30 Burst results for "Sam Sanders"

Alphabet settles shareholder lawsuit over alleged mishandling of sexual misconduct

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

00:42 sec | 4 d ago

Alphabet settles shareholder lawsuit over alleged mishandling of sexual misconduct

"Learning. Alphabet. Google's parent company has settled a Siri's of shareholder lawsuits over its handling of sexual harassment claims under the settlement filed yesterday in California Superior Court Alphabet agreed to commit $310 million to corporate diversity efforts over the next decade, Employees will no longer have to settle disputes with alphabet using private arbitration. And the Mountain View based company also agreed to limit confidentiality agreements during sexual harassment and discrimination cases. The lawsuits were in response to reports that three top Google executives quietly left the company admitted misconduct allegations

California Superior Court Alph Harassment Google Siri
Most California Schools Unlikely To Open In Fall Under New State Rules

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

Most California Schools Unlikely To Open In Fall Under New State Rules

"California's governor has issued new rules that could keep public schools across much of the state closed this fall. Kyle Stokes of member station KPCC reports if their toe open counties will have to reverse a surgeon Corona virus Cases. Governor Gavin Newsom says schools cannot open for in person classes if their county Has been on the state's Corona virus monitoring list in the past 14 days. Much of Southern California the Bay Area and Central Valley is currently on that watch list. Here's Newsome. We all prefer. In classroom instructions for all the obvious reasons, but on Ly on ly if it could be done safely. The state's two largest school districts, Los Angeles and San Diego have already announced they'll resume classes next month online on Lee, But the governor's order would override plans like in suburban Orange County to offer some on campus instruction. Start the New Year for NPR News. I'm Kyle

Kyle Stokes Governor Gavin Newsom California LY Kpcc Newsome Orange County NPR Bay Area Los Angeles Central Valley San Diego LEE
Better News with Sam Sanders

The Nod

05:52 min | 2 months ago

Better News with Sam Sanders

"Sam Sanders. Thank you so much for joining us today. Just seemed beautiful faces. You have done a lot of political reporting for NPR. You also host the podcast standard minute which covers pop culture and news so much happening in the world right now. That requires you to be plugged in I'm curious. How has the news been affecting you? In this moment it's been it's been a lot so like the news. Itself is heavy, and it's hard as a drink of color to be a real human being who you are and also processed kind of news I. Think what's bigger for me. What's larger from my mind? Right now is how. Black germ was trickily. We are asked to be a part of this story. educate white people and our white friends, but also be extremely diplomatic, and above the fray at the same time. I think even on twitter I've noticed a lot of the people that I follow being respectful about the kinds of images share, but on cable news is kind of like I mean. How many times was the image of George Floyd circulated? It makes me wonder what you think about how these stories are being covered I, think. We are seeing. Newsroom leaders. In this moment seek to cover the black men and women who are being killed by police seek to cover the black people, and all kinds of people out there protesting and marching, and the same instances they do not accept the full humanity of the black journalists in their Dutra this idea of objectivity, which is been around and. Mention John Lesson for a few decades now basically says all journalists are above the fray. They are not partisan. They are not local. They don't take any side. report the facts now. We're faced with his moment where we're having talk about black lives, matter again and newsrooms are asking folks like me to be. Objective in that Muzasa us to see both sides. But there's no both sides when a man like me is being choked up for eight minutes night. I watch cable. News and you just watching the news in general I feel like I've never seen so many kind of flat correspondence. Grave because you have them there, but it's also tough because he feels like. They're bringing them out to kind of just comment on this moment. Comment on trauma, and it's not just common. We are asked in many ways to publicly perform black grief for white consumption, and so my flight in this the moment is to say, amplify these flat voices, but don't make us. Criers were more than that journalists. It seems like right now. The it's more urgent than ever to stay informed, but. It feels all that. It seems like it's like one horrible thing after another. I'm curious like somebody who has to stay informed. How do you do that with out losing it? I would say the first order business is knowing that like you don't have to be on twitter all the time, and you should not be on twitter all the time. I think especially at night. We have to monitor our media consumption we can go to. To Sleep. There are many nights now I will turn the phone off. Walk the phone down to my car in the parking garage in my building. Put the bone in the car. The is every night in Sam's went upstairs to go to bed and then I think the second order of business is to consistently kind of truth. Squad yourself with other people you trust and Mike talk about this news with other people that you trust. If you sit at home on the scroll on the feet all day, and it's just you and your thoughts by the end of the day your tears. It is okay to call someone you know interest just to unpack. At this point is too much for anyone to deal with alone too much last night I was able to sleep in its partners. I'm able to function, but like the day before I made the mistake of opening twitter just before I went to sleep in literally the first thing in time I was video of a black being being killed Yup and I did not sleep. What can we ask you? This register is as journalists than black folks on the Internet. We feel this duty in moments like this to constantly be in the struggle, but what I always tell myself is. You can't centers up on fire to keep other people more. And at a certain point, your self destruction is not helping anyone. With so much processing of our own that we have to do with all of these traumatic entrenching headlines. I'm wondering. Has Anything changed for you about how you report the news? Take the imaginary white man off your shelter. I think what I think. Leg We so much. Show is a podcast, and it's also on the radio and the average age demo of a weekend. NPR listener is fifty eight years old plus mostly white for the longest time I was at. Gut Check everything I did and say we'll look. Will that person get and so I think my responsibility in charge to myself now? Is Not to worry if they understand all of it or like all of it, but to worry about it, but I'm saying it's true NFL what saying speaks to the vomit. I have consumed white media since I was a kid, and I just figured it out I watched frazier. Do you know I watch? I watch all that stuff and I. Know I can I can figure this out I want to give my white listeners same grace, so that's been my charged myself in this moment cake. This imaginary white may have to perform for off my shoe. And just? Tell the truth and making play

Twitter Sam Sanders NPR George Floyd Dutra Criers NFL John Lesson Muzasa Frazier Mike
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 2 months ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Not Everyone Gets To Use iPhones In The Movies

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

00:59 min | 7 months ago

Not Everyone Gets To Use iPhones In The Movies

"They let us iphones in movies. But and this is very pivotal. If you're ever watching a mystery movie bad guys cannot have iphones on camera. Who said that. I don't even get it if the if you're watching a mystery movie bad guys can't have iphones on camera. This famous director who directed one of the biggest mystery films of last year. Said Apple will never let you put an iphone in the hands of a villain. Oh it's bad. Pr For them. Was the biggest mystery film of last year knives out. Yes okay so this is the point. Yes so Ryan Johnson Director of the film knives out which I saw twice in love. It's great talking Vanity Fair this week and he said yet. This is a dirty little secret of Hollywood Apple Iphone to look a certain way and movies and they don't want to be tied to the villains

Vanity Fair Apple Ryan Johnson Director
Netflix's 'Love Is Blind' brings the reality dating show into 2020

Pop Culture Happy Hour

08:54 min | 7 months ago

Netflix's 'Love Is Blind' brings the reality dating show into 2020

"Netflix plan to take over television has extended to dating shows for a while. But perhaps they've never made one so weird so baffling at so cringe. Inducing Lee embarrassing for everyone involved as love is blind and you probably know someone who's watching it then what the show insists on calling an experiment. Couple sit in separate cells that they call pods where they can hear each other but not see each other and once they've had a conversation or two if they're getting along they get engaged and only then do they meet will any of them. Make it to the altar. I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes. We're talking about the NETFLIX series. Love is blind on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR joining me and Steven from NPR. West is one of our most treasured friends. Who the record should show. We did not force to watch. Love is blind Sam Sanders the host of. It's been a minute. Hello Sam I would. A page ought to be on this show. We should also point out that Y'All can't see me in her. We're trying to figure out whether we can possibly have a meaningful conversation county each other so before we get to deeply into it. The basic idea of this show is that you start with some men and some women they all sit and if you think of them as little tiny prison cells with furniture and painted walls they are separated by a wall that they can't see through but they can hear through so it's basically like having a conversation with someone in two adjoining phone booths. And so they talk to each other and then if they like each other enough to get engaged without ever having met or spoken to a non television based situation they move out of those pods and they go on vacation and live together and see if they really really want to get married they all have to have a wedding and go up to the altar. And then when you're up there you have to decide. Are you going to say yes? Are you going to say now? Dump you forever Steven. You're a viewer of trashy television. Way Back leaving. Some fairly trashy dating shows enough that I can peg this show as a combination of the bachelor married by America and Mr Personality hosted by Monica Lewinsky. Boy Cut. What did you think of this one? You know the first episodes I struggled a little bit. I found it very stressful. It's got some of that kind of falsely generated conflict. It's a dating show. I've kind of weaned myself off of the Bachelor Bachelorette for kind of ethical reasons as much as anything and getting back into a dating show. Took me a couple episodes. At which point I could not stop watching it. The instruction going in with Stephen. I know you're very busy right now. Even just watch three or four. I've watched all ten and burned through them. Basically in one sitting one of the things that makes this show. So Benjamin is that it's on Netflix. So there are among other things no commercials and no reason to break into the show and say begun. And then I'll come up the senior about to see and then you come out of commercials. Here's a recap of what you saw. Before the commercial break with the bachelor going back but he's Ryerson on streaming services edited versions of the Bachelor and the Bachelorette where they cut that crap out and then each episode will be like twenty six minutes long. So this doesn't have that but it's centered on this ludicrous false choice between getting married or never seeing each other again. Which is down like they're not allowed to subvert the show in any way they're not allowed to say like f you were dating. There's sort of forced to do one or the other and they. They all seem to buy into this experiment in a way. That is very silly but at the same time it is a weirdly intoxicating show that I ultimately enormously enjoyed even though it's very very stupid. Yeah I basically agree with that. Take Sam a hit me. What did you think? Oh Man so. There are two big reasons. I love this show one for what it says about net flix and to for what it says about what we normally do. And don't say about love one. This really shows that like in spite of trying to be the place for Prestige Film. Net flicks is actually really good at reality. Tv You'll recall. Cheer you'll recall tied in with Marie Condo more queer eye or nailed it or next and fashion or the glass blow reality show followed by the circle and now this. They're making really good addictive reality. Tv and that's for several reasons. You know some of Stephen pointed out. They don't have to commercial breaks thing. Let these stories flow and organic and then in many ways they are not overproducing this stuff when I compare What's going on with. Love is blind to like the bachelor. There seems to be less direct manipulation by the producers. They'll be plotlines in the bachelor of where the had the couple go to a country music concert but wait turns out the country. Music singer is one of their excess craziness. Ensues you see the last of that with the blind makes it feel more earnest. Even though still fake I know I know right at the very least. They're better at hiding it. It doesn't feel conspicuous. Whatever manipulation there is and you know they're certainly is like we're all going to happen to meet up with my parents and I. It does become kind of something that you know is is staged in some of the same ways but I do agree that they're better at making it feel like something that could happen in a real person's life. Yeah so that's the first thing like this to me is evidence that whether they like it or not. Netflix is now better at reality. Tv then movies and with that the second thing it says to me is the things we do or do not talk about publicly when it comes to courtship. I think this show is really brave and having these people who are strangers very early on in their quote unquote relationships talk about race. Talk about physical appearance. Talk about money. One of the couples has to deal with the fact that one is black and one white. And they discuss it. The entire time very openly and candidly and responsibly. Another couple Barnett. And what's her name? Maria she's flat broke in one episode. She says to him my credits crap. I don't always have a job a few months ago. I was Outta my car. What you think about that. You would never see that on the bachelor you would. And most couples don't talk about that until it's too late so to see. That disgust candidly on this show. I find it kind of refreshing. Well it's one of those things where it's both early and too late because on the one hand only known each other for a couple of weeks but on the other hand there are already engaged so I agree that there's that funny. There's this funny conversation between a SAM mentioned Barnett. And amber where? It's not just that she's saying like I'm broke or whatever and he asks her. How many days a week she works and she says as many as I feel like she says I work to live. I don't live to work. Which is one of those things red flag that could be as you said. There's such a fine line between my queen and I know the same way about folks to say that as folks who say. I don't do drama. It's like Oh no. You don't drama. Well right actually do drama. You sort of have to theoretically talk about those things but you have none of the history that might make talking about those things in some ways both easier and harder. But you have to do it anyway. The part that I found most jarring to tell you the truth was like the very first time someone in this show says I love you. I almost crawled out of my skin of so weird so weird. The other thing I think is amazing about it is the people keep saying this is crazy and I keep wanting to say yes. It is run. Are we nuts? Yes in like that is what makes me. What's become the saddest story line in this show? And this is the story of Mark in Jessica. They have a great emotional connection. But Jessica doesn't think that mark is physically her type. He's not tall enough not Nordic enough not blonde enough not white enough and that becomes clear very early on and she never just says that he's also ten years younger than she is and exactly former relationship. Where if it were a family pet you would phen. Is it out of mercy? Twenty hours before this show.

Netflix Stephen Thompson Steven Sam Sanders Barnett NPR Sam I LEE Bachelorette Linda Holmes Jessica Mark SAM Marie Condo America Prestige Film Monica Lewinsky Benjamin
Ronan Farrow says 'close to 50' potential Weinstein jurors were sent home for reading his 'Catch and Kill'

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

03:42 min | 9 months ago

Ronan Farrow says 'close to 50' potential Weinstein jurors were sent home for reading his 'Catch and Kill'

"This week Jury selection started for the trial of Harvey Weinstein. He's as of course this formerly super successful Hollywood producer who was accused of decades of sexual abuse more than eighty women have come forward accusing him of things. The story broke as you remember. This is kind of the beginning of the METOO movement in October of two thousand seventeen in the New York Times and the New Yorker so harvey was finally finally charged with sex crimes in New York in May of twenty eighteen. So that in and of itself is about a year and a half ago I'm not going to get into the charges. But they're horrible So yeah jury. Selection started this week and the other thing that also happened. This week is that new charges were put against him in Los Angeles so now. He's facing the possibility of two criminal trials. Meanwhile he just settled a civil suit a couple of weeks ago. So it's just all all of this tumult around you know he's very horrible allegations and it's really one of the only you know men who is going through the criminal criminal justice process in terms of these accusations. Yeah and we should underline eighty women. You said Yeah Zero Eight zero and then we have these two. You know criminal trials now the one in New York they mentioned we have two women pressing charges one is an unidentified there and even in La both of the women are unidentified in those court documents. So it's also just a big story in terms of you know what it takes to come forward yet another interesting aspect during jury selection. Is You know the idea of trying to find an impartial jury. In these cases right I mean not only are they trying to find people who don't know a whole lot about the story which at this point is extremely difficult Mac that it's been to more than two years and the stories were huge but also you know attorneys are concerned about the possibility of having an impartial. Jury when you know one in and five women have been raped in her life rate and just the idea of even if she isn't super familiar with the Weinstein story just dealing with sexual assault in her life of either herself or someone she knows like could also create someone who is partial in one way or another Ronan Farrow tweeted on Thursday night that he is heard the fifty potential jurors fifty have been released so far we all read his book right and killed and so it's weird. The only thing I will add is that hearing the stories of these women. Yeah you're not only struck by their ultimate bravery in coming forward at great risk in themselves but just the endless amounts of people all right protected. Harvey Weinstein this. Systemic cover-ups over a decade can't get horrifying. It's yeah and it's extraordinary. How much much in how pervasive that was among everybody police and and colleague Turney everybody? Yeah Yeah I want to ask this question about impartial impartial jury and jury of our peers because when we talk when we are supposed to be having our be tried before a jury of our peers so many of our peers have have been victims of sexual harassment or sexual assault and so is it. What does impartiality really mean here? If you're throwing out all of the folks who might have been affected by crimes it's like this that gets even bigger question around. Just the idea of Lake is the crew. Does the criminal justice system work in these cases you know and you look at the fact act that this settlement came out earlier this month where women at least got some money out of it. I mean. Obviously that doesn't result in Weinstein actually going to jail which I would imagine. Imagine is extremely important to a lot of these victims but yeah I mean I don't know I don't know how you get an impartial

Harvey Weinstein New York New York Times Assault Metoo Ronan Farrow Hollywood Turney Los Angeles LA Harassment
"sam sanders" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:04 min | 11 months ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"For. NPR comes from national car rental. Who wants you to know that with a membership in our complimentary Emerald Club you can skip the counselor and choose any car in the aisle at participating national locations you can even select an upgrade without paying extra learn more at national car dot com slash? NPR for today's indicator is nine hundred and seventy million that is the estimated number of video streaming subscriptions that are expected to exist in the next x five years And most people in the US they account for one or two of those. Yes at least right now most people in the US say they're willing to spend around twenty bucks per month on streaming which is like no it's a two streaming services maybe three and so these services are in this really tight competition with each other over those dollars. So Sam let's profile some of the League warriors and the streaming war. Oh Yeah let's start with the big one net flicks. It has almost one hundred and sixty million subscribers shocking. That's a lot. I didn't know that much. That is why they charge about nine bucks a month. A lot of folks say that it could be in trouble because net flicks is losing all these big shows like friends and the office to these other new streaming services and the thing about net flicks. Is that friends in. The office. Are Their two biggest shows. Most Watch on Netflix. In terms of minutes watched the old shows do so much better better than all of Netflix original content. Yeah and like I. It's it's much more economical than original content. Because you know people are going to love it you know it's going to be a hit and if you make your own content like queer eye and ozarks. They've definitely made some hits. But you just don't misses a lot of them. Are Mrs so now. Let's just lost all of these. These shows that that have been. It's like it's cash cows. It's losing its main business. So they're in trouble so the second big gun is Amazon. Prime Amazon prime has about one hundred million Liam subscribers they own a bunch of shows and make original shows like the Marvelous Mrs Mazel and the man in the high castle but they have a secret superpower which is that Amazon prime streaming comes with Amazon prime shipping so they can probably afford to be a bit lazy on content. Currently it's about thirteen dollars a month. The streaming almost almost feels like secondary. Yeah it's like the the side dish to getting things shipped to you really fix exactly. And then there is Hulu with twenty eight million subscribers. which is the home of handmaid's tale and now love island solution? Start at six dollars. But who has the service where you can pay to subscribe to just streaming TV so a lot of people. Use It to watch the Olympics. And Sam didn't you signed up to watch the World Cup. I did so. I signed up for the live TV streaming on Hulu to watch the World Cup. But I gotta say Stacy wasn't the best experience because the screen froze a lot. It was no boundary. Maddie buffering. Yo It's back and then on top of I forgot to move the live streaming service or whatever from my Hulu subscription So now that I think about it talking to you I'm still paying forty bucks a month for Hulu really. Ah Stacey there's more Yeah next up is apple. TV plus they have the splashing new show which everyone's been seen gene ad for that TV news. Show with Jennifer Aniston and Steve Carell and Reese Witherspoon. They also have Oprah's book club. I Would Watch Oprah's book the heck out out of that five dollars a month five dollars a month I might do that. That is like super. I mean who knows if it will stay at that price but five dollars a month is good. Then there's HBO Max which is coming next year from Warner Media and SAM. This is where you will now have to find friends and other. Hbo Shows like succession. And Am also sesame street especially street and succession are going to be seen full service. I know it's a little. Oh more expensive. It's fifty packs and then stacey there is more probably what will soon become the big Kahuna Disney. Plus tomorrow it's supposed to be the monster Mr of online streaming. Not only will Disney have all the you know Disney movies. It'll have all the marvel comic stuff and all the Pixar stuff and all the national geographic stuff and star wars star wars could probably have its own streaming site and he's just fine and in fact like the shows that Disney is developing for the streaming. Service has caused all this excitement. That's according to Jessica Reef Erlich. She's an analyst at Bank of America Merrill Lynch and she was actually at an analyst meeting at Disney when they introduced Disney anyplace there were audible gasping room when they started talking about mandatory him. Give it to what of their original shows. It is a star wars. Spin off and Jessica Jessica says there was a second gasp and then the second one time was when they announced the which was shocking. Love seven dollars a month. That's pretty good. So if you add all all that up so far it's fifty five dollars a month for all those streaming packages. Yes and there are a whole bunch of other streaming services cropping up there's ESPN plus food network plus Youtube Streaming Channel Peacock is getting launched by NBC and that will have the office and Battle Star Galactica and saved by the bell and cheers and thirty rock. I've even mincing ads for B. E. T. plus O'Grady's upcoming streaming service and they're boasting about being able to offer the entirety of Tyler. Perry media pack cattle does zipping catalog. This formidable it's all just so much like it's too many services it's all annoying expensive in confusing you don't know want brothers created friends or that. NBC You on the Office you. It comes very difficult to find the shows that you're looking for. They won't all be in one place anymore. So Jessica look at things that most of these services will not survive. They won't get enough subscribers. I also think that like as this stuff becomes more cluttered and confusing. I'll just use all the services less when it stops becoming easy to figure out. What watching her so Jessica thanks to survive? The streaming services will end up looking a lot like the old cable packages so the big streaming packages But with a twist. The crazy twist is like these. Bundles aren't just going to be other streaming sites bundling together. It's going to include all kinds of things including like physical hardware. Apple's GONNA use Apple. TV Plus it's new streaming service as kind of a bonus apparently to get people to buy you know the newest phone or or special computers or a TV Disney snia Portland with verizon. So if you get an unlimited verizon wireless plan you will get the Disney streaming service for free and you'll get a deal if you sign a three year contract contract. It's a lot three year contracts with no cable package. NFL phone contract and an annoying apple equipment upgrade all in one. Do you know what it feels like. Sam What does it feel likes. They sort of feels like consumers are always stuck in second gear. It's like it has been our day or month or Stacey When the rain starts to fall today's episode of the indicator was produced by Jared Marcel backcheck checked by Nadia Lewis? Our editor is Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is a production of N._p._R...

After withdrawing from Title X, reproductive health clinics scramble for cash

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:33 min | 1 year ago

After withdrawing from Title X, reproductive health clinics scramble for cash

"This is referring to title ten. This is a program they'll start in one thousand nine hundred seventy by president nixon and what it does it helps provide died low cost or sometimes free family planning health services things like birth control or cancer screenings so just last week planned parenthood that massive organization mutation announced it is bouncing out of that. It used to be a very big recipient of title ten money. It probably a lot of things around the country to people but the problem is that at the trump administration changed the rules on how that money is issued out so the difference now. Is that if you get titled ten money. If somebody wants an abortion or has questions about an abortion abortion doctors can no longer refer them to wear to get one part of the issue here is that a planned parenthood never actually uses any federal money for abortions and self. That's a federal rule itself. Yeah no one can do that. It was just a matter of them telling people hey here's where you can get one if you need it so instead of actually following these rules planned parenthood decided decided it is going to stop accepting title ten money and more than two hundred eighty six million dollars has gone to fund title in this fiscal year and about sixty million of that ah goes to planned parenthood every year so what happens if his money goes away from planned parenthood's budget. Are we gonna see clinics close. I was reading somewhere that they might begin. Just start charging copays patients. Yes so some in some cases planned. Parenthood is sorta the only game in town or only game in the state yeah in terms of a patient of mexican those people. Oh probably don't realize that they're receiving titled ten money. <hes> maybe now people will start having to pay a co-pay

President Nixon Two Hundred Eighty Six Million
Instagram Slowly Tests Hiding The Number Of Likes On A Post

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Instagram Slowly Tests Hiding The Number Of Likes On A Post

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from American pest open your doors who a healthy pest free home with American pest offering safe environmentally friendly pest control solutions throughout the D._m._v. for over ninety years learn more at American American past dot net instagram is slowly testing out a big change. The Social Media Company is starting to hide the number of likes that post since stories get when they're put on that platform. Sam Sanders hosted the N._p._R.. PODCAST it's. In a minute is an instagram fanatic so he's here with analysis hi there Sam Hey. How are you for people who aren't on instagram? I guess you're you're putting up pictures and you can see that five people liked it or five hundred people liked it. What's happening to that feature now exactly so in the same way that on facebook you can see how many people like your grandma's post about someone's birthday? It's like that on Instagram as well but that social reward that we all get for making instagram post to get a bunch of likes it's become a popularity contest. INSTAGRAM says has and they want less of that so in May instagram began to experiment with removing the ability to see how many likes our views other folks post receive just in Canada at first and not all Canadian users just some and this week instagram. Graham rolled that out to Australia and Brazil and Ireland Italy Japan and New Zealand so now some folks in those countries won't be able to see the light or view counts on other people's posts but they can still see the tallies on their own posts. Wait wait a minute. I can still have that addictive feature of looking to see if anybody likes my thing but I don't have to feel bad that somebody else got five thousand likes on. There's yes so at this conference in April Adam massery the head of instagram. He said he wants. As users to spend a little more time quote connecting with the people they care about not wrapped up in popularity contests with strangers and that kind of statement may be instagram responding to a recent trend specially with younger users they want a social media experience that feels a bit more private and personal not so public and performance live so they basically are moving towards a more walled off social media just for folks that they actually like or at least know and of course this is also also a moment steve full of negative headlines about all of the social media apps how they affect our emotional health fears about what kind of data they collect on us and so for instagram disliked test allows a company to possibly get a few days of positive headlines. And it may make it seem like this big. Tech Company really cares about us. There certainly are big issues on the table as you've just suggested and there are studies suggesting that people can be more or less depressed to based on how they use social media for example but is this this tweak and I guess it sounds more like a tweak than a huge change really going to change the experience and make it more healthy well. I was thinking about it. I use instagram a lot all the time and I said to myself even if I don't see the light count on Instagram for other people. I will still see all those pretty people on the beach with ads and pretty friends and cute dog's living a life that looks better than mine. The photos in the videos of a picture perfect life are still out there so that intense comparison it can still be there even without me seeing a light count and I talk with Karen North. She's a professor of Digital Social Media at U._S.'s Annenberg School and she told me sometimes that like function on Instagram is not a bad thing then maybe trading one problem for another our people say if I get X. number of likes all donate you know service dog to a vet or a plant a tree or do some other 'cause we cannot join together anymore to promote those causes or even have that sense that we've come together.

Instagram Social Media Company Professor Of Digital Social Me Sam Sanders Graham Facebook Steve Karen North Annenberg School Ireland Italy Japan Canada New Zealand Australia Brazil Ninety Years
Millennials Rely On Parents For Financial Help, Study Shows

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Millennials Rely On Parents For Financial Help, Study Shows

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from google from connecticut california from mississippi tim minnesota millions of businesses are using google tools to grow online learn how google is supporting businesses in your state at google dot com slash economic impact there's new datta out there that shows young adults today are more likely than previous generations to get financial help from their parents and there are a whole lot of reasons that this is happening sam sanders of npr's it's been a minute is gonna tell us he's in studio sam how are you i'm well nice to see like okay i have to admit when i first heard this i thought when there are parents who financially are in a position to help their kids haven't they always they have but it seems to be more frequent there's a recent report by financial services firm called country financial end it found at a little more than half of all americans ages twenty one to thirty seven received some sort of financial assistance from a parent or guardian of someone and by one count millennials be eldest folks in that group of thirty eight right about a quarter of those who work fulltime still rely on their parents to pay at least one of their bills why there are so many reasons rachel detail but the biggest of them are the cost of stuff just being higher we all know the college costs more we know that it costs a lot more to buy a house and so parents help with that end we see an entire swap the folks who graduated college into the great recession so their careers have just kind of info launches well when we talk about student debt and how it exacerbates this phenomenon the folks at her most hurt by this they're usually first generation black and brown students who got swindled by four profit colleges i mean i know you talked to a lot of young people about how they are grappling with this yes what struck you about those conversations we talked to a bunch of people and the one constant throughout was folks telling me how much shame they feel discussing getting help and their parents we heard from christina karoubi she's twenty two her parents parents helped her paper living expenses undergrad and they're often give her a personal loan to help her paper graduate school they're not rich but they can help and they wanna help but christina told me when she talks the friends she lies about their help i've had a congress people who like will start talking about grad school and they'll be like oh yeah those loans and i'm like yeah man kind of just go along with say and i'm just feeling super weird about myself and i'm not alone like i'm telling people people filled the shame over their privilege but also in the midst of all that emotion people are connecting the dots and having larger more system in conversations about how some families got all of his wealth and how some families did not right so let's talk about the people who did not what'd you hear from folks folks who don't come from generational privilege exactly and that's a lot of people you know so we reached out to me not to so for this episode of the journalists and a host of a podcast called carter girlfriend and she's written a lot about being in millennial an dealing with money and she she is a woman of color an immigrant and she says folks like her a they asked to send money home to their parents whenever i reid stories of millennials and money and especially when we talk about millennial entitlement of money the subtext of always like white millennials and to be fair like a certain kind of white millennial first jen students from low income families for black and brown folks they are often asked more often by their parents to give money and there's data the backs this up a poll from university found the black and hispanic parents are more likely to expect support from their children when my parents which for lotteries right which up enzi entire stereoty about what we think of when we think of millennial exactly i'll just say this

Google California Mississippi Connecticut
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

13:40 min | 1 year ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"I said how do you wanna say on this one herself in the foot yeah i guess this episode was very very chill and friendly when i interviewed her recently a my name is ken these costs you meet in it's very nice day say sundial it's quite hot if you'd have no idea upon first hearing her that she is one of the busiest authors of the moment with the best selling fiction debut on her hands but that is exactly who candies cardi williams is an today we talk about her moment aunt her very very busy book it's called queenie hi.

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Betty this week on the show from southern California Public radio host of the big one. Jason my goal is and NPR reporter the nessa Romo. All right. Let's not show. From NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. It's been a minute happy weekend. Welcome. Welcome to my guest Vanessa Romo. Breaking news reporter for NPR to Jake Margolis, my friend in science reporter for Casey here at L A and a special special guest. John rule. Oh, Josh, Josh. Everybody. How are we feeling about John right now, I always feel for job? But he's having a week. I this song it is a classic. But I'm really in love with called living it up. I am talking about this week. And I've talked about job on the show before because of the catastrophic fire festival. We know what this is at this point. This was the social media influence of music festival that we're supposed to bring big name artists to the Caribbean. But it was one big scam. And so these people that were promised like Bilas by the ocean showed up to disaster tents the cheese sandwiches. Yes, they had cheese sandwiches when they got that. It wasn't even a sandwich. Laughed on top of dry bread. Yes. Saddest looking picture ever. And so John is involved in this because he was one of the founders of the fire festival along with Billy McFarland. The scammer who was really minded who is now in prison. But John rule was promoting it hyping it and these two documentaries came out in the last few weeks about the fire festival, and how it failed one from Netflix, Hulu, and they both paint a picture of a job rule who knew exactly what was going on. And didn't stop at the end of it heat when he says, it's not fraud. We just advertising I said, oh, it's not fraud. It's just false advertising. And then he was like, it's okay, we're going to build through this buyer festival live on you're like, no. We gotta move forward. Jake. I haven't seen them yet. But I followed the fire festival live as it was happening and train shot in Freud of their. Yes. Lada shot him until you get to the actual people. People on the island the island goes who were fronting money to do the food services and construction for this thing I've seen. Yes. So there's gofundme us now to help those people get their money back. They've raised their goal. But big thing about this Giro for months said it wasn't my fault. It wasn't my fault. It wasn't my fault. These documentaries fan of different picture. He responded in a tweet this week and said, and it's luckily quote. Quote, I was hustled scaled bamboozles hoodwinked lettuce stray someone got up this Christmas. Poor job or job. On that note. We're gonna talk about some other news of this. As we always do gonna have each of my guest described their week of news in only three words veteran of the show. But nessa Romo, you know. How this goes you go. I all right. So my three words are normalized fatigued whatevs? So all of us all the time all of us all the time. So these are not they're not using. I'm not saying these words as statements, but they're all kind of questions, and they're all sort of questions that I've asked myself this week, normalized, fatigued, whatever. Okay. So on Tuesday, the supreme court issued a ruling that essentially opens up the possibility for the Trump administration to finally administer the transgender ban in the military, right? So unto the supreme court decision, basically lifts these injunctions that have been preventing the banned from being implemented across the country throughout the military. And so it's not a decision on the league. -ality of the ban. It's not a decision about whether or not it's going to stay in place permanently. It just says that four now the Trump administration and the Pentagon can if they so choose begin to implement the policy. There's a wrinkle right because the Pentagon said I'm Wednesday that a fourth national injunction from case in Maryland district court remains in effect, right? Well, there's still confusion about it's still massive confusion about this. And the DOD actually also hasn't said or the Pentagon hasn't said, yes, we're going to go ahead and implement this. Right. It's still pretty there isn't very much clarity about this. And so like the big takeaway with this. It's like this is yet another Trump policy initiative in which there's a big proclamation a big announcement..

nessa Romo John NPR reporter Jake Margolis Pentagon Vanessa Romo Sam Sanders fraud Trump California Betty Josh Jason Caribbean Billy McFarland supreme court Bilas Lada
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"I'm Sam Sanders. It's been a minute here with a friend of the show, and friend of mine who I have not talked to in a minute. How do you coordinate shower? Hey there Sam Sanders. So your job is one of the host of NPR's all things considered. Yes, keeps you very busy. I feel like the last time you were here on this show. It was well over a year ago. How have you been where have you been in was? Well, it turns out have been busy doing a ton of really intense interviews, but I may be on the show against what are you going to be on today as and as a special way, I'm bringing you on in this conversation on because I've been basically jealous of you all year in these amazing interviews you've been getting for this series of live shows that you've been doing in DC and in New York, and you have this one that came out but two or three weeks ago where you talked with on stage in front of a live audience for like an hour the viola Davis. Yes, she is incredible. She has the triple crown of acting. I think like an EMMY and an Oscar she has Tony thinks she has to Tony. And we were at the ninety second street y and she was in the middle of promoting with. Does big film with Steve McQueen who had directed twelve years a slave? And we really thought we were going to have kind of like a fun viola Davis, you know, like in her heist film, kind of interview and it turned into something else. Something much something much richer, something that felt real very real and something that gave me more than a keyhole view into how Hollywood works totally. And like she spilt the T on her problems with the plotline of the help. She talked about how she wasn't even the first pick for how to get away with murder. I mean, this is Connie show from Sean Dillon. She plays the lawyer and killer Annelies Keating, she talked about what really goes into making a blockbuster happened with the black woman at the lead like she really spilled the tea she did. And I think one thing that was different than how I approach the interview is that so many people have talked to her in terms of saying viola Davis where did you come from? You'll like a comet, you know, or. Tell us about your dark back story. You know, she's very she grew up poor and talks about how poverty affected her life. I approached this as you are a baby. And what's it like at the top? Because I know the air guests in let's talk about what that's like for you. And how you move through that world because he's been a person of color were you're the only one or one of a few. It is it's complex, and she I think really engaged on some of those ideas, and even took it to places, I didn't expect I totally enjoyed it. I'm so glad to give it to our listeners. We're going to toss to it. Now, you can do the honors make the official toss to your interview with. Okay, everyone please enjoy our conversation with the actress viola Davis..

viola Davis Sam Sanders Steve McQueen NPR Tony Annelies Keating EMMY New York official Connie murder Hollywood Sean Dillon Oscar ninety second twelve years three weeks
Harvard scientists say interstellar object may be a probe sent by "alien civilization"

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:31 min | 2 years ago

Harvard scientists say interstellar object may be a probe sent by "alien civilization"

"She will be the first woman to chair this particular committee. She will be the first person of color show, this particular committee, and I think probably most important she will be the only chair of this committee with any kind of a stem background since nineteen ninety-five.

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Sam. Hi Bob. Hello. How are you? I'm fine. So I was just telling Brent, I'm not sure that the that I'm out to the audience. I mean, I am right main because I have been for like thirty years, but but but. From NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. It's been a minute today on the show we're talking about coming out. National coming out day is Tober eleven. And this year is at thirtieth anniversary of that day and thing that I always think every year around this time is is never just one day coming out and happens differently for everyone often more than once and for some of us, it seems the process really never ends case in point. My friend Bob Mondello film critic for NPR's all things considered. How old are you? Bob, I turned seventy next year. Shut up? No, really so. Okay. What year did you come up? That's a hard question to answer. Do you mean to myself? Do you mean to my folks to you mean to my friends? Do you mean? I, it depends what you're talking. Okay. Well, so you see what I'm saying? Bob grew up in the sixties when you could get locked up for even going to a gay bar. It was a very different time and again, so. Bob's first coming out actually wasn't until nineteen seventy four. After he just had his first same sex experience. Bob told his best friend who he thought might also be gay. I was in his apartment and it took me forever to work up to it. I I was sitting there and I was taking deep breaths and I was trembling. But what I said was, I'm gay. I expected him to say, so am I in fall into my arms and what he actually said was twice in one week, who was the other one. Well, that was my reaction. How dare somebody else beat me to this, but it didn't even, you know, when I was coming out, we didn't have models in public discourse that we're no models for gay people on generous hadn't come out on television and will, and grace was far in the future. And so I think it's a different world than I, I hear about people coming out at the age of twelve and I think could Lord I was never that brave. I mean, never in the world. And I don't really know what it would be like today to do that. I don't know either. I mean, I remember my process and it literally Bob, it took me years just to look at myself in the mirror and say the words I am gay, took me years to do that. Okay. Now if I can turn this interview on its head, why I. Oh God, somebody reasons I was years so much younger than I am. What what I'm suggesting is you're, you're coming at it at a different period and it. Yeah. So, yeah. I mean, I was raised in a church where it was you went to hell for it. Yeah. Yeah, totally. Okay. That's different. And they try and you know they, there were points in my life where folks in the church tried to pray it away where I tried to pray it away in like it was so.

Bob Bob Mondello NPR Sam Sanders Brent Lord I thirty years one week one day
Google opens News on Google Assistant to all; and questions with Panoply's CEO

podnews

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Google opens News on Google Assistant to all; and questions with Panoply's CEO

"From a busy Luton airport delays, news, Google have opened up their news on Google assistant developer information, which includes details on how to enable appearance on the Google equivalent of the daily news briefing a full this week. You had to send a cheeky Email to somebody admitted a conference then sent somebody else. You've met three years ago at a conference who then suggested nice man called Gordon then manually approve your Google account as what we did. Anyway, you'll content will still need editorial approval. Last week we reported the panoply had suddenly stopped producing new podcasts focusing instead on its hosting platform, megaphone, panoply, CEO, Brendan Monaghan aunt said some of our questions on the announcement that two new podcast, it's still going to be produced and megaphone is cleverer than the average podcast host refined the full Cuna pod news dot net. We hear that, yes, Spotify is testing pass through according to somebody with knowledge, if the Massar NPR with the driving force who requested spa. Fine. No longer cash, their podcasts than our beat testing with a number of podcasters who are big enough and more or in the cube finding Cleo. A podcast from Canada's CVC has won a major award bro. Consta- says in a tweet at the third coast festival, the EU has passed a controversial. New copyright law includes a so-called relig tax write for publishers to demand payments from links in services, like Legal News, an onerous demand for platforms including podcast hosts, potentially to check for copyright infringement on upload poor trackers published their US twenty podcasts for August lawyer. David Oxford reminds podcasters of the US legal requirements to clearly identify sponsored messages in podcasting. The outline of podcast festival in Los Angeles has confirmed Sam Sanders from NPR podcast. It's been a minute. We'll be one of the guests and the pod news podcast is now in Diese

Google United States Luton NPR Sam Sanders Brendan Monaghan Spotify Los Angeles CVC Legal News CEO Developer Gordon EU Canada David Oxford Consta Three Years
Apple doesn’t think you deserve a $9 headphone dongle with your $1000 iPhone

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:09 min | 2 years ago

Apple doesn’t think you deserve a $9 headphone dongle with your $1000 iPhone

"This quote is all about the new iphone rollout which began to happen this week. There was an apple event in which they introduced the next generation of iphone and you know how with the last of iphone they took out the headphone Jack, right, right. They wanted to push folks bluetooth headphones. So if you wanted to use school headphones, you had to get a little dog'll to make the headphones work. Now, apple has said with these new iphones, some of which cost up to more than fourteen hundred dollars, they're not going to include Odongo for you. They're gonna make you pay extra for the Dunkel nine dollars extra for the dangle. After you have paid fourteen hundred dollars for a phone, that's nine dollars too far. I'm I'm already upset at apple because like I still have my older generations, small iphone. I just I just want apple to make phones that are made for the smaller handed among us and the smaller pocketed. Yes. Most women when they do have pockets, they're smaller. You might as well just buy a MAC book. Just walk around with them. We have an ipad in front of me why I don't understand what did you guys get this new iphone situation? Because you know what? I'm still very anti. No traditional headphone out. Exactly. Like I like that I'm team

Elon Musk Neil Degrasse Tyson Apple Joe Rogan Neal Nombreux Serena Williams Yuan Musk Tesla Northwestern University Dunkel David Odongo President Trump Writer Danielle America
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"From NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. It's been a minute today on the show sid formerly known as sid, the kid. She is a songwriter producer and she's a lead singer of the band. The internet said is having a moment right now. She was featured in Drake's nice for what her songs of appeared on h. b. o. insecure and her group the internet. They're out with a new album called hive mind. Sid first came to prominence as a part of odds future. It says southern California, hip hop collective that has made a few stars Frank ocean to NATO flu. Earl sweatshirt, some citizens pinging swings lower degener-, and the leader of odd future Tyler. The creates. His. On the danger. In futures heyday the group, especially Tyler. They got a lot of criticism for lyrics at some people thought were sexist and homophobic, and sid was in the middle of all of this. Those weren't her lyrics, but she was the only female member of the group. And there was also media speculation about her own sexuality. Sit talk to me about how she's navigated all of that then and now and we also talked about her newest album with the internet. High mind which I gotta say is this perfect chilled out Aren being for a late summer drive in southern California or anywhere. For that matter as a warning. This chat include some vulgar words a bit later, do not believe them. All right with that. Here's my chat with sid. She joined me in our Culver city studios. Enjoy. You seem very much like a west l. a. person I'm I'm for midtown whereabout like Crenshaw on Venice. Okay. Okay. I was saying that because so much of the new album gives me this like kind of close to the beach, five. I get that it serve IB flowery, kind of breezy. It's in no hurry. Yes, it's in no rush. Yeah. As LA for sure, right. My about it last night. They're saying they love New York. 'cause basically there's always something to do, and I was like, yeah, get that. She's she said, like in LA I just feel like I could just sleep all day..

sid Tyler Sam Sanders California producer Crenshaw NPR LA New York NATO Earl Culver Drake Venice
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Listeners we wanna talk to you about how you're processing the news how your process in your lives we can talk about anything hit me up let me know about me line at sam sanders at npr dot org sam sanders at npr dot org you're listening to it's been a minute from npr the show where we catch up on the week that was i'm sam sanders here with two guests laura nelson who covers transportation for the la times hello hello and clinton yates senior writer at espn's the undefeated also undefeated himself a try that's right so i wanted to talk this week about the big news of the week that interesting interesting interesting breakup letter that donald trump sent to north korea this week you know president trump cancelled this summit with north korean leader kim jong own was scheduled for june twelfth in singapore there was talk of real progress and getting north korea to at least move towards denuclearizing this letter and this cancellation this week throws a big wrench in it i for one needed some help making sense of this up and down and back and forth in hot and kohl's between the us and north korea so i called up an expert his name is john john delory we talked via skype he's a professor at yonsei university in seoul and he's also an expert on korean peninsula affairs in us china relations so i asked john if it's true that basically everybody seemed to be caught off guard when trump abruptly pulled the plug on the summit yeah i i mean so north korea stuff it's kinda one surprise after another and this is the latest i don't think here in south korea anyone was expecting it and i saw statement by like the president himself the south korean president that he was very perplexed so if the south korean president who just met a few days ago in washington with president trump is very perplexed than i think we can assume everyone's a bit surprised yeah you know in the crazy relation to between trump and kim jong hoon there've been so many ups and downs for a while there was a really rough rhetoric from trump about fire and fury then there's.

yonsei university china kohl kim jong donald trump washington president south korea seoul sam sanders john john delory us singapore north korea espn writer clinton yates laura nelson
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

28:32 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Hey y'all this is sam i'm betty this week on the show npr editor our zoo razz bonnie and national correspondent for the los angeles times matt piers all right let's neither south from npr i'm sam sanders it's been a minute every week we launched the show with a different song you know which one this we'll talk more about it later but i my guests with me in studio rizvani editor for npr's morning edition thanks for being here thanks for having me of course and matt pearce national correspondent for the a times you cover about everything there yes yeah you'd beat whatever needs to be yeah if you're getting call be somethings probably wrong love it also our guest today is madonna i'm playing probably my favorite song i like a prayer so i'm playing it because madonna performed this song this week at the mit gala gala gala gala gala i'm sure you guys followed the story right out for sure it was a catholic name met gala which is a little weird the theme of the show was heavenly bodies fashioned in the catholic imagination so everyone kind of dressed in their sexy catholic outfits and is one does what does madonna sung this song there because it's all about religious imagery in the video for the song but people were mad about this gala were okay i wasn't sure if the critics had come out there were like how dare you disrespect the catholic church like i didn't sign up to see a seductive pope brianna you know but turns out the catholic church like sanctions gala they were like in the planning they gave artifacts to the exhibit in fact cardinal timothy dolan he talked about the whole event whether it was appropriate.

editor los angeles sam sanders npr matt pearce madonna timothy dolan
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from fox home entertainment the post the untold true story of the pentagon papers cover up and the journalists who worked to expose the truth starring meryl streep and tom hanks available on blu ray or to rent hey y'all this is daddy this week on the show npr producer justin richmond and npr reporter and coach which host sharing mirasol mirage i'll write that down you'll know what i'm playing right now oh this is one of the best conde song opens i'll tell you hail from npr i'm sam sanders it's been a minute each week the show starts with a different song we'll talk about this one very soon but i i gotta thank my two guests were being here with me today in studio serene modestly mirage you she covers race ethnicity and culture for npr also host npr's coast which podcast and justin richmond producer extraordinaire for show you may have heard of called morning edition at npr that's right thank you both for being here and thank you connie for this lovely rousing anthem to get us into this show the beat knocks need to see your your pants at the concert crop anybody know so this song is called monster it's from connie's last album my beautiful dark twisted fantasy and i'm playing on this week for a reason not just because it's always a good time gonyea have you guys been following his tweets so he can.

meryl streep reporter sam sanders npr connie fox pentagon tom hanks producer justin richmond
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"All right thanks to listen to liz beard she's also a teacher until she helped us find manja all right back in the studio with vanessa and alina that call was so interesting to me you guys because like even for her to take ten minutes to talk to me she was like working you hear her moving boxes around your driving with the teacher friend somewhere else we assume that people in certain professions are just doing well because they went to school and that's that right she's making less than her local dollar general assistant manager i wish i wish and i don't know how this could ever happen but i wish people could have honest conversations about salaries and maybe not on an individual basis but sort of on a professional basis just within your community because i think in that circumstance it sounded like the dollar manager really had his eyes opened to the reality of another person about whom he made assumptions earlier exactly you're listening to it's been a minute from npr the show where we catch up on the week that was i'm sam sanders here with two guests today vanessa romo who covers breaking news for npr's twoway blog and alina celje cucumbers tech in retail for npr both of them joining me from dc hey there hey there hey there hi sam so it's time for our main story of the week i want to talk about facebook you know we've been hearing nonstop now for the last two weeks or so all about facebook and its ties to this kind of shady data firm cambridge analytica that's the firm that used facebook data from like fifty million people to possibly influence the twenty sixteen election since this has come to light big tech is under fire mark zuckerberg who leads facebook might actually testify in front of congress he's also said that he may be open to congress and the federal government regulating his company which is a new development some big question for us today is.

assistant manager sam sanders vanessa romo npr facebook cambridge analytica mark zuckerberg congress liz beard ten minutes two weeks
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Now on that positive let them know coming up we're going to look back on election 2016 and what we know now and also a very special edition of who said that with the very special guest post stay tuned you're listening to it's been a minute from npr i'm sam sanders we'll be right back support for this podcast and the following message come from simply say getting a good night's sleep is easier said than done especially if you hear a noise downstairs you could turn on all the lights and keep watch or you can rest easy knowing that your home and family are protected with simply say each simply safe system is a complete security arsenal there are no contracts and no hidden fees get a special ten percent discount when you order today at simply safe dot com slash minutes support also comes from masterclass producing online classes taught by masters of aircraft each class is shot with cinematic production quality and offers ondemand lessons loaded with exclusive content classes include gordon ramsey teachers cooking any leave of its teaches photography steph curry teaches basketball and more it's been a minute listeners can unlock every class with the new all access pass available now at masterclass dot com slash minute do you love trivia puzzles nerdy games in humor what about interviews with actors musicians and people from all walks of life yeah then join me off your eisenberg host of empires asked me another every week on the npr one app and wherever you listened to podcasts.

sam sanders basketball npr gordon ramsey ten percent
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"A little farther lynn hugh alnow they're good i would think big you just for the name alone i am now dollars bosnian new belgrade hugh uh as you would dogana yourself and not that i hope hippies still do that make that happen the rescue on saturday set working on it thanks for checks heavy from his whole thank you bye the dollar had a blowout a swear to you back the beagle it's great to see the the bottle bottle hurry up listeners we want to hear from you for this segment if you want me to give you call talk about whatever uh emailed me sam sanders at npr dot org sam sanders at npr dot org we also welcome your dog photos too said email address but so because we have a lease here and she is in south korea i wanted to talk about one of my favorite story lines ever of all time all the time may olympic young are love your answer olympics are lit man slit alone can i tell you about the winter olympics and why i think it's the better olympic we're y'all fall on life norway to go i feel like pretty much every event at the winter olympics maybe with the exception of curling if a mere mortal tried it yes we would be debt which whereas like summer olympics it's like oh i can run across the track right right like i gelatin yet right now biathlon right pairs figure skating there's blades guys there's actually believe heads involved.

lynn hugh alnow sam sanders olympics norway belgrade
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Support for npr and the following message come from georgetown university featuring parttime master's degrees answered certificates in downtown d c and online information at sc s dow georgetown dot edu slash npr hey y'all thank at eight fifty companies shell comedian and host a fake the nation the game five five and new york times reporter so tan dad all right let's dive account it was correct yes okay but he wants to get a right hey y'all from npr i'm sam sanders it's been a minute each week a different song y'all know this song we'll talk more about that later foot first two great guests here with me at npr in new york and the game far from fake the nation of hot kashmira wolf that his quotes all the comedy about politics without any of the politics about politics and like that air and so banda my good friend from the trail we asked a go trump routed trump rally together i remember canal numerous culture for the new york times probably like the most awesome job in the world i sleep a lot more than i used to bless yes so this song doc in name it jack kemp closely spaced phase wherever there put this long is called literally space jam is that correct brent confirm scott watched it mandela did this themes arkham the movie which actually never seen but it's by the full a culture cultural card here guy you're going to be like uh plastic spacium the part of the culture you must consumer clearly.

npr georgetown university sam sanders new york new york times scott york times reporter jack kemp brent mandela
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Are gonna either torpedo etter send you know just inflame everybody on both sides again an the interesting thing is that dhaka really seem to be the warned soft spot that president trump had even during the campaign so he didn't wanna see kids being deported right basically many questions remain two listeners wanna call you for this segment you can drop us line tell me about what's going on where you live we might call you back sam sanders at npr dot org sam sanders at npr dot org now it's time for our main story and i gotta premises by saying dan be brought to you here just before this little known fact besides being a literal jackofalltrades reporter for the washington post style section dan zach is kinda carved out his own little mini beach in many place of expertise at the post he is one of the washington post resident experts on nuclear weapons he even has a book about nukes it's called almighty courage resistance than existential peril in the nuclear age that what you call a great book title radanov about how we are going to having a subtitle at all and you have and came up with vat one um so anyway i wanted to talk nukes this week because this nuclear confrontation between north korea and donald trump has been going on for some time but this week at there were conversations in talks not quite about nukes but talks between north korea and south korea which might seem to indicate a change amarin too much into the fact that northants out the talking india via perhaps ferry dock before and you know you might be kind of thumb it might easy to interpret this as talks that were prompted by president trump's rhetoric around this but also you have to remember that the olympics are coming up in south korea and north korea wants to go and north korea wants to go to what extent has donald trump tweeting so vociferously about nukes and north korea's leader has that spoken to the truth of how dire the situation is.

dhaka sam sanders reporter dan zach washington post nuclear weapons north korea india president trump south korea president donald trump
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"That listeners wanna talk to you for this segment if you want us to give you a call in here about anything going on where you live drop a note tom what's going on sam sanders at npr dot org same sanders npr dot org but in a book so usually at this point the show we take the time to talk about one story indepth but i wanted us to do things a bit differently today and goram the horn and share one story that we think was kind of overlooked this year so let's do that camilla you're up first all right so the story that i picked i mean it's overlooked not because it necessarily should have been a bigger deal than it was it was it was a little moment but there's a couple of things about it that have kind of stuck with me this was in february and president trump was meeting with a group of sheriff's from around the country and this one sheriff from texas said that there was a state senator in texas who was uh trying to introduce legislation to require a conviction for civil asset forefeiture which is what to civilizeda forfeiture is where the police can take property including cash jewellery cars from people who they suspect of having committed a crime and keep that property leg if you had a total elibility your wallet and got arrested they could just keep it exactly although this normally happens with much larger quantities of money hundreds of thousands of dollars and they'll keep it and that money will then go in.

tom sam sanders camilla trump texas senator president
"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"sam sanders" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Both pay off from npr i'm sam sanders it's been a minute wherever and however you listening i hope you're week is going okay so far today on the show we've got a good chat for you were gonna talk about the internet with a guy who became famous by being funny on the internet his name is matt bella side you might know matt he made a name for himself doing these brilliant comedy videos for buzzfeed he would basically complain about stuff while under the influence of wine and he recorded all the video series was called wine about it get it and the premise was very simple matt would open a bottle of wine at his desk in buzzfeed headquarters and just start complained about stuff he complained about morning myburgh is like a warm toasty oven and i am the delicate flaky pastry inside you wouldn't take a delicate flaky pastry out of this war dostiyev while he's in there being all warm and delicious in flaky that's actually alike is you take it out and eat it but i digress he complained about his coworkers prayers are one coworkers is always chatting it up on the phone right at their desks ran for everybody payroll you never going to believe who i saw order in the unlimited appetizers down at the thank god it's friday's this is a place of but the ball pinata fees there are rules here he complained about text messages also people turn every message until like six team different messages furs like hey said map said i think i found sent some nachos served oh way sent a bird pooped obama serbs i think i got most of it off said do you still want to split the.

sam sanders text messages matt bella buzzfeed