21 Burst results for "Samantha Fields"

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:58 min | Last week

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

"To federal funds established after the attacks of september eleven. Two thousand and one have paid around twelve billion dollars over the years. The money went to first responders. The families of those who died or people have gotten sick as a result of the terrorist carnage. Medical claims have been increasing in recent years. Many from people with cancer marketplace's samantha fields reports on the ongoing health costs connected to that day twenty years ago this weekend. Michael o'connell responded to the world trade center as a firefighter on nine eleven and spent the next few weeks working at ground zero five years later he got sick. I know the exact date. It was december thirty first. Two thousand six new year's eve. He went to bed that night filling healthy but when he woke up the next morning i literally had swollen limbs swollen ankles all my joints were inflamed by body kind of blew up to like twice the size. It was a pulmonologist figured out that he had a rare autoimmune disease called sarcoidosis that was attacking his skin and joints and told him he'd gotten it from breathing in toxins. The material that responders and survivors were exposed to when the towers collapsed was quite toxic. Dr michael crane treats a lot of nine eleven first responders through the world trade center health program clinic at mount sinai so huge huge burning buildings collapsing. Everything inside is burning and it collapses down into a pile and then an enormous. Dust cloud a lot of firefighters. Police officers and others at ground zero started getting sick almost immediately. I with what they called the world trade center cough then. Ptsd and depression. And eventually years later cancers this exposure has a really really long tail anyone who develops any kind of illness linked to nine eleven can get free healthcare through the world trade center health program but michael bearish a lawyer for nine eleven survivors says there are likely a lot of people dealing with nine eleven related health problems. Who don't know they're

Samantha Fields Michael O Connell Dr Michael Crane World Trade Center Health Prog World Trade Center Cancer Sarcoidosis Mount Sinai Ptsd Michael Bearish Depression
"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | Last month

"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

"Busy Saturday. It's so busy so often at all five of his restaurants that there comes a point pretty much every night now where they just have to cut off online orders and stop answering the phone, something that used to happen, maybe once or twice a year. It's really a rare phenomenon that we're going through and it's good in some ways, but it's also incredibly stressful in other ways. Customers for the most part, he says, have been great patient understanding. Aware of at least some of the challenges I get. Asked probably 40 to 50 times a day. How things are how things are going. And and they all want to know how How is the staffing issue? And I say we're in great shape where we have just enough workers, But just enough is not enough. And that's just enough for now. A lot of those workers are high school and college students who will be heading back to school in a few weeks. And if this fall is anything like last fall, the tourists will keep coming. On Cape Cod. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. This final note on the way out today, a quick Olympics update and a gender pay equity update all in one and I will pause here briefly for a spoiler alert break talking women's soccer scores. Just just waiting just waiting to hang on. Okay, So the U. S Women's team beat the Netherlands today on a penalty kick shootout, the semis or Monday..

Monday today Olympics Samantha Fields 40 Cape Cod once last fall five Saturday U. S Women's twice a year 50 times a day one this fall Netherlands
"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Marketplace Morning Report three words, that's the call out. Check it out. Yeah. The U. S Department of Agriculture says whole hog prices were up earlier this year on higher demand as we all started going out again, which makes sense, but bag as you know if you listen to this program is a global business, and it ain't just the U. S. Of a that matters. So as we do with all things hog related, we called Brian Duncan He's the vice president of the Illinois Farm Bureau. He raises hogs and farms, corn and soybeans himself as well. Miss Duncan's Cairo's doll. How are you, Sir? Good Chi. Good to talk to you again. How are you doing? Good to talk to you. Why don't you go ahead and hit that little red button? We'll get this show on the road. I did. I'm ready to go. There you go. Alright. Your step ahead of me. So listen, Let me just jump right in here. The reason we called you was because of a headline we saw in the Washington and the Wall Street Journal the other day. Rather that goes like this. U. S hog prices sink as China rebuilds heard, and I said to myself, we got to talk to Brian Duncan. Yeah. Well, I guess I'm your go to on this issue. You are the hug guys. So, so I mean, look, there's a lot to talk about. But first of all the prices you're getting market for your hogs. How are you doing? Business was Prices are pretty good right now, Kai. Actually, we've had a really good combination of factors. Some good domestic demand, along with exports, like you just referred to You know, there's quite a bit of uncertainty, though. China is always a wild card, and then the next question is, Do you believe anything they're saying about the rebuilding of their hog industry? And then we've also got this whole issue with line speeds and a judge's ruling in Minnesota that's going to slow us up so It's pretty tumultuous time we're trying to hang on to some profits is that the lines beating is literally how fast they process. The hogs. Just give me the 30,000 FT view here is that what's going on? Sure, there was a new new inspection system that went in place for moving hogs through the harvest facility. Which is good for producers like me good demand, but a judge has looked at that system and said they've been take into account all the factors that should have been anyhow. Now it's a political football. Chi. Yeah, I bet Let me ask you a couple of, um sort of ancillary questions. Number one is whether I understand You guys have been having a drought up there and farming stuff in the best of times and and I can't imagine doing it during a drought. Yeah, I'm in the northern part of Illinois and we are very dry. We had some good rain Father's Day weekend, but that's about it If the hot temperatures would stay abated, you know, we sure don't want that dome They've had out in the Pacific Northwest to come over the Midwest. I'll tell you that. Yeah. Uh, okay. So item number two is sort of domestic demand as people get back. Are you seeing demand for ribs and you know all that good stuff that comes out of your hogs. Yeah, we are. And food service has come back online and all of a sudden they start stacking up right and ballparks. I mean full capacity at Wrigley Field. You know, that's a lot of hot dogs. They need all of a sudden, so As we see things come back online Park is positioned pretty competitively priced in the meat case, and and we all know. Okay. Bacon's a bargain at twice the price. So yes, Demand is good. Alright, but wait a minute. Are you a Cubs fan? Yes, I am. But boy after this last six games, I'm not so sure I'll claim them. But afraid I am. Yeah, It's a little tough, little tougher Cubs fans right now, Um Okay, last thing and then I'll let you go and let you get back to work, Mr. Duncan. How long do you think And I'm pretty sure I've asked you a variety of this question. At least every time over the past, you know, a year and a half or whatever. How long are you figuring until you can look and say, you know what the pandemic is done, and my operations on my farm are back to normal. That's a great question. I thought it was going to be pretty soon here. You know you're always a little nervous, and you don't want to take things for granted. But I think once we get over this demand surge, now re stacking. I'd hope By the end of summer things will have settled into what what is a sustainably profitable time period for all of agriculture, not just the hog industry, but all of us. Brian Duncan. Uh, he does hogs and corn and soybeans. I think as well up in northern Illinois, also the vice president of the Illinois farm Bureau, Mr Duncan. Thanks for your time, sir. I do appreciate it guy. It is always a pleasure to talk with you. Coming up. Growing our own pair of jeans, a stem study, perhaps get it. Stem science technology growing jeans? Never mind first. Do the numbers down. Industrials Found 131 points today. 3/10 Percent 34,000 to 6 33 NASDAQ Picked up 18 points about a 10% 52 14,002, the S and P. 522 point. Half percent. 43 19 construction spending fell about 3/10 percent in May. That's according to Commerce Department. Housing construction, though still posted a 2/10 percent gain. Lumber prices been talking about that a little bit of been dropping pretty fast as supply has come back. So homebuilders, D. R. Horton Nailed on 2.7% visa homes lifted 3.1%..

Brian Duncan 18 points 131 points Samantha Fields 3.1% 2.7% Cubs 30,000 FT Illinois Farm Bureau D. R. Horton Duncan Wrigley Field 2/10 percent Minnesota May Half percent U. S Department of Agriculture Pacific Northwest today 43
"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 3 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the Tulsa Race massacre and in his speech Laying down a marker of sorts on the systemic racism in this economy, the president announced a couple of things he wants to do to try to narrow the racial wealth gap, a gap that has the average black family in the United States. Having just 1/10 of the net worth. The average white family on the president's list proposals to reduce racial discrimination in housing and increasing black home ownership, and his market places him at the field reports one key way the Biden administration plans to do that. Is by addressing the real racial disparities in home appraisals. Homeownership is one of the key ways for people to build wealth in the U. S. But white Americans are much more likely to own homes than black or Latino. Ex Americans and their homes were also worth more, says Junior Howell, a sociologist who studies housing appraisals. Homes in white neighborhoods are worth on average, almost $250,000 more. Incomparable homes and similar black and Latin ex communities. One major reason for that, Howell says, is that homes in predominantly white neighborhoods are often appraised to be worth more than comparable homes in predominantly black or Latino ex neighborhoods. And the racial inequality and appraisals is growing. Over time, The gap nearly doubled between 1980 2015. Because one of the main factors appraisers consider in determining how much a house is worth is how much other comparable homes nearby have sold for recently, and after years of redlining, segregation and other forms of housing discrimination, Andre Perry at the Brookings Institution says When you compare homes to others in neighborhoods have been discriminate against essentially recycled discrimination over and over again. It's a vicious cycle. He Laura Lee Raymond at Georgia Tech says that can really determine how much wealth you accumulate by owning your home. And so that is going to contribute hugely to the wealth gap in this country because home equity is 50% of household wealth. Raymond says the Biden administration's plan to address racial discrimination and home appraisals is an important Step, but it doesn't necessarily make it possible for black households to become homeowners doesn't really do much about that. One thing that would Raymond says, would be some kind of down payment assistance. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Lumber prices fell today, continuing a month long slide.

Andre Perry Laura Lee Raymond 50% United States Samantha Fields Raymond Georgia Tech Junior Howell Brookings Institution today Howell U. S. Latino Tulsa Race massacre 1/10 Latin one 1980 2015 one key One thing
Chip Crisis in 'Danger Zone' as Wait Times Reach New Record

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Chip Crisis in 'Danger Zone' as Wait Times Reach New Record

"Our lead story today is one of demand and supply in that order. The commodity in question is semiconductors. The demand as we'll explain is nearly universal the supply well it's lagging and more so every day bloomberg got its hands on some data from the susquehanna financial group that says if you order a chip today the aforementioned semiconductors you're going to have to wait seventeen weeks for it to be delivered. Four plus months that is to put it mildly no way to run a supply chain. And as marketplace's samantha field reports. It is doing damage to way more than cars or computers or smartphones. These days almost everything has a chip whether we think of it as high tech or not. If it has a plug or battery probably has chips in it glenn. O'donnell research director at forrester says that includes refrigerators video. Doorbells and light bulbs you can turn on with your phone and even lower tech things like kids toys because all the toys gotta talk now and they got to react and they have little motors right. Now there's a shortage of all kinds of chips. Even the most basic ones says china vasan an analyst at bloomberg intelligence for. It doesn't matter if it's one hundred dollars or fifty cent part. There's just not enough capacity at factories around the world to meet the demand from all of the industries. That need chips because there's such a shortage. The semiconductor industry is having to pick and choose what to prioritize says. Mario morales at market research company. Idc it's for prioritizes. The large scale lear is like computing. Mobile phones is the largest market so though supply chains are always going to get priority and other companies especially smaller are going to have to wait longer for chips so shrine of austin at bloomberg says if you need something like a new appliance anytime soon even if you don't care about it being smart all of those products will be in. Short supplies are investigating line and shrim- boston says the shortage is likely to get worse before it gets better

Samantha Field Vasan Bloomberg Bloomberg Intelligence Donnell Forrester Mario Morales Glenn Motors China IDC Austin Boston
"samantha fields" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:10 min | 5 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on WBUR

"Big international climate Summit wrapped up at the White House today. The talking is the easy part. Of course. Now comes the actual doing. Cutting of emissions and greening of economies. One of big selling points that President Biden's been hitting on back since he was candidate. Biden is that taking on climate change is going to create a whole lot of economic opportunity, and along with that opportunity, a whole lot of jobs. What kind of jobs though, and for whom? Marketplaces. Samantha Fields is on that story. If the U. S actually does what President Biden wants to do, and spends billions or trillions of dollars on clean energy and infrastructure and tackling climate change, it will create millions of jobs across all sectors of the economy, says Robert Poland, an economics professor at U Mass. Amherst. The largest proportion of jobs Aaron construction electrician's rue Furs. Plumbers pipefitters a lot of manufacturing jobs, many in clean energy, including wind and solar. But Jason Walsh at the Blue Green Alliance, says a lot of those new jobs are not being created in the same places where oil and coal and natural gas jobs are being lost. A solar jobs being created in California does not replace a cold economy job in eastern Kentucky. So we have to be very intentional and targeted about pushing investment into the communities that have been on the hurting end of this energy transition. That means going beyond job retraining programs, which often haven't worked that well, Poland says. It includes 100% tension guarantees. It includes reemployment guarantees a guaranteed job, and the job has to pay the level that the current job pays in East Kentucky. Coal mining jobs are the highest paying ones around, but they've been dwindling for years since Peter Hilly of the nonprofit Mountain Association, We had a mono economy here for more than 100 years and resource extraction economies drain a place and the question is, how do we create More diverse economy so that when anybody loses a job, they've got multiple options. So there isn't just one industry in the community. He says that so many people are relying on.

Samantha Fields Robert Poland Jason Walsh Peter Hilly Blue Green Alliance California 100% Mountain Association President East Kentucky today eastern Kentucky millions of jobs more than 100 years one industry billions or trillions of dollars U Mass. Amherst One President Biden
"samantha fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 5 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is from a new survey from Charles Schwab and Ariel Investments. 30% of Black investors under 40 got into the market for the first time last year. Marketplaces Samantha Fields, reports one night last spring, Rachel Tulley was scrolling Instagram, and she stumbled across a story from some random guy about stocks and investing. That night. I think I spent like four or five hours going through, like every post he ever made. He made it so relatable to. We already knew about stocks. She works for Apple in Atlanta, and she gets shares a couple of times a year. Every time I got them, I would just tell them just to get the money. But when she came across that random post that sent her down a rabbit hole, the pandemic had just started and she just broken up with her boyfriend. And so I got all that time back to myself, and I was just like, well, I'm about to try to do something with this time that something has been investing more young black Americans are getting into the markets for the first time, in part because it's gotten much easier to invest online for free, says John Rogers Jr. Chief investment officer at Ariel. Also, I think what's happened this last year, of course, was this extraordinary rise in the stock market in general, which he says generated a lot of interest from people who'd never invested before. Overall, black Americans are still less likely than white Americans to have money in the market. But for those under 40, there's no longer a gap, which is a big deal, Roger says. Comes in the way that African Americans came to this country and the segregation we faced and all the other challenges that we face. We're so far behind in this race, and we don't have multi generational wealth. You get further and further behind and because black families have so much less generational wealth, Rogers says. Historically, they haven't talked as much about how to build wealth, but that is changing, too. Nearly 40% of black Americans surveyed say they talk about the stock market. Now versus just 10%, who did growing up, Kevin Jeter says he never did my family and my friends like They're living paycheck to paycheck. So there's not a whole lot of excess money. Tol even put in a savings.

Rachel Tulley Kevin Jeter Samantha Fields 30% Roger Rogers Atlanta Ariel Investments Apple last year Charles Schwab four five hours Ariel 10% John Rogers Jr. under 40 last spring Nearly 40% first time
"samantha fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 5 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One vaccine shot in this country. And you know what that is? Other than really good news. That's a business opportunity is what that is, especially if you are in the travel business. Searches for domestic flights for this coming summer have gone up nearly 60% in the past month. That's according to the travel site. Hopper. Google Searches for hotels had 10 Year high this month and searches for plan a trip to Disney World increased. Kid. You've not 2600% from march to April and forget about getting a rental car. When ever you get wherever you are going. Marketplaces. Smithfield's reports on what travel pent up demand looks like Toyland. Anthony and her husband are ridiculously excited to finally go on vacation. The pent up demand here in our own home to just leave the house and go do something is This huge Anthony's, an accountant in Oregon and recently at the height of tax season, I told my husband, I needed plane ticket somewhere they decided on Tennessee. Flights were pretty cheap, she says. But rental cars that's going to be one of the most expensive parts of our trip. They're also finding most places they're thinking of visiting require reservations now and seemed to be booking up. That is true for all sorts of things from Disneyland tickets to campsites. Ah, lot of people like Anthony are booking trips within the U. S. And in many cases, staying relatively close to home. That's according to Christopher Nulty at Airbnb more than 70% of the searches that we're seeing are for destinations that about 50 to 300 miles away from home for folks, So you know the sort of I can get there on a tank of gas destination, and many of these are sort of in remote locations. Many of the flights people are looking for and booking are also two more remote outdoor. The spots. Says it did the motor in an economist at the travel booking site Hopper. National parks have done really well and beaches have done really well. That seems to be where a lot of the interest currently is in the motor, and says airlines have been adding flights to those kinds of destinations. Meanwhile, affairs are starting to go up prices went up about 12% in March alone and demoted and expects they'll keep going up as summer gets closer and as more people book I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. This final note on the way out today in which you on Musk takes another step toward getting humanity off this planet. That is what the founder and CEO of Space X has said his ultimate aim is Anyway, NASA announced today it has chosen space X to design and build the spacecraft that is going to take us back to the moon. $2.9 billion is the contract as it stands right now. I'm a take the over on that. Sadly, there's no timeline, either. The Biden administration has said it's reviewing President Trump's 2024 days, but still Cool. Right.

Christopher Nulty Anthony Space X Oregon Musk NASA U. S. $2.9 billion Tennessee Airbnb Toyland March 10 Year today 2600% One vaccine April Samantha Fields march more than 70%
"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:20 min | 5 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Run by a nonprofit called the Black Doctors Coded 19 consortium. And it's the first place value has seen where he can just walk up for the most part in Philadelphia, as in many places, you have to find appointments online, and that's how this clinic started to, says Dr Ayla Stanford, founder of the consortium. Initially greater than 90% of the people that were signing up were African American. But within a week, Stanford says that number dropped to 50%. And then you could just look out the window and you could see Tesla's and Mercedes and range Rovers. In the area where I am, where the same people would never be caught in these neighborhoods. That is when Stanford says she decided to scrap online registration all together and we made it first come first serve, so everyone just stood in line, and it's working more than 70% of the people. They're vaccinating or black. Stanford attributes a lot of that to the clinic being entirely walk up and a recent experiments. The city did backs that up. Last month, Philadelphia reserved half of the doses at one of its vaccination sites for walk ups just for six days. And walk ups was kind of an eye opener. James Garrow is a spokesperson for the city's department of Public Health, he says. In those six days, the number of black and Hispanic residents getting vaccinated increased by more than 50% off all the way is the city has tried to improve the racial equity and vaccine access so far, Garrow says. None of them have produced the very crystal clear response that we saw it from this. Now the city is starting to do walk ups again at another of its vaccination clinics. Dr Stanford wonders why it's taken so long. It's just frustrating beating your head against the wall just to get what I feel like is basic equity. In terms of this vaccine. This has been proven to prevent hospitalizations and deaths from Clovis when the Black Doctors Cove in 19 consortium first started administering vaccines it was doing about 1000 a week. Now it's doing one or 2000 Day backsies here, so that's game time backseat here. All right. So who's next? Down the hall? It's Martin values turn and he's nervous. Well, you know, sticking is over. She's okay. Yeah, I've done See That's it. He's done about 45 minutes after he first walked up and gotten line Now, remember the advocate of Emma, Let me buy, you know, Get your shot right on down here. Get a shot that Dr Stanford says, is how you reach people? Go to where they are and stay there. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Speaking of the pandemic winding down, a number of big companies have announced concrete plans to start bringing workers back into offices. This is not what you might call a return to normal because in many cases, it will not be quite the same. Companies like Ford Target and Microsoft are planning for a hybrid model with a blend of people on site and remote. From the workplace Culture desk marketplaces Meghan McCarty Carino has more Going remote overnight when the pandemic began, certainly wasn't easy, but embracing a hybrid workplace, maybe even trickier, says Brian Crop, chief of HR researcher Gartner. When everyone is working remote, everyone has a much more similar experience. But in a hybrid world, some people going in the office 40 hours a week. Some people are gonna be there four hours a week. That unevenness and variability is going to be really, really hard to manage. And yet 95% of the company's Gardner surveyed are planning for hybrid work, partly because employees wanted and partly because it saves on overhead. Hybrid companies will need a smaller footprint with fewer individual workspaces, says Cali Williams Yost, a business strategist who specializes in flexible work. There will be more spaces for collaboration. I think there will be space for uninterrupted concentrated work, but you will have to reserve them. You will have to schedule them. And those who do show up shouldn't be given an unfair advantage, says Harvard business professors said all Neely leaders have to develop new capabilities and competencies on how to make sure that they're running an equitable hybrid team, ensuring that they're equally Helping people develop get promoted in the organization that could require additional training to overcome in person bias and careful monitoring of pay and promotions. Making McCarty Carino for marketplace. Uh, coming up cards and letters were coming. Magazines were coming. Where could they have gone? But first, let's do the numbers. The Dow Jones industrial Average gained 305 points 9/10 percent to finish at 34,000 Oh 35, the NASDAQ picked up 180 points. That's one tense and 3% also one and 3/10 percent toe end at 14,038, the S and P. 500 added. 45 points one and a 10% to land at 41 70. It is an April 15th without panic for most Americans, As of course, the Iris extended most people's tax deadline to May 17th. Not the case, though, for freelancers, gig workers the self in fluid or if you own an S corporation. Unfortunately, your estimated tax payments are still do today, Bonds rose..

Microsoft Brian Crop 180 points Samantha James Garrow 14,038 305 points Philadelphia 95% May 17th Garrow 50% April 15th NASDAQ six days 3% Harvard Martin Ayla Stanford Last month
"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:35 min | 7 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Texas boiled water notices are slowly being lifted. That said a good chunk of the Texas Electrical Reliability Council announced their resignations today and life. Is still very far from normal. People are dealing with burst pipes and water damage and his market places him at the field reports. Businesses are too This time of year is usually when everything starts to bloom at Gretchen O'Neill's Flower Farm in Maynor, Texas. It is supposed to be spring here is supposed to be warm. So when O'Neil heard the forecast for snow and freezing temperatures last week, she did everything she could to save the flowers in her greenhouses I spent about $4000 and brought in a generator and kerosene heaters. Extra row cover that saved most of those flowers but the ones outside in the fields. Many of them were damaged or destroyed during Valentine's Week, a huge revenue week for her The timing was terrible for Ashley Frick to she owns Colleen's Kitchen. A restaurant in Austin takes a lot of resource is and funds to prepare for those big days. Instead of letting that food go to waste, Frick says Colleen's partnered with a local, nonprofit and other restaurants we were able to feed Different shelters around town where I mean, it's hard to be focused on your business. When you're also delivering food to people that have absolutely nothing. Many Texans have stepped up to help struggling businesses, too. Becky Hume lost almost all of her spring crop at verdant farms in Bastard Texas, which means for the next month, at least she won't be able to deliver the shares of vegetables that her CSE members had paid for. But when she emailed to tell them so many of them, you know, understood the problem that I had. You know, just such a steep fall of revenue that they have stepped up and said Yes, we want to help you get across this. Enough people, Hume says that she can afford to keep all of her staff and replant things like radishes and a rubella. That should, with a little luck be ready in about a month. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Coming up. It created a mouth problem.

Becky Hume Austin Samantha Fields Frick O'Neil Hume Colleen's Kitchen Texas last week Colleen Ashley Frick Bastard Texas Texas Electrical Reliability C CSE Maynor, Texas about $4000 next month today Valentine's Week Gretchen O'Neill's Flower Farm
Will rent relief come soon enough?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:11 min | 8 months ago

Will rent relief come soon enough?

"We're gonna start off the show with evictions which surely is on the minds of millions of people consuming them making it hard to focus or sleep or do much of anything at least fourteen million people are currently behind on rent. That's according to the latest data from the center on budget and policy priorities. The only thing keeping many of them in their homes is the cdc's eviction moratorium but that is set to expire at the end of the month. Now president elect joe biden. He says he wants to extend federal eviction. protections through september and as marketplace's samantha fields reports. He is also proposing billions in rental assistance. Congress just approved twenty five billion dollars in rental assistance as part of the latest covid relief package in december. douglas rice. The center on budget and policy priorities says that money can be used both for background and future rent payments. Maya submit that anywhere from two to six million households. This year will be helped yet. It's still just a fraction of the more than fourteen million adult renters who report being behind on rent. President-elect biden has proposed an additional twenty five billion but it will likely take awhile for rental assistance to actually reach people that is why housing advocates are pushing biden to extend and strengthen federal eviction protections before they expire this month. Emily benn for chairs the american bar. Association's covid nineteen committee on addiction the current. Cdc moratorium isn't protecting everyone. Many tenants are not aware of their rights under the eviction moratorium or they feel intimidated in triggering. Their rights strengthening the federal moratorium would give state and local governments time to get rent relief out to the people who need it says. Zach newman. an attorney with denver-based covid nineteen addiction. Defense project it just seems like a really terrible outcome of this moment to have hundreds of thousands or millions of people around the country when money is on the way that newman says is his biggest fear. That tenants will be affected right before rental. Assistance arrives i'm samantha fields for

Center On Budget And Policy Pr Samantha Fields Douglas Rice Elect Biden Joe Biden CDC Emily Benn Maya Congress Biden Zach Newman Denver Newman
"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 8 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For the first time since pandemic April, the number of people on American payrolls did not rise. Instead, payrolls in December actually dropped by 140,000. That is also weaker than expected. Economist Julia Coronado is founder with macro policy perspectives, and she's been reading deeply into the report. Hi, Julia. Good morning. Where was the weakness focused? The weakness was focused almost entirely in restaurants, which is not surprising. Given the rise of the pandemic. They had to shut down. They laid off almost 500,000 workers. Which nuances the other piece of data that wages went up 8/10 of a percent month on month. Right exactly on And that's not because wages are rising, but because a lot of low wage workers fell out of the calculation, so that's not a sign of spring but a sign of weakness and that the most vulnerable workers are getting hit the hardest. It was terrible in restaurants. But if that's where the weakness was concentrated, maybe things were at least treading water elsewhere. No things were pretty decent elsewhere, you know, Expected strength and in housing, construction and manufacturing s o some decent numbers. If we can turn the corner on the pandemic, some of this could be transitory. I think that's the glass half full take of this report. Economist Julia Coronado. Macro policy perspective. Thank you so much. My pleasure. So, December numbers but keeping this 2021 focus. What about the month? We're living in now? January marketplaces Samantha Fields the short answer. Not yet. For one reason the U. S. Is still setting records for new covert infections and deaths. I think that that's the biggest determinant. Frankly, what's the virus doing? Erica Grow? Shin is an economist at Cornell University. She says. As long as so many people are staying home. We just aren't going to see a lot more hiring. We sort of reached a plateau. I would say that is not going to look a lot better until the vaccine reaches the whole lot more people and we're not there yet. But Heidi Shierholz at the Economic Policy Institute says the latest covert relief package will have a positive effect on the economy this month without that stimulus package. Over 10 million people would have lost unemployment insurance benefits at the end of December, and that would have been a huge drag on the economy that we will not see. And with the Democrats soon to be in charge here, hold says there is likely more relief on the way. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Markets. The SNP future is up 4/10 of a percent. Now it is the week that interest rates started moving up off their pandemic. Close. The 10 year benchmark is up now at 1.9%. Marketplace Morning report is supported by C three dot ai c three dot ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence.

Julia Coronado Samantha Fields Shin Erica Grow Economic Policy Institute founder Heidi Shierholz Cornell University
"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:14 min | 9 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Effects of that pandemic relief package soon. Lot of what's in there is an extension of the original relief Congress passed back in March. People can get jobless benefits for longer will get federal help on top of what their state gives them, and there are more loans and they're for small businesses. But as marketplaces Samantha Fields reports, some of the original protections have already run out when Congress passed that new $900 billion covert release bill just before Christmas. One thing it did not do was extend the requirement that many employers offer paid sick days for people who get Cove ID. Tony Goldman at the Center for Law and Social Policy, says that will have public health consequences. We're at a moment when the country is experiencing over 200,000 new cases a day of the virus, and this is a program that one study found. Reduced coded by 15,000 cases. A day before Congress passed the emergency sick time mandate in March. Goldman says more than 30 Million workers in the U. S did not even have a single paid sick day. Most of them are in low wage, high risk jobs in grocery stores and restaurants. So these are workers who may face the choice where they cannot stay home even if they are sick with Cove ID because they would lose income that they need to pay for rent to pay for groceries along with paid sick time. Congress also let paid family leave benefits expire as of today. Those gave parents up to 12 weeks of paid time off to take care of their kids. If they're school or daycare, closed because of co vid Vicki Shabo is with the think tank New America. That means that in some families, parents may need to make choices about whether to keep their job or whether to provide care for their Children and disproportionately. We know that it's women who have taken a step back during this pandemic. Even with the 12 weeks of paid leave in place, and Shay Bo says the elimination. The expiration of these provisions on Lee make that outcome more likely. Employers can still choose to offer paid sick and family leave, and if they do, they can still claim a tax credit. But Ruth Milkman, a labor sociologist at the City University of New York, says without a mandate, I suspect that most of them will only do it for the workers that they considered to be the most valuable that, like in the past professionals and managers, which means the people who need the benefits, the most, she says, will once again be the least likely to get them. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. So here's a really sobering fact. According to experts, more Americans are going hungry right now, then. At any point since the census started keeping track in the late nineties. The pandemic relief package that we keep talking about. It does set aside new money billions of dollars for food stamp benefits and food banks. But the need like I said, unlike anything we've seen before. We're gonna take a close look now at Texas food banks there have been scrambling to feed people. They're getting double the number of families they did last year, while at the same time dealing with some pretty heavy budget cuts. From Houston Public Media Elizabeth Trove all has that one. Quinn McGee wakes up early to get ahead of the long line of cars at the local food pantry in southwest Houston on pickup days. It's something to behold, when you leave you looking at families literally. Inside air you seeing all these cars and sight Wow. Mickey, who uses they and them pronounced started getting food there in November. They have a partner and a nine year old son. The family has had gaps and paychecks do tow unemployment and mental health leave. They have struggled to catch up with bills. Vicky's family had never been to a food pantry before the pandemic. Now coming home with groceries is a sigh of relief is literally like a I'm really like, Okay, I can rest easy just a little bit just a little. McGee says. In the grocery bag. There's always fresh fruits and veggies, carrots, potatoes, apples, bananas have gotten strawberries. I've gotten Manda Rand's. You say it's nice to have a healthy alternative to the canned goods that can be high and sodium. But in the new year it's likely that fewer fresh foods will make it into grocery bags like McGee's, thanks to a $2 million cut to a statewide grant program. That translates to a £19 million loss of produce. Celia Cole is CEO of Feeding Texas and Association of the State's 21 food banks that's produce We will not be able To get its produced that will likely go to waste and it's produced that could be nourishing hungry Texans at a time of unprecedented food and security due to the pandemic. Beating Texas estimates it's been serving around 1.8 million families each month during the pandemic. The surplus agricultural products grant program pays for leftover produce from state farmers to be shipped to food banks. The Texas Department of Agriculture cut funding for the program to balance the statewide budget. At the Houston Food Bank. A forklift drives up to unload pallets of fresh mangoes from a truck trailer. Food Bank President Brian Greene says the slashed budget means the organization will receive 100 fewer tractor trailer loads like this over in the next year. He says the program is a critical source of fresh fruits and vegetables. It accounts for about 10% of our total distribution, and that's fairly consistent. I think of the food banks in Texas. And I think in terms of produce, it's about a quarter of the produce that we receive, Green says. If you consider these cuts, along with unprecedented demand and uncertainty around federal USDA funding Food banks are facing a potential food cliff Celia Cole says local food banks still anticipate it delay in the first three months of 2021, which could mean they fall short about £29 million of food each month. Almost every single food bank is projecting a potential gap between the demand in their communities and their ability to meet that demand. That's why Cole says there's an immediate need that this state program could help pay. For now. She says she hopes when the state Legislature convenes in January, it will immediately reverse the budget cut. I'll say I'm cautiously optimistic. I think that the responsible thing to do would be to restore the funding for this fiscal year. Cole says this program has received bipartisan support for nearly 20 years in Houston. I'm Elizabeth pro ball for marketplace. Coming.

Congress Texas Celia Cole Quinn McGee Houston Food Bank Samantha Fields Tony Goldman Houston Center for Law and Social Poli Ruth Milkman Texas Department of Agricultur Shay Bo
"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 9 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Get them. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. So here's a really sobering fact. According to experts, more Americans are going hungry right now, then. At any point since the census started keeping track in the late nineties. The pandemic relief package that we keep talking about it does set aside new money billions of dollars for food stamp benefits and food banks. But the need like I said, unlike anything we've seen before. We're gonna take a close look now at Texas food banks there have been scrambling to feed people. They're getting double the number of families they did last year, while at the same time dealing with some pretty heavy budget cuts. From Houston Public Media Elizabeth Trove all has that one. Quinn McGee wakes up early to get ahead of the long line of cars at the local food pantry in southwest Houston on pickup days. It's something to behold, when you leave you looking at families literally. Inside air using all these cars and sight Wow. Mickey, who uses they and them pronounced started getting food there in November. Have a partner and a nine year old son. The family has had gaps and paychecks do tow unemployment and mental health leave. They have struggled to catch up with bills. Vicky's family had never been to a food pantry before the pandemic. Now coming home with groceries is a sigh of relief is literally like Yeah, I'm really like, okay, I can rest easy. Just a little bit just a little. McGee says. In the grocery bag. There's always fresh fruits and veggies, carrots, potatoes, apples, bananas have gotten strawberries. I've gotten Manda Rand's. You say it's nice to have a healthy alternative to the canned goods that can be high and sodium. But in the new year it's likely that fewer fresh foods will make it into grocery bags like McGee's, thanks to a $2 million cut to a statewide grant program. That translates to a £19 million loss of produce. Celia Cole is CEO of Feeding Texas and Association of the State's 21 food banks that's produce We will not be able To get its produced that will likely go to waste and it's produced that could be nourishing hungry Texans at a time of unprecedented food and security due to the pandemic. Beating Texas estimates it's been serving around 1.8 million families each month during the pandemic. The surplus agricultural products grant program pays for leftover produce from state farmers to be shipped to food banks. The Texas Department of Agriculture cut funding for the program to.

Quinn McGee Texas Houston Texas Department of Agricultur Samantha Fields Manda Rand Celia Cole Mickey Vicky partner CEO Association of
Where does the economy go from here?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:27 min | 9 months ago

Where does the economy go from here?

"We are going to dispense with the president's remarks last night about changes he wants made to the virus relief. Bill that congress finally passed on monday. After months of negotiations. We are going to dispense with it with this observation. It's all fun and games and political intrigue until somebody gets hurt and people are getting hurt all over the place in this economy as we have been telling you for months and we got more evidence of that this morning courtesy of the commerce department will learn consumer spending fell nearly half a percent last month the first time. It has fallen since april thing. How long ago. That was and it same time. Personal income fell by a little bit more than a full percent. The third decline in four months. It's no mystery. Y right government aid has been keeping people afloat and that aid is running out so to get us going. Marketplace's samantha fields looks at what that is going to mean for this economy. This time of year is normally when people spend more money. Carl tannenbaum chief economist. At northern trust says the fact that personal income and consumer spending dropped in november is a bad omen. It does give a pretty good sense that households are not going into the new year in very strong answer to the urgency around. The negotiations in washington consumer spending crashed in march and april but then bounced most of the way back largely thanks to government aid back in april after the cares act. There was a huge pop in personal income. Ted rosman is an industry analyst at credit cards dot com and a lot of that did trickle down to other sectors of the economy. He says over the summer a lot of people felt like things were getting better but now maybe those unemployment checks have dried up. They've long since spent their first stimulus check. Maybe they're not able to go back to work. And people are nervous. After months of uncertainty over whether the federal government would provide more relief says tim quinlan senior economist at wells. Fargo six a long time to build up consumer confidence and not so long to disrupt it or to shake it and when people have less confidence and income there are less likely to spend their money. Carl tannenbaum northern trust says that is a bad combination spreading done by households accounts for almost seventy percent of our annual gross domestic product. Our national income. And if it's not recovering he says neither will the economy.

Carl Tannenbaum Samantha Fields Commerce Department Northern Trust Ted Rosman Congress Bill Tim Quinlan Washington Federal Government Fargo Wells
"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:54 min | 10 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"One of the things you look for in a labor market to see where things might be headed is wages and whether they're stuck as they were for years after the financial crisis. Or whether they're going up to that point Starbucks today starting next month, nearly all of its current employees are going to get at least a 10% bump and starting wages are going to go up. 5% attract and retain new employees is the corporate mantra, of course. Home Depot said this week. It's permanently raising pay for most of its workers as well. So marketplaces Samantha Fields looks at what this might portend. So far during the pandemic, A few big companies have permanently raised wages for their employees Best buy and target over the summer. Now Starbucks and Home Depot. But Molly Kinder's at the Brookings Institution, says that is still the exception. Most companies at this point have not raised wages. In fact, she says, most big companies have gone the other way and stopped offering hazard pay to their employees as they did in the spring because of co vid. However, I think the winds are shifting. More and more Americans, she says, now support raising the minimum wage and sorry, J. R. Rahman of the nonprofit One Fair Wage says many retailers and restaurants are having trouble recruiting and retaining workers for jobs that come with high risk and low pay. Workers are in very large numbers, not willing to return for the low wages that they had before. Because of that, she says. She's seen hundreds and hundreds of independent restaurants. Having to just raise their wages pretty dramatically. Most big chain restaurants have not raised wages, but J. R. Rahman says they may have to eventually to compete. Ultimately, though, Sucharita could Ali, a retail analyst at Forrester says. We want to raise the standards of the lowest income households. It's gotta be through a government mandate because, she says, most companies are not going to do it on their own. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. One of the things the New York Fed does besides turn its president John Williams, loose for interviews. They do a whole bunch of data gathering and analyzing, as he said minute ago. When in fact, all the regional banks do that, as does headquarters in Washington, But a report from the New York Fed this week caught our eye household. The debt is going up more mortgages in a hot housing market, along with student loans and car payments. That same report, though, found credit card debt is falling. A good thing, right? Let's credit card debt. Well, yes and no as marketplaces, Justin, Home reports. Ever since the pandemic started, many people have been receiving government relief. Kathy Jones, fixed income strategist at Charles Schwab Marketplace Underwriter says People have also had fewer ways to spend that money so that combination really sent the savings trade up..

Molly Kinder Starbucks Home Depot Samantha Fields J. R. Rahman Fed Brookings Institution Charles Schwab Marketplace John Williams Kathy Jones Ali New York Forrester Washington analyst Sucharita president
"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:32 min | 11 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Repayment, especially if somebody's so broke that collecting that money from them would cause real financial hardship. But they cannot waive repayment of pandemic unemployment assistance, which is federal As it stands now, The law require states to recoup that money from everyone who was overpaid and ever more says she's worried that a lot more people are going to start getting over payment notices in the coming months. If this issue doesn't get solved, this is going to be more explosive. I think then people losing the $600 the extra weekly federal unemployment money that ran out at the end of July. Larson. Ross has no idea where he's going to come up with $10,000 to repay the state of Colorado. He's having a hard enough time affording rent bills and groceries. It's hard, you know, like I don't know if I'm gonna be able to pay I need this back. I don't know if I'm gonna have Tio Leave my apartments. I just I just don't know eyes. It's very scary. He says he thinks about the debt every minute of the day. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Once or perhaps as depending on how long it takes. The dust settles after the end of voting tomorrow, Attention is going to turn back to the economy, and this is a busy week. The October jobs report will be upon US Friday morning, and the Fed meets Wednesday and Thursday. There is not going to be an interest rate move of that we can be Almost completely certain actually. But you can probably count on the Federal Open Market Committee statement and chair J. Powell in his press conference, saying something about the main street lending program. Designed for small and medium sized businesses. It has been well shall we say, less successful than had been hoped? So now his marketplaces Justin, who reports the Fed is going to lower its minimum loan size in that program from 250. 2 $100,000 just explains how that should help. By allowing businesses to take out smaller loans. The Fed says. It's hoping more businesses will participate..

Fed Ross Federal Open Market Committee Samantha Fields Larson Colorado Justin J. Powell
"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:12 min | 11 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm sorry Ben, ashore in for David Brancaccio first, the new jobless number 787,000 people filed for unemployment last week that is very high, but it is also down about 100,000 from the week before, and it's the lowest level since March. A number of people filing. Continuing unemployment claims 8.37 million The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved Judge Amy Cockney barrettes nomination. It now moves to a full Senate vote. If the past couple of weeks are any indication, it could be a very big fundraising day. For Democrats marketplaces Samantha Fields, reports. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday, September 18th by that next Monday, Democrats had donated more than $160 million through the fundraising site Act Blue and they gave at least 35 million more during the confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. Democratic strategist a team, O'Meara says This is the first time in decades that the Supreme Court has been a bigger motivator for the Democratic side. Then it has been for the Republicans. Liam Donovan, a Republican lobbyist. Pretty much agrees. Anger is a powerful thing. What it terms in terms of translating into dollars, and that's not what Republicans have right now. Almost all of those dollars will be spent by election day, says Democratic strategist Julia Eggar. I've seen a couple folks say like, Oh, wow, you know, there's not even a way to spend this amount of money. There is an inn close Senate races, she says. The extra million's can make a big difference. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. We got new numbers this week on how much cash the presidential campaigns have on hand for the run up to Election Day, According to the latest filings with the Federal Election Commission. President Trump's Campaign committee had $63 million available for last minute expenses. Compared to the Biden campaigns. 177 million in some Democratic House and Senate candidates are outraising their GOP opponents in states where you might not expect it. Bottom line. All of that money sloshing around means even more political ads. Marketplaces, Kimberly Adams reports. Five million. That's how many ads have run on cable and broadcast TV if you tally up the pitches for House, Senate and presidential races, according to the Wesleyan Media Project. Campaigns don't care about efficiency. They care about winning Erica Franklin Fowler's co director of the project and a professor of government at Wesleyan. One of the reasons why you continue to see a ratcheting up of advertising is that there's always a fear that if your opponent is out hearing you that you're giving them an advantage. With all of the money still flooding into federal, state and local elections a lot more ads are coming. Sorry, but as you get closer to Election Day, especially in the most contested media markets, there won't be space so the access funds will need to go somewhere and campaigns will have to be creative about how to do that. Oh, and they have ideas Advertising to people's ro coups and PlayStations. People who are streaming YouTube TV. Tim Lim is a Democratic strategist working with several state and federal campaigns. And you're going to see some crazy, wacky stuff your claims with banners, you're going to see roving trucks with ads. Lim says campaigns have some unexpected options instead of having to say OK, we're gonna cut X out of this budget cut. Why this budget? No way we can fully fund Excellency, we can fully fund the TV, the digital in the mail and even think about expanding outreach, which is why you're seeing Democratic ads in traditionally Red States. Texas in South Carolina, Nebraska and Alaska. Laurie Cox Han is a political science professor at Chapman University. Sometimes you'll see a campaign spend money in a state where they don't really have a shot, but they have to spend it somewhere. Henry called another race with the Democratic candidate who had money burning a hole in his pocket We've seen over the last eight years how decisions.

Senate Senate Judiciary Committee Supreme Court Samantha Fields Judge Amy Cockney Wesleyan Media Project Federal Election Commission Democratic House Judge Amy Cockney Barrett professor Tim Lim David Brancaccio Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Julia Eggar Ben Liam Donovan Laurie Cox Han President Trump O'Meara
"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:21 min | 11 months ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on KCRW

"The marketplace. I'm sorry Ben, ashore in for David Brancaccio first the jobless number 787,000 people filed for unemployment last week that is very high, but it is also down about 100,000 from the week before its lowest level since March. A number of people filing. Continuing unemployment claims 8.37 million Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote today on Judge Amy Cockney Barrettes nomination to the Supreme Court despite minority leader Chuck Schumer, saying Democrats will boycott the vote. If the past couple of weeks are any indication, it could be a very big fundraising day for Democrats marketplaces Samantha Fields, reports. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday, September 18th by that next Monday, Democrats had donated more than $160 million through the fundraising site Act Blue and they gave at least 35 million more during the confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. Democratic strategist a team, O'Meara says This is the first time in decades that the Supreme Court has been a bigger motivator for the Democratic side. Then it has been for the Republicans. Liam Donovan, a Republican lobbyist. Pretty much agrees. Anger is a powerful thing. What it terms in terms of translating into dollars, and that's not what Republicans have right now. Almost all of those dollars will be spent by election day, says Democratic strategist Julia Eggar. I've seen a couple folks say like, Oh, wow, you know, there's not even a way to spend this amount of money. There is And in close and it races, she says. The extra million's can make a big difference. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. We got new numbers this week on how much cash the presidential campaigns have on hand for the run up to Election Day, According to the latest filings with the Federal Election Commission. President Trump's Campaign committee had $63 million available for last minute expenses. Compare that with the Biden campaigns, 177 million in some Democratic House and Senate candidates are out, raising their GOP opponents in states where you might not expect it. Bottom line. All of that money sloshing around means even more political ads. Marketplaces, Kimberly Adams reports. Five million. That's how many ads have run on cable and broadcast TV if you tally up the pitches for House, Senate and presidential races, according to the Wesleyan Media Project. Campaigns don't care about efficiency They care about winning. Erica Franklin Fowler is co director of the project and a professor of government at Wesleyan. One of the reasons why you continue to see a ratcheting up of advertising is that there's always a fear that if your opponent is out there in you that you're giving them an advantage. With all of the money still flooding into federal, state and local elections. Ah, lot more ads are coming. Sorry, but as you get closer to Election Day, especially in the most contested media markets, there won't be space so the access funds will need to go somewhere and campaigns will have to be creative about how to do that. Oh, and they have ideas Advertising to people's ro coups and PlayStations. People who are streaming YouTube TV. Tim Lim is a Democratic strategist working with several state and federal campaigns. And you're going to see some crazy, wacky stuff your claims with banners, you're going to see roving trucks with ads. Lim says campaigns have some unexpected options instead of having to say. Okay, well, we're gonna cut X out of this budget cut wire. This budget know we can. We can fully fund Excellency. We can fully fund the TV, the digital in the mail and even think about expanding outreach, which is why you're seeing Democratic ads in traditionally Red states. Texas in South Carolina, Nebraska and Alaska. Laurie Cox Han is a political science professor at Chapman University. Sometimes you'll see a campaign spend money in a state where they don't really have a shot, but they have to spend it somewhere. Henry called another race with the Democratic candidate who had money burning a hole in his pocket We've seen over the last eight years how decisions.

Supreme Court Samantha Fields Senate Senate Judiciary Committee Judge Amy Cockney Federal Election Commission Judge Amy Cockney Barrett David Brancaccio professor Democratic House Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Chuck Schumer Tim Lim Julia Eggar Wesleyan Media Project Ben Liam Donovan Laurie Cox Han President Trump
"samantha fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As we were talking about a little bit ago. Right now, More than 30 million people are trying to figure out how to pay their bills without the extra $600 a week that Washington was paying them. But as marketplaces Samantha Field reports, some unemployed people never got that money in the first place or any other unemployment benefits, even though they are eligible. Harry my circle. It's tried to file for unemployment this spring in Wisconsin when he lost his job as a painter. I tried and tried and tried to call and Chlo and called in said on the phone for hours and hours and hours on hold and never got through that nobody After a while, he got so discouraged that he gave up. I just got tired of being on her own list into that stupid music. Going nowhere. Nobody ever answers you're on hold next available operator will come true. Never comes. When you have that experience over and over and over again, I actually conceived why somebody would just say Forget it and give up. Heidi Shierholz of the Economic Policy Institute says there's no way to know how many people have given up on trying to file for unemployment. But what we know is it's still a big problem. Another big problem is that a lot of people don't know they can apply for unemployment. There's just so much confusion Annalise Cougars with the Brookings Institution, and she says often, people don't even think they're eligible. I think a lot of people that work part time or who worked, for example, is tipped workers. They might just assume that they're not gonna hold by. But the cares act expanded eligibility for unemployment, so they probably would A lot of people who have been going without benefits for months are barely getting by Harry my circle. It's fell behind on rent almost immediately back in April and almost everything else to him behind on my electric and gas on behind on my phone and Food. I'm just hanging in. There have been going to food pantries and so forth and stuff like that. Heidi Shierholz of the Economic Policy Institute says people in my circle with his position should not give up on trying to get unemployment. Even if it's been months, she says. As long as you can show, I lost my job at this time due to the pandemic, you get benefits. For all the intervening weeks. You get your benefits back to when you lost your bell. And for a lot of people, that could mean many thousands of dollars. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace.

Heidi Shierholz Economic Policy Institute Harry Chlo Samantha Field Samantha Fields Wisconsin Brookings Institution Washington Annalise
"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"samantha fields" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Be full for a long time. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. His final note on the way out today, which may well be even after everything that has gone on so far this year. This may be the sign of the apocalypse is upon us, Kentucky Fried Chicken KFC. Is the actual approved branding, I think, anyway, KFC hears the news from a press release headlined Meat of the Future. The company is working with a Russian three D printing firm. And here's the quote. Using additive bio printing technology, using chicken cells and plant material to reproduce the taste and texture of chicken meat almost without involving animals in the process. Now, yes, Industrial trick informing is unpalatable at best. But What Marketplaces, supported by C three dot a. I see. Three got a software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ay ay. All right. We are.

Samantha Fields