when are we allowed to open Restaurants generally measure their cash flow and available credit in days weeks. Probably not months so as it becomes a sustained problem. The restaurants are going to have to really tough decisions to make which is why we need Congress to act quickly. We've heard these calls to the public to buy a gift certificate to their favorite neighborhood restaurant as a show of support. Is that something you think is a good idea right now? We we absolutely support that. Obviously we are focused right now on serving our community. These are difficult times for everybody and usually if it's a snow day if it's a natural disaster folks are going to the restaurants. We don't want to change that at all. We want to continue to be the center piece of the cornerstone. These communities Sean Kennedy with the Natch National Restaurant Association. We appreciate

National Restaurant Associatio San Francisco Sean Kennedy TOM Congress Bayside Simone Barron Seattle Samara Sariano Executive Vice President Queens Partner Manhattan California Washington
"samara" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

10:02 min | 2 years ago

"samara" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"One. Yeah this was an interview. We got to do While we were out in. La Is the first time yeah visited the La Studios and it was really nice. It was you got to bond with the dog. Journey took a long time. I stepped on her. She was mad at me and I had to gain her trust by pretending like I didn't want her to Thing it was I got to see it all play out. On Valentine's Day it almost broke my heart Samantha. Literally before he walked in had said she needed to find the dog to pet. Because we were in we were in. La For several days. So you're away for ages and you were feeling the earn needed. I needed to touch a dog if you did. I said so Our friends over in the La Studio has an office dog. Sophie has dog there Anderson Andy Who is an adorable adorable dog? Also the name confusion that was there. Any was a little confusing but yes We got to sit in. Take a tour of their beautiful with too nice showers in their office by. Yeah yes day. They got a waterfall shower. Y'All yes it was intense as well as a nice little balcony. It's not little nice balcony. It was pretty decent size. Yeah Yeah it was nice as well as the fact that we got to hang with our sister network Samara Bay is starting her podcast with. Us called permission to speak which is very exciting. She's doing some amazing things. She is a dialect coach. Yeah Yeah work on like avengers. Endgame Wonder Woman Eighty four all kinds of things and now she is also working with women running for office as we've spoken about on the show. There is no shortage of Critiques AROUND WOMEN'S VOICES. Right right and it is really interesting. What she's doing in her podcast. Which as you as you listen to this I believe will have dropped four a medium that is about speaking and listening. Right there really. Isn't that much out there on that topic especially for women other than being told. You're annoying honestly I. I didn't think this was going to happen. But I did have a tiny little fear in the back of my brain that we were going to get there and she was gonna be like so listen to your show. I definitely had the moment of like she's going to be. These are the reasons why people think you're annoying and these are the things that you need to work on. And she absolutely was a delight Actually really reaffirming. Yes about just finding the things about you. That are authentic about you not picking apart but building up. She helped us before our panel. We added fat all ask. You did the last thing she said to us was don't apologize. The first thing I did was apologize man. I was like Oh. I'm sorry I did think I worry about auto. Yeah but it went. Okay I did. It takes a while to learn. It wasn't it was The way you spoke. You're apologizing on the apologizing right rate of apology for women. Which is what she speaks about it. Because you didn't say you're sorry doesn't mean you're not apologizing so a great another piece of advice rate and The panel you're speaking on was about getting angry and for women. What does that look like? And why do a lot of US including me struggle with it and it was great because she also gave me this wonderful piece of understanding of clarity that I haven't seen a lot of healthy examples of angry women in my life modeled in my specific life especially when I was younger and just normalizing that and seeing more and more of that because then I don't know how to express it very well I go from zero to fifty And that's because I don't. There's no examples from me so that was another wonderful. Got as well as podcast voice. Which is something that? I struggled with before I before I started in when I first started where I thought I had sound a certain way that would be the most likeable version of me but everybody hated that version right because they can tell right. I wasn't being mean. They did not like that which has been done with women. If you're not authentic get out and even if you are some time changing And this was the great conversation that we got to have with Samara. And we're very excited to share it with you so I guess we'll let past us and pass Tamara. Take it away. We have with us a very very special friend. Samara introduce yourself for us. My name is Samara Bay. I am based in. La And I am a dialect coach for TV and film and also sort of a speech communication coach for politicians for entrepreneurs for anybody. I like to say for anybody who's interested in using the voice to get what they want. How long have you been doing this work? I got an MFA a masters in acting in. Oh six and I was like dead. Set on being a shakespearean actress like regionally. Not even like I wasn't. I mean maybe like New York Shakespeare in the park would have been great but I was like. I'm going to make no money and make art and like never have a family and never I was like I really like romanticize the nomadic existence and like honestly to all the nerds out there listening like having Shakespeare background has had a massive impact on everything else. I've done with my life but starting a no six when I got out and then moved to New York and was trying to make the acting thing happened. I had already picked up some mentors in this dialect world. It's pretty small. There's like twenty of us. Total on both coasts. A few. There's somebody Atlanta. There's somebody in Chicago for the most part that's hit it's like less than two dozen and a lot of us actually have the same agent to represent us for TV and film stuff so like sort of how the work happens and there was obviously a process over many years both in New York and hear of me being like that's a cool side hustle. But like I'm an actress thing and then over time I was like wow. I have a more fun. Actually doing this and supporting actors and kind of allowing myself to be kind of an anthropologist. Sociologist like just thinking about the ways. Humans communicate rather than you know endlessly trying to fit some type that I was never gonNA fit. It was like a a many year progression but really I've been dialect coaching now for almost fifteen years. And how do you get into something like that? I was reading some of the dialects. You've coached before like how do you even do that? I mean it is a bit nerdy. It's quite fun because when you're actually coaching somebody is very visceral. And you're in the space with another artsy person and it's still silly and embodied and kind of just creative but there is an initial step which is not uncreative but it is a little heavier. Where like if I'm being working on right now is a nineteen fifties North Carolina African American vernacular for a couple who are like farm house but aspirated educated. That is a specific story in quote. We are telling with that accent and then for me. It's like I can either just like do a search on Youtube for like North Carolina the end or I can really try to find somebody. Hopefully somebody from an earlier era. There's all kinds of youtube is kind of a time capsule if you think of it that way and I found this one guy who really fits the bill and is now in his eighties or whatever nineties but would have been the right age at the time and he did the speech. That of course made it onto youtube because the Internet and it's beautiful. He's from the right place. He has the right spirit of the character and I break down. The sounds using the international phonetic alphabet. I know it's called and it does not the same as the beer. But the international phonetic alphabet very simply is a symbol for every sound so instead of the letters. Which if you have the letter A. in a word you don't know it literally can be like Apple. Aw like father all like Awol Hukou on a or a like about five. Sounds with the letter. A now international phonetic alphabet. We've five different symbols. Which by the way up top when people take linguistics classes or take speech classes. That's a hard thing to learn like especially if you're an artsy type. You're like now looks like math literally and things like that but the initial I mean I can only say that because if anybody hears ever like experience that the initial hurdle sucks but on the other side of it. It's like a secret code to decode everybody's accent and it works. Do you see that when you talk to people or you're trying to get is you're talking. You're like I mean I would like to think I'm kind of kinder than that and I what I've discovered about. How my brain works? I can kind of either focus on content or focus on sound. So if I'm actually having a real conversation with people I am not just being. Yeah I can tell you as somebody says you know to diagnose me I'll start to listen a little bit about. Yeah I got nervous. I was like Oh we're going to have to take it but I'm.

La Samara Bay La Studios New York Youtube Samara North Carolina Samantha Sophie Andy Who Chicago Apple Tamara Atlanta
1,400 Seattle students without updated vaccinations could be banned from class: report

News, Traffic and Weather

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

1,400 Seattle students without updated vaccinations could be banned from class: report

"Some students in Seattle public schools will be banned from going to class tomorrow come jeffco July explains why last year lawmakers eliminated the personal and philosophical exemptions from required vaccines this was after an outbreak of measles in the unvaccinated population in Clark County but starting on Wednesday unvaccinated students without a legal exemption will not be allowed in S. P. S. classrooms we don't hear anything from the family's gold the kid will come into school you will have a more even a nice welcoming place and tell their parents can come and get them the director of health services Samara hoax says they are flexible and if the family could prove they have a vaccination appointment in the next week or so the student will be

Clark County Seattle Director Of Health Services Samara
Dwayne Johnson Sings & Drinks Tequila on 'Colbert'

Nick Digilio

03:19 min | 4 years ago

Dwayne Johnson Sings & Drinks Tequila on 'Colbert'

"Santa claus knows yeah so colbert man let me just say can i say this real quick one of the guests the only guest last night or i say yesterday morning from the night before because i watch him the next day was that was the rock was was was dwayne johnson and i want to say i want to say this was without question and i think dwayne johnson's a very charming guy and he's good talk show host and he has fun stories that was without question he did two segments to full segments with him was the best talk show appearance he's ever made really yeah and colbert i mean when into wrestling history they talked about his grandfather father he sang samoan song it was the drank they drank whiskey together are tequila are they drank tequila together they had an eyebrow contest because you know stephen colbert has that eyebrow thing to he does the eyebrow thing so they had like they get a shot together with the eyebrows they and they did their it was fantastic and it was a really entertaining and and colbert asked really great questions they didn't even talk about skyscraper at one point at one point it's like okay so the new movie the new movie a skyscraper and the rot grabs the blue car all the guys have the blue cards the rat black grabs bluecardiganed any throws the cardio's the hell with the movie let's have another drink and so he pulls the bottle out and he's like yeah let's show the clip so they show the clip and then they come back and they said goodbye he didn't even talk about the movie and it was still an extraordinarily entertaining interview so based upon what you said it seems like campbell's the real sorry that movie yeah well neve campbell was on the night before and colbert was asking her and they showed a clip and she's like flipping guys and stabbing guys with scissors and knocking i was like look at neve campbell kicking samaras and then colbert asked her you know who kicks more ass the rocker you she's like me so that's enough for me to want to see this movie so although eric texted me he saw it and he he texted me and he was like i it's ridiculous well really like you can't tell from the commercials that the movies ridiculous i'm going to see it in that loudest biggest screen possible so the dumbness is even more you know that shakespeare's the right movie to see yeah all right so here we go these google searches which phrases each state searched for oregon montana pennsylvania and connecticut search for air conditioner i probably would do that too you know my ex wife lives in oregon she lives in medford oregon and we text back and forth every once in a while we're still on friendly terms and she constantly telling me because i always tell her you know what the weather is like here and she's like yeah it's one hundred and three right now it's always like ninety degrees there the hell can you live there isn't that farther north it's almost california she's she's right near the border of california washington idaho wyoming and colorado all they were searching campsites that makes sense maryland amusement parks oh that we didn't talk i talk about that going to great american stuff that i used to do that a lot when i was a kid ask alaska in vermont bike rentals all right louisiana they.

Colbert Ninety Degrees
Macedonia naming dispute: 4,000 protesters in Greece's Thessaloniki march with banners calling politicians 'traitors'

Latino USA

01:57 min | 4 years ago

Macedonia naming dispute: 4,000 protesters in Greece's Thessaloniki march with banners calling politicians 'traitors'

"The eu funds to be cut to those governments that won't take in more asylum seekers he also wants to change eu rules that require migrants to stay in their countries of first arrival which often means italy in greece after the meeting tweeted that he felt things were moving in the right direction german chancellor angela merkel says the meeting created a lot of goodwill but that for now it's not going to be possible to get a european solution she recommends agreements in smaller groups of two or three countries miracles coalition partners are threatening to bring down the government if she doesn't find a way to reduce germany's burden from silom seekers for npr news i'm teri schultz in brussels egypt has extended its state of emergency for another three months president abdel fattah el sisi expects it to be approved by parliament within seven days and go into effect by mid july egypt has been under a state of emergency since april of last year this is npr news thousands of people demonstrated in greece's second largest city against a deal with macedonia that seeks to end nearly twenty seven years of disagreement between the two countries over macedonia's name protesters threw bottles and chairs and police responded with tear gas and stunned grenades nationalists in both countries oppose the deal that would rename greece's neighbor north macedonia and allow the greek province of macedonia to still use that name at the world cup in russia england has progressed into the next stage of the tournament after defeating panama but npr's alina seljuk reports panama fans still had something to celebrate panama lost to england six to one but this was a historic moment for team panama it's scored its very first world cup goal as a result of this match both england and belgium qualify for the knockout round of sixteen panama will blade tunisia next though neither team will move onto the next phase separately japan and senegal ended their match in times or airing two goals each lots of fans from both countries attended the game also in the stands was japanese princess who's the first member of japan's royal family to visit russia in more than one hundred years alina sell you npr news samara russia golfer bubba watson overcame a six stroke deficit to win his third travelers championship title on sunday watson closed with a seven hundred sixty three for seventeen under total and a threeshot win watson became the first three time winner on the pga tour the season polling within one of billy casper's tournament record of four victories i'm jim hallmark npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include carnegie corporation of new york supporting innovations in education democratic engagement and the advancement of international peace and security more information is available online at carnegie dot org and the corporation.

Billy Casper Carnegie Dot Washington Senegal Belgium Panama Alina Seljuk President Trump Brussels Germany Chancellor Italy EU New York Carnegie Corporation NPR Greece Bubba Watson Russia Japan
India hits back at US, hikes import duty on 29 products

BBC World Service

03:47 min | 4 years ago

India hits back at US, hikes import duty on 29 products

"Gration a priority of its presidency of the eu which begins in july here's catcher in country after country across the european union we've seen the rise in popularity of tough on migration politicians and parties take italy for example the new government has has absolutely no more mass immigration the migrant issue has the potential to rip the european union apart as each government simply looks after itself there's growing agreement over the idea of processing centres outside the european union trying at least to keep economic migrants out and only allowing in those migrants who have a legal right to stay the us house of representatives vote today on a series of reforms to the immigration system the bills would cut legal migration and address wider issues around family separation so votes come after president trump ended the most controversial part of the administration's immigration policy children will now be allowed to stay with their parents but whole families will be detained if they've entered the country illegally tony martinez the mayor of brownsville in texas says no one knows how long it'll take to reunite children already separated from their parents it's gonna be a herculean task if you will because it's going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly know where these children were separated from the families and where those parents are president trump has said that north korea had already returned the remains of two hundred us troops missing from the korean war there is no confirmation this has happened mr trump told supporters on wednesday evening at a rally in the state of minnesota that the remains have been sent back that day the north korean leader kim jong un pledged to return some american soldiers remains after meeting donald trump in singapore india has become the latest country to increase import duties on some american agricultural goods in retaliation against us tariffs on steel and aluminium around thirty products are affected duties have also been raised on some grades of iron and steel products from delhi davina gupta has the details and they didn't government has decided to raise the import tariff saw on major agricultural produce at almonds walnuts apples even american trip in some cases the tariff has gone up as high as ninety percent and it begins from twenty percent which will have a big bill to the us pharma's amelie because most of these products are imported from the us india is a big market for these farmers news from the bbc former employees of one of the world's biggest foreign aid agencies the medical charity met samsung on frontier have told the bbc that some of its staff used local prostitutes while working in africa the female whistle blower said the behavior among logistical staff was widespread the allegations were not made against doctors or nurses the charity says it does not tolerate abuse harris mental exploitation but needs more information to investigate the claims east african heads of state to meet on thursday in ethiopia to try to get peace talks for south sudan back contract more than four years after civil war broke out it comes a day onto the two men at the heart of the war president salva care and the rebel leader react mischa net for the first time in two years if he appears prime minister abby arcnord broker that session in addis ababa the prime minister of new zealand just cinder our dern has had a baby girl she was admitted to hospital in auckland early on thursday her deputy winston peters is now acting prime minister will run the country for the next six weeks while miss done takes maternity leave she's the first world leader to do so correspondent howard griffith says ms ogden and her partner clark david twentyfirstcentury couple everything about it is very modern even the way it was announced was actually announced two new zealand and the world on social media with a post on instagram photo of very proud looking mother died and young little baby with the message welcome to our village three more matches to be played in the football world cup in russia today denmark take on australia in samara in the south west of the country before franz play peru catcher in the evening game features argentina and croatia the argentine captain leeann are messy will be hoping to put behind him the missed penalty in the team's opening match that's the latest bbc news news you're listening to the inquiry on the bbc world service with me helen grady each week we bring you four expert.

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