35 Burst results for "Samantha it"

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:58 min | Last month

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

"To federal funds established after the attacks of september eleven. Two thousand and one have paid around twelve billion dollars over the years. The money went to first responders. The families of those who died or people have gotten sick as a result of the terrorist carnage. Medical claims have been increasing in recent years. Many from people with cancer marketplace's samantha fields reports on the ongoing health costs connected to that day twenty years ago this weekend. Michael o'connell responded to the world trade center as a firefighter on nine eleven and spent the next few weeks working at ground zero five years later he got sick. I know the exact date. It was december thirty first. Two thousand six new year's eve. He went to bed that night filling healthy but when he woke up the next morning i literally had swollen limbs swollen ankles all my joints were inflamed by body kind of blew up to like twice the size. It was a pulmonologist figured out that he had a rare autoimmune disease called sarcoidosis that was attacking his skin and joints and told him he'd gotten it from breathing in toxins. The material that responders and survivors were exposed to when the towers collapsed was quite toxic. Dr michael crane treats a lot of nine eleven first responders through the world trade center health program clinic at mount sinai so huge huge burning buildings collapsing. Everything inside is burning and it collapses down into a pile and then an enormous. Dust cloud a lot of firefighters. Police officers and others at ground zero started getting sick almost immediately. I with what they called the world trade center cough then. Ptsd and depression. And eventually years later cancers this exposure has a really really long tail anyone who develops any kind of illness linked to nine eleven can get free healthcare through the world trade center health program but michael bearish a lawyer for nine eleven survivors says there are likely a lot of people dealing with nine eleven related health problems. Who don't know they're

Samantha Fields Michael O Connell Dr Michael Crane World Trade Center Health Prog World Trade Center Cancer Sarcoidosis Mount Sinai Ptsd Michael Bearish Depression
"samantha it" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

The Relaxed Dog

01:58 min | Last month

"samantha it" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

"Was because of her. And partly i will. Cite glen cook gave me a lot of confidence as well. You know i was probably the oldest one on our cost And the one who couldn't use a computer and all of those sort of things but he actually gave me a lot of confidence and of met some really wonderful papers for seminars that had been held. Derek joel of a lot of respect for viglen would some a lot of a lot of great resources available dave when we can do it. Yeah and of course lorne loyal who i just love because she just makes people feel so comfortable and gives people so much knowledge. She's a great lady in the job. Industry it has been an absolute pleasure. Having a chat with you this morning loved hearing. Thank you. Thank you robot. Look forward to catching up again. Light you take care thank you. Thank you very much for listening. I hope that you enjoyed the show and just like dow new listeners. In san jose in the us and cebu city in the philippines of shade this podcast with their friends and now they've got even more talk about also feel free to jump into the facebook group and leave comments or any suggestions or looking forward to that until next week sti- saif and remember. Your dog is family..

glen cook Derek joel viglen lorne dave cebu city san jose philippines us facebook
"samantha it" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

05:01 min | Last month

"samantha it" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

"I love giving gifts the best one that i've ever given. Ooh that's a tough one. Oh my god. I don't know a trip. That's nice trip beautiful. Yeah who was the recipient engaged fan of. What's your favorite board game. I really like playing scrabble. Wow i know that gay tamil play with me because i win all the time you can play scrabble scrabble. I love it. Oh wait. I also love s- categories so much love that game cats so fun these amazing four games so much. What's your favorite color. That varies day to day. I could be all over. I'm i'm really cold to purple lately. What about your favorite color. I don't think really have a least favorite color. Yeah yeah they're all great. I love our. I'm just like drawn to summit certain times and other times. Not okay diamonds or pearls. Ooh i mean. I'm not really for either but if i had to pick i'd probably pick pearls. Yeah dislike gemstones like yes because i'm yeah option. Totally okay this is a silly question drugstore makeup or designer while neither really but i guess at the end of the day it doesn't matter whether it's drugstore designer what matters for me is like the quality and the ingredients and nontoxic like yeah so blow dryer air dry when we were just talking about this earlier. I'm kind of a both kind of both. It depends like. I don't wanna go to bed with my hair really wet. So i'll blow dry my hair or if i wanted to look really pretty i might style it. But yeah he's playing the four day by day being a moment pilates or yoga womb. Well bar because it incorporates. Both coffee or tea coffee yes. What's the weirdest word in the office. Okay the weirdest word is colonel. Because of how it spelt there is no are in. That word is c. o. l. o. n. e. l. It's so funny because like when you say colonel. I'm thinking of like k. e. r. corn kernel. Yeah you're right like it's like colonial. Colo quotas colonel. Whole inoke leyland now..

Colo
What's Up With Pandemic Sex Orgies?

Stuff Mom Never Told You

01:24 min | 2 months ago

What's Up With Pandemic Sex Orgies?

"This has been something. That's puzzling me. Throughout the pandemic samantha knows. I've like occasionally brought it up. It's been on our ideas list for a long time dissipated the yeah well i just kept seeing all these news stories about cracking down on sex orgies and i was just really curious whether or not this was a thing that was happening the whole time and i'm just not in the orgy lube which i'm very much not in the orgy loop and to be clear like no king shaming or shaming of sexual activities as long safe informed consensual activities amongst adults. I just was really curious about all these stories. I get sieg so recently. The new york department of health updated their guidelines for having safe sex during the pandemic which we talked about including this line quote make kinky be creative with sexual positions and physical barriers like walls that allow sexual contact. Bob preventing close face-to-face contact interesting. They heavily advice avoiding sex parties. But if you must get vaccinated. I in choose larger more open and well ventilated spaces. Good to know and as you as you probably heard that the story these guidelines did make the rounds of people like are you talking about glory holes essentially a well ventilated space. I can have a sex party

New York Department Of Health Samantha BOB
Christina Applegate Reveals She Has Multiple Sclerosis

AP News Radio

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Christina Applegate Reveals She Has Multiple Sclerosis

"Actor Christina Applegate says she's been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis Margie's our letter with the latest Christina Applegate said she found out a few months ago that she has multiple sclerosis which affects the nervous system Applegate who is forty nine says it's been a tough road and a strange journey but she's felt supported by others who also have MS Applegate previously battled breast cancer she's probably best known for her roles on married with children Jesse Samantha who and dead to me

Christina Applegate Margie Multiple Sclerosis Applegate Ms Applegate Breast Cancer Jesse Samantha
Infertility & Womens Health With Samantha Davis

The Essential Oil Revolution

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Infertility & Womens Health With Samantha Davis

"While i am here. With samantha davis. Sam is a mama of to one brand new just three months old like to almost as day and is a certified dula and childbirth educator. She wears many hats at embody. Dula trainings as a board member trainer curriculum contributor and membership director. She is a published author with her book. So female samantha or sam liked to be called and metoo welcome to the show. We'll try to make this too confusing with two dulas named sam who love essential oils. How we not met thank you thank you. It's good to be here. thank you for having me. Well i would love to hear more about your book. First and foremost so female. Tell me about that. So basically i had moms coming to me for so long asking me. What oils to use in labor and childbirth postpartum. Even moms that weren't clients of mine. So i ended up doing was i put it in a book and i was like. Oh it's already here in book. And i'm gonna make it super accessible and in affordable it's affordable it's just for women's anyone pick it up and here's the thing and you may have experienced this to all use breastfeeding as an example. Because it's such a common and popular one ray so breastfeeding the big one i get is oh i have a momma who's not producing enough. What oil she continues. Okay well basil's great festivals. Great these all oil. She can use but wait a minute nine times out. It's han it's a latch issue right. So if we're just gonna make moms supply you know. She gained a plethora and she's in gorge. And we're not addressing the actual issue right. We're not solving a problem. We're just gonna end up with an engorged mama. Yes lots of milk is gonna come which is great but we we gotta deal with the flash and see what's up. We need to address that ray.

Samantha Davis Dula Metoo Childbirth Postpartum SAM Samantha Basil Gorge RAY
New Jersey College Student Stabbed up to 120 Times in Uber Killing

Mark Levin

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

New Jersey College Student Stabbed up to 120 Times in Uber Killing

"Gruesome details revealed in the trial of the man accused of murdering a New Jersey college student who mistakenly thought a car she entered was uber ride. Pathologist testified there were more than 100 stab wounds plunged into the body of 21 year old Samantha Josephson. Trial of Nathaniel Roland is entering its second week. He's facing kidnapping and murder charges

New Jersey College Samantha Josephson Nathaniel Roland
"samantha it" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Suci was this. What's the acronym for her party in birmingham. Mld l. d. re year is going to be able to speak to a better but she's a very important figure and she was under house arrest for twenty one years i think the president and hillary clinton were in the other room talking with her about major peacekeeping stuff and you were like wall. No i mean. I was in a meeting and was a historic meeting. Was the first sitting president's trip to myanmar. There had been liberalization where democratic election had occurred and the results were being respected. It looked like and things were liberalizing. Political prisoners were getting out of jail. I'd actually negotiated. The communique before obama came with a whole set of concessions by the burmese government's obama showed up. The communique was negotiated and people were happy with it and there. I found myself in her house in a meeting. With hillary clinton barack obama and the rest of teams might very small meeting of maybe half dozen people in on and luckily even though i was incredibly uncomfortable in the meeting. Your bust out. You're in this security bubble especially when you're a foreign country but even in america where you can't get separated from the bubbles. You can't be like timeout. I gotta go palm for whatever. So i just got swept along. You can't raise your hand and say excuse me my skin's about terrip. I need to relieve some of this pressure. Because that's the really anyway so luckily there was a moment where the meeting got so-called skinny down. Where only the principals were left. And i think what was left with. Secretary clinton suci president bombs. It was very reasonable. The rest of us were kind..

Suci hillary clinton burmese government barack obama birmingham myanmar america Secretary clinton suci
"samantha it" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:17 min | 3 months ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I feel like to at scale. See what's there so much. This is why you're my favorite well. And also i think you know we interviewed amy poehler on armchair and her and three other men created upright citizens brigade which is a formative comedy experience for so many comedians. And you were talking about this idea that you almost feel like to succeed. You have to be a guy's girl you know like you have to be someone who gets along with the guys and who can hang with the guys quote and like. I just love this idea that you guys had a girls night. Essentially giants say this. The female relationships are important and to not disregard those so that you can like climb a ladder or you can like get along with the men. In and of course the reason we feel this is because men dominate so many of these professions. But i loved it just like no also focus on the the girls that i never would have done it. I mean the reason. I'm so careful gear on this one to give credit where credit's do is that liz had been. She'd worked at the pentagon for years. She's been in some of the most male dominant and she just knew that this was placed that she could create just with this small. Act right a place of refuge and a place to inculcate a solidarity. That wasn't there before. And what. I became un ambassador. I had talked to madeleine albright. Who was america's first female secretary of state shattered some serious glass of her own big time before that she was. Un ambassador back in nineteen ninety-three twenty years. Before i was in the job. And she had had this insight as well that i would not have had but for liz and but for madeline which is when she got to the un there were one hundred. Eighty three countries represented there and only seven of the ambassadors. Out of one hundred eighty. Three were women so she created something. She called the g seven. Which of course. The group of seven among countries but girl seven and she gathered those seven ambassadors together. And i think they managed to notch some not trivial policy achievements in so far as they got female judges elected to the war crimes. Tribunals and those judges ended up being involved in passing down the first ever verdicts on rape as a weapon of war and a form of genocide so it ended up having this knock on effect but beyond that they just met and it allows you to identify kind of what you. And what's the what's the guy was society. What's the community. The broader dynamics and it was across region religion because just what these seven countries happened to be. That had put women forward. When i got there. Flash forward twenty years there. One hundred ninety. Three countries in the world by ten countries had joined the un. Since and when i arrived we had thirty seven female permanent representatives female ambassadors and so on mallon advice i convened the g. thirty seven would fluctuate it went up. I think it was the g. Forty one forty two. Do you know this book confidence code. No writing down tattooing it on my body women and girls and confidence and so forth so we brought these authors to talk to these female. Pr's about confidence and these are women who were often the first person in there not only in their family but in their village to go to college and here they were representing their country at the united nations just breathtaking stories of courage.

Un amy poehler liz madeleine albright giants pentagon madeline america mallon united nations
Fun Summer Tastes and the New TerraShield

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

02:07 min | 3 months ago

Fun Summer Tastes and the New TerraShield

"Samantha. Thank you so much for being here with us today. Thanks so much for having me so cooking with essential oils is something that maybe not. A lot of people are familiar with so if i am new to cooking with essential oils. What are some of the things i need to know. Cooking with essential oils might take on. It is mostly for flavor unless you're not heating up oils because like with everything. Each essential oil has a flash point which means they all have a temperature that they basically burn off at which can remove potential benefits but it does leave the flavor bind. That's really interesting. So if you're planning on putting into oils in raw foods you'll definitely get the benefits and the flavor but if you're deciding to cook with it you're just looking for the flavor to replace the dry herbs that you'd probably use cooking with essential oils is also an easy clean and honestly less expensive way to season a dish because you want to use them. Sparingly essential oils are concentrated versions of the plant. So you don't need much you can always add more but you can't take anything away. I start with a toothpick sized amount and slowly. increase it from our flavor. Can you let us know what some of your favorite recipes are. I think a lot of people might want to use essential oils in different recipes. But might not know where to start so i. What is your favorite recipe to use a citrus. Oil in absolutely really was interested. Any type of drink but also desserts. Interestingly enough i love wild orange orientate injuring in chocolate cakes brownies. It really brightens up those richer desserts and you can even add them into frostings. Or if you're going for more like a summary dish you can add a little bit into a salsa and my favorite drink to do with wild. Orange is making lemonade with some freshly squeezed lemons. Your favorite sweetener and then just a drop of wild orange in maybe a drop of tangerine and you have this bright unique fresh lemonade to hopefully cl- you off. During the hot summer

Samantha
Reiki Healing, Chakras, & Essential Oils With Andrea Frasier

The Essential Oil Revolution

02:04 min | 3 months ago

Reiki Healing, Chakras, & Essential Oils With Andrea Frasier

"I'm here with andrea frazier who holds. A master's degree in education. Is a national board. Certified teacher raking master teacher and is a certified transfer mational coach andrea offers online ricky classes at the shine ricky school. She is author of the bestselling book. The shock gra method and is the founder and facilitator of the online group. coaching programs. The shocker activation method and the healer within academy andrea. It's honor to have you here with us today. How are you is samantha. I'm so happy to be here. I'm doing great how are you. I'm doing great. Yeah i wanted to dive into this topic as well. We've sort of poked at this topic a bit throughout the Podcast life span but I i don't think i've ever had anyone who's really whole life is released. Circled around this concept and I know that you work. A lot with essential oils and shot grows and rakia and essential oils as well and ricky and essential oils is something that you credit a lot of significant healing and transformation in your own life to is that correct. Oh yes very much. Let's hear about that. How did this journey began for you. Yeah so back in I think it was two thousand three somewhere around there. I was in my early to mid twenties. And i was diagnosed with fibromyalgia which is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder and chronic fatigue as well so he just had widespread pain throughout. My body. just aches all the time. I was tired all the time. And i mean this pain had actually started early back as far as i can remember like middle school In my knees and it just got worse and worse over the years. Our i had trouble sleeping and and just insomnia and it was just always sick and i just never felt good like i literally felt like i was eighty.

Andrea Frazier Shine Ricky School Andrea Ricky Samantha Chronic Musculoskeletal Disord Fibromyalgia Chronic Fatigue Insomnia
"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

04:29 min | 4 months ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

"I kind of you know what. I'm sorry i'm i'm just happy sula joy to keep it bottled. This is a hobby. This is worse all worked out. But i told that story just to quickly tell. This one is For the latest episode. Yokel hero samantha. Actually wrote the music to those songs. Sow god i mean i thanks. I would have been happy to pitch in but but It was one of these things where you know she just sorta said. Oh dad i took a pass a tune and and You know played it for me and it was. It was like The fable of the shoemaker and the elves i woke up in my work is done. This is this is great. Thanks yeah i got a full night's sleep. Yes and i was up at three. Am with the baby. But that's when you i guess. Apparently that's when you do your best your best work. Yeah your mind is raw. You're not always kind of in that half alive. You know half asleep dreaming state. Oh yeah life is just a to do list. Yeah yeah exactly. It's so interesting you saying that. You found your niche in The writers rooms being the person who could write songs. Because i when. I got my first tv writing job i mean i. I studied musical theater at nyu. I you know. I'm my father's daughter. It's it's in me somewhere. But i hadn't really considered it until i about three years in should being in the writer's room and i was like i mean. I wonder my dad did that. I wonder if i can just sort of see. If i can pitch myself writing a few songs for the show and i ended up pitching a musical episode and it was an you know that was an hour long years ago and i thought so often about my dad writing streetcar and just thinking that it was. You know it's possible you can just you know if it's good you it'll it can be on television but Street streetcar though is one of those things that i sort of can't believe that you did that. Data is just so. I think about it constantly. I watch it. Just if when in doubt when i don't when i want something that i'm very familiar with as background noise. That's streetcars is a goto. Especially because well. I mean the back to the connection to the simpsons. Several songs were written in that with me close by. I'm sure well song especially right. The i i will say i wrote. The who song it was. Driving samantha to disneyland god really. It was a charm charts childhood away from it machine in my room. I mean it's just a southern california childhood. yeah we had an annual pass I didn't see the kiss. Let's during the week so you know when a weekend. Let's go to disneyland the way you'd go to a playground which really isn't too growing with us for all l. a. Closer bad this is somewhere you go. He was just go on to check out. Country bear jamboree in the dojo. Mom worked at disney so it was the cheapest thing we can do. This isn't a podcast. But i just had to say it's a charm childhood. It's a chat. Yeah listen. I i remember fifty five years ago. I saw art link last ladders house party and there was kids who lived a few blocks from disneyland and like my stomach. Hurt envying those kids. It's their backyard thousands of miles away so very very happy to what you came when you were driving the disneyland properly. Som- you're saying. Well i so i usually. We would all go. But i had sammy for the day and so she's just in a car seat in. I had a little hundred dollar. You know casio keyboard that on the seat next to it and i was just around chords whom a minor b flat megiddo and i actually did write the tune on the long drive and i remember traffic. I'm.

fifty five years ago hundred dollar southern california one thousands of miles sammy first tv samantha disneyland three years disney one of these things casio The writers rooms fable an hour three songs those things shoemaker
"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

"Very liberal. But i love. I love those moments that you know and being this morality like my mom always told me like. If i wasn't a comedy writer i would have been a lawyer. Seventy so combative and i think all the policies like i don't know they lead down the right path. Eventually you totally right for being such a smart ass. Yeah. there's nothing wrong with being a little russell. It just as long as you grow out of it. I would say i mostly have. I think it was just encouraged to kind of lean in to lean into funniness. It was never ever. I mean gosh. Being funny was never discouraged in this family. It's it was just samantha. Was was like pick by her high school to You know. Give the speech at graduation. Because i knew should be funny and she's done a lot of a sketch. Performing to to great success and younger daughter went to harvard. Got on the lampoon. The gave the speech graduating. So i always just. We would not know what to do with the kid wanted to do anything. Use unfunny accountants. Are they always about would if we were Would if we had to let go to swim meets would if that was what no disrespect to swimmer but they i remember them saying we just that was our life was just okay another swim meet my husband and i fear because we're both creative and i'm dislike. I guess we'll figure it would take feels.

Seventy both samantha harvard
"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

02:28 min | 4 months ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

"Like pure vaudeville hundred percent. Now you know and also met they had to say. Oh that's good that's bad that's good got married. But she's an ad but she's got money not just corny things like what a little scottish children say. Yeah into this short break Be very moon in latin. It didn't it will. We'll get into the story but it almost it could have. There was a moment where i almost was like. You know wanted to be in front of a camera as a kid and my parents were very much like no. Let's let's keep you at home till you're eighteen and and hope that's the right decision was yeah i think so very savvy. What's she was very funny kid. I can attest that when she was eight year old playing soccer and at the i was an assistant coach in at the end of the year party. Where going gets an award. She won funniest player again. Best were available. I would've taken it suffer. That's the category of an award valley story. Yes well but i you know all this is to say i think that i understood the simpsons as being funny pretty young you i was never sort of you know frowned upon to watch the simpsons as a lot of kids my age. I think their parents didn't let him watch for news. You know putting dinner on the table so enjoy it. You better watch the kids around it. If you don't know you know. I'm remembering that sammy. Actually a kind of indirectly worked their way into simpsons episodes because i was the only writer in the writer's room who had kids john. Vp's mom Once once paid me a really nice compliment is she said So my episode. She said you can tell. Jeff martin has kids because For for episodes like a flashback. Ones where bart's Did i think it might be lisa's. First word gonna know here. Sammy us to do something. She was kind of a tough nut. And i was she she. Where i'd you know you'd say okay. Samantha you need to say you're sorry.

Jeff martin Samantha eighteen scottish Sammy eight year old First word sammy simpsons john lisa once latin hundred percent vaudeville
"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

05:31 min | 4 months ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

"Guy scarlet join us but maybe next time you find that There were some commonalities that came from starting kind of at that time in these big shoes type of jobs like both of you starting twenty two did that kind of assume you had a bit of a thesis even if it was subconscious like okay. We're going to have this type of thing in common completely. I think. I think all of the the guys named i think we all had a lot more in common and it was just just sitting around the lampoon for hours and hours also criticizing stuff i will. I compare us to comic book. Show right right right just a bunch. A bunch of guys sitting around have accomplished nothing at our lives. Just freely watching tv shows and setting were show ever in this is funny and that is not totally obnoxious but but You know somehow it's some subliminal level learning your craft a lot when you pick things apart but it also do it. Sounds like the par for the course experience for any kind of liberal artsy or experience like you know an echo chamber of like. I can do this better which i think could go either. One of two ways like one where it's like. Okay well then you just keep saying i can do this better needed. Never do it or you are part of the latter part of that where you actually go and change television forever so kudos to you guys for making good on your snarky commentary. I guess well june nice. Well i wanna stop talking quick but real quickly. So i i worked at letterman for seven years. And i met my wife scouting Letterman remote and in be we had. Yeah and then had had a kid. And but if i can jump in when when you know you're in great dodd but i if when when some you know i'm i'm just yes. Anding him when he was talking about meeting my mom. It was pretty sweet because my mom her new year's resolution before meeting my dad was to marry a guy like david letterman. She said i'm gonna meet a guy like david letterman. The my dad showed up and she said to her friend. I'm gonna marry him before they even talk. Oh my god stories happen anymore. It's a pre internet story. Maybe because you go always greener swiping right but then you like no. There's a star that seaton's me exactly. I mean i was dead in the water Turns up now so six Six grade years at letterman. Got an offer we we were out for the emmy awards Out in la and a meeting was set up. With sam simon for the show that had aired yet though is for the simpsons and he offered me the job and it was just like okay so in between accepting the job and moving My wife are our one year old daughter out to la. The show aired in was an instant smash so i. I started working on the show like just weeks after after it premiered. So i i really I pulled the ringo. There have like a really happy memory. Was honestly i was going to get on a plane and samantha and my wife's exam we're gonna follow two weeks later and we watch the general which was either the third or fourth one that ever aired. And you're watching. Oh this is good. Oh this is a good episode. This is the perfect. This is perfect tv episode. And and just a very very happy feeling that i was going to be joining something that had had the the wind behind it. Yeah that's gotta be comforting for your choice. Oh absolutely and also joining guys. I was already close friends with john. My greece and jean george meyer. So yeah. incredible and So samantha i really love the thread that you posted in kind of a are right afterwards. That your dresses episode came out and I'm sure a lot of people who listened to the podcast. Vardi read it but couldn't could you kind of walk us through some of those moments and highlights of kind of up before we get into your career specifically some of your memories of of kind of growing into this family and your members of the simpsons early on. Gosh well i mean. I think that because my dad is my dad and my mom is also a. She became a comedy writer writer and eventually show runner. And because these are my parents. I think comedy was you know i was quick to speak and i was quick to speak funny things and i think that for a while and you can attest to this data for while. I think i was your puppet. I think that you guys you know would and you can name many examples. But they would just teach me. What's what's a good one bad. We'll we'll do like an That's good.

seven years john sam simon samantha third jean george meyer david letterman one year six two weeks later both twenty two two ways Vardi scarlet One fourth one emmy seaton Six grade years
Supernatural, Season 12 Preview

Sci-Fi Talk Time Capsule

01:56 min | 4 months ago

Supernatural, Season 12 Preview

"Now from supernatural season. Twelve special samantha. Smith who is once. Again mary winchester to check with everybody like am. I see she's alive. You guess you can say she's alive. I'm alive guest. So i'm actually live and brought back to life from from the minute i died so i'm twenty eight. I'll be just nod your head like sure. Of course you are. And the boys are older than i am And so now. Mary's going have to so much has changed the world technology. Everything in thirty three years is completely different than a nineteen eighty three and her children are adult and they were raised in a way that she probably would not increase them. Her husband is gone. The there are still monsters. They're still hunting. There's all that whole part. And i think that feels most comfortable with hunting. And so she we. I go back to that. And i'll be hunting and working with the boys and they sent me to fight training and weapons training. And i've been having a ball. I've never really done very sporty. But i never did martial arts boxing or any of that stuff and my trainers like but it's it's been it's been. They have amazing people helping me so it's been superfund. There's a lot of opportunity for heard to make like little comments on the boys do things as a mom. Yes and that's it once a month always a moment. I don't care that. I haven't seen him in thirty years. I'm gonna tell you what. I think and There there's also the there's the fun side of the genetics and inheritance. And i'll see something i'm like you know all of that and just the love. There's so much love

Mary Winchester Samantha Smith Mary Boxing
Finding Europe in America

Travel with Rick Steves

03:01 min | 4 months ago

Finding Europe in America

"Says you have to actually go to europe to taste of the old world after all many american and canadian cities and towns were settled by european immigrants. Sometimes they tried to recreate a bit of what the new from the old country. Even if we can't go to europe we can discover benefit prayed here. In our hemisphere samantha. Brown hosts public television travel series places to love where she films from destinations. Both around the world in closer to home. She joins us today on travel. With rick steves to look at some of her favorite places to find a bit of europe. In america samantha. Thanks for joining us. Pleasure to be here rank. Boy know all i do is go to europe again and again and again but i really. There's a lot of europe hiding out here in the united states during covid lockdown times so we can't travel overseas like we'd like to but we can find little knockoffs here in the united states from all around the globe knockoffs because some of them are terrific kind of constructions and others are honest to goodness immigrant communities. That are still the way they were hundred and fifty years ago when they were there were settled just in my state washington. We've got leavenworth which is a famous little german. It's kind of a touristy. Gimmick but poulsbo is originally a norwegian town and its norwegian to this day and we have linden up by the canadian border which is a very dutch was settled by holland immigrants. What are your favorite slices of europe in america. Well one of my favorites is a city that i had gone to my entire life. My family Was brought up right outside of it and then after doing two years of europe came back to and it just hit me like a ton of bricks that this was a european city and that is philadelphia pennsylvania. It is by far the most for me. The most year of paean city in the united states and so then i started like do a deep dive like why is it so it was just a feeling i had like. Wow i just feel like. I'm in europe. And there were so many connections One of the main architects was an emigrant from leon france. He designed the ben. Franklin benjamin franklin parkway which is now. We're all the museums are lined. And he designed that off of the sean z z. and along this beautiful roadway parkway where they're abuse. There's the rodin museum. there's the philadelphia museum of art. Which has the largest collection of renoir in the world. Incredible and others rittenhouse square. They're all these not just pockets. Because i think you know there's places we'll talk about today the have pockets but this is a city that is just so of france and the best connection that i love about philadelphia is that it is also it has the most mural arts i think in the world and its sister city is leon so if you ever go to leeann france and the kuala rouge is where you see those phenomenal murals and that art that is available to all end. It's all over the city. That's what the to share so the city a definite of brotherly love is a great. If you want that. European and more specifically french you know kick

Europe America Samantha Rick Steves Poulsbo Franklin Benjamin Franklin Par Brown Linden Holland Philadelphia France Washington Rodin Museum Pennsylvania Philadelphia Museum Of Art Rittenhouse Square Kuala Rouge Leon
Health, Happiness, and How to Get It With Tim James

The Essential Oil Revolution

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Health, Happiness, and How to Get It With Tim James

"I'm here with tim james. He is the producer of his own chemical free food products known as the chemical free body at the chemical free body. His inbox is constantly flooded with people singing and dancing about how he has given them a life. they couldn't believe was possible. Historic will have you laughing crying and gasping but most importantly he shares his recipe to a longer happier and healthier life. Tim welcome to the show. Thanks so much for being with us here today. How are you samantha. Doing fantastic. And i am excited to share and i hope the listeners. Get one thing out of this show today that they can go home and implement that will drastically improve their health and their happiness. While i have no doubt about that. So i want to backtrack to where your journey began. Because you've gone through quite a bit of health. Struggles yourself but i also know that there was a dear friend involved in your journey that led you to where you are today. But let's start with you. I grew up on eastern oregon on a cavern. Hey form now so. I was hunting and fishing. a lot. I play baseball too high level ben by age. Thirty seven Forty pounds overweight and my elbows were cracking and bleeding. Exa emma i left. Knee was cracking leading with x. Amount had acid reflux really bad. I had another skinny on my back. it was embarrassing to take my shirt off and then i had Finally had an organ removed on vacation. And that's when. I learned that my poor health doesn't affect just me and then i was actually bleeding readily we talked earlier about. I have this t shirt on says love when you poop. Because when i go to the bathroom number two it was a very painful experience hauled by blood and this went on for two and a half years

Tim James Samantha Exa Emma TIM Oregon Baseball BEN
Ep 50: The Church of Englands influence over education [TEST]

National Secular Society Podcast

01:26 min | 5 months ago

Ep 50: The Church of Englands influence over education [TEST]

"One school that. I were attacked. They were little pads. On each table. Prayer jelly babies and samantha. Sorry jedi baby or all these types of things get into children and make it difficult for them to kick against the and they want to be good and they to go along with that and they want to believe that these things are true. Listening to pursued fifty of the national secular society podcast produced by the puck. If you many adults today that they would send their children to touch england's school they would probably say yes. Cb schools are often well established and have a reputation for providing high quality education often to. They're the new up shoot in commuting distance. But it's the influence of the church of england along with tila strokes and other legislation is always so benign. The evidence presented in two reports recently published by the national secular society suggests otherwise in particular syndicates that in recent years the church of england has been quietly gaining greater influence over state schools. Even those that are not fiscal. One of the nss is reports on. This topic is entitled. Religiosity inspections the case against faith-based inspections of states it studies the impact of mandatory inspections on pace goes by sponsoring religious group and presents the key arguments polishing such inspections. One of my guests on this episode. Matthew hill contributed to this report. My guest chris. Elway rachel

NSS Samantha England Church Of England Matthew Hill Elway Rachel Chris
Chip Crisis in 'Danger Zone' as Wait Times Reach New Record

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:05 min | 5 months ago

Chip Crisis in 'Danger Zone' as Wait Times Reach New Record

"Our lead story today is one of demand and supply in that order. The commodity in question is semiconductors. The demand as we'll explain is nearly universal the supply well it's lagging and more so every day bloomberg got its hands on some data from the susquehanna financial group that says if you order a chip today the aforementioned semiconductors you're going to have to wait seventeen weeks for it to be delivered. Four plus months that is to put it mildly no way to run a supply chain. And as marketplace's samantha field reports. It is doing damage to way more than cars or computers or smartphones. These days almost everything has a chip whether we think of it as high tech or not. If it has a plug or battery probably has chips in it glenn. O'donnell research director at forrester says that includes refrigerators video. Doorbells and light bulbs you can turn on with your phone and even lower tech things like kids toys because all the toys gotta talk now and they got to react and they have little motors right. Now there's a shortage of all kinds of chips. Even the most basic ones says china vasan an analyst at bloomberg intelligence for. It doesn't matter if it's one hundred dollars or fifty cent part. There's just not enough capacity at factories around the world to meet the demand from all of the industries. That need chips because there's such a shortage. The semiconductor industry is having to pick and choose what to prioritize says. Mario morales at market research company. Idc it's for prioritizes. The large scale lear is like computing. Mobile phones is the largest market so though supply chains are always going to get priority and other companies especially smaller are going to have to wait longer for chips so shrine of austin at bloomberg says if you need something like a new appliance anytime soon even if you don't care about it being smart all of those products will be in. Short supplies are investigating line and shrim- boston says the shortage is likely to get worse before it gets better

Samantha Field Vasan Bloomberg Bloomberg Intelligence Donnell Forrester Mario Morales Glenn Motors China IDC Austin Boston
Nurses Have Been Hit Hard by the COVID-19 Pandemic

News, Traffic and Weather

01:00 min | 5 months ago

Nurses Have Been Hit Hard by the COVID-19 Pandemic

"Podcast. APP mic over 19 pandemic has pushed many local nurses to the verge of burnout. Washington Post Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that three out of 10 Healthcare workers have considered getting out of the field. Almost Suzanne Font takes a closer look at the ongoing nursing shortage. We asked the Department of Health exactly how seriously nursing shortages but they haven't been able to give us exact numbers. What we do know is there's about 140,000 licensed nurses in Washington state, and the nursing shortage has been exacerbated by the pandemic. Samantha Conley is a nurse at Harborview Medical Center in Trauma and PTSD is going to really start to build up and I really worried that we're gonna come up on a big deflation of the profession. Clinton Hospital Association says it has worked with the state to expedite licensing for nurses from other states and new graduate nurses. The group also has asked the state to move those patients that don't need to be in the hospital to care centers to free up more nurses. Hospitals also continue to rely on travel nurses for help, but

Washington Post Kaiser Family Suzanne Font Samantha Conley Department Of Health Harborview Medical Center Clinton Hospital Association Ptsd Washington
Episode 140: You Like Huey Lewis & The News? - burst 04

The Swearwolves

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Episode 140: You Like Huey Lewis & The News? - burst 04

"Listen we all have our embarrassing cds or music that we had bought back in the day. Like one of the first cds. I ever got the song. Rico suave rico by gerardo so i bought that fucking cd. That's awesome leedle models jingu. None of that was spanish by the way that was just my memory on the sandwich. I don't drink or smoke or into dope. try coke. You asked me how to do it. I cope addiction has to do with the female species. Edem raw like sushi. That's awesome

John Kale Samuel Jackson Mary Heron Willem Dafoe Bret Easton Ellis Harron Jared Leto Patrick Bateman Wayne April Fourteenth Mary Christian Bale ONE Kimball Paul Allen Samantha Bret Miller Three Nights A Week Two Thousand One Number Gerardo Rico Coke
Busch celebrates birthday with win at Kansas Speedway

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

Busch celebrates birthday with win at Kansas Speedway

"Kyle Busch led four times for twenty laps at Kansas speedway with final ten laps being the most important has he picked up his first NASCAR win of the season and it came on his birthday bush battle cow arson for most of the race but Larson had the dominant car leading one hundred and thirty two circuits around the track he would be relegated to nineteenth after late race restructure in back in the field for bush to win ended a roller coaster week of emotions as he and his wife Samantha shared the heartbreaking news that she had had a miscarriage Kevin Harvick finished a race in second his strongest run of the year with Brad Keselowski taking third I'm Jerry Jordan

Kyle Busch Bush Nascar Kansas Larson Samantha Kevin Harvick Brad Keselowski Jerry Jordan
Nourishing Your Hair and a Look at Clementine

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

01:44 min | 6 months ago

Nourishing Your Hair and a Look at Clementine

"Samantha. Thank you so much for sitting down with us today. Thanks so much for having me. How can essential oils help my hair. I think the biggest contribution essential oils can make to. Your hair is improving. The overall appearance some essential oils can help. Keep your hair clean. There are also a few essential oils that are known to give your hair healthy glow which i personally love living in a drier climate. Plus your hair always smells grape and what essential oils do you recommend adding to my hair care routine. There really are so many oils. You cannot your hair carotene. My first go-to is a leave in treatment. I include a few usually ten to fifteen drops of geranium juniper berries cedar wood rosemary and tea tree in a bowl with about a tablespoon or so both fractionally coconut oil and jojoba oil. Then i'll rub that in coma through my hair and give myself a little scout massage and if my really soaks it up though i'll add a bit more carrier oil and to help with shine i'm usually missing when my hair is feeling dry. I also know. Many people lovling as part of their deep conditioning routine along with some lavender injury. Neom finally samantha. Can you tell us about other products that dough. Tara has for my hair absolutely with the new hair care product launch. We've totally refreshed our hair care products. There's a new protecting shampoo that include some amazing essential oils like invigorating peppermint and eucalyptus and cleansing tea tree and rosemary. The same essential oils can be found in the conditioner. But i like to add some lavender and dream. If i'm planning on leaving it in throughout the rest of my shower eighteen.

Samantha Coma Tara
European Regulator Finds Possible Link Between J and J Vaccine and Blood Clots

Breakfast with Sammy J

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

European Regulator Finds Possible Link Between J and J Vaccine and Blood Clots

"They use medicines regulator has warned. There's a possible link between the Johnson and Johnson covert 19 vaccine and rare blood clots. Your correspondent Samantha Holy The European Medicines Agency pulls the rollout of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine after US officials detected eight rare blood clock cases. Including one death among the nearly seven million people who've been vaccinated, European officials have now concluded unusual clots with low blood platelets should be listed as a rare side effect. What it sees. As with the estrogenic, a vaccine over all the benefits outweigh the risks. The UK is yet to approve the Johnson and Johnson vaccine.

Johnson Rare Blood Clots Samantha Holy European Medicines Agency United States UK
Across Political Lines, Opinions On Vaccine Passports Are Divided

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:44 min | 6 months ago

Across Political Lines, Opinions On Vaccine Passports Are Divided

"Dot com slash smb. Now let's ask a little something to the debate over vaccine passports people keep asking. Should we have them. Should we not the reality. Is that in many places we already do. Here's npr's tovia smith too many. It's a no brainer. Just like passengers are screened before boarding planes for the safety of everyone so too. Should everyone entering a crowded space be checked to ensure their low risk for spreading. Covid if we're going to end this nightmare what we need is information. And if people are making unsafe choices the rest of us to know. Peter wilson musician from phoenix seized vaccine passports as ticket back to normal life. You know you have to vaccinate children to go to school for other things. Were just extending that to adults to keep everybody safe. This is your ticket to freedom san at the union pharmacy just outside boston. A pharmacist intern. Hands a proof of vaccination card to linda samantha Thank you so much. It's a low tech version of the digital vaccine passport that could become ubiquitous new york state's. Excelsior pass already allows residents to flash code from their phones to earn their way into anything from a broadway show or a gym to a private wedding. Samantha says she would be more apt to go places that are making sure everyone's vaccinated. I know it's awkward. But they're not asking for their life story just trying to keep people safe and trying to also keep their business so think. It's a win win indeed. Many businesses are already

Tovia Smith Peter Wilson NPR Linda Samantha Phoenix Boston SAN New York Samantha
"samantha it" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:15 min | 11 months ago

"samantha it" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Hi samantha. Hi deborah. Thanks for having me. How did yin li's work. I come into your life <hes>. That's a great question. I have to say. I think it was originally from the new yorker. It wasn't this story. This wasn't the first. Union story i encountered. Maybe it was extra. This one though sheltered woman has always stayed with me so deeply. There's no easy way to forget it. There's no easy way to feel like i'm done thinking about it. And i've been interested to see how often it returns to me again. And again. And i think that i initially was so attracted to it. Because it's such a complicated story about mothering and mothering. Stories while not rare <hes>. Ones that are complicated enough to satisfy me are rare that to find a story that questions mothering. Or even that digs in to the extent that this one does where you know we're bringing in themes of capitalism and the effects of capitalism on mothering. I mean. I don't know that i've seen that really anywhere else <hes>. Maybe in some amazing science fiction but never in a story that dwells in realism. The way this story does and the fact that yijun decided to kind of capture this luminol moment of one month. You know the first month and to take that tiny quiet microcosm and make it into this devastating huge chasm of a universe. I i find that unbelievable right. The story deals with a character who only takes care of babies in the first month of their lives. And who also takes care of mothers in the first month of <hes>. Of motherhood motherhood is something you have written about a fair amount in your own fiction. Yeah yeah. I am a mother of three and i think that when i became a mother i like most mothers was amazed at how little i knew beforehand. Despite having mother despite being daughter. I knew so very little about how to do this. And the way that it would change my identity the way that it would open me up in a tremendous way and so i. I went looking for literature that reflected that to some extent in. I don't know that i found too much of it. Even the word mother the first place we go is someplace. Really very basic and stereotypical i. You know it's like making dinner making cookies driving mini vans and there's none of that in a sheltered woman and i really appreciated that because i did feel like when i first became a mother having made life became obsessed with death which ultimately you know that makes a lot of sense and yet no one had prepared me for that and no one had told me that was going to happen so i kind of looked for the pieces that dealt with that question and tried to write these stories myself so now. Here's samantha hunt reading sheltered woman by and li a sheltered woman. The new mother groggy from a nap sat at the table is though she did not grasp why she had been summoned. Perhaps she never would anti may thought on the place mat sat a bowl of soybean and pig's foot soup that anti may had cooked as she had for many new mothers before this one many however was not exact in her interviews with potential employers. Auntie may always gave the precise number of families she had worked for a hundred and twenty six when she interviewed with your current employer. A hundred and thirty one babies altogether the families contact information the dates she had worked for them their babies names and birthdays these. She had recorded in a palm size notebook which had twice fallen apart and been taped back together years ago. Auntie may had bought it at a garage sale in moline illinois. She had liked the picture of flowers on the cover purple and yellow unmelted snow surrounding the chased pedals. She had liked the price of the notebook to five cents when she handed a dime to the child but the cashbox on his lap. She asked if there was another notebook she could buy so that he would not have to give her any change. The boy looked perplexed and said no. It was greed that had made her ask but when the memory came back it often did when she took the notebook out of her suitcase for another interview. Auntie may would laugh at herself. Why on earth had she wanted to know books. When there's not enough to fill one. The mother sat still not touching the spoon until tear-drops fell into the steaming soup. Now anti may said she was pushing herself in the baby. A new rocking chair back and forth back and forth this squeaking less noticeable than

yin li yijun the new yorker samantha deborah samantha hunt
"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

"That from my experience sheltering in place. With my wife and my dog I'm having. Sheltering in place with an animal has been really comforting and so I wanted you know different people were selecting different photographers that gay as photographer. And you know someone might be working with more of a portrait photographer, and so that was kind of my thing that I wanted to focus on. I wanted to find someone who I knew. You know really cared about animals and was sheltering in place with an animal and kind of how that. How how was for them and so I? I reached out to Robyn Schwartz And I met her at the New York Times portfolio review a couple years ago and I remember seeing her on my list of photographers that are going to review and she was the first one and I remember thinking. That's not the Robin Schwartz. Some thinking about this. It's another robin shores. She wouldn't be here. Asking she wouldn't be here getting a review, but I hadn't with my son doing that portfolio review and I did not know anything about like the caliber photographers. And, so was her, and I, remember being really excited to see her work. and we kept in touch afterwards. Lee Stole Fund each other. Links to weird animal, accounts or photos of our our animal companions and I know that I wasn't sure that Robin with actually going to pick up this for this assignment, because she she actually has cancer and I know that she's tired a hard time with it. And I mean like anyone who has cancer. And, so I wasn't sure if she would be up to doing it but she picked it up and She focused on what a lot of her work focuses on her animal companions and her daughter. and. Her daughter had just come home from Spain and they think she had A. The pretty sure she had the coronavirus when she got back, and so she was initially sheltering in place with another with another family member, but by the time I ask them to do this project. The Moi was her daughter. Amelia was back at her home, and so she shot them around the home. and. On the rooftop they live in like a converted fire I'm lost the fire building. Fire Department building I. Think it is and sorry I'm forgetting to English. So she she was doing she did the shoe and we talked about. The images were amazing. She just has this really. The way that she photographs animals like humans and. It was really beautiful to get this glimpse into her life at home and. She said to me afterwards that. And also when I was doing the interview with her, that you know? She was really This project was something that you know. She wasn't really shooting at got her out of bed every morning and that to me just made me feel. Like it went beyond you know amazing images, and it was more than a photo shoot and more than just a story for wired, and it was just too many something that was released special. That's fantastic. Is it on the website now? Yes, it is. It's on our photo section and it's part of the series called shuttered..

Robin Schwartz Amelia Robyn Schwartz cancer Spain New York Times Fire Department Moi Lee
"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Well I think there's a lot of French to that, but I definitely think. In terms of style, it's really clean and really precise, and they're sophisticated lighting. There's often like complicated lighting setup. Send there. It's yeah, there's some. But it definitely berries I mean we don't tend to have. referring mostly to commission photography, but We do for daily Web Stories, we. Use Stock Images. But for commissioned work when it definitely ranges, do work with the Tigers that you know. Don't have complicated lighting setups in shoot with natural or Or they're really. They do really amazing work with a handheld flash There's some really amazing photographers that I've worked with. That are just that can do so much with so little And but I would definitely say it's very clean and. You know they're POB. Senate stands out. Sometimes it's you know high contrast, and but it really ranges. It depends on the story and you know who were working with. Pop is is a good word I. was thinking I was going to say that they were allowed photographs. But that's not really what I meant. They are present in the th th. They are not even if you're doing something low key and filled with shadows. They're not quiet photographs force. And that's been one of the things I've admired about the magazine for a long time. Tell me a story to tell me a story about a shoot. That went really really well. Not, only from the photographers point of you, but then when the images wind up on your desk, and you had the abundance of riches. Sunny! Amazing stories about. Amena go with something. That's very recent. so of publications has done the same story where because of. covid nineteen everybody is was reaching out to photographers and asking them to. Show us what they're shooting while. They're sheltering in place. And so. Our entire team did this project together where we selected a photography for in work on a commission with them, and basically the guideline with. They couldn't leave their home. And at that time, we weren't really commissioning anyone. An- any shoots. It had to be within someone's home or they had to have their own studio at home. We weren't sending anyone. But I know.

Tigers Senate
"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

"At some point. There was a position at AIRBNB Open, and I ended up applying there and it was originally. A position as a researcher on. An cheerleader and so I started working there I ended up being there three years, and from the researcher curator curator position. I moved into a photo editor position. And then from there, I worked in a creative producer position. And it was. A period of time where I really learned a law, I was able to make a lot of rookie mistakes and you know may built a lot of relationships with different photographers. Had amazing mentors and it was also back in the day when no one really knew what Airbnb was truly start off when I got there. And no one hated them yet. Now I mean. I think it was like employee, number, two, hundred, fifty, five or something. But it grew really quick. So I learned a lot on the job. It was definitely. Yeah there was things. Move so quickly there. Just interrupt for a second in my ignorance. I would have always assumed that you get the homeowners to snap a couple of shots. Put them up in. You're done. There is a whole world of photographic curator as you said. AIRBNB yes. and I know things have changed a lot since I've been. There are not exactly sure what the structure is like there anymore, but But yeah, it was. Yeah. It was kind of my first taste of photo editing and I loved it I. wanted to do more of it. and I actually while I was doing creative production I actually like when I look back at everything I've found that the time when I was solely doing thorough editing, I enjoyed the most there, and then after that I. after to sort of three years I ended up taking a job instagram where I was kind of doing a mix of sayings and. was doing a combination of I kind of have my hands dabbled in a bunch of different things. where I was doing a mix of research editing. On commissioning working on building installations trying to think what else, but yeah, that was probably. And then from there on the was there about two years. It was very much. Joke around that was like working at Disneyland. But. There on the position of Front for me about the physician at wired and I've always loved wired. Well that's that's remarkable like so many people in the photography world A career depends upon the ability to be flexible to be creative. And and to work in in a whole different number of directions all at the same time and you wound up landing at one of the nation's best and I would argue most important magazines now that you are more or less in charge of the photography there. What is wired photograph I mean if you look at the magazine, it it. It's perfectly obvious that the magazine has a style. It has a certain. Way of presenting images, but it in your words. What is what is.

Airbnb researcher editor producer Disneyland
"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"samantha it" Discussed on Photography Radio

"I. have a real privilege and honor to speak with Samantha Cooper Sam is the senior photo editor at wired magazine, and in case you don't know. Wired magazine is a magazine dedicated to examining how new technologies influence the world influence culture. It is part of the Conde nast suite of magazines including the New Yorker Vanity Fair magazines like that it is a monthly magazine with just under a million subscribers looked it up a little bit earlier today, they miss nineteen million social followers followers on social platforms. It is a to my way of thinking one of the essential magazines for understanding contemporary life, and it is Impressive, not only four. It's a writing, but for its photography for the way it presents a visual image of the world. Sam is one of those people that decides what how we get to see what we get to see. The images of the world that's unfolding before us so sam frames magazines. Pleasure to talk with you today. let me begin with with easy question. How's life out on the West Coast out? How are you surviving these extraordinary days? Hit Pretty challenging it. Some you know things are really hard Between the protests. Covid and just wanting to support. Friends and family and It's. Yeah. It's hard to stay focused right now, but. You know just trying to do the best that I can. Get it is a difficult time for all of us that that's absolutely certain I want to begin with something fairly basic because a lot of us in the photo world rely on photo editors, but probably don't even really know what a photo editor does. so let me ask the world's most basic question. You have been a photographer. You are a photographer, but you are a photo editor first and foremost. What is the photo editor? So Whether there is the person who is arranging photography for the story That consist of variety of different things. You could be arranging all the details for the shoot selecting the photographer selecting the images. Working out the logistics of the shoot. and..

editor wired magazine Samantha Cooper Sam Conde nast monthly magazine New Yorker Vanity Fair Covid
"samantha it" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"samantha it" Discussed on KCRW

"Their support can I ask you why you came so far Chinese community to enjoy and for the most beach and once you lose freedoms and Samantha it's not easy to get it back I'm only saying NPR news Taipei Taiwan the killing of a run in Major General Qassem so the money has stirred up the geo political and military dynamics of the region one of the major players of course is Russia Anna bush's sky a is a senior fellow at the Washington institute and she's here to tell us how Russia a US adversary is viewing these developments welcome to the program thanks so much for having me you wrote a post after the U. S. killed for the money quoting a journalist to describe the Kremlin's reaction to it as a quote mixture of satisfaction envy and admiration can you explain that why was there a billion envy so according to this journalist the enemy comes from the fact that this act of killing silly money is interpreted as the fact that the United States still has primacy in world affairs and then the complexity comes from the fact that there's so many other issues to talk about here Russia and Iran have a very complicated partnership in the Middle East and on the one hand a weakened Iran could be an advantage for Russia but at the same time if you're honest two week that also presents a problem because then Russia cannot rely on Iran to do a lot of the heavy lifting in Syria that has been doing up until this point so explain why a slightly weakened Iran would be a good thing for Russia because their allies aren't they they don't have a formal treaty but as far as their behavior goes absolutely fresh always leaned closer on the run a solid block in the Middle East and the complexity here comes from the fact that ultimately Russia doesn't want anyone stronger than itself and in the Middle East specifically putting cultivated an image of somebody that can be a power broker in SO in Iran that's too strong could theoretically undermine that narrative but at the same time in around that's too we can also be a problem in the Iraqi parliament voted to work towards removing foreign troops from the country after that US strike the trump administration insists that US troops aren't yet planning to leave but what would it mean for Russian influence in a rock specifically if they did yeah that's a really important issue Russia has been working very hard to return to Iraq first all of Russia opposed the US led intervention in ever since pressure has been working to return to Iraq first will through three energy deals both the with Baghdad and with Iraqi Kurdistan through arms sales also through soft power projection so Russia has been trying to fill that space increasingly so you would have been more and more steps in what I would also predict as another possibility you could see Russian PMCs private military contractors coming to Iraq as well so maybe even having a presence in Iraq themselves a taking over that space militarily that that's right we certainly seen that in Libya and under Putin Russia increasingly relies on this PMC model in its foreign policy let's talk about Syria of briefly Putin visited aside shortly after so the money's assassination Russia has a big presence in Syria where along with Iran it's been supporting the Syrian regime in the civil war there what do you see happening in the wake of this assassination in terms of that relationship yeah so I think the Kremlin's first worry with the killing of selling money was because the United States coming after next up Kremlin thinking is colored by a very paranoid fear that the U. S. sponsors regime change throughout the world and that ultimately other themselves maybe next so I think Putin wanted to project strength wanted to project power at a time when he's worried in specifically sure this goes back to the issue of how stable is a side will Russia have to commit more resources the necessary if Iran is too weak those are the issues that may be worrying him and do you think the US is acting to sort of stop Russia from its own ambitions I mean Russia is trying to stop the U. S. is the U. S. actively trying to stop Russia in the Middle East from its ambitions do you see that as a counterpoint counterpoint no unfortunately not and this is frankly this is not new at all this began under the Obama administration and we're seeing a continuation of that under trump the United States has been very ambivalent about its position in the Middle East and it's been a great opportunity for Russia to take advantage of so we've named Russia as an adversary no national security strategy but we're not really competing with Russia in the Middle East and a bush of sky a senior fellow at the Washington institute thank you so much thank you I'll start Austria is a small village that looks like it belongs in a fairy tale I'll kind Wellings of stone church with a towering steeple nestled in the mountains on a large lake it's picture perfect to picture perfect when.

Samantha it
"samantha it" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"samantha it" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lose freedoms and Samantha it's not easy to get it back I'm only saying NPR news Taipei Taiwan the killing of a run in Major General Qassem so the money has stirred up the geo political and military dynamics of the region one of the major players of course is Russia Anna bush of sky a is a senior fellow at the Washington institute and she's here to tell us how Russia a US adversary is viewing these developments welcome to the program thanks so much for having me you wrote a post after the U. S. killed for the money quoting a journalist to describe the Kremlin's reaction to it as a quote mixture of satisfaction envy and admiration can you explain that why was there a glee and envy so according to this journalist the N. B. comes from the fact that this act of killing silly money is interpreted as the fact that the United States still has primacy in world affairs and then the complexity comes from the fact that there's so many other issues to talk about here Russia and Iran have a very complicated partnership in the Middle East and on the one hand a weakened Iran could be an advantage for Russia but at the same time if it runs two week that also presents a problem because then Russia cannot rely on Iran to do a lot of the heavy lifting in Syria that has been doing up until this point so explain why a slightly weakened Iran would be a good thing for Russia because their allies aren't they they don't have a formal treaty but as far as their behavior goes absolutely Prussia always leaned closer on the run a solid block in the Middle East and the complexity of comes from the fact that ultimately Russia doesn't want anyone stronger than itself and in the Middle East specifically putting cultivated an image of somebody that can be a power broker in SO in Iran that's too strong could theoretically undermine that narrative but at the same time in around that's too we can also be a problem in the Iraqi parliament voted to work towards removing foreign troops from the country after that US strike the trump administration insists that US troops aren't yet planning to leave but what would it mean for Russian influence in a rock specifically if they did yeah that's a really important issue Russia has been working very hard to return to Iraq for soul of Russia opposed the US led intervention in ever since pressure has been working to return to rock first will through three energy deals both to with Baghdad and with Iraqi Kurdistan through arms sales also through soft power projection so Russia has been trying to fill that space increasingly so you would have been more and more steps in what I would also predict as another possibility you could see Russian PMCs private military contractors coming to Iraq as well so maybe even having a presence in Iraq themselves a taking over that space militarily that that's right we've certainly seen that in Libya and under Putin Russia increasingly relies on this PMC model in its foreign policy let's talk about Syria of briefly Putin visited aside shortly after so the money's assassination Russia has a big presence in Syria where along with Iran it's been supporting the Syrian regime in the civil war there what you see happening in the wake of this assassination in terms of that relationship yeah so I think the Kremlin's first worry with the killing of selling money was because the United States coming after next up Kremlin thinking is colored by a very paranoid fear that the U. S. sponsors regime change throughout the world and that ultimately other themselves maybe next so I think Putin wanted to project strength wanted to project power at a time when he's worried in specifically sure this goes back to the issue of how stable is a side will Russia have to commit more resources the necessary if Iran is too weak those are the issues that may be worrying him and do you think the US is acting to sort of stop Russia from its own ambitions I mean Russia is trying to stop the U. S. is the U. S. actively trying to stop Russia in the Middle East from its ambitions do you see that as a counterpoint counterpoint no unfortunately not and this is frankly this is not new at all this began under the Obama administration and we're seeing a continuation of that under trump the United States has been very ambivalent about its position in the Middle East and it's been a great opportunity for Russia to take advantage of so we've named Russia as an adversary no national security strategy but we're not really competing with Russia in the Middle East an ambush of sky a senior fellow at the Washington institute thank you so much thank you I'll start Austria is a small village that looks like it belongs in a fairy tale I'll kind Wellings of stone church with a towering steeple nestled in the mountains on a large lake it's picture perfect to picture perfect go to the.

Taiwan Samantha it NPR Taipei
"samantha it" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"samantha it" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Their support why you came so far I need a minute to enjoy the speech and once you lose freedoms and Samantha it's not easy to get it back I'm only saying NPR news Taipei Taiwan the killing of a run in Major General Qassem so the money has stirred up the geo political and military dynamics of the region one of the major players of course is Russia I'm not bush's sky a is a senior fellow at the Washington institute and she's here to tell us how Russia a US adversary is viewing these developments welcome to the program thanks very much for having me you wrote a post after the U. S. killed so the money quoting a journalist who described the Kremlin's reaction to it as a quote mixture of satisfaction envy and admiration can you explain that why was there a billion envy so according to this journalist the N. B. comes from the fact that the act of killing silly money is interpreted as the fact that the United States still has primacy in world affairs and then the complexity comes from the fact that there's so many other issues to talk about here Russia and Iran have a very complicated partnership in the Middle East in on the one hand a weakened Iran could be an advantage for Russia but at the same time is around two week that also presents a problem because then Russia cannot rely on Iran to do a lot of the heavy lifting in Syria that has been doing up until this point so explain why a slightly weakened Iran would be a good thing for Russia because their allies aren't they they don't have a formal treaty but as far as their behavior goes absolutely Prussia always leaned closer on the run a solid block in the Middle East and the complexity here comes from the fact that ultimately Russia doesn't want anyone stronger than itself and in the Middle East Pacific reporting cultivated an image of somebody that can be a power broker in SO in Iran that's too strong could theoretically undermine that narrative but at the same time in around that's too we can also be a problem in the Iraqi parliament voted to work towards removing foreign troops from the country after that US strike the trump administration insists that US troops aren't yet planning to leave but what would it mean for Russian influence in a rock specifically if they did yeah that's a really important issue Russia has been working very hard to return to Iraq first while Russia opposed the US led intervention in ever since pressure has been working to return to Iraq first will through three energy deals both with Baghdad and with Iraqi Kurdistan up through arms sales also through soft power projection so Russia has been trying to fill that space increasingly so you would have been one more steps in what I would also predict as another possibility you could see Russian PMCs private military contractors coming to Iraq as well so maybe even having a presence in Iraq themselves a taking over that space militarily that that's right we've certainly seen that in Libya and under Putin Russia increasingly relies on this PMC model in its foreign policy let's talk about Syria of briefly Putin visited aside shortly after so the money's assassination Russia has a big presence in Syria where along with Iran it's been supporting the Syrian regime in the civil war there what you see happening in the wake of this assassination in terms of that relationship yeah so I think the Kremlin's first worry with the killing of selling money was because the United States coming after next up Kremlin thinking is colored by a very paranoid fear that the U. S. sponsors regime change throughout the world and that ultimately other themselves maybe next so I think Putin wanted to project strength wanted to project power at a time when he's worried and specifically sure this goes back to the issue of how stable is a side will Russia have to commit more resources than necessary if Iran is too weak those are the issues that may be worrying him and do you think the US is acting to sort of stop Russia from its own ambitions I mean Russia is trying to stop the U. S. is the U. S. actively trying to stop Russia in the Middle East from its ambitions do you see that as a counterpoint counterpoint no unfortunately not and this is frankly this is not new at all this began under the Obama administration and we're seeing a continuation of that under trump the United States has been very ambivalent about its position in the Middle East and it's been a great opportunity for Russia to take advantage of so we've named Russia as an adversary national security strategy but we're not really competing with Russia in the Middle East and I bush of sky a senior fellow at the Washington institute thank you so much thank you all star Austria is a small village that looks like it belongs in a fairy tale I'll kind Wellings of stone church with a towering steeple nestled in the mountains on a large lake it's a picture perfect to picture perfect go.

Samantha it
"samantha it" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"samantha it" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"AM L has been in touch. His name is Thomas. He has a hilarious idea. He wants to prank girlfriend off that there is a snake in her bed. When I read it. I thought I don't know if I can do it. But you know, what we can we can. And we will. So we have Thomas on the phone morning Thomas. We love your idea. I think we're grossed out by your idea. But here's the way our phone calls work. We're going to dial your girlfriend Samantha and when Samantha picks up you just take it away. We're just here listening it. Okay. All right. Good luck. Hello. Hey, listen. I gotta tell you something. This is really, you know, just I hope you're sitting down. I went into the bedroom to change your sheets, and I don't know where this came from. But there is there's a snake in our bed. And it's one of the biggest ever seen. On the pillow. Right. Where you sleep it laid a bunch of ex. And I don't know if one of our neighbors has a snake that's gone missing where this came from. But we gotta do something about this. I'm working on it, but it shed its skin. So there's skin all over the place in our sheets, it's flittering throughout the sheets in and out. It's both in and on our sheets. Is there an animal control fifty out of the benefits? I'm I'm working on it. I just I wanted to tell you I want, you know. Okay. Call animal control. Maybe I don't know. Like, can you catch it or kill it can do to fetch it? Anaconda? Oh my God. How big is it? I, you know, I didn't even not even able to look I can't even see it all, but okay? Call animal control. But I I wanna let you know. I think our sheets are ruined. There's slide from the shedding the skin throughout. Burnham get oh God. Okay. As figure out how to get this thing out. I'll take care of the rest later, but you know, it's it's this is a big. Oh god. How did he in is there like like? What happened? How did you know? There was there were no windows open. I just hope there's not more. Huge. Okay. Well, I guess I got a call call someone whoever you call for a giant snake on my God. And I know what happens or like, I don't know to be like. I don't think move as long as the only one. But let's all right. You know what I'm just gonna? I I don't think this is a poisonous snake. I've seen undiscovered channel poisonous was are really colorful. This one's not that colorful. I'm gonna grab by the tail and I'm going to try out the window. Idea. It'll be this. This got it out. It's. Professionals to get there. Oh, oh, it'd be being the. Still my cheek. Off. Holy. Oh. Awesome. Sam. Samantha. Yeah. Are you at work? Yes. Samantha it's Garrity. Katie in the morning. We just played a pride on you. God. There's no snakes bet you'll have to move don't work. Yeah. Thomas Thomas wrote to us and said that he wanted to play a prank on you. And so I think it worked. Oh god. Did it work? Yeah. Yeah. It really did. Thomas. I gotta go back to work. All right. Good sports event that by by nice work. Thomas does real pool that all of course. Thank you. Bye secret..

Thomas Thomas Samantha it Burnham Katie Sam