29 Burst results for "Samara"

Hubie Halloween and 25 Horror Movies Classics

The Big Picture

05:29 min | Last month

Hubie Halloween and 25 Horror Movies Classics

"See. CR. Thank you for being here with me today I appreciate you man, of course, man this is this is our favorite time of year in a Lotta ways. Yeah. I, think last year we had a conversation like this to write maybe around the release of mid Samara about what what's going on with horror movies. What are horror movies? Now the world has gotten certainly more horrifying in the last twelve months. We had a conversation like this, but before we get into you. Know Lists and the Adam Sandler movie. I kinda wanted to take your temperature on where you think this genre is at right now. Well, I don't know that we can say for sure because I'm not sure what her movies were not getting, right? I don't know what movies maybe delayed release that didn't get the festival bump that they needed from south by or or any of the summer festivals that might have happened So it's hard to say but I I would say that. I find my appetite for her pretty much the same as it was any other year. I don't necessarily find as festive outside I. Don't know the for one thing in Los Angeles. It's ninety degree. So doesn't really feel like Halloween but for another I, just you know everybody's inside. So I don't think the decorations of really started to go up yet I. Don't know that I don't really spend a lot of time in the Candy Aisle at my age you know what I mean what do you think? Well, I know you're costume guy. No you'd like to dress up just on any. Oh Wednesday. So this must be strange for you to not be able to dress up as a giant clown and run the streets. Pharaoh that's me. Yeah I I agree I think it's a little bit strange to not feel the Halloween and the Halloween season but I don't necessarily associate horror just with Halloween. It's definitely a twelve month a year John Reform me and it's this month a year. History to Halloween is when we are allowed to watch nothing but her for like a month and not seemed like we should be committed. Yes. I appreciate my wife creating a dispensation for me to be able to watch some of the most vile things imaginable on film. I several consecutive days on quite a run right now catching up on stuff seeing stuff for the first time. A lot of it is very gross or very disturbing and you're right. There's like we psychologically grant ourselves the right to do this at this period, which is pretty pretty weird. Come on honey. It's early. October. Let's watch. Torn to pieces. Yeah anyhow. What about from the from the year so far in terms of the movies that have been released have there been any that you actually liked from the Shawna Yeah I've seen a couple of things on demand that I thought were pretty cool. Some of them were like late nineteen things that finally got released this year I think that you and I. were. Really looking forward to seeing a bunch of stuff in Texas at. South by which was the OH maybe we'll go to Austin rate like right as quarantine was starting to become really apparent as the magnitude of the situation was dawning on us. So I I really don't know if you've seen anything in twenty twenty that you think is like really stellar. You know. I wanted to ask from hosts. Really Right. Y-. Right. So I think that that's I think that's where we should take this conversation which is a couple years ago. I. Did this Horror Oscars Gimmick on the site where I picked my favorite. What I thought was the best horror movie of every year since Nineteen, seventy, nine and I like the idea of continuing to hand out that award every year and so looking at kind of what would be the five contenders from each year but as you say Most of the movies of that are sort of noisy studio movies have been pushed back candyman for example, Nia Costa's remake reimagining of that classic is not coming out now until next year that's a bummer i. a lot of people were looking forward to it. I was looking forward to it. We got a few things. You know we got we got the invisible man we got relic There have been a couple of movies on shudder shudder originals, one of which I'll talk about later in the show. But like blood quantum, which I talked about on the show Z, the Beach House that I think are all worth recommending but I wouldn't say are on the order of. Hereditary or or something like that. You know that we haven't had a movie like that. That feels like it's a little bit of a moment. A little bit of a movement announces a new filmmaker in a loud and noisy way I. Don't know you know. Host is really interesting. I think the last time the show is just you and I talked about we talked about host and it kind of feels like it has has the belt for horror movies in twenty twenty if only by circumstance. Yeah I think you mentioned all those other like invisible man etc I would the lodge in there I would throw the rental and they're like. They were really there is some pretty solid doubles to left, but the host was the one where I was just like a watch it again I'm going to recommend it's all my friends I'm going to try and get people who don't ordinarily watch horror movies to check it out, and especially if we're talking about twenty twenty horror movies, it is a movie that only have been made this year. Do you think that that's a movie that's going to stand the test of time or only resonating with people because we're all looking at screens all day. No I think it will I think it's going to be a good time capsule movie for sure. But I think that there are some things that it does and you talked about this with Alex Ross Perry, which was an amazing conversation. If people haven't checked it out and I, think his some of the stuff he said towards the end of your conversation will influence what we're about to talk about today. But I think that you guys talked a little bit about the technology and the the storytelling that it employs and how it seems to be like a step for like an evolution in what could we do with? The collective psychology of what's going on with people and that's what's awesome about her movies is that I feel like unlike any other genre really taps into how people are feeling at any given time about certain things it has at least that capacity.

Adam Sandler Samara Alex Ross Perry Los Angeles Oscars Texas Nia Costa John Twenty Twenty Beach House
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 3 months ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:04 min | 3 months ago

Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

"One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, we met bill s Preston and Ted Theodore Logan in the movie bill and Ted's excellent adventure they returned in bill and Ted's bogus journey in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one, and now almost thirty years later they're back in bill and Ted's face the music Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves return as well. Bill and Ted respectively, and this time they'll need not just their triumphant man to save the world but also their daughters I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about bill and Ted face the music on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR here with me and Steven from his home studio is plan Weldon of NPR's arts desk. Linda and also with us from his home in Washington DC, we have JC Howard who is a producer of NPR's Ted Radio Hour and how I built this I. J. C.. Good to have you back good to have you back. So if you are all not familiar, there's not a lot setup that you need or these films except to say that Bill and Ted were introduced to us as teenage bro Friends who had a band and just wanted to have a triumphant band when they were older and eventually they got sucked into time travel and picking up different historical figures, and later we're going to try to save the world and there was. A whole story where they were going to ultimately right a great and triumphant song it's it is a surprisingly complex canonical story of which you need to know practically nothing in order to enjoy I think these films Stephen now that I have thoroughly set the table kind of what is your attachment to bill and Ted these movies. If you have one, well, I've seen bill and Ted's excellent adventure. A BUNCH OF TIMES I've seen bill and Ted's bogus journey a couple times. These are movies that have kind of existed on the wind for the last thirty years. I re watched these movies within the last five years I. Think I talked about the. What's making me happy on this show but still kind of needed to go back to be reminded of what happens in them going into this movie I mean this movie is coasting on goodwill. There is a certain amount of fan service going on here. I mean I'm not sure how many people were clamoring to revisit these characters almost thirty years later but at the same time. Something really really smart happens in this movie and you can tell before you even start watching it, and that is that it is ninety three minutes long all three of these movies are about ninety minutes long and I think they understand that that is the perfect lengthier. There is a certain amount of sequel bloat here. The first two movies are incredibly Chintzy. The stakes in the first one are no greater than maybe Ted we'll get sent to military school and you're there's like the entire fabric of space time can be ripped apart. This is a very shaggy movie. I. Think there are stretches where it sags but. I do appreciate the number of updates. You don't have the gay panic stuff that really dragged down the earlier movies are no gay slurs in this movie. This movie bothers to give its female characters a little bit more agency the women who become their wives barely have any part to play in the other movies, and here you get more of that you get their daughters who are given kind of their own subplot. So I appreciate that it's not just rattling around with these two dudes who are now middle aged, but they're taking an interest in people outside of just bill. Yeah and you do get their daughters. The structure of this one is kind of that they go on one journey through time and their daughters meanwhile who are played by Samara weaving and bridget lending pain go off and tried to get a band together for their DADS to play with on this epoch song that's supposed to save the world. So you kind of have the one journey going on the other journey going on then naturally in the third act it all comes together and I did like those two performances from the daughter's there are also some kind of new faces in this one kristen Schall plays Kelly who is The daughter of Rufus who was the George Carlin character in the original JC it feels to me like you are too young to have a moustache attachment to these movies but I have been assured that that is not the case because television. Yeah. That's exactly right. I was actually super excited to hear this movie was happening and I'm going to show my age a little bit and say that I was born pretty close to the release of the First Bill and Ted Movie of Bill and Ted's excellent adventure. So my first encounter with these guys was as as they say a most impressionable youth. And I was one of what I can only assume are millions of kids who watch bill and Ted's excellent adventure every time it ran on cable TV. The thing about the first movie is the problem that they needed to solve was very simple. Billon Tade just needed a good grade right granted the solution to that problem was a little larger than life and included doctor who like time travel home box and all but the problem itself was simple. The second movie bogus journey was certainly a little nuttier. It had killer robots and aliens and the grim reaper. Didn't feel like it hit quite the right notes for me. No Pun intended. So win a third film was confirmed. The main question I had was like, what are they going to do? Are they going to try to recreate the success of the original and go back to simple run of the mill time travel Orlean into the bizarre and crazy and from just the trailer? It was clear that they weren't going to just lean into the bizarre, but they were diving in head first. But I think what separated this one from the nineteen ninety one sequel is that it has a lot more heart. The original movie was really about the friendship of bill and Ted and saving that they didn't seem to care as much about saving the future as much as they wanted to just make sure that bill and Ted could still just be friends. So it had this kind of surprisingly earnest quality and I think that was what was missing in the second film in this third one for all of its bizarreness in all of its doubling down on death in heaven and hell, and all these kinds of weird things. It really reignites the idea that there are friendships and. Relationships here that are worth saving. Yeah I think you're absolutely right that they go back to the relationship between those two guys being the center of the story and I. Think it's really funny. One of the things that I think is featured in some of the the trailer stuff but they are both married they both have you know lovely wives that you have met before since they got them from the past and they have relationships with their wives that are completely enmeshed with their relationship with each other. So they can't conceive of having individual marriages that aren't some. Like a four person marriage I thought that stuff was sort of funny because I think one of the things that carries over like if you're going to take these guys in age them thirty years you have to either assume that at some point they became more normal, which is a weird thing to assume about bill and Ted. Or you have to assume that they are still very bill and Ted, which would mean that they are still kind of very fixated on this idea that they are a duo and they are always together and they are each other's right hand Glenn you had indicated on twitter that. You perhaps did not have the same nostalgia for these characters that perhaps I have and others may have what is your take care? All right. The ticker about to hear from me Linda Holmes is going to be a subjective it's rigorous. It's clear eyed it is on demand by the gauzy scream nostalgia because unlike all y'all I never saw these movies until this week just to prepare for the show and I didn't see him for very simple reason I didn't have to I. Mean I was a junior in college nineteen, eighty, nine I was studying marine biology. I was dating a string of profoundly unfulfilled women and. Being. On a college campus and eighty nine and not here boobs heinous strange things are afoot at the circle k just over and over and over. So I felt like I got it. And think about the time late eighties early nineties mainstream. American. Comedy was kind of stuck in this catchphrase based mode and I was like, okay. I don't need to see this while I've seen them all now and I'm here to tell you. Sure I guess that's your thing. I like the Guy Listeners of the leads I. think that's the appeal here but left only once an excellent adventure. It's a visual gag that gets tossed off. It's a Freud at a mall holding a corn dog and it's like, okay, fine. You got me I mean it's low hanging fruit, but you got. And in face the music this new film shore on Paper Samara, Weaving Kristen Schaal Holland freaking Taylor they are gunning for me they are coming. But ultimately didn't stick. It's not supposed to. That's not what it's for. It just evaporates on contact with the eyeballs and maybe that's exactly what the world needs. Right now is dumb sweep dumb but I

TED Bill S Preston Ted Movie Ted Theodore Logan Linda Holmes NPR Stephen Thompson Washington Alex Winter Jc Howard Keanu Reeves Kristen Schaal Holland Producer Kristen Schall Samara Weldon Billon Tade Steven Orlean
Intellectual-Property Assets Are Getting More Valuable

Intelligence Matters

37:14 min | 3 months ago

Intellectual-Property Assets Are Getting More Valuable

"As a foreign intelligence agency were responsible for understanding a broad range of threats. Presented by governments to the United States, one of those threats include our cyber threats how nations may be using cyber to achieve their national objectives that might be intellectual property theft for example, to counter department offensively valid by accelerating foreign governments ability to actually productized particular RDA for weapon that may be targetting critical infrastructure of a country. As part of threatening that country or as part of putting pressure on a given country. How are we doing against the cyber threats are we? Barely keeping up, are we catching up? Are we getting ahead of the game or? Is it always going to be hard for the defender. Overall technology is getting more secure. Technologies Belt more securely today. So. The fundamental resilience is is improving known. You have open source products. We have lots of is looking at a given technology and helping find vulnerabilities and address them. That being said for an ever-more connected economy in ever more connected society, and as we build more connections, sometimes systems that were not necessarily built for those kinds of connections we bring and introduce new risks on the third poll the positive side there's far more awareness about those risks and how to approach addressing them identifying what are the most important assets to protect. Seems to be an effort on the part of NSA to kind of open up a blackbox and Kinda shut the reputation no such agency we want to be trusted to achieve or we believe we can uniquely contribute to team USA on either the first step. Is conveying who we are conveying the culture. That's here the commitment to American values. Certainly. When a part of our mission is an intelligence mission in a democracy, you have an obligation to ensure that the Americans. We serve feel they understand the values by which we live. And neuberger is the current director of the national security. Agency's Cybersecurity Directorate. She has held a variety of jobs in both the public and private sectors. We just sat down with an to talk about her career, her and her director. It's multiple responsibilities and how she sees a cyber threats facing our country. I'm Michael Morale and this is intelligence matters. So an welcomed to intelligence matters, it is great to have you on the show. It's great to be here. So I think the place to start and is with your career before you joined the national security. Agency. You had a career in the private sector. Can you tell us about that and tell us what you did in the private sector and then what drew you into government, service. Sure. So I was in running technology at a at a financial services company during that time period when financial services companies really moved off mainframe environments to the Web. Decline server technology. So that piece of both taking an operations and emission and its associated technology and people and culture really Shaked shaped the way I approach a lot of those problems today. And I was raised in in a family where my dad came as a refugee all my grandparents came as refugees to the US and they just. Constantly instilled in US how grateful we should be for the opportunity to be born in America and raised in America, with its freedoms with its ability to pursue one's dreams and and that we owed it for that and. I was driving home from from work in. In two, thousand six, we just done a large acquisition of. Companies of banks, custodian operations. And on the radio, they were talking about the bombing of mosque. Samara Moscow in smaller rock and just the. Soldiers dying civilians dying and the troubles there and I I still don't know why but I thought of my dad and. That's myself. Perhaps now's the time to repay a little bit of of that in some way and. I've been a graduate student at Columbia had a I had a professor tell me about the White House fellows program and encouraged me to apply and I kind of I have to admit was a bit of the New Yorker Countless New York ever. kind of put that aside and for whatever reason I just felt that calling at that moment called him and said I'll apply and fast forward I was assigned to the Pentagon. With zero military background. And you learned a lot about the culture very drawn to that shared commitment and spent a year in the Pentagon worked for the navy and then came to NSA. Couple years later. What did they doing at the Pentagon and the Navy? So I was the deputy chief management officer, the Navy essentially, the Navy had a number of broad enterprise wide technology efforts which they were working again, bring that you people mission. Technology Triangle. And they asked me to help work on a couple of working directly for the secretary of the Navy figure out why a of them were struggling and then help them get on track. So I worked on that and I often get asked by people. How did YOU END UP AT NSA? A pretty funny story in that I had a seventy six year old and I was commuting from Baltimore and the. The work life balance was a bit tough and I met somebody and he asked me about. How he was doing and I commented that I really love the work but it was a little hard for me to do the juggle. And he said, you know I happen to know that NSA standing up you director NSA standing up cyber command and I know they need people with your kind of of background. So how about if I make a phone call there? And I went for an interview commute was thirty minutes and it sounds so foolish but. That was pretty much what it took. Interesting interesting. So the private sector and then the Department of Defence which is as you know this huge enterprise and then NSA and this is a this is not an easy question I know about kind of the similarities and differences of those three different experiences. It all begins with people. In every organization missions have to adapt and change They adopted change in the private sector because perhaps you have a competitor, perhaps the customer spaces adapted. Certainly financial services saw that we're the scale of data was just increasing the scale of trains was increasing and the traditional manual processes couldn't keep up. So we automation with needed to reduce errors and help us keep on track with we're trading was going. Technology could deliver on that, but the the business of the organization had to change to fully take advantage of the technology and the way people did that mission and use technology had to change along the way. So I think in each of those organizations that taught me that for that, that triangle has to be kind of guided together to get to an outcome mission technology and people if you really want to be able to fully. Whether it's take advantage of a market or stay ahead of an adversary in our own mission here in the ICU dod that triangle has to work together and you have to communicate every those three planes together when talking about why the changes needed. So an in your tenure at NSA, you've served as its first chief risk officer. The assistant deputy director of operations, the head of the Russia's small group, and now the head of the Cybersecurity Directorate. Can you take us through your trajectory there how did your responsibilities differ from roll to roll? Absolutely, and so I came into an Santa's small team part of a small team that was standing up cyber command, the chief risk officer role was. was created after the media leaks period of two, thousand, thirteen where we learned that. Really appreciating risk mount looking at in a holistic way across partnership risk operational. Risks Technology risks. We learned that we needed to adapt the way we looked at risk and then change according to that. So I think in each of those roles. Either, the adversary was changing around us a threat was changing around us. We. Wanted to take advantage fully of an opportunity and I was responsible for taking the big picture strategic goals, translating those two measurable outcomes and objectives and helping you know contribute, communicate the why and then bringing the team of people along to get their each other's efforts was a bit different. But you know. We talked about the risk of doing the risk of not doing weighing that appropriately we talked about the insuring that as we approached new missions policy and technology move together, and certainly when we looked at the elections work in two, thousand, eighteen, the Russia's small group work we saw we're adversaries of have used influence operation since the time of Adam and Eve perhaps would have changed was again the ability to use social media to both focus and directed to have larger impact. So focusing on the Russia's small group for just a second and what was that what was the what was the mission and what were your responsibilities with regard to the two thousand eighteen election's to the extent that you can talk about that. Absolutely. So the mission was ensuring the integrity of the two thousand eighteen midterm elections ensuring that we I understood the threat second that we appropriately tipped all the information we had about the threat to key partners across the US government. Certainly, FBI from a counter infants perspective digest from Cybersecurity of elections, infrastructure perspective, and they finally that we would support Cyber Command. If if authorized to impose costs, it's were attempts to disrupt. Disrupt the election. So. After the two thousand eighteen election's president trump publicly confirmed that cyber command played a role in deterring the Russians in two thousand eighteen are they're important lessons from what happened in two thousand eighteen about how we as a country can defend ourselves against this this insidious threat. Yes. So you know across the government, we look at two key polls. Integrity one is attempts to malignly influence population whether that is to highlight social discord to highlight issues that divide the population or to. Hand up sheer inappropriate. You know share information as part of shaping individuals ideas, and then the second is potentially interfering hacking into elections infrastructure as part of efforts to change the vote and I think the first pieces, the value of resiliency. The sense that you know once trust is lost, it's very hard to regain. So the knowledge for the American public that there are hundreds of people across the US government committed to and working to ensure the integrity of our elections. When it comes to counter influence though the biggest resilience as each of us. As Americans when we're reading something asking who might be trying to influence me what is the source of that information I fully confident in that source of that information. And then finally the role of the role of technology and the role of Public Private Partnership. In as part of elections integrity. So for us in the intelligence community were constantly watching for which adversaries maybe seeking to to shape a populations thinking to shape an election and then rapidly tipping that to partners or. To the private sector to ensure that they're both aware of techniques and our countering them on their platforms. So we've since learned shocked last week the updates from deny that the Russians continue to engage in election interference, the Chinese, the Iranians, and the punchline of all that for me is it's really hard to deter. Foreign interference right and I'm wondering if it's something special about foreign interference or if it's more about cyber at the end of the day and the difficulty of seeing cyber attributing it if you see it, how do you think about that question absolutely I think it is more about cyber than about elections from a cyber perspective when we look at fully both protecting cyber infrastructure and then to your second point about attribution, there's complexity laying what we call the red on top of the we may see threats. That are talked about strategic perspective and then we partners across the US government a looking to see where does that present itself? Where are the given vulnerabilities in a given infrastructure? The powers when you can lay the two together and say, here is a nation state that has intent to interfere in whatever that is an election critical infrastructure. I Pete Best and then translate that to the tactical level to say that network scanning or that vulnerability in hardware or software may well be used to achieve the objective putting that in place, and then most importantly preventing it because at the end of the day riding report about a victim and notifying the victim is far less satisfying than being able to put that together and prevent the adversary cheating their objective. So we've already started to shift now into your new role, right which was relaunched in October I believe. So be great if you could, and if you could explain for our listeners I, what NASA's two main missions are. Again and then cybersecurity and the difference between them just to give folks here level set absolutely. So Ns as a foreign intelligence agency were responsible for understanding a broad range of threats. Presented by governments to the United States, one of those threats include our cyber threats how nations may be using cyber to achieve their national objectives as that might be intellectual property theft for example, to counter the department defensively Thallady by accelerating foreign governments ability to to actually productized particular rnd for weapon that may be targetting critical infrastructure of a country. As part of threatening that country or as part of putting pressure on a given country. So that is the threat information on the second side. And say has cybersecurity mission. We're celestial known We build the keys codes and cryptography that's used to protect all of US government's most sensitive communications thinking nuclear command control weapon systems, the president's communications with allies, and we provide technical advice to mitigate those same threats that I talked about. So the really the he integration of the two missions where we think the magic is where we can say here's what we think adversaries are seeking to do, and here's how from a cybersecurity perspective we recommend you protect against. So so what motivated and the relaunch of the directorate and has its mission changed at all really good question. So we recognize that we were at a crossroads with national security as both technology and society ships were happening. We saw only kinds of technology that people want to from small satellites to Internet of things and each of those presents huge advancements. But they also present cybersecurity risk. Along with that, we saw various nation surtees. New Technologies think North Korean crypto currencies to get around sanctions to achieve their own objectives and we said we really need to up our game to more quickly be understanding those threats and ensuring that. We could both provide advice to build new technologies as early as possible, but also to counter adversaries use of those same technologies to achieve their national security. We're GONNA take a quick break to hear from our sponsor. Dumb. We'll be right back with more discussion with an neuberger. At Lockheed Martin, we're on a mission. Your mission. Not just the next mission but the one that's two steps ahead. That's why we've not only taken the lead in hyper sonics, but we're helping you integrate technology faster than. It's why we're not only developing the laser weapons systems you'll need but deploying them in the field. Our mission is to build the integrated solutions you can depend on because the world is depending on you. So and what are the what are the primary areas of Focus for your directorate? What kind of people work there? What's their skill set and what kind of customers do you serve? Questions. So the first parties. Operationalizing Intelligence. How do we ensure that from the intelligence that we see we took anything that's unique. And timely quickly so that we can prevent the victim. So that's the first, the first piece of of work, our areas of focus are. Both understanding that giving guidance encryption, we believe encryption. A key protection particularly in telecommunications environment that in many cases is entrusted. So both in building the government's special encryption, modernizing that as well as providing advice and insights on how to best use. Encryption the text of people who work cure are like we see him any organizations abroad gamut we have intelligence analyst. We have country-specific experts have a broad swath of technical experts, encryption network technologies, hardware, and software vulnerability analysts as well but the power is weird that can be integrated where you can say. How do you build on route of trust all the way through to an end point? Had you properly defend network and take a step back and do risk analysis to say? We are the gaps in your resilience and we're should your next dollar investment to closest gaps Right, and then what about customers is your is, is it just the Department of Defense? Is that the US government is even broader than that? How do you think about who it is you're working for? Yup Great Question. So there's a specific set work we do for what we call national security systems systems carrying classified information national security information the director. Vanessa is also the national manager for National Security Systems, that's the authority under which as I mentioned, we have we build the keys codes and cryptography responsible for distributing threat information as well. So those are across the US government with a particular focus on duty. Weapons Systems. And Related Systems. A second set of key partners and customers are dhs I. D. H., S. and its role supporting critical infrastructure. And, the sector specific agencies, and like I said the the real magic of understanding the critical infrastructure, we're it's key gaps and vulnerabilities are and being able to marry that up with what a foreign government may be intending to do and providing focused insight. Across the US government, there is broad use of commercial technologies, particularly duty and and national security system. So you may have seen when we're issuing advisories were also issuing advice on how to secure and configure those commercial technologies well because we see that. Those are used all across. Sensitive, systems as well. Your director has issued I think a dozen or so. Advisories about cybersecurity threats. Can you talk about why you guys do that? What the criteria is for quitting one of those out and then how do you think about the impact they have? Do You keep metrics on that? How do you think about? Advisories absolutely. So. Our advisories other way we really do them for three reasons. One is if we see a nation state actor using a particular vulnerability against the system care about we find that it really drives urgency of action people run faster when they're pursued, and if we can say, this nation state actor is using this vulnerability. Here's the mitigation advice to protect yourself against that we see impact and I'll talk about that how we measure that impact at the end. The second thing is there's a deep expertise here because we build and we break encryption. So encryption related technologies like the peons like you. You may recall the windows ten cryptographic vulnerability in January. Those are areas we focus on because we know those are sometimes hard to understand technically hard to implement. So if we can give very practical advice, them will issue those as well to help that be put in place, and then the third would be where there's a timely need and we're getting a lot of questions and we feel that putting out a product helps guide people and thinking about how to think about security I'll give an example. As. As covid. Pressed a lot of organizations across the US government particularly duty as well to move to telework. We started getting a lot of questions about secure collaboration. which commercial tools were safe to us and our goal was teaching people how to evaluate what safe to us. So we issued a product we're laid out the different attributes like. Code is available for review its end to end Krypton and a few other such attributes, and then we rated different secure collaboration publicly available tools against them and the cool part was we had companies call and say, well, you didn't get something quite right or can we be included as well and we said absolutely, we issued a second version and then we have another one coming out next week because our goal was making it as useful as possible and also helping teach people. How to assess. Different. Products for security. You ask the question about how we measure impact. So there's three different measures we've been using. The first is, do we see patch rates go up? They'll do we see for vulnerabilities that we've talked about here is a foreign actor might be using a boehner ability to achieve an objective. Can we watch those patriots go up and it was really cool to see. And a number of cases we've we've watched that increase. The second piece is there is a very capable and active cybersecurity industry has the information shared enable them to better protect. Sensitive US government national security systems networks, and you know in the case of the Xm vulnerability that we issued, we're advisory where we talked about the particular unit of Russian intelligence using the XML male vulnerability. It was really great to see five different cyber-security entities using that to identify other. Russian intelligence infrastructure and then take that down. So that was success for us that we made it harder for that adversary to achieve its objectives, and then the third one is really the feedback on the number of downloads and the feedback from administrators saying this was useful. This was unique timely and actionable could act on it, and then in May you guys took what I thought was an unprecedented step of actually openly attributing the exploitation of vulnerability to the Russian, Gru. and. That seemed to rare to me and I'm wondering why you decided to actually name Russia in this instance. So I it is rare because as you noted earlier, implicitly attributions hard. You may have seen a prior product where we highlighted one st state using another country's. Infrastructure to achieve its objective and then highlight he just hard attribution is. So when it's done, it needs to be done with precision to be confident. In that and we chose to do it because. We see that it makes targeted network owners more quickly patch and secure and build the resilience of their systems network administrators have way more vulnerabilities to address than they have time for or frankly money for and way more alerts than they can act on. So we can say this particular vulnerability is being used by a nation State Intelligence Service. We see them we see network administrators moving quickly and addressing it, and that's a fundamental goal. Fundamental goal is improving cybersecurity. If you kind of step back and look at look at the big picture here, you know, maybe from a thirty five thousand foot level how are we doing? The cyber threats are we barely keeping up? Are we catching up? Are we getting ahead of the game or? Is it always going to be hard for the defender. In this game in because the guy on the offense can always come up come up with something new how you think about sort of where we are in the history of of the threat of cyber and defense against it. I think we points overall technology is getting more secure. Technologies built more securely today. So the fundamental resilience is is improving you know when you have open source products, we have lots of is looking at a given technology and helping find vulnerabilities and address them. That being said were an ever more connected economy in an ever-more connected society, and as we build more connections, sometimes two systems that were not necessarily built for those kinds of connections. Data Systems. In that way, we bring and introduce new risks. On the third poll on the positive side, there's far more awareness about those risks and how to approach addressing them identifying what are the most important assets to protect and ensuring good practices are in place and it's far easier than ever to put that in place. So I think it's a mixed story on the one hand more more technologies built more securely, and there are communities of individuals working together to ensure their secure on the other hand far more. Technology some of which. Is connected in ways that bring risk in ways that we always have to and I guess the third part, which is where we started adversary seeking to take advantage of those risks to achieve their objectives. So. If you if you were standing in front of a large multinationals board of directors in you're talking to them about cybersecurity. What's the one or two things that you would absolutely want them to take away from from your conversation? What is the tangible thing you most want to protect and what's the intangible thank you most want to protect. So if you're drug company, what is the intellectual property that's going to be your next potentially big drug big driver of economic growth, big driver of healing, and then second what's the biggest intangible? Thank perhaps, that's your reputation. The way you treat your employees, the price, the prices that you charge and what you're, what you're. How much you mark that up. Make sure that you're protecting both carefully make your your cyber security commensurate with with the risk presented to you if you lose either one. And you mentioned you mentioned Skater Systems and I'm not sure that all my listeners know what those are just explain that and then is there something? Is there something special about protecting data system from protecting? Normal network absolutely. So Skater Systems are essentially control systems for the core areas of infrastructure in a given country in a given company. So think power systems clean water drug manufacturing. and. Those are. Those are often complex system. So what's unique about them is you know those systems over the years were often built four reliability in the event of a bad storm that power system would come back online with confidence as. More technologies got connected. So for example, the ability to measure. Use of power the ability to measure confidence in in water and chemical level. Some of those systems got connected to network systems that provide a way to access them. One of the joint products we recently issued between Ns. WAS An ICS product because there had been some public articles about. a given attack against skater systems in the Middle East, and we wanted to ensure that we together with. One of our closest partners was providing technical advice to. Skate entities in the US based on what we were learning about those attacks. So interest, a couple more questions you've been terrific with your time. Seems to be an effort on the part of an essay to kind of open up the black box and showed the reputation no such agency right. Your conversation with me thinking example of that why is that a priority for for the agency and for General Nakasone? I in the cybersecurity mission fundamentally if we're not trusted we can't achieve our intact. People take advice from those they trust and the power of. Across the US Government Team USA work cyber. There each organization plays its position within that role. You Know My counterpart at Digest Chris Crabs often talks about them being the national risk managers. At an essay, we believe what we can bring uniquely is that integration of intelligence series of seeking to do what their capabilities are, what their infrastructure looks like and how to defend against cyber security advice to counter that, and that's always continuing because technologies change adversaries, goals change, and the resilient always has to be increased to meet that. So we want to be trusted to achieve what we believe. We can uniquely contribute to team USA on cyber. The first step to doing that is conveying, we are conveying the culture that's here the commitment to American values, and certainly WanNa part of our mission is an intelligence mission. In a in a democracy, we have an obligation to ensure that the Americans we serve. Feel they understand the values which we live. So your your former colleague and my really good friend Glenn Gerstl road. Op Ed about a year ago about what he saw the. Profound implications of the Digital Revolution on national security, and he raised a lot of concerns and among those was the sheer pace and scale and volume of technological change and. And data that's GONNA force intelligence agencies including NSA to fundamentally change how they do business I was GonNa say thinking big picture about those kinds of challenges. What are you trying to tackle I? Would've the adjustments look like, how do you? How do you think about the challenge that Glenn laid out? Absolutely, so I from the perspective of large amounts of data and ensuring, we can make sense of them. Ensuring that we can do big data analysis to help. Triage the information we identify and determine what are people are big assets put their time on to determine he's and how to act on them. So for example. We we're looking at machine learning to classify malware and we're certainly looking at. Machine learning potentially to help us identify vulnerabilities scale particularly when we look at systems that represent thirty years of technology like muffins systems, how do you secure a weapon system? That's been out there and represent each phase of technology and have confidence in its resilience and in command and control. And then finally. We have an obligation to both bring those technologies to be on our mission and understand how adversaries might use that and manage that accordingly. So for example, as we think about artificial intelligence and the potential to automatically. Direct weapon. In the United States we have strong values around how we would think about automation versus human control. In other countries around the world, there might be different ways that those kinds of decisions are approached. So how do we ensure that we both? Bring that integration of. Compliance and technology to the way we pursue it but also be aware of those gaps and keep an eye on the risks of those gaps. And you mentioned you mentioned people and you mentioned people a couple of times and and just took two questions about that. One is given the competition that you face with all of these cyber security firms and. Your folks must be very attractive to them, and their skills are quite valuable in their private sector. How how difficult is it for you to recruit and retain talent? Really thoughtful question because you asked two questions in their recruit entertained. So. From the recruit side, we get really great people. On the routine side. We have a really compelling mission. and. What brings keeps people. Here is the sense that they're contributing to something bigger than themselves. That is challenging fulfilling. It's on us as organizational leaders to ensure that each person has that opportunity to contribute what they can uniquely bring chew to that mission. And one of the one of the cool aspects of the Cybersecurity standup has been people who have left to call in and say, Hey, I'd like to come back I learned a lot. In the private sector, the missions, calling me and like to contribute again, and we've hired a number of them back and continuing to increase that and part of the message we have when people if people do decide to leave is to say that is great. You will continue to contribute to the nation's security. You'll learn a lot in the five at sector, and if you ever want to come back the doors open. What do you? What do you want the American people to know about the women and men who work for you. That, they're committed to the values. That this country was established for. That there are significant threats to the United States, our allies and to those values, and that not always can we talk about those threats because? By impact sometimes intelligence community, even the security mission has to operate in those shad in the show does so. Trust our values, trust that we are proud Americans. We swear an oath to the Constitution of the United States, and if you do question it or if you want to learn more roll up your sleeves and come into the for a few years and get to know what yourself because each person has unique abilities and a unique ability to contribute to their to their country in whatever way they choose whether that's government are in the private sector. But if you ever doubt it come on in and work here and and raise your voice and be a part of it. It sort of takes you back to what your parents taught you to. It really does it my dad grew up in in communist Hungary and In the beginning when I came into government, he would call me on the phone sometimes and switched to a foreign language and. I realized that for him growing up in another country. Is that complete trust of government that I American born? You know have that doesn't mean it's trust and verify it's from verify but there are things that I take for granted growing up in this society that I don't know if he ever will. So being able to look at things through his eyes and through mind make me realize how fortunate we are to be here and how much we have obligation to. To ensure it stays that way. And thank you so much for joining us and thank you for your service. Thank you so much for your time.

United States Director NSA Cybersecurity Directorate Russia USA Theft National Security Systems New Technologies President Trump Navy Michael Morale Neuberger FBI Pete Best Nasa Department Of Defense Lockheed Martin Chief Risk Officer
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"You to NBC for Samara. Theodore. Now overnight. We're headed to the mid sixties. We've got quiet conditions for the most part. You know, we are mostly cloudy tonight. Rain chances continue to dwindle and tomorrow we are looking at highs in the low eighties, so bouncing back to a little closer to the norm for this time of year. Partly sunny for your Monday Please note that we do have rain chances. The timing on that in the afternoon early evening as a front impact the region we could see some showers or storms spark Tuesday, mostly sunny best day to be out in about hi's on Tuesday, low eighties and will even notice humidity dropping a bit. Wednesday and Thursday. The rain returns We're goingto be seeing some showers. Both is not complete washouts but just anticipate. Some rain highs will be in the low eighties on Wednesday, mid eighties by Thursday, served in four meteorologist Samara Theodore 68 degrees outside our studios in Friendship Heights at 10 30 Thiss is w t o p your source for today's top news, traffic and weather, always connected and constantly updated. In your car at home at work and on the go. W GOP Never miss a moment. Good Sunday evening. I'm Del Walters Lord Tony Act is that the editor's desk coming up? Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders says voting by mail is essential during a pandemic voted Virginia Tech to rename two buildings with controversial namesake sign Mike Barilla concerned voters might want to consider early voting in person. I'm Sandy Cosell. This week marks the centennial celebration of a woman's right to vote. I'm Andrea.

Samara Theodore Samara Senator Bernie Sanders Sandy Cosell NBC Del Walters W GOP Mike Barilla Friendship Heights Vermont Virginia Tech editor
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:38 min | 4 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"NBC for Samara, Theodore, now wrapping up the first half of our weekend. What we need to know is things stayed pretty quiet today, and they will Main drive for a lot of us. There is a small chance that an isolated showers storm could pop south and east of D. C, but I think a lot of a state dry temperatures tonight in the low seventy's please. No patchy fog is going become an issue overnight. Some of that patchy fog could be on the dense side, and it'll linger into Sunday morning High temperature Sunday Upper eighties partly sunny Ah lot of clouds again tomorrow. Maybe a few more breaks of sunshine Monday. Looks like we're gonna see a lot of sunshine, mostly sunny on Monday, with highs on Monday in the low nineties. Monday's rain chances are very small. I think we stay dry. But there's a very small chance we could see an isolated shower storm Tuesday that chance starts to creep up a bit highs in the low nineties. Otherwise mostly sunny and then Wednesday some showers and storms likely as we prepare for our next frontal system. I'm starting four meteorologist Samara Theodore tomorrow. Thank you checking the temperatures around the region 78 degrees right now. In Silver Spring, Maryland, it's 74 Dale City, Virginia and 76 degrees outside our studios and friendship pipes. At 11 30 Thiss is w t o p Your source for today's top news, traffic and weather always connected. And constantly updated in your car at home at work and told to go. W T O P never visible moment and good Saturday evening. I'm Del Walters, Laura's Patani AC Is that the editor's desk coming up Freedom of expression lighting with potential super spreaders. As motorcycle enthusiasts gather in.

Samara Theodore Samara NBC Del Walters Maryland editor Dale City Virginia Laura
Dangerous heat, humidity Monday in Washington DC region with heat index values near 105 degrees

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

Dangerous heat, humidity Monday in Washington DC region with heat index values near 105 degrees

"As as we we head head through through the the overnight overnight hours, hours, not not budging, budging, much much with with temperatures temperatures down down to to the the low low eighties eighties and and upper upper seventies seventies overnight, but quiet tomorrow for your Monday two things to know we have a heat advisory in effect again from noon to eight PM, with heat and next values reaching up to 105 degrees. As we head through the afternoon and excessive heat Watch will also go into effect as we could see index values reaching 110 to 115 degrees for your Monday throughout parts of the region. I'm storm Team four. Meteorologist Samara Theodore.

Samara Theodore
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 5 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Not to NBC for Samara Theodore. A lot of the activity that we've seen this Sunday thus far has been west of I 95. And as we head through the overnight hours that'll continue could see a few showers make their way in the DC metro area, maybe even a few isolated storms tonight as well. Overnight. I anticipate some showers of may linger into the early morning hours and then taper off for your Monday Expect a drying out kind of situation early and then in the afternoon and isolated showers. Storm can't be ruled out hi smaller around 90 degrees Tuesday and Wednesday, both in the upper eighties. Hello nineties with mostly sunny skies, dry conditions. In fact, you'll notice a downward trend in the humidity before rises again towards the end of the week. As we are anticipating another storm chance on Thursday with highs in the low nineties, asserting for meteorologists Tamara Theodore tomorrow thank you very much checking temperatures around the region in this hour. We're looking at 82 degrees. If you happen to be wandering down on the National Mall 84 in Annapolis, said Rehobeth. It is 83 degrees and going out west to Leesburg. Cool 72 degrees. 8 31 Thiss is w t. O p Your source for today's top news, traffic and weather always connected. And constantly updated in your car at home at work and on the go. W T o p never visible moment. Good Sunday evening on Del Walters, Lord Tony AC is that the editor's desk coming up A nation surgeon general, saying Despite the growing increase in covert 19 cases, the country.

Samara Theodore Tamara Theodore NBC Del Walters Lord Tony AC National Mall Leesburg editor Annapolis Rehobeth
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:06 min | 5 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Samara. Theodore Samara. 17 days. Can we go for 18? Who is going to be hard? You know, we're supposed to make it to 18 tomorrow, but it will be by the skin of our teeth. We've got 89 degrees, possibly coming in for your Monday. So we'll see. We'll see if we can hit that 90 tomorrow. But for now, we've actually got a thunderstorm that's bubbled up, and that's down. Ah, farther South and Culpepper County in Orange County, and it's getting ready to head into Southern Faulk here, arriving in bleak at a 36 PM and Summerville at 8 44 So, ah, that storm's got with it, even though it's not classified as severe. It still has 30 to 40 mile per hour wind gusts as well as pea sized hail and some very heavy rain getting ready to cross over 17. In Morris fill in southern Faulk here, so that'll continuous track. It's got some lightning with it as well. Some lighter stuff falling in Woodbridge. Let's see on other than that north of Winchester. Heavy shower spotted there. So as we head through the evening, an isolated shower at this point or storm can't be ruled out through tonight. Tomorrow high temperatures near 90 We'll see what we can do chance for some isolated activity storms tomorrow afternoon. Tuesday and Wednesday, both in the low nineties with lower humidity, dry conditions and mostly sunny skies Thursday, chance for showers and storms with highs on Thursday in the low nineties, right now in D, C 83 degrees 74 in Manassas and 77 Leesburg, and what type of bubble was that again? It was like something. Something bubble down south. I thought I've never heard of that before. Oh, I'm sorry. I was at a storm bubbled up Downs, Okay? Sure bubbled up. Okay. I'm sorry. I was just wondering talking about OK, 77 degrees outside our studios in French your pipes brought to you by new Look home design. Find out why 30,000 homeowners have chosen new look to do their roof. It's a 22 Doctors say they are expecting a rise in cases of Children diagnosed with type one diabetes. That, too, is related to Corona virus. The risk of getting type one diabetes is genetic in the past. We know that different viruses can trigger this autoimmune attack with the Children's National diabetes program. Doctor Fran Kogan. I anticipate just like I do with pandemics of flu that Cove ID will also precipitate new onset diabetes, but we don't know That yet after being exposed to viruses, it could take a while for people to develop the antibodies that attack the pancreas that makes insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. I would not be surprised that in the next six months to a year we see a lot more patients do to co bit. Christy came w T o P news time Nick in Delhi Holding a virtual press conference, A group of Republican state lawmakers in Virginia said Governor Ralph Northam administration should prioritize in person education and develop a plan to get school buildings open five days. A week delegate Kirk Cox. We need to be creative. We need to be flexible, instead got confusing, false and I want this administration, he said During a special legislative session next month..

Faulk Kirk Cox diabetes Governor Ralph Northam Samara. Theodore Samara. Culpepper County Fran Kogan Woodbridge Winchester Christy Summerville Virginia Morris Nick Orange County
Tropical Storm Heading to Mid Atlantic With Rain in Washington DC area

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 5 months ago

Tropical Storm Heading to Mid Atlantic With Rain in Washington DC area

"Again, Samara Theodore Overnight lows falling into loan mid seventies We have human condition tonight with rain chances increasing overnight as we track a tropical storm. This was recently named Tropical Storm Fay brewing off the coast of the outer banks making its way to the mid Atlantic tonight and then possibly for the Hudson Valley. Beyond. We are talking a flash flood watch in effect at midnight until tomorrow afternoon. For those who are headed out to the eastern shore in Delmarva Peninsula, so longer Coastline going Ocean City Beach. Just keep that in mind that rain could reach anywhere from 1 to 3 inches by tomorrow afternoon Highs will be in the mid to upper eighties for a lot of us. Your Friday in the DC metro area. Rain chances substantially drop off throughout the day. Looks like most of the rain stays well. East Saturday and Sunday, Low nineties. Both days bring chances for showers and storms with the higher chance on Saturday. I'm starting for meteorologists Tamara Theodore 90 in Bui Lee's Birgit 87. We've got 88 northwest DC 6 51 Now on double D T o P.

Samara Theodore Tamara Theodore Ocean City Beach Hudson Valley Delmarva Peninsula Bui Lee
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:43 min | 5 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"In with Samara Theodore for the rest of our Thursday. Things look great folks. Quiet temperature's dropping into the sixties and seventies overnight tomorrow, plenty of sunshine even hotter, very hot, in fact, for your Friday with highs in the mid to upper nineties Humidity won't be oppressive tomorrow, which you will notice humidity rising as we head into the holiday weekend, July 4th. Now Saturday starts off nice with a nice mix of sun and clouds. Humidity does start to rise. High temperatures, though a little bit cooler in the upper eighties and low nineties. Saturday afternoon. We can't rule out some scattered showers and storms, but I don't think we're looking at any washouts here Saturday evening. In fact, we should be drawing and clearing by Sunday, really the same song We'll be singing high temperatures. Upper eighties low nineties with a chance for some isolated, too scattered. Activity Sunday afternoon. If you're headed to the beach things look good with highs in the mid to upper eighties. I'm starting for meteorologists Omari Theodore, checking out some temperatures across the area Tonight, D C has 90 McClain is at 85 right now Gaithersburg at 87 degrees Green Belt at 85. Some parts of our area could cool down into the seventies late tonight. It's traffic and weather on the eights. And when it breaks here on W T o p your weather alert station 7 30 This is w t. O p Your source for today's top news, traffic and weather, always connected and constantly updated in your car at home at work and told to go w T o p Never miss a moment. Good evening. I'm to be tree sodas. We have Alicia A Belson at the editor's desk and coming up tonight. A top U. S medical expert calls the Corona virus the worst health crisis in a century. Stay here for a special report heightened.

Samara Theodore Omari Theodore Alicia Gaithersburg McClain editor
"samara" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:34 min | 6 months ago

"samara" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Samara and Bijan C. evo sheer at the KCBS editor's desk this morning at seven fifty as our news watch continues its Memorial Day weekend but if you're planning to go camping you better think again KCBS is Megan Goldsby reports currently Allstate campground sites in the state park system are fully closed until further notice Gloria Sandoval with California state parks says they have re opened some parking lots at parks in some previously closed trails but no you can't stay overnight we think of ideas of how people can explore the outdoors in their backyard and that has become a thing especially in suburban areas with backyards families are taking very tiny camping trips out on to the lawn that is harder to do in San Francisco so those are the customers James dong who owns last minute gear in the mission is doing curbside pickup for right now I think barbecuing is a little bit more of the things that try to be outside without going all the way into camping or back country of any kind he would like to see Memorial Day weekend sales look more like last year but don't is actually cautioning would be backpackers using a first hand account he read on outside online about I'm a person that went back and re skiing in Colorado because you know they were like well I'm I'm fine I feel very confident or whatnot and they end up needing a rescue and he said that the rescue for him felt like a tipping point he started feeling guilty about you know all the search and rescue people that had to respond in a situation where it's impossible to keep social distancing and wondering you know why he did that and basically because that for everyone that will all be camping soon enough so dong says he's grateful to his loyal customers who have been buying gift cards and the ones ordering tents and packs for future trips using curbside pick up also all those camp stoves that you can just go ahead and use this weekend making gold speak KCBS we are as we've been reporting this morning on KCBS there is a four alarm fire burning at this hour at San Francisco's fisherman's wharf and pier forty five KCBS this Tim Ryan is on scene there and we'll get you another update coming up here at the top of the hour the rotary club of San Francisco is a stepping up to ensure vulnerable populations have face protection during the Copa nineteen crisis KCBS this Kerry who dissect reports from the mission district where members handed out free face masks to the homeless they're calling it the million mask challenge the goal is to deliver one million masks to people who needed during the pandemic some of those are being distributed to salvation army encampment homeless individuals as well as other food pantries in San Francisco Ron Jan with the rotary club district five one five though here in San Francisco is here to deliver cloth masks to people living on the street gives us so much joy and fulfillment that we are doing our part to prevent cold in nineteen spread these men living in a tent in the mission district say they're thankful to them pretty generous definitely Jim says they hope this small gesture can prevent this spread and help in situations where they need to enter an essential business an individual came up to us and said we really need this mask because we can't go into a store without a mouse and for us we want them to word of course for safety for themselves as well as anyone there their encampments in San Francisco Kerry who to sack KCBS where are your money news now on KCBS with this Bloomberg report we know the corona virus pandemic has hit hotels.

Samara editor Bijan C. KCBS
"samara" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:20 min | 8 months ago

"samara" Discussed on WTOP

"Four four day forecast with Samara Theodore Hey friends today it's been a pretty tricky forecast we managed to make it to the seventies though in the DC metro area and farther south they did hit the eighties as we had in the overnight hours I think things are gonna stay pretty calm now we the front is passing and there's still a chance as the front passes over the next couple hours that we could see something bubble up maybe a shower an isolated thunderstorm but I think that chance really dropping as we had past sunset here now tomorrow temperatures are going to drive themselves up into the upper sixties near seventy mostly sunny day gusty in the afternoon Tuesday Mar it's a cloudy chance for some rain and then I think a greater chance for rain for your Wednesday with highs on Wednesday only in the upper forties pretty raw and cold and cloudy by Thursday back to the low sixties with sunny skies sixty six right now the district sixty four in Silver Spring and sixty six in Leesburg brought to you by Len the plumber trusted same day service seven days a week it's seven twenty now the latest developments on the corona virus outbreak in the DMV as the virus continues to spread the White House has extended the federal social distancing guidance through April thirtieth Maryland has announced five new deaths related to a corona virus number of pope at nineteen related deaths in the state now fifteen Arlington county is reporting its first two deaths related to corona virus a seventy two year old and a six year old both with underlying medical conditions and Howard County also reporting its first two deaths again both patients had underlying health conditions there are now close to twenty five hundred cases of coronavirus in Maryland Virginia and the district Maryland has more than half of those Virginia has eight hundred ninety cases there are three hundred forty two cases reported in the district as blood supplies become dire because of blood drive cancellations during the corona virus outbreak X. county's fire departments are partnering with inova blood donor services to more blood drives coming up for you to help out tomorrow at the end of all into your fire station from one to seven PM and then on Tuesday at Centerville volunteer fire department from three PM until seven PM young boy in Virginia has come up with a unique plan to help local medical workers who because of the pandemic running out of supplies when he was three years old SO habit bag of Ashburn Virginia had to be taken to inova Fairfax hospital for a medical problem well now he's seven and he wants to give back so is asked hotels in the area for items that could be used for medical supplies his mother is my bag we've called area hotels and we went around and they had a lot of shower caps and some also had caused a lot of face mask they had for house keeping them together two thousand shower caps three thousand gloves and nine hundred masks to be donated to the inova Fairfax hospital ER where they can be used as personal protective equipment neckline Elie WTOP news due to social distancing restrictions many businesses have had to shift their business models to delivery or curbside pickup for one Maryland winery staffing help us come in the form of a dedicated delivery dog with Laurie yada the co owner of Hagerstown Stonehouse urban winery learn that our business would be limited to carry out she decided to enlist soda pop hits her eleven year old brindle boxer.

Samara Theodore
Food And Beverage Industry Hit Hard By Coronavirus Outbreak

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:45 min | 9 months ago

Food And Beverage Industry Hit Hard By Coronavirus Outbreak

"It is a hugely uncertain time for those in the service industry restaurants and bars have been closing their doors and that has meant so many people have already lost their jobs. We bring you now. The stories of three people trying to figure out what happens next. My name is Simone Barron and I work in the service industry I have for thirty four years and I currently live in Seattle Washington. I was working for Tom. Douglas Restaurants Tom Decided to close all of his restaurants Laying off eight hundred people. It's pretty devastating. Everybody's really unsure how they're going to pay their rent pay their mortgages see their children their families. We all know that if we don't get that next paycheck that a lot of us are going to be in some trouble and then that's the other thing that we're all worried about is if we will have jobs to go back to so. We're all really panicked right now. Yeah My name is Daryl noon and I am a partner in a wine store and bar in Manhattan. We have a shopping meals. Have a bar. And we're in a an open market place so the sales of the bar dropped pretty drastically but people were buying wine in a way. That was like pretty panic. Inducing like cleaning out our shelves so quickly quickly after that everything had to shut down except for our retail store. But that nobody was going to be allowed to come down so we were only allowed to do deliveries which we had never done before people are like calling in Queens and being like. Hey Can you come to Bayside? And should we go to bayside and drop off a bottle of wine to someone? It's it's a fascinating new reality. My name is Samara Sariano. I am a food server in San Francisco California. The last couple of weeks have been extremely stressful and pretty scary. A lot of people stopped coming out. Normally I worked six shifts a week and last week. I was scheduled three shifts a week. I basically used the money to pay off bills for this month and to buy what groceries I could and I really don't have even one hundred dollars to my name now And I'm really not sure what I'm going to be doing for rent or bills next month. I've already implied for unemployment insurance. But I know that will take weeks to come through and it was still probably won't be sufficient to support me. San Francisco's so expensive and my rent is a great worry to me right now. It's a difficult time for so many people what can be done. We're going to put that question to Sean Kennedy. He's an executive vice president. At the National Restaurant Association that organization represents more than half a million restaurant businesses and they sent a letter to the White House and Congressional leaders yesterday asking for critical help. Thanks so much for being with us on good morning. What Kinda help are you looking for? They're really three buckets that The restaurant industries looking at right now one is just immediate access to cash second is medium and long-term access to credit and then tax relief for the industry when we come back on line. This is really the perfect storm for the restaurant industry. This is not like a natural disaster. That's located in one particular area. The passes quickly and we focused on rebuilding. There's a nationwide problem in which States and localities are just shutting down restaurant operations across the nation without a lot of warning and with tremendous impact in our. It's certainly early days but I mean given what we're seeing. Do you have any estimate as to how many people in the industry could ultimately end up employed? That's a great question right now. What a lot of restaurants are doing is trying to retool trying to allow for more takeout drive through delivery services For a lot of restaurants they just physically aren't able to consider themselves that way for other restaurants they're looking at whether or not switching to that business model is going to generate enough revenue to keep the doors open and the burners turned on so my sister happens to work in the restaurant industry. It was talking to her yesterday and she was just heartbroken. Because this is work as you know people who work in the Industry. They socialize with their co workers. They become sort of your extended family. Her entire community her entire network has been affected by. We heard from some employees Just a couple of minutes ago. Who are deeply concerned about their own future. What is your message to them right now. It is heartbreaking and a lot of our restaurant owners view their employees as family Almost all they do is saying but it's one in which we are really struggling with the best approach we can take. That's where it'd be making such an aggressive ask of Congress right now. This is a national pandemic. It's a public emergency. So we need the public government to step in and provide this funding so that our goal right now is really just to keep these employees on payroll allow them to continue to work for us even if we're not operational even if we're in hibernation so to speak so that as soon as we get the all clear signal from public health officials we can pivot. We can open up those doors and we can bring everyone back online as quickly and immediately as possible new knotted to this earlier. But are they going to be restaurants? That just can't survive because they can't make it on takeout alone. We're really trying to avoid that. But it what is challenging right? Now as we don't know a natural disaster has a beginning a middle and an end we were in the beginning of this right now and we cannot forecast how long we're going to be in this position. Or when are we allowed to open Restaurants generally measure their cash flow and available credit in days weeks. Probably not months so as it becomes a sustained problem. The restaurants are going to have to really tough decisions to make which is why we need Congress to act quickly. We've heard these calls to the public to buy a gift certificate to their favorite neighborhood restaurant as a show of support. Is that something you think is a good idea right now? We we absolutely support that. Obviously we are focused right now on serving our community. These are difficult times for everybody and usually if it's a snow day if it's a natural disaster folks are going to the restaurants. We don't want to change that at all. We want to continue to be the center piece of the cornerstone. These communities Sean Kennedy with the Natch National Restaurant Association. We appreciate

National Restaurant Associatio San Francisco Sean Kennedy TOM Congress Bayside Simone Barron Seattle Samara Sariano Executive Vice President Queens Partner Manhattan California Washington
"samara" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

04:23 min | 9 months ago

"samara" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Sort of was like I. Don't think this exists. Period right so it was really quite shortly after that that I. Started pitching this podcast idea because I mean the inbetween anything that happened is that Paul Scheer podcasting genius and House like four of them asked me to be on one of them. This is so ridiculous, but he asked me to be on a podcast. Um, where he was doing like a top one hundred movies of all time one episode per movie and they were breaking up the episodes with according to an expert in the middle to talk about something related to the movie and the movie for me was Sophie's Choice Oh my goodness. Real upper definitely from made when I was like to. but you know. He wanted to talk about dialect like what Merrill was doing it how you tell stories with dialect and I've actually coached Paul, so it was fun to be like. I literally walked out of that podcast studio and I called my mom and I was like Oh. Man podcast is like my medium. And she was like that's what you do with what you learn from the. Conference I love that, and so I kind of you know so. The end of the story is that the PODCAST is called permission to speak. And it is going to be an interview every week with I. Sort of I think of it as sort of two generally two categories either people who are. Experts on the voice like their social scientists and linguists and speech coaches. Who Coach Hillary Clinton who coach? Corporate people who are like sitting on massive amounts of. Tips. And can come on and really you know sort of throw best ideas into the pot. And then the other massive category is people who are new not call themselves quote unquote experts who are just living life in some industry, where, either because a leadership position because of some bravery, they have a perspective they can share and I'm sort of excited to bring some people who we think of in the public eye, but we don't necessarily associate with the voice. Bring them in and get to kind of talk to them about the stuff that they haven't necessarily talked about in other interviews. The is about sort of your public persona. And how do we build? Our Public Persona feels authentic. I'm so excited I think I'm GONNA be subscribing immediately. All the notes. That rates to me being like this is thing, but I don't to do in the world. Correct I haven't heard many things that it's geared to how to use your voice how to speak how to find your voice in also. Here's some tips for just in case you are a little, nervous or trying something new I think this is fantastically. thinking it really is like the super..

Paul Scheer Coach Hillary Clinton House Sophie Merrill
1,400 Seattle students without updated vaccinations could be banned from class: report

News, Traffic and Weather

00:44 sec | 11 months ago

1,400 Seattle students without updated vaccinations could be banned from class: report

"Some students in Seattle public schools will be banned from going to class tomorrow come jeffco July explains why last year lawmakers eliminated the personal and philosophical exemptions from required vaccines this was after an outbreak of measles in the unvaccinated population in Clark County but starting on Wednesday unvaccinated students without a legal exemption will not be allowed in S. P. S. classrooms we don't hear anything from the family's gold the kid will come into school you will have a more even a nice welcoming place and tell their parents can come and get them the director of health services Samara hoax says they are flexible and if the family could prove they have a vaccination appointment in the next week or so the student will be

Clark County Seattle Director Of Health Services Samara
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Film film and i really wanted to work that before we've got onset because i know a lot of times you know shooting really quickly sure and so we planned all of that ahead ahead of time and especially because of shooting out of order and shoot all of these days so we could go back to the script and figure out okay so she should greece level six sir. Yes we figured out the off of each scene so that it wouldn't get too repetitive because a lot of horror films. The protagonist protagonist can play oh be shocked or scared over and over again and i really wanted to pivot each time and get and then determined and then just frustrated or just completely over it you know yeah yeah and starting with that shock and frighten frightened and instead of getting more and more afraid and just unraveling wanted her to get getting go four on ripley by the army. Are there ten points for this. Are there films that are referenced by the filmmakers or two. Who is that helpful for us and actor or is it sort of just going with your gut in terms of what subscription it's different for each job. Sometimes you really want those references to to get a sense of what the filmmakers a thinking but with this <hes> was really i mean the tone was already on the paper and and then when we were on the location it was so beautiful and i really got a sense of how grand this settings yeah for yeah yeah totally and then i'm just playing the truth of the scenes. Even though this so ridiculous yeah you know it's an interesting negotiation that i think like i feel like all the actors and this this is sounds basic but it doesn't happen are on the same page like there is a reality but there's also a bit of an arch missed some of the performances. That's just i right like i just i love the weights cast like i don't know like the permutations they went but like the fact that henry's the patriarch like not the biggest name. It's just a great actor. He spent perfect for this one of those actors that every time i see him like oh. I wish i saw more of him. Yeah he really can play that. You seem very grand and intimidating at first slowly unravels into this desperate bummbly yeah. They're morons okay so jumping around a bit image guns akimbo. I think i might see you in toronto for that. Yeah i'll be there too so mr daniel radcliffe spending time with that gentleman. He's the best swedish love the best asked so. I gathered this unique. I mean his sensibilities. I love how cool it was. I was hiding my harry potter.

mr daniel radcliffe greece harry potter henry toronto
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Easy perfect so was there a metric for success on that one because that's where thing on netflix things my sense is that did that was watched by a lot of people yeah you anything or is it like they just say. I have a numbers numbers work with netflix. I think someone said to me that it was the most watched netflix original at that time but i don't know if that's true. Not you figure it out. I'd have no way of knowing but career-wise you notice. There's that changes things a little bit more and more dole started opening especially actually without genre and getting into more and more brooms and meeting with different causing directors definitely started rolling off to that and that's when i made the moved to l._a. So you've made the move yeah. I think yeah come over going to be treated. Are you so far. I love it yeah yeah. It took a year to feel like home but again back to my roots of moving around it wasn't necessarily a huge heat shock but remember we the template that we've discovered for us. You need to move every two years so welcome to new york. Twenty twenty one loves it. The when and how did three billboards happened small role but like a really key flat was incredible. I really and i have to thank my fiance for that because because i was such a fan of martin mcdonagh's work but jimmy who's a rider he you know when i was learning the lines for the audition. He brought up the notion that he's a playwright. You gotta get every single line right and that character was written so precisely nicely so i had a lot of buts likes run and i made sure i got every one of those like idioms in the right right place and at the rap potty martin said the only person who auditioned that got the lines right. It's sommes oh thank god thank god. Thank you jimmy. What <hes> what is that experience onset like you're working up to. John hawkes is unbelievable. Aw francis mcdonnell the stars of the all stars seeing..

netflix jimmy martin mcdonagh francis mcdonnell dole John hawkes new york two years
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Yeah that was the goal was to just keep working and i was so young in a way i started when i was seventeen contain <hes> so i was just excited that i got to go to drama school every day and got to do this but you know i get to see what a set looks like in this you know yeah. It was a huge production and i thought that was really cool and i just wanted to keep doing that. How soon did when did you come to the states for the first time i came to. I'm so bad with dates. It was straight off. Do i finished away so maybe i was twenty money one when a car i'm so you've got to talk to the staff really overtime. She's i came over of a to get representation but i still lived in australia because i was i could get work that and and i'd seen a lot of people go move to america when they were still known in australia and it's so hard to get work so i was just auditioning from australia and luckily dante myself on tape and i could still work. I can do like embassador things in australia and make money got it and then moved to the states. When i finally booked job there got it was there. Was there a template for you can actor or actress to emulate at that point a path that moore again at that point. It was like i was going with you. You take anyone wanna hire me right. What's the first big hollywood audition that like got. You excited. You remember one one. That was like oh. I must have done. I was unemployed for nearly two years. I don't i yeah millions yeah. I i honestly anything and everything that made it like a twenty year. Old woman was there. Were they tv series movies. Everything yeah uh-huh. Did you find yourself going out for the same kinds of parts completely different. Let's good yeah. It was fun yeah 'cause that's seems relatively lucky to that that you were already being thought of indifferent passes. I think my team for doing that. They didn't pigeonhole me. They really believed to me that i could. You know that i could be versatile enrolls unrolls which was fantastic so what's the first american production that you were. Did i think i did i was in two <music> scenes of monster trucks worldwide walmart again. There's a lesson there somewhere. I don't know what the lesson lesson is. But there's a lesson i mean i wasn't carrying the film on shall i was it was really great to see how american productions just to see a little snippet of a i've actually heard it's a decent movie despite dump it into whatever notes okay and then the big one was the babysitter the babysitter so yeah so for net fleetwood mac gee who on samba cast you're the lead or the babysitter n- so did that feel like a jump in terms of the production of being the lead in a production like yeah. Really a lot of pressure was freaking adopt. Well 'cause yeah handelman the american accent for that long before so had dialect coach and <hes> really wanted to you know because it was sort of the big the opportunity if i failed at that i didn't know if i was going to be hyatt afterwards so i really wanted to do a good job and put a lot of pressure on myself itself but michi was wonderful to work with. He's he's. He's so sweet so he really calmed me down i did i moderated a panel that he did a comecon on years ago for the terminator movie he did and i'll never forget. He's like such a showman. Oh yeah usually when you have the moderate something it's like. You've got a job to do kind of like traffic. Cop i get up there. They're gonna literally. I'm like start. Introduce the cast and i'm like an and here's mckee and mc jesus..

australia walmart hollywood moore mckee america dante twenty year two years
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"That's great. That's the key not to feel judged. Not feel like to feel that there's freedom spinning critical way not personal way not a personal judgment. We're all in this together. Let's fuck around with it and you're not being yourself character which connotes. I think i saw quote. Where it's you know it's easy to be a character but it's hard to be yourself with actors yeah yeah okay okay so so early on they put you into the acting classes like a theater program schools outside of school programs and you do you remember immediately really finding that to be like a safe place on my first role i was like five or six production and i played the grinch for toll running around with blonde hair blue eyes thinking i was the scariest thing possible and you know all the parents laughing fagan had a great time explains a lot about where he ended up so far. You're you're in all goes back to the grinch uh-huh. When does it go from fun to something serious in terms of like. I'm actually gonna give this ago. I honestly i've been asked this question. If you times pinpoint a lightbulb moment i think it was a natural succession from doing it at school and i was <music> always doing theater outside of school and i just anywhere it was i would gravitate towards and then yeah. I don't even remember when i think for a show called out of the blue in australia when i was thirteen or fourteen <hes> and it was is just of course you know it wasn't a decision i made it just. Was there no so grateful that my parents really supported on me undoing probably saw how happy it made you in other form yeah and i think i was quite determined as well because i loved it so much and i get to do this all day. Every day and great yeah okay signed me up what backtracking a little bit so you mentioned the film being exposed to for your dad adam. What were you into as a kid like we're remember actors or filmmakers or were you in to australia. I mean that was the heyday also of like when like this look wave wave of amazing australian they love brew dark movies and i was really young so watching animal kingdom at twelve years exit exc town yeah. I don't know what was i into in indonesia was hot too. We couldn't really go to the films films because they were all either subtitled or dubbed in most of asia as well. I think and my parents were really adamant about not letting us watch television too much. You know we sort of had to use our imagination and mom always made us paint. If we didn't do our homework she would just say well. He still watercolor the levins line. Don't every time yes nation alum. We've just make short films do skits for our parents and my dad had a huge library. It was a whole room but instead of bookshelves. It was just full of d._v._d.'s so i remember watching the breakfast club and falling in love with that and i've watched it about seventeen times and we had a like a dodgy copy of friends because it was the only way we could find english speaking d._v._d.'s so i was i was in love with friends. I have great memories of my dad coming home and watching that together but we only had up to season six. I didn't realize it finished until the way season thirty nine or whatever i remember reading the scripts on and it was like episode five thousand one hundred forty nine great do they actually put the number on yes. Were you traumatized all by by the math that the ring probably came out when you were like brown ten. That was my first heart film i ever saw it traumatized me the character name. Oh yeah oh but you know. My sister's name is morgan so it's like it's your parents knew something water. I don't know what happened but smart malkin asia. That was the first scary film. I watched and i remember the girls at high school..

australia fagan asia d._v._d. indonesia malkin morgan brown twelve years
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Yeah based on what your parents did or what was i mean they. They just they just love moving. I think that's why this don't married. Uh-huh it's actually my mom worked for museums. She's a p._h._d. In parana can opt which is very niche ancient singaporean. I'm a little rusty online yeah yeah it was a little rusty on parental may have made that word it up for all and check this after keeping on your toes and then dad he was a filmmaker and then he worked act for corporations when we were growing up aw and then now he's has a p._h._d. In film noir and is a professor fashion professor professor of film a university in australia. It's pretty cool. So were you exposed to a lot of specifically fillmore. Let of ingrid bergman and bette davis yeah. Did you absorb that in one or did you reject it because it was your dad's love i loved them but i think because because he has a critical mind of films he was teaching young age. You know you look at that shot. It's beautiful and we were like we just find joy. Joy movie dumb and dumber dad like visit great education as a kid yet. You soak that up so okay so by nature of moving around a lot too few. How do you feel defined you as a kid does that because that can make you adoptable or it can make you mountain adapt to the one of the opposite way however i really appreciate it now because i was always a performer and the lifestyle of performa might you you go to different cities and countries and you have to make a whole new family onset you meet two hundred people in one day and you work with them for a couple of months and then saying goodbye the do it all over again and i don't think i could be. I don't think i would be as loving of that if it wasn't for yeah the growing up with the same that is interesting because i've talked to a lot of actors actors authentic always boggles my mind because i think it happens for a lot of actors especially early on that by the end of of a a great experience. You've you've really bonded with the speed and you're like you feel like you're going to see you again. You're going to see them. Wipe the rest of your lives and the reality is often like yes a one in ten films. You might find a real really good friend that you you do hang out with malicious is just like no. It's just gets in the way i in l._a. No i'm i'm in serbia arrow back. In serbia back via <hes> in the upbringing has served you well in that because you kind of had a year because i of course and i also think it contributed to my love of the work because i was so shy and have severe anxiety and my parents put me into drama classes at a really young age because i wouldn't speak twelve children for weeks and as a way of getting out of my shell they'd put me in drama classes and i really loved the outlets. Yeah it's interesting. It's a recurring theme similar like i talk more on. Mike like most people don't associate actors with introverts but definitely so what was that because you you talk about anxiety growing up yes. That's something that's always kind of stuck with you in some ways right now. I'm freaking out and there's a lot of liquor up here. It's ten thirty in the morning so i don't know if we're really ready to go. I've got nine of these to do otherwise. But how does it manifest now. Does it get to affect your life or work crew announcing anxious so i don't i don't know i mean there's definitely ways to cope with it and things not to do and <hes> therapy and all that jazz and it's great you know i think the more i talk about the more people like oh me too. So what about on a film set is that because like what's my happy visit. That's larry. I can just be a lunatic tickets tokyo judge..

severe anxiety professor serbia ingrid bergman parana bette davis australia tokyo l._a Mike one day
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"That's enough plugs for one week right guys okay onto onto the main event. Here is a bright shining new star meets samaraweera you can see should we just have a chat a cheeky welcome to cheeky chats with us mara weaving helena. I wanna a great to meet you. How's the press retreating you. This is probably a good one because there's there's some good good energy energy. Yeah it's good. The reviews seemed to like it which is nice. We saw this one. I mean i as as the days gone by like it is does feel like it's like gaining momentum. I saw one from guillermo del toro yesterday the tweet the tweet yeah i mean i've stayed off of looking too much because i think just for me if i care about the reviews and the judgment than maybe it's just not a healthy thing to it's hard to separate myself but my fiancee like texts me the good ones and he reads them out loud and a separate the when you have the likes of guillermo like not only talking about the movie about your performance. I'm still in shock about. It'll hit me like a week and yeah yeah well. You should enjoy this is right because there's no you've been doing. This is your first rodeo but this is this is a different kind of attack. I should enjoy it more. I such batting zayed like the movie making thank you pop. It's fantastic. The press stuff gets me yeah okay so we're going to treat you nicely warriors. You did a great job. Why am i think she usually job better. Are you the kind of person that like on a job. You expect the best or worst like you're on a job like. Are you expecting affecting like when i see this in theaters on t._v. Like i'm going to be disappointed or i'm going to be excited. I never know because a lot of it's in the ed yeah so even if you feel really good you just s._t. Just that lesson you learned early on like oh. This is kind of out of my august from age fourteen okay. I can just do the best. I can can do and hope for the best yeah and luckily with this. They nailed it clearly yeah so when did when did the did you notice a shift in recent months of like when people people started at least whether you hang attention says you've been you've been working to cut something but when i saw it in theaters with with a whole crowd of people at a fantasia i that's when i was yeah i i calmed down after seeing that reaction. Had you seen before yeah but with execs and everyone's going to say oh it's great <hes> the honest opinion until you with the wrestling fans. That's the right audience to asia. Yeah and i'm sure i haven't seen it with like a packed audience. This is the kind of thing where it's going to y- like i was biting my nails. The first the opening and then everyone started laughing offing at the right moment and being afraid at the right moments. I calmed down. You're like oh wait. We kind of did what we were trying to do so okay so let's let's let's go back. This is personal first podcast. I feel like i was doing some research. I hadn't until two days ago. Okay wall yeah sorry. This is three minutes and you can already tell. I one on one five okay. That's i consider that a solo exclusive nine okay so talk to me growing up. What are your parents do where where you can afford it around. A bit travelled a bit. So what do you consider like. Where did you grow up if somebody asks you what do you say. I say it's a long story now. It's time do you have it yeah exactly yeah. I was born in australia but i left it two weeks old and we grew up in fiji singapore indonesia <hes> little bit in italy and then moved back. I julia and then within australia moved pretty much every two to four years..

guillermo del toro australia wrestling asia fiji singapore indonesia julia italy three minutes four years two weeks one week two days
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"I just got back from d._c. Twenty three in los angeles a <hes> which is essentially comecon for all things disney and disney has enough things just to have their own comic con <hes> <hes> they have obviously pixar and star wars and marvel in the animated films and now disney plus and i'm probably forgetting a thousand other things things and all the fox properties now so there's an embarrassment of riches and de twenty-three is kind of their big fan event where they bring out tons of stars stars make a ton of big announcements shots exclusive footage and also give some access to the press like myself so i did a bunch of interviews with with it's felt like on who's like us on saturday. I felt like i interviewed every movie star on the planet in the course of like three hours so it was everybody anybody from dwayne johnson to angelina jolie anna kendrick it was just it was everybody was there for all manner of films and <hes> it was exhausting but a lot of fun to oh and by the way and the star wars cast spoke to daisy ridley our old buddy j.j abrams john boyega kelly marie tran it was it was a lot of fun so we're just starting to. We're gonna just start to roll out all these interviews. There's a lot of them so look out for i'll be touting them on my social media joshua horowitz on twitter instagram <hes> but also follow along m._t._v. news <hes> and they will <hes> spread the good word on on those interviews. There are a lot of fun lot of cool conversations so hope you guys enjoy that one also worth noting new comedy central after hours episode up with with the great danny mcbride adam devine eddie patterson there the sars of the righteous gemstones on h._b._o. We did a our own kind of riff on on hot ones and omar's a parody a tribute to that very popular web series. We did ours a little bit. Differently went a different direction. I'm very proud of it. Those guys were blast to shoot with. It's very funny and again a foul that can check that one out on comedy central's youtube page judge. I've sent it out over an instagram and twitter so highly recommend that one and that's about it..

disney twitter dwayne johnson los angeles danny mcbride youtube pixar instagram joshua horowitz eddie patterson omar three hours
"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"samara" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Prepare your is humans. Happy sad confused. Begins <music> today on happy second fused samara weaving on her breakthrough role in the new film ready or not. Hey guys. I'm josh josh horowitz. Welcome to another edition of happy sad confused first time guest first time for probably for many even hearing the name samara weaving. I would guess <music> but this was. This was a unique opportunity. I thought because you may have heard about the film ready or not. It's now in theaters. It opened just last week. It's one of those films snuck up on me and i think a lot of critics and audiences. When i saw the trailer i was like i didn't even know this movie existed and i suddenly it was super intrigued by it and wound behold when i saw the finished product. It's too wild fun movie that. I definitely recommend if you don't know anything about it. Basically it's kind of a horror thriller. It's about samara weaving plays a young woman who gets married into a very wealthy family and and quickly finds that she suddenly has to be kind of indoctrinated a through a game that is played and the game basically entails her being hunted so it's a pretty dark premise but it's played in a very arch and funny way. It's it's super. Entertaining has a great sample around samara incuding mcdowell and henry journey may not know that name either and reserve the i've always been been obsessed with ever since he was kitsch ridge in the first mission impossible movie. I've been like holding out hope ever since that. That character comes back because he was amazing and i bet he does come back next to mission impossible movies anyway sidetrack but the biggest. I think talking point around this film has been the leading performance from samara weavings mara <hes>. You probably haven't seen her in a lot of things. She was in miniseries remake of picnic picnic hanging rock. She was in the netflix film the babysitter she had a choice little role in three billboards outside ebbing missouri as penelope very funny in that but she's now suddenly getting a lot of really interesting opportunities in this one. This performance in this film really stands out and if you watch it you'll see she definitely has some star power and charisma and she's definitely one to watch. She has just finished shooting the new bill and ted the film guys. Come on amazing <hes> she plays alex winter aka bills daughter in it. Can we see that and she's also in a crazy new action. Film called guns akimbo opposite our old buddy daniel radcliffe so lots of really cool things happening for samara <hes> and i was always intrigued getting actors at that kind of moment whether ab- about to break in there it's all kind of just starting to happen and that's definitely the the moment for some are right now and if you're wondering about her last name yes she is related. She is the niece of the great australian actor hugo weaving you know from <hes> <hes> of course the matrix films and so many other things so definitely some talent in the bloodlines of the weaving family so real fun to talk to samara on this conversation conversation on the podcast this week other things to mention well guys..

samara josh josh horowitz samara incuding mcdowell daniel radcliffe alex winter netflix ted missouri
"samara" Discussed on The Tip Off

The Tip Off

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"samara" Discussed on The Tip Off

"But we finally gotten in touch with Odell home. The man whose testimony right now is the only piece of direct evidence in the case against Curtis flowers. And then one day late full after months of Tunis reporting on the story in general, Samara was on the phone chatting away to cookie who's imprisoned at the time. And he came out with Odell Hallman told our producer Samara free Mark that he actually that Curtis lowers had not confessed to the murders this dollars, the star witness for the state saying that I was friends with Curtis. He confided with me when we were both incarcerated that he had committed the murders. And then he told Samara, like on a cell phone from prison that he made up that testimony that was false. Is ten of being killed. Some people in need. There was a lot. I don't know about this. It was all. All faithful. Smart ended the Cova cookie, and immediately Madeleine people have asked us about this before, like, what's your reaction? It's like honestly, in that moment, my reaction is like I have like fifteen questions like where immediately critical of did he really for Saul? Are you sure? He said that such a dumb question. Right? 'cause like especially to another reporter, but like how did he actually say it? Yes, actually said it. Did he say it more than once? Did he suggest like, how did he say it? And so there you have to ask all these questions before you. Like sinks in really, I think how important this is what just happened. You know what? How important it was that he saying, 'i testimony in this death penalty case is false, and there was more about cookie. He'd been presented as great witness, but Samara Madeline wanted to dig into his track record what we wanted to find out what we wanted to try to compile his criminal record because we wanted to see if he'd gotten any kind of deals in exchange for his testimony like whether the prosecutor had given him any like lighter sentences or anything at all. But this wasn't a case of typing the name into a computer and bringing records up now yet. Again, these jails old records not been logged on any computers. All of the records that we were wanting in the podcasts were all technically public records. So like if you looked at the law Mississippi, it would say that these are things that that we would have access to, but just because we, we have access to them under the law, doesn't mean that they're easy to find. And so finding these records was a challenge in a lot of cases. So they tracked down all of the strange places where these booking records were being held for Carleton county. They soon found themselves in a dusty old abandoned jail, found ourselves in this old jail. It was like a civil war, post civil war era jail in Mississippi that was no longer used as a jail and hadn't been in a long time, but it was being used now to store some records. So the jail was mostly vacant. And if you just picture like two stories, smaller jail, it's got like, you know, some bars and some of the windows and inside the paint is just completely peeling off the walls. There's no electricity. And then like there are these like narrow hallways that lead back to, you know, like a row of like maybe five jail cells me. It's like a tiny jail, like in one wing, and then you'd like get to the end of that wing and you find like a jail cell that was just like packed with boxes or filing cabinets. And so we were hauling stuff out. From that jail cell into this like front and tree room, where there was a little bit more natural light like we'd flashlights in there, but anyways, and so then we were in the like set up this little workstation, and we're looking through all these documents trying to find documents related to a home in. One super Pac..

Samara Madeline Saul Curtis flowers Odell Hallman Mississippi Tunis Carleton county Cova producer reporter Madeleine prosecutor Mark one day
After nearly skipping Wimbledon, Djokovic wins fourth title

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:51 min | 2 years ago

After nearly skipping Wimbledon, Djokovic wins fourth title

"Bell with a look at prospects for another america's cup on the bed i think we're gonna have a few years wait before we get to even be able to hope for that we're not waiting anymore for sports at one forty five let's head over to at and t see if we have a score yet and the game is joe salvator and jennifer we do have a score it's the giants in front i one nothing over the as in the bottom of the third inning that run coming in the second inning as brandon crawford with a one out double and gorky swallowed with an rbi single that came off shawn monnaie andy swore is a pitch great over his last six starts for the giants has struck out four as so far through three innings of work this is the rubber game of this part of the series that'll be obviously here in san francisco next weekend after the all star break three games at the coliseum so right now in the bottom of the third inning it is the giants the front of the as by a score of one to nothing before the game the giants placed yesterday starter jeff samara on the dl third time that he has gone on the disabled list this year this time with right shoulder inflammation the giants hoping that the ten day rest of course couple with the all star break will get the shark back on track at the world cup today was france winning its second ever world cup title defeating corey four to two it's also it's first ever world cup win on foreign soil novak djokovic wins the wimbledon men's final straight set win over kevin anderson took just two hours and fifteen minutes to complete that after djokovic anderson played the two longest semi finals ever at the all england club yovich is the fourth band went at least four titles at the.

Djokovic Anderson England Club Kevin Anderson Novak Djokovic Corey France Gorky Jennifer Joe Salvator Bell Jeff Samara San Francisco Giants Shawn Monnaie Andy Brandon Crawford America Fifteen Minutes Two Hours Ten Day
Dwayne Johnson Sings & Drinks Tequila on 'Colbert'

Nick Digilio

03:19 min | 2 years ago

Dwayne Johnson Sings & Drinks Tequila on 'Colbert'

"Santa claus knows yeah so colbert man let me just say can i say this real quick one of the guests the only guest last night or i say yesterday morning from the night before because i watch him the next day was that was the rock was was was dwayne johnson and i want to say i want to say this was without question and i think dwayne johnson's a very charming guy and he's good talk show host and he has fun stories that was without question he did two segments to full segments with him was the best talk show appearance he's ever made really yeah and colbert i mean when into wrestling history they talked about his grandfather father he sang samoan song it was the drank they drank whiskey together are tequila are they drank tequila together they had an eyebrow contest because you know stephen colbert has that eyebrow thing to he does the eyebrow thing so they had like they get a shot together with the eyebrows they and they did their it was fantastic and it was a really entertaining and and colbert asked really great questions they didn't even talk about skyscraper at one point at one point it's like okay so the new movie the new movie a skyscraper and the rot grabs the blue car all the guys have the blue cards the rat black grabs bluecardiganed any throws the cardio's the hell with the movie let's have another drink and so he pulls the bottle out and he's like yeah let's show the clip so they show the clip and then they come back and they said goodbye he didn't even talk about the movie and it was still an extraordinarily entertaining interview so based upon what you said it seems like campbell's the real sorry that movie yeah well neve campbell was on the night before and colbert was asking her and they showed a clip and she's like flipping guys and stabbing guys with scissors and knocking i was like look at neve campbell kicking samaras and then colbert asked her you know who kicks more ass the rocker you she's like me so that's enough for me to want to see this movie so although eric texted me he saw it and he he texted me and he was like i it's ridiculous well really like you can't tell from the commercials that the movies ridiculous i'm going to see it in that loudest biggest screen possible so the dumbness is even more you know that shakespeare's the right movie to see yeah all right so here we go these google searches which phrases each state searched for oregon montana pennsylvania and connecticut search for air conditioner i probably would do that too you know my ex wife lives in oregon she lives in medford oregon and we text back and forth every once in a while we're still on friendly terms and she constantly telling me because i always tell her you know what the weather is like here and she's like yeah it's one hundred and three right now it's always like ninety degrees there the hell can you live there isn't that farther north it's almost california she's she's right near the border of california washington idaho wyoming and colorado all they were searching campsites that makes sense maryland amusement parks oh that we didn't talk i talk about that going to great american stuff that i used to do that a lot when i was a kid ask alaska in vermont bike rentals all right louisiana they.

Colbert Ninety Degrees
Macedonia naming dispute: 4,000 protesters in Greece's Thessaloniki march with banners calling politicians 'traitors'

Latino USA

01:57 min | 2 years ago

Macedonia naming dispute: 4,000 protesters in Greece's Thessaloniki march with banners calling politicians 'traitors'

"The eu funds to be cut to those governments that won't take in more asylum seekers he also wants to change eu rules that require migrants to stay in their countries of first arrival which often means italy in greece after the meeting tweeted that he felt things were moving in the right direction german chancellor angela merkel says the meeting created a lot of goodwill but that for now it's not going to be possible to get a european solution she recommends agreements in smaller groups of two or three countries miracles coalition partners are threatening to bring down the government if she doesn't find a way to reduce germany's burden from silom seekers for npr news i'm teri schultz in brussels egypt has extended its state of emergency for another three months president abdel fattah el sisi expects it to be approved by parliament within seven days and go into effect by mid july egypt has been under a state of emergency since april of last year this is npr news thousands of people demonstrated in greece's second largest city against a deal with macedonia that seeks to end nearly twenty seven years of disagreement between the two countries over macedonia's name protesters threw bottles and chairs and police responded with tear gas and stunned grenades nationalists in both countries oppose the deal that would rename greece's neighbor north macedonia and allow the greek province of macedonia to still use that name at the world cup in russia england has progressed into the next stage of the tournament after defeating panama but npr's alina seljuk reports panama fans still had something to celebrate panama lost to england six to one but this was a historic moment for team panama it's scored its very first world cup goal as a result of this match both england and belgium qualify for the knockout round of sixteen panama will blade tunisia next though neither team will move onto the next phase separately japan and senegal ended their match in times or airing two goals each lots of fans from both countries attended the game also in the stands was japanese princess who's the first member of japan's royal family to visit russia in more than one hundred years alina sell you npr news samara russia golfer bubba watson overcame a six stroke deficit to win his third travelers championship title on sunday watson closed with a seven hundred sixty three for seventeen under total and a threeshot win watson became the first three time winner on the pga tour the season polling within one of billy casper's tournament record of four victories i'm jim hallmark npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include carnegie corporation of new york supporting innovations in education democratic engagement and the advancement of international peace and security more information is available online at carnegie dot org and the corporation.

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India hits back at US, hikes import duty on 29 products

BBC World Service

03:47 min | 2 years ago

India hits back at US, hikes import duty on 29 products

"Gration a priority of its presidency of the eu which begins in july here's catcher in country after country across the european union we've seen the rise in popularity of tough on migration politicians and parties take italy for example the new government has has absolutely no more mass immigration the migrant issue has the potential to rip the european union apart as each government simply looks after itself there's growing agreement over the idea of processing centres outside the european union trying at least to keep economic migrants out and only allowing in those migrants who have a legal right to stay the us house of representatives vote today on a series of reforms to the immigration system the bills would cut legal migration and address wider issues around family separation so votes come after president trump ended the most controversial part of the administration's immigration policy children will now be allowed to stay with their parents but whole families will be detained if they've entered the country illegally tony martinez the mayor of brownsville in texas says no one knows how long it'll take to reunite children already separated from their parents it's gonna be a herculean task if you will because it's going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly know where these children were separated from the families and where those parents are president trump has said that north korea had already returned the remains of two hundred us troops missing from the korean war there is no confirmation this has happened mr trump told supporters on wednesday evening at a rally in the state of minnesota that the remains have been sent back that day the north korean leader kim jong un pledged to return some american soldiers remains after meeting donald trump in singapore india has become the latest country to increase import duties on some american agricultural goods in retaliation against us tariffs on steel and aluminium around thirty products are affected duties have also been raised on some grades of iron and steel products from delhi davina gupta has the details and they didn't government has decided to raise the import tariff saw on major agricultural produce at almonds walnuts apples even american trip in some cases the tariff has gone up as high as ninety percent and it begins from twenty percent which will have a big bill to the us pharma's amelie because most of these products are imported from the us india is a big market for these farmers news from the bbc former employees of one of the world's biggest foreign aid agencies the medical charity met samsung on frontier have told the bbc that some of its staff used local prostitutes while working in africa the female whistle blower said the behavior among logistical staff was widespread the allegations were not made against doctors or nurses the charity says it does not tolerate abuse harris mental exploitation but needs more information to investigate the claims east african heads of state to meet on thursday in ethiopia to try to get peace talks for south sudan back contract more than four years after civil war broke out it comes a day onto the two men at the heart of the war president salva care and the rebel leader react mischa net for the first time in two years if he appears prime minister abby arcnord broker that session in addis ababa the prime minister of new zealand just cinder our dern has had a baby girl she was admitted to hospital in auckland early on thursday her deputy winston peters is now acting prime minister will run the country for the next six weeks while miss done takes maternity leave she's the first world leader to do so correspondent howard griffith says ms ogden and her partner clark david twentyfirstcentury couple everything about it is very modern even the way it was announced was actually announced two new zealand and the world on social media with a post on instagram photo of very proud looking mother died and young little baby with the message welcome to our village three more matches to be played in the football world cup in russia today denmark take on australia in samara in the south west of the country before franz play peru catcher in the evening game features argentina and croatia the argentine captain leeann are messy will be hoping to put behind him the missed penalty in the team's opening match that's the latest bbc news news you're listening to the inquiry on the bbc world service with me helen grady each week we bring you four expert.

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