21 Burst results for "Sam Rainy"

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Dork Forest

The Dork Forest

05:35 min | 3 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Dork Forest

"That's a good eye. But these people, people see it, and they're like, oh, gone. Killmonger. No, that's terrible. And you don't want to kill killmonger. You want to throw them into the ocean and have namor find his body and bring him back to life. That's what I want because and then how he's a tool of Atlantis because Atlantis hates the land dweller. Anyway, is Atlanta's really part of the lore of that. Yeah, yeah. So is that Aquaman or no? No, Aquaman is D.C.. And he also, as Atlantis. Atlantis can be owned by all things. Okay. Because it's in mythology, right? Sure, sure, sure, sure. Wait, so so wait, Atlantis, who do I know any characters from Atlantis in marvel? It would be namor. It would be Neymar, who was in the original defenders, I think. He was, he fought World War II with Captain America. Okay. But not in the movies, not in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Sure, sure. Yes. Yes. Yes. That's right. And go to the long boxes marvel. Did you see the most recent marvel? Madness into the mind of grandness. Who is Charlie's their own at the end of it? Oh, oh God. First of all, I love Charlize Theron. And I did, God, dang it. I haven't seen it in I haven't seen it in weeks, I'm afraid. She was purple, I think. Does that ring a bell? Right, right. I have to tell you that oh yeah, she was Chloe, wasn't she? Yeah, CLIA. Which is such a short moment. We got to get out of here. Leah is Doctor Strange's estranged wife who is also super magical. And she's like, she actually just became the sorcerer supreme in the comic books. Okay. So the fact that Charlize Theron is clea is a goddamn delight to me. It's a delight. That's so exciting. Mind of madness. And that was horror. That was Sam Raimi. It was like Sam Raimi, and he really, it was her because he brought the zombie. He brought all the what ifs from TV because it could be all the different universes so he could do all the things. I was surprised that they didn't put miles Morales in there at all. But maybe because there was no deal with Sony yet. But I did want to see spider ham, who didn't want to see spider ham. Oh my God. I'm spider ham. Right, but it was Sam Raimi. Did he do evil dead? Yes, he did. And this didn't make my list, but remake of evil dead is incredible.

Atlantis Neymar namor Charlize Theron Captain America Sam Raimi D.C. Atlanta CLIA Charlie Chloe Leah Strange Morales Sony
"sam raimi" Discussed on The 3:59

The 3:59

04:14 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The 3:59

"Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness premiered with a splash over the weekend, topping The Batman for the largest box office opening this year. Let's make sense of all that madness in a spoiler filled discussion. Of doctor Chang, this is your daily charge. Joining me to discuss the state of the Marvel Cinematic Universe in the wake of this film is resident comic book expert Sean Keane. Welcome, Sean. Hello, hello. I'm speaking to you from earth three 8 three. Is that an actual I'm curious if that was an actual number if you just do that and pull that out of your head. Oh, I'm pretty sure that's the university visit. Okay. Let's get before we get into things. I want to offer a final warning to anyone who has to watch the film and intend to do so. We're going to be getting really deep and spoilers so if you care, please pause the episode and check back in later. And apologies in advance to my producer Brian, who has not watched the film. So sorry, Brian. All right, here we go. Last morning. Great. Yeah, Sean, what did you think of the overall film? I thought it was like a heap of fun in the way most marvel movies are. I had a few issues with what they did with Wanda's character in the wake of WandaVision. It felt like a big change that maybe needed to be built up to more. What about you? Yeah, I enjoyed it. I also enjoy Sam Raimi, who is San Remy's work. He's the director of this film, obviously, but he directed evil dead, army of darkness, all these classic kind of horror slash darkly comic films that and a lot of that sensibility is in there. So I thought, I thought it was enjoyable film. I also had some issues with it, which we can get into in this discussion. But before we get into some of those, just in general, how did you feel about this film as a stand-alone.

Sean Keane Sean Chang Brian San Remy Wanda Sam Raimi
"sam raimi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:42 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Characters that you sort of would expect to see, but they're in the background and never quite taking over what is his very specific journey of like, here's a guy who's draped in fear his entire life and he's going to tackle that fear with the help of a character who's fear is the major hindrance of her life, you know? And it's old guy and young girls sort of come together and figure out their lives. And I love the bear cub aspect of the storyline. It really works for me. I think they take strange and new and interesting places without sort of abandoning the character and yes. The Sam Raimi of it all. We get an official horror movie in the MCU. It's our first horror movie, and it's so much fun. Joelle, you are forgetting morbius. Well, Steven, why would you bring that movie? Oh no. No. We are living in the summer of morbius people. But this feels great in a way that you can bring, you know, I mean, I'll have kids so I always give the age a drum. I think a ten year old could probably handle this film and not have horrifying nightmares. There are moments where I think maybe you would want to shield your 5 year old's eyes and be like, don't look at that, it might scare you. But overall, I really did enjoy this movie. It's a lot of fun. One of my big takeaways from this film is that it is way too scary for little kids. And I was very taken aback by the PG-13 rating and how much horror imagery, how much just intense imagery there is in this movie compared to most of these kind of buildings getting knocked down kind of movies. My kids are now adults, but I definitely had that parenting like, oh man, I would not take a little kid to this movie. Just putting that out there. I'm Glenn, what did you think? This movie is kind of a mess. It's not entirely an unpleasant one. I mean, Raimi has said in interviews that a lot of the things about this movie were changing on the fly as he was going through it. So they were laying the tracks right down ahead of the train while the train was in motion given COVID and a host of other things. It feels like that. It's a jumble. So my reaction to it isn't as pure. It's one of those films that while you're looking at it, you feel like floating in the air between you and it is this kind of Gauzy scrim of studio notes and studio memos..

Sam Raimi Joelle Steven Raimi Glenn
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

02:52 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And it can be like <Speech_Male> a lonely kind <Speech_Male> of like <Speech_Male> not great existence. <Speech_Male> And I think we had <Speech_Male> so much fun collaborating <Speech_Male> on this, <Speech_Male> both <Speech_Male> on the script on <Speech_Music_Male> set and the <Speech_Male> editorial suite. <Speech_Music_Male> But I think <Speech_Male> we're going to continue down that path. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> we're sort of <Speech_Male> medium <Speech_Male> agnostic. It <Speech_Male> doesn't have to be filmed <Speech_Male> and it could be <Speech_Male> certainly we're interested <Speech_Male> in television, <SpeakerChange> so many <Silence> great things are happening there. <Speech_Male> I'd <Speech_Male> be remiss if I didn't ask you <Speech_Male> what's your favorite <Speech_Male> Nick cage performance <Speech_Male> barring <Speech_Male> the movie that you made with him? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yes. <Speech_Male> Okay, there's <Speech_Male> two and they're neck <Speech_Male> and neck, but I <Speech_Male> hold them very <Speech_Male> dear. It's my heart. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Raising Arizona <Speech_Male> and adaptation <Speech_Male> are to <Speech_Male> performances that <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> wildly different. <Speech_Male> One is just this <Speech_Male> hyperbolic, <Speech_Male> almost cartoonish <Speech_Male> and a good way. <Speech_Male> You know, comedic <Speech_Male> performance that <Speech_Male> is just like has a <Speech_Male> tremendous amount of power <Speech_Male> and raising Arizona <Speech_Music_Male> and that movie <Speech_Male> is incredible. I've <Speech_Male> revisited <Speech_Male> a number of times. And <Speech_Male> then on the other <Speech_Male> side of adaptation <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it's just this <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> small nuanced <Speech_Male> detail like <Speech_Male> stripped away <Speech_Male> real performance <Speech_Male> and it's split <Speech_Male> and two and he's playing both <Speech_Male> these roles and I just <Speech_Male> think <Speech_Male> it's an illustration <Speech_Male> of really the <Speech_Male> versatility of <Speech_Male> Nicolas Cage <Speech_Male> as an actor in this <Speech_Male> sort of way that he <Speech_Male> approaches things. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> so storied <Speech_Male> dependent and I just think it's <Speech_Male> kind of fascinating and <Speech_Male> remarkable. That's <Speech_Male> part of what makes your movie <Speech_Male> so fun is that you're <Speech_Male> kind of asking for <Speech_Male> all of those versions <Speech_Male> of him. And even <Speech_Male> the younger version of <Speech_Male> him, it's <SpeakerChange> an <Speech_Music_Male> incredible outcome. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm happy you feel <Speech_Male> that way. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> That was the big challenge <Speech_Male> for us. <Speech_Male> Tom, we end every episode <Speech_Male> of this show by asking filmmakers. <Speech_Male> What's the last great <Speech_Male> thing they've seen? <Speech_Male> Have you seen any <Speech_Male> good movies or TV <Silence> or anything you <SpeakerChange> want to recommend? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Oh, so <Speech_Male> I can tell you <Speech_Male> what I'm excited <Speech_Male> to see. <Speech_Male> That I haven't <Speech_Male> been able to see it because <Speech_Male> we've been finishing <Speech_Male> this film is everything <Speech_Male> everywhere all at once. <Speech_Male> Premiered <Speech_Male> at south by <Speech_Male> Southwest at the same <Speech_Male> time and I have <Speech_Male> not had the <Speech_Male> time to see it yet, <Speech_Male> but I'm <Speech_Male> so excited about <Speech_Male> it. And I'm just like, <Speech_Male> you know, <Speech_Male> fascinating ideas <Speech_Male> that people <Speech_Male> have about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I've heard that it's <Speech_Male> a nice analog to this <Speech_Male> film where it's where <Speech_Male> it's got jumping <Speech_Male> genres and <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> like a meta narrative and <Speech_Male> I don't know I'm just <SpeakerChange> so excited <Speech_Male> about that. <Speech_Male> I can confirm <Speech_Male> it's amazing and that would be <Speech_Male> a really fun double feature <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> bearable weight. So <Speech_Music_Male> hey, congrats. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for doing the show really <Speech_Male> appreciate it, Tom. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much <Speech_Music_Male> for having me. I really do <Music> appreciate it. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you to Tom Gorman, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you, of course, <Speech_Music_Male> to Adam name and for <Speech_Music_Male> his insights on <Speech_Music_Male> this episode. Thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bobby Wagner, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for his production <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> work on this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode, please stay tuned <Speech_Music_Male> to the big <Speech_Music_Male> picture. <Speech_Music_Male> Because later this <Speech_Male> week, we are in fact <Speech_Male> talking about <Speech_Male> a new Sam Raimi movie <Speech_Male> talking of course <Speech_Male> about Doctor <SpeakerChange> Strange <Speech_Male> and the multiverse of <Speech_Male> madness. We'll see you then.

Arizona Nicolas Cage Tom Gorman Bobby Wagner Tom Sam Raimi
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

02:16 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"For love of the game, 11 crime wave, ten, the quick and the dead, 9, the gift, 8 Spider-Man, 7 evil dead, 6 army of darkness, 5 Spider-Man two, four drag me to hell, three dark man, two a simple plan, and number one evil dead two..

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:56 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"As well, Spider-Man twos are pretty good ending for that universe. This is not a movie that needed to exist, not just because no movie needs to exist because they kind of did the arc pretty well in two movies, I think. I don't think this movie adds much. I agree with you. I think it's just a symptom of the more of this genre. So for the sake of conversation, why don't we put its murder and within the Woods together at 13? Sure. So that we can say, these are the early makings of a great filmmaker. This is what you have to do as an independent filmmaker to show that you're worthy and that you deserve a chance that you deserve some money. And then we can get both of those out of the way. Now, we're getting closer and closer to a lot of good movies in a row here in our conversation. And so our quibbles will be modest. I do think that for love of the game has to go at 12, though, because I rewatched it this week, and I was expecting to like it more. And it really doesn't work. And it is so close to being a very good baseball movie and the baseball in the movie is kind of impressive and we obviously understand that Kevin Costner is just kind of the most enduring athlete of the movies of the last 30 years. You know, he's somebody who's so believable in these parts. And so credible in these parts. But everything happening between him and Kelly Preston is so banal and so mediocre, it's kind of mind-blowing to me that Sam Raimi made the movie. And I know I sensed what he's after, right? He's trying to do a little bit more of like a Leo mccary movie, I guess, like something really traditional and sentimental, and it just lands with the thud for me. So I feel like it has to be for love of the game. I think it's the nostalgia of an era where pitchers through 9 innings. This doesn't happen anymore. You're telling me. I'm not a bullpen? What do you have to complain about? You've got the Toronto Blue Jays lineup right now. You're flying. Yeah, no, I'm Bo Bichette, Vlad junior. I know everything's too pivoting from the raptures to the Blue Jays. Yeah, I don't think for love of the game is very good. I think it has some good actors around Costner, the baseball scenes are good. Even within the Costner sports movie rankings, I wouldn't put it at the bottom, and that's because I watched 15 minutes of draft day this morning on cable and I'm like, well, that's the game's better than that. But that's true. But it is not a particularly it's not a particularly fun energetic movie. So we also have decided what to do with crime wave, which you've kind of said, you know, you think is objectively bad and I'm arguing is kind of subjectively good. It's hard for me to argue that it's better than most of the other movies on this list, but I hope you're going to give me crime wave over for love of the game. If we both don't like for love of the game and I really like crime wave, maybe we can put crime wave next in sort of this weird spot of agree to disagree and then that is that's the plan. That's what we should do. Crime wave goes to 11. I don't love it. It's an interesting movie..

baseball Leo mccary Blue Jays Kevin Costner Bo Bichette Kelly Preston Vlad junior Sam Raimi Costner
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Because this is not number one within the Woods. But it is, I agree. But it's a primal scene of his career. So if evil dead two is encoded in evil dead one, both evil deads are encoded in within the Woods. If they wouldn't exist without it, that's his proof of concept short. And so I'm glad it exists, even though it's a little boring at 32 minutes. We have 15 films here. Is it the is it number 15? Sure. Within the Woods? No. The worst one is can they say, what do you think is the worst one? What's our order here? How are you doing this? I think we should just bounce around, but I think let's go from worst to best. I think the worst one is Oz. I agree with you. I revisit it, I was the great and powerful, and it's a real miss. And it's a strange thing. And I worry a little bit about multiverse of madness when I watch a movie like this, or I'm like, why is Sam Raimi interested in this? What is this, what is it about this story and this universe? And is it just the ability to shift from black and white in one aspect ratio to the color and another aspect ratio? Is it getting inside the world of historical movie making with this story? Obviously The Wizard of Oz has a story as larder with allegory. Is there something in that allegory? I don't know. It's a movie that has high production values and looks kind of bad, and most Sam Raimi movies don't look bad, so it's this one stuck out to me in revisiting his flicks that it just didn't feel right. Something is off in the stew here. Would you agree with that? I would, and I think maybe there's some mark of interest in that. He only does something like this once, whereas Tim Burton made one of these every year for about ten years. Because Alice had Wonderland movies or his other Roald Dahl movies was just totally shameless, you know, it's just like, I don't care this looks like shit. $90 million, whatever. I mean, rami, we went with the one. But I also think it's interesting that he picked material or material picked him or this movie was engineered when a show like wicked already existed on Broadway that kind of deconstructed that stuff pretty well to Tony Award winning effect. I guess, I don't know if you saw the tweet recently that wicked is going to be two movies, which is just like, come on. We don't need that. But that's painful. It's painful. But I think wicked as a Broadway show, you know, that takes us apart pretty smartly. I think Raimi's movie God forbid we talk about screenwriting when we're talking about a director. It's just not a well written movie. It's not, it's not a good idea for a film, not really. And then the execution is lax when I said you can tell if someone's hard isn't something or not. This is not like a bad passion project. Like whatever you say about wild and heart, some people think that that's lynch's best movie, some people think it's his worst. That's his Wizard of Oz movie. His whole bloody heart is in that movie as a Wizard of Oz, riff..

Sam Raimi Roald Dahl Tim Burton rami Alice Tony Award Raimi lynch
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:38 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"But someone with his skill set in way of making movies, he could have retroactively been a kind of discovery if he'd been practicing with this kind of craft and a different more anonymous period for directors. And he has lots of trademarks. He puts the same car in every movie and he has the same actors and usually Ted Raimi's in there somewhere looking like Ted Raimi and Bruce Campbell's a snooty waiter. I mean, I like all those things, but it's not self important the way that Tarantino stuff is. He's also not as important as Quentin Tarantino is, but like when Tarantino puts like red apple or something in his movie, it's like, oh my God, it's his universe. When Raimi does this stuff, it feels like, well, these are his friends. And this is his, you know, these are his hallmarks and it's fun that they're in there, but it's not significant. You don't unlock the meaning of Spider-Man because Bruce Campbell's in it for two minutes. But it's nice to see Bruce Campbell there. There's only a handful of filmmakers too that I can think of who genre hop the way that he does, so carefully, you know, Soderbergh in recent times is someone who I think is pretty capable of bouncing around. You know, Howard hawks is often cited as someone who could make a screwball comedy one year and then a hard bitten western in the next year. But and Raimi has done this. I mean, he has made not just superhero movies and horror movies he's made westerns. He's made noir films. He's made sports movies. He's made children's fantasies. He kind of has done it all. And so that's another reason why I think it's hard to pinpoint whatever he is. And whatever he represents. I wonder, will he be remembered, you know, will he be canonized in a way? We're spending a lot of time talking about him and anticipation of this movie that, you know, he basically took over after another filmmaker dropped out, is he one of the ten or 20 most important filmmakers the last 40 years in your mind? I think that he would fall into that category of the very subjectively, maybe. Right? The influence is there to an extent. There's a canonicity to the first evil two evil dead movies. We're like, you can't study horror without them. Right? So you say that sentence and you sort of go, how much weight does that sentence bear? If you can't study horror without two movies that a guy made, it's probably fairly important filmmaker. The comic book movies that he's made. I think suffer it away from being, they don't suffer artistically. They're good. I think what they brought is more ambivalent, at least to me. If you are someone who is very excited to see the multiverse, you are probably very happy Sam Raimi made them. I am less so, but I mean, they exist. So I mean, yeah, in a way he's probably on he's probably on the list. He's also someone I think who benefits from for people of our age or generation who are listening to this. They benefit from rewatching. And I did it over the last year, not in anticipation of this podcast which I think you asked me about a week ago..

Ted Raimi Bruce Campbell Tarantino Raimi Quentin Tarantino Howard hawks Soderbergh apple Sam Raimi
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:41 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I kind of consistent and boring strategy for the next 20 years. That's what I mean about Pandora's box, right? And he's a weird candidate for that. I mean, I've argued in pieces on the site and with friends and stuff that the main Hollywood story of the last 30 years is revenge of the nerds. And it's not a nice revenge. It's not a nice revenge. And it's a revenge that now gives cover to all kinds of other things under the guise of progressiveness and diversity of Disney and marvel. It's a superficial patina laid upon something basically very nerdy, which is like, we're going to force our culture on you now forever. And you have to like it. I don't think Raimi was, I think Raimi was thinking that. I think he's an unpretentious guy. And I think he wanted to, you know, this sounds like a Simpsons line. I think he just wanted to tell a good story about a Spider-Man, you know? I think that's what he was really. I think that's what he was really trying to do. And I think that to some extent, I don't think it got away from him. I just think it got bigger than he thought because it met an appetite that was ready for that kind of unambiguous heroism. I will say this about the Spider-Man movies as opposed to the Nolan movies. Literally and figuratively, there's no gray in them. The Nolan palette is gray and the Nolan moral universe is gray. It's one of those movies that's like, everyone's kind of a hero and everyone's kind of a villain. Spider-Man's more like, no, this guy's a hero, and it's kind of hard to be a hero, and there's responsibility in being a hero, but it's not about the darkness within, at least not to the third till the third movie, which I think he kind of botches, right? He doesn't do that so well. But those first two movies, those long, clean, broad strokes of good and bad and innocent and wicked and all that, they worked for the moment that they came out in. They tapped something good. Yeah, there's definitely a post 9 11 New York City reading of the first two Spider-Man movies that I think resonates. And the third one in which the alien symbiote comes to kind of reckon with Peter Parker's morality is less successful and there's something interesting about that because I feel like superhero films in general struggle with ambiguity. They struggle with telling complex stories oftentimes. Well, look at evil dead, evil dead is not about the darkness within. It's like it sucks to be possessed by a demon. But it's not like a David Lynch demon where it's like the demon is probably to some extent, you know, societal rot, you know, manifested in killer bob or something. I mean, evil dead is just like, there's an evil force in the Woods. Don't read the book, you know? I mean, there's ways that people have talked about Raimi is a conservative and I'm not referring to personal politics or anything, though..

Raimi Pandora marvel Hollywood Disney Peter Parker New York City David Lynch bob
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:45 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Like that's what sold Javier and Matt tolmach and all these guys who, you know, still are participating in the Spider-Man movie making industrial complex, but at that time had no one had really cracked this nut of this thing that everyone knew if done right was going to work. Peter Parker is one of the great creations of American fictional storytelling of the last 75 years as a reason that there's a Rite of passage for so many teenagers and adolescents who get into Spider-Man and that he endures as a movie character now, but Sam Raimi, who has made extraordinarily zany movies and arch movies and also made these quite sincere films, you know, he's coming off this period in which he's made a simple plan, like you said, a kind of Coen brothers monkey and also for love of the game, which is this really syrupy, traditional romantic sports drama, and then the gift, which I think is kind of the underrated odd oddity of his career. And you know, these movies were fine. They did fine. They did they all did okay business, and he's in this kind of holding pattern as a filmmaker. It's still kind of surprising that they took a chance on him in this spot. And they empowered him to make this movie and then two more movies after this. The first one in particular, I think is a pretty incredible act of origin storytelling. It's hard to make these things interesting. We've now seen 200 of them. So I think everyone has origin story fatigue. But at the time, I remember watching it as somebody who grew up reading the Todd mcfarlane Spider-Man run and feeling like this is pretty close to what I was hoping it would be, which is an unusual experience with these kinds of stories. Yeah, and it's the fact that we've seen 200 synths that speaking for myself gives me pause and now wanting to praise it 20 years later because it's the opening of Pandora's box to an extent. It is, right? And it's the same way that you can look at something like the first Jon Favreau Iron Man, which is not as good, but is good in some of the same ways..

Matt tolmach Peter Parker Javier Sam Raimi Coen Todd mcfarlane Pandora Jon Favreau
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:36 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"He's an entertainer, and even if there's something mildly sadistic about the way evil dead was made, because he really put everybody through the rigor, Bruce Campbell's given these interviews for years about how basically Raimi kicked the shit out of the whole crew. It's fundamentally all in good fun. You're not supposed to have any residue from the evil dead movies. You're not supposed to go home and be like, oh man, that was fucked up. You're just watching it. You're like, that was fun. I mean, it's closer to Peter Jackson than that way. The backyard movies Peter Jackson used to make where it's just like they're fun. They're disgusting, but they're fun. So that raises an interesting question, which is, what is it that Sam Raimi is interested in as a storyteller? Because I would not say that he's somebody who is necessarily huge on character or even archetypes. And even though he is interested in hero figures and has long wanted to make a version of the shadow, instead made dark man, of course he made the Spider-Man movies. He made an L Frank baum, Oz film. There are these sort of, I guess mythologies that compel him, but I never think of him as a guy who's really good on individual characters. So, like, what kind of what kind of storyteller is Raimi? I mean, it's an interesting question. I think he's interested, as you say, to some extent in heroic archetypes and how can he disfigure them a little bit? I mean, like, quite literally disfigurement and dark man is kind of the superpower, right? And he managed to find an interestingly non Gritty way into Spider-Man where the heroic aspect of Spider-Man is about exuberance, a kind of teenage exuberance, which timed against the glomerulus of the Christopher Nolan movies. I always preferred all respect to all the listeners of the podcast who think The Dark Knight's the best movie ever made or something, but I like the Raimi Spider-Man movies a lot more. But in terms of what kind of storyteller is, I think he's also a bit of a shape shifter..

Peter Jackson Raimi Bruce Campbell Sam Raimi Frank baum Christopher Nolan The Dark Knight
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:50 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"That clicked in my brain. What's your relationship to the evil dead? Because you see two before one like so many other people? Yeah, I think I saw two before. One, I certainly saw it on VHS. I saw it out of the desire to, in my mind's eye to be like, if that's what the cover looks like, what could the movie be? You know, I mean, it's that kind of movie. I mean, I think that because I'm writing something on the site about raby, and I've written about his work before. It's a bit of a thought experiment, not just to go beyond your own adolescent experience of it, but to just think about what a movie like evil dead would have meant to a horror audience or a cult audience in 81. It feels attainable, right? Not the feeling I could make that. But the feeling someone like me under a certain set of circumstances may be kind of good luck out and make something a bit like that, which is partially tied to the location, which is just like, yeah, drive into the Woods and find four walls. And the slight amateurishness to the acting, which I say is a compliment, right? Because it's not studied acting, and because there's no one famous in it, you really feel like anything could happen to anyone at any time. And you know, you mentioned the camera and it's interesting that the movie comes out the year after The Shining, because The Shining is the ultimate steadicam movie. And not just the ultimate steadicam movie in that they use it, but it's such a stable graceful balletic use of the static camera. And this is what a master filmmaker does with the technology. And then depending on who you believe you have Raimi like nailing the camera to slats of wood or hockey sticks and then this crew alternating with just running around with it. And it's the same aesthetic impulse that Kubrick had, which is these traveling shots, the subjective shots are dream like and visionary and are hurtling towards this vanishing point at all times. I mean, the tracking shots in the two movies could not be more different, but it's the same idea. And I love the idea that Kubrick and the most imperious form of studio movie making and Sam Raimi as basically like a little shit he'll financing this with his friends. Hit upon the same innovation, but also I love the idea that for Raimi, the tracking shot is an obstacle course. Like Kubrick gets everything out of the way of the camera and rabies was like, let's put things in the way. How many things can I stick in the path of my camera operator to almost kill them in trying to get these shots? And they're just, they're brilliant. Yeah, I think with Kubrick in The Shining, everything feels sudden and with Sam Raimi everything feels fast. And there's a difference between those two things, you know, seeing the camera hurtling through the Woods that way in so many of the movies that he's made. And you see this all the time. I feel like, what was the Amazon Prime small independent film that had that long extraordinary tracking shot in the Texas town in the 1950s that you and I both liked? I can't remember the name of that movie. The vast of night. I mean, even the vast of night you look at a movie like that that's made 40 years later, you can feel the same rami invention in it and him kind of using some of that. I guess he used a drone to recreate that, but this is well before drones were making movies that Raimi was incorporating these styles. Well, again, I love the idea of like flexing flexing your muscles on a small budget..

Kubrick raby Raimi Sam Raimi hockey Amazon rami Texas
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:49 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"We use is season tickets. We are here. We are here for every game that Sam Raimi. I guess pitch is given that he has made a baseball movie, maybe not one of his most successful movies, but we'll talk about that. He's an interesting cat. He's a, you know, he's from Michigan and he's somebody who obviously was consumed by and obsessed with movies, particularly genre movies, and as you look through his filmography, you can see somebody who's got a lot of love for the three Stooges and ray harryhausen and crime movies. And so, you know, as he makes his way into the movie making world independently, he does so with a cohort you're familiar with, and that's one of the great things about his origin story is he's part of this class of filmmakers who are his friends, not just Bruce Campbell, the lantern jawed star of many of his early films, but the Coen brothers were friends and collaborators. How much of that is part of what makes you attracted to him? Is it that knowing that he was a part of that crew and that those guys kind of came up together? Because they're obviously so important to you. Yeah, I mean, just the basic backyard myth of Sam Raimi is very lovable, even before you get to college and the Coens come into it, right? JJ Abrams makes super 8 as an homage to Spielberg and that myth of the backyard movie maker, but I mean, Raimi fits that myth too. He just comes along a little later, right? He's running around with his friends with a camera, these early movies that they make have ridiculous titles. And it does come out of a kind of movie love, which is true, the Coens, as well. I mean, they made a movie, I think, in their teens called Henry Kissinger man on the go, right? Which is not, which is, you know, I mean, that's them. But I think that that love of older movies, that idea that filmmaking technologies becoming just democratized enough that you can be a kind of youthful amateur, and even just film production is still relatively new ish as a school thing..

Sam Raimi ray harryhausen JJ Abrams Bruce Campbell baseball Coen Michigan Raimi Spielberg Henry Kissinger
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:00 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Sean fantasy and this is the big picture, a conversation show about Sam Raimi. Later in today's episode, I'll have a conversation with Tom Gorman, the co writer and director of the unbearable weight of massive talent, the Nicholas cage meta action vehicle we discussed last week on the show. I hope you'll stick around for that. But first, this week sees the release of Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, the latest MCU entrant, and that movie is directed by one of my favorite filmmakers on the planet, someone we haven't had too many opportunities to celebrate on this show because he hasn't made a movie since 2013. I'm talking about the great Sam Raimi and joining me to discuss his expansive career and style is lowly raptors fan Adam name and hi Adam. You had to do that, didn't you? You know? How about how about only three years removed from a non super team championship raptors fan? This is being recorded on a Friday and it was not a good Thursday night in the city of Toronto. I'm very sorry for you, but you're right. You can clutch tightly to that NBA championship and I as a New York sports fan haven't seen happiness in many a year except when I watch Sam Raimi movies, so let's talk about the man. I know you're a fan. I've been looking forward to talking to you about him for a long time. We've made mention of evil dead two in the past. We've talked about his overa before. Who is Sam Raimi? Why is he good? Why does it matter that he's back in the movie culture? I think that Sam Raimi at least for a long stretch of his career for longer than most. He sort of just unambiguously a force for good in mainstream American movie making. You know, not to moralize and the ethics of good and bad movies. I don't really mean in that sense that his movies are inherently progressive or that they have a good ideology to them. But he's such a gifted filmmaker. He really sort of, I think, ennobled that idea of coming out of nowhere and kind of making do with what you have and parlaying that into increasing budget sizes and opportunities without losing that independent spark and without losing that sense of personality. I think most people would agree there was a point at which something shifted in his filmmaking and not just the batting average went down, but the bloat went up and there's probably a way on this podcast to sort of discuss where that breaking point is for each of us or where critics kind of saw it happening. But there's something very honorable about a filmmaker who keeps moving up weight classes, industrially, and doesn't lose themselves. And not only did he not lose himself, but I think the things he brought to the table in the first place like inventiveness and a really physical propulsive style and a sense of humor and a playful approach to violence. Like these are good these are good things for me. And I think I don't know if you guys have used a phrase like this with other guests on this show. But he has what I would call a lifetime pass, right? He might not have made only great movies. But if you make evil dead, and if you make dark man, I don't care if you make other stuff that's not so good. That's a lifetime pass..

Sam Raimi Sean fantasy Tom Gorman hi Adam raptors Adam NBA Toronto New York
"sam raimi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

03:16 min | 5 months ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"There was a couple bits of left here here and there. Mostly with the violence, when you kind of get that Sam Raimi reaction of people just reacting to a disemboweling or two. I think I agree with both of you, but here's what I think is happening, okay? There is definitely in eggers previous films and experimental or surreal or almost a lynching quality to those movies where the weird, the fantastic, the Supernatural, whatever you want to call it, it's hovering just at the periphery. It's just below the surface, however you want to say it, but it is part of the texture of every freaking frame of the movie, so you feel in every scene that it has the potential to go south to go into dark, weird magic, which creates as you're watching each film this sense of dread and mystery that's very unsettled quality in the viewer. In this film, I think he kind of cordoned off all his more experimental impulses from the main story and shunted them all off into the realm of dreams and visions and fevers and drugs, which is. To be fair, that's what a lot of so called realistic films do. But it's such a conventional storytelling choice from this whom I thought was a very unconventional director. So I kept finding myself growing impatient for the weird stuff for the gods, the prophecies, the norms, the norms get name checked all the time we never see them. I wanted more norm content. They wanted more Björk, the Björk of it all. Please, yeah. This has a bigger budget, has a much more coordinated marketing effort. So do you guys feel that this is his step into the mainstream and leaving the art house behind? I hope not. I mean, if this is his first step into the mainstream, I don't think it's a very good step. And those hallucinations that otherworldly stuff, I got to say every time it showed up at completely brought the movie down. It just brought everything to a stop for me. It was like listening to somebody talk about that one time they got really high. They think it's funny while they're doing it, but I'm just sitting there waiting to get back to the story to get back to the mission to get back to the revenge and so on. And I just feel like every time that happened, I got derailed and I hope if he is going to tiptoe into bigger budget fair again, I hope that he will avoid those conventions, but I also hope he won't use the budget completely on those technical aspects, which, as I said, I felt that he was so slavishly attached to those technicalities that he didn't allow himself to have characters and he has such good characters in his other work. The witches, those are some characters. Don't disagree with you. Yeah. Now, Chris, I don't think you agree that this film is a more mainstream take from him. You said this is of a piece with his other films. Yeah, it felt that way to me. And I mean, I'm thinking about this as we're talking, you know, the examples that he cited and again in that New Yorker profile of the kinds of challenges that he faced in the edit on this film and trying to make it more accessible and at the behest of his finances, he mentioned a braveheart and Gladiator. Both those films as I recall, they have dreams and visions in them. I mean, they're not as fantastic. How do I say that word? Fantastic. Fantasma gore phantasmagorical. They're not as phantasmagorical as the ones in this film, which gave me so many new scenes that I just want to airbrush on the side of my van..

Björk Sam Raimi Chris Fantasma gore
"sam raimi" Discussed on The Cinematography Podcast

The Cinematography Podcast

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on The Cinematography Podcast

"It also I never seen it on video at any of the video stores that I frequented even the ones that had lots of titles or eclectic titles. I know it got a VHS release. I just never saw it. So I'd never seen the movie. So I picked up the shout factory Blu-ray and I don't buy a lot of blurays. Shout factory is like one of the great companies to get blurays from because they do very respectful restorations of cult classics and weird ass movies. There's a few other companies like vinegar syndrome and arrow video that do similar things. But I got the Blu-ray, and I was kind of procrastinating on watching it because I was like bracing to hate it. I actually really liked it. It was surprised. It is rainy film. It's written by Sam Raimi and these two guys who maybe you've heard of Joel and Ethan Cohen ever heard of the three of them co wrote it. And I feel like it's not the strongest effort from any of them. And if you read the IMDb trivia section or read up on it, you understand that Sam Raimi is kind of distanced himself from this movie, the producers kind of took a lot of the things that made him him away like he wasn't allowed to work with the composer that he preferred to work with. He wasn't allowed to work with his own editor. So there were issues with the way the movie was made. But I was honestly shocked at how much I enjoyed it. And if you watch it, it has the seeds of everything that Sam Raimi has become and also the seeds of everything that the Coen brothers have become..

Sam Raimi Ethan Cohen Joel
"sam raimi" Discussed on X96

X96

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"sam raimi" Discussed on X96

"Maybe you won't be Big D B. Greg's dropped out of high school before the tent. It's It's one to nothing, man, Peter singling it here. Kids Z. Thank you for saving me. Ask your reference. All right, Ken Ken controls the question. He has one point your question. McGuire has been a practicing blank since 1992. He even received the award world's sexiest blank in 2000 to fill in the blank. Hey. Alcoholic. Be atheist. See vegetarian can Vegetarian. Correct. Way to go, Ken, You've got two points. Katie controls the question This, sir, I know it'll be a good one. Katie? Yeah. What was the general attitude of the crew of Spider Man towards Toby. Playing. The part of the story is a legendary Was the day they thought he was too skinny. Be. They didn't think he was funny or see they love to miss Spider Man, but the director was disappointed. Oh, boy. Oh, there's a isn't there an obvious ends with a work? We're going to go back with C. They loved him a Spider man, But the director was disappointed. Yes. So Sam Raimi had him back three times. No, that's zero. Probably that's incorrect can go ahead. You have the choice of either. Hey, was they thought he was too skinny or B? They didn't think he was funny. Hey, Hey,.

Ken Ken Sam Raimi Toby Katie director McGuire B. Greg Peter
Marvel's Avengers: Retailer Says Spider-Man PS4 Exclusive Listing Not Correct

Gaming Ride Home

01:22 min | 2 years ago

Marvel's Avengers: Retailer Says Spider-Man PS4 Exclusive Listing Not Correct

"Spiderman may be exclusive to the playstation version of Marvel's avengers a since removed product blurb on the retail website based dot listing for the upcoming Marvel's avengers game noted that Spiderman would be exclusive to the playstation four version of the game and by extension the playstation five version when that releases. Andy Robinson reported on the detail for Video Games, Chronicle Dot, com, and wrote it's not clear if the marketing blurb was supplied by publisher square, inex- However the company has previously confirmed has a global marketing deal with playstation and that there would be surprises for playstation players. That story is linked in the show notes and would be undeniably pretty big surprise for playstation players. It would make sense to considering Sony's part ownership relationship with. The character Spiderman has been a weirdly important element of Sony's business for some time. Sony makes money off all Spiderman Marvel movies and the playstation three pretty much wholesale news these Spiderman Font established by these Sam Raimi's spider man films for its logo, and then of course, there is the INSOMNIAC developed Spiderman game that Sony published which performed so well that it led Sony to finally put a ring on insomniacs finger and purchased the studio.

Sony Spiderman Chronicle Dot Sam Raimi Andy Robinson Publisher
The Dark Knight Trilogy (Nolan #4)

Filmspotting

06:37 min | 2 years ago

The Dark Knight Trilogy (Nolan #4)

"Welcome to film spotting so Josh. We've arrived at the stage of our Nolan who've review where we've actually reviewed the films on the show previously the first three films in the series following Memento and insomnia all predate film spotting this week. We're revisiting Nolan's dark knight trilogy. Two thousand five's Batman begins which started. It was one of the first films reviewed on the show. Way Back in two thousand five. That movie came out in June. The show began in March of. Oh five unfortunately. Our Review on episode eighteen of the show has been archived in the basement of Wayne Industry headquarters along with all the other films. Spotting PROTOTYPES COW. Can't hear me out among the disappointed listeners. Who went to search for that review? Just today thinking I'd be able to hear Sam. I thought it would be good preparation you know like to do. My homework. Couldn't find it so we'll have to unearth that at some point. Yeah I'll have to give you a tutorial on searching the archive film spotting website. Because it's there but you can bet. I did not seek it out interest in listening to the archive that I found only went back to. I forget what show but it wasn't this one so yeah I'll have to get to to`real but with that review lost a time. I guess the best thing we can do for now is move on to version two point. Oh world like to disappear. Barron staff was not for the parents to serve. Justice cannot let pass. If you yourself and you become something else. Dialing our Christopher Nolan overview stays on chronological track at least for the moment with two thousand five's Batman Begins Adam. This is Nolan's big-budget high profile. Follow up to insomnia which itself was a medium budgeted studio. Follow up to his indie breakout. Memento what did I expect from Batman begins in two thousand? Five Nolan was already on my radar as a special talent superhero movies. Were something I enjoyed but aside from Tim Burton's Batman Installments and Sam Raimi's Spiderman Efforts Spiderman. Too by the way came out in two thousand and four I felt Comic Book Films. Usually fell into a fairly predictable box. The question for Batman begins then was whether or not the John. Laura would bend to Nolan's promise or Nolan would bend to the genre in two thousand five to my mind. Nolan's will one out even next to Burton and Raimi's Work Nolan's take on the superhero film stood out as distinct. It was dark. It was intense and above all it was rooted in a real world. Specificity that was recognizable while building his costume. I love that Bruce Wayne Orders some ten thousand bat ears that turn out to be unusable. This Bruce Wayne and even Batman could exist just like us he had to do Amazon returns. That first impression of Batman begins makes me think that I watched it through the Lens of a Superhero Movie. Perhaps with tempered expectations this time. Though in the midst of our review I was decidedly watching it through the Lens of a Christopher Nolan movie and from that perspective keeping in mind masterful later efforts like the prestige which was Nolan's next film the Dark Knight which doubles down on much of what made Batman begins so throwing inception and dunkirk. That begins played as far more conventional. It has Nolan touches to be clear deception traumatized characters narrative twist but they each seemed a bit better towards the genre this time around something of a compromise. If in understandable one given where Nolan was in his career ultimately I think my original impression is probably the correct one and we can maybe get into a tangent here atom on whether or not a films original context matters. Most I think that's especially applicable. Maybe to dark knight rises but either. Way Adam. I'm curious what frame of mind you're in while revisiting Batman begins for our Nolan overview. Did you approach it as a superhero movie which in twenty twenty means contending with the reality of the MC you or did you assess it more? On a Nolan scale you know from interstellar on the bottom to the top where you'll find dunkirk. How dare you? I love how you unnerve me heading into my reply here and maybe that's appropriate because even though you answered it. I see what you're trying to do I'm onto you. You're actually previewing are pending discussion of the Dark Knight by presenting me with a joker like Dilemma Harvey. Rachel press the button and kill the other passengers. Risk them killing me Nolan movie or Superhero Movie. Your just an agent of chaos. Josh always knew what do I look like a guy with plan on one hand? I wasn't looking at this film. This trilogy of films as a Nolan creation consciously and I am it would be happening unconsciously of course just by the nature of this little project that we have set out on at the same time. I was eager to see this origin story again because just like I suppose bruce being forever scarred by his encounter with the bats I'm gonNA forever be blessed with the memory of my first superhero movie. Richard Donner's Superman. It's been talked about a little bit over the years here on the show and among its many thrills it shows us who Clark is how we got Earth those early discoveries of his gifts running alongside the train kicking that football. This first demonstrations of his abilities and helping people as Superman. That's the stuff I ate up. Then that's the stuff. I still eat up now. The Fun stuff. I guess that equate with Superhero movies. That is lost the darker. You alluded to this the darker. The more realistic the more serious. These movies get honestly the more these films feel less like Superman and more like James Bond. And that's definitely the case in this trilogy. I think this is where we really see. It happen right. Where Superhero Movies did turn into? Something else became something else in pop culture. We watched it unfold over the course of these. Three movies didn't we? I think that's fair. I think you could roll in watchmen there but that was two thousand nine so this was ahead of that.

Christopher Nolan Bruce Wayne Sam Raimi Josh Dunkirk Wayne Industry Insomnia Adam Tim Burton Richard Donner Barron James Bond Dilemma Harvey Rachel Amazon Laura Clark Football
Who Would Win - Ash from the Evil Dead vs Pennywise

#WhoWouldWin

03:14 min | 3 years ago

Who Would Win - Ash from the Evil Dead vs Pennywise

"Pennywise shape shifting creature I found in the Stephen King aval it in one thousand nine hundred eighty six penny wise as a cosmic evil who feeds on children because they're the easiest prey having existed for billions of here's billions pennywise is no longer concerned with the doings of mortals the monster currently known as it has gone back and forth preying on mortal going into hibernation for what is a seeming eternity every twenty seven to thirty two years or so this scary clown returns to feed hearken back to our forty by some sort of mass tragedy or violent incident pennywise is a shape shifting creature who feeds on fear taking the message of anything that the protagonist I is afraid of fun fact Penny wise was inspired by what scared author Steven King the most McDonald's yes flights the already airborne scared king saw a person dressed as Ronald McDonald board the flight at the last moments summoning up the courage king ask the per clown where he was coming from and Ronald immediately snapped back with McDonald land permanently cementing the notion of a terrifying clown in the us through his work forever that is pennywise we'd like to thank our sponsors for this week McDonald's for providing health nutritious snacks for we're never gonNA get them as a sponsor I would love that I do not think that is likely that McDonald's money eat our chicken it's mostly chicken that's a good positive right there I'm all about the pink slime let me tell you right now does it look like a doug it doesn't it on Chicken Burger okay so here are the details for Ash Williams now Ash Williams Aka Ashley Joanna Williams first appeared the nine hundred eighty one film the evil dead Eh played by Bruce Campbell and created by Director Sam Raimi Ashville Liam's the unlikely hero the evil dead films and TV series has been played by demonic spirits ever since an ill-fated trip to a cabin in the woods it's with a group of friends the group unknowingly releases demons by reading the Necker Namakonha ex Mortis the economics mortis or book of the dead is bound in human flesh Russian inked in blood of course all of our kid listeners shocked Tober James with a Q. and under no circumstances should be read aloud as doing so releases evil dead or spirits who become debts a debt by the way is a lifeforce person animal or even inanimate object that is possessed by Kandar Ian Demon their cunning and manipulative and can only killed by bodily dismemberment shocked over I guess it's the season that member moment ashes known for two main weapons sought up shotgun otherwise known as boom stick and the more noticeable home light xl chainsaw which was adapted to replace his right hand which was we did an evil dead film after being possessed by dead later during the army of darkness film Ashville themselves new mechanical right hand using play chainmail gauntlet and customize spring

Stephen King Thirty Two Years
Spider-Man Fans Are Not Happy With Sony Pictures

Herman Cain

02:59 min | 3 years ago

Spider-Man Fans Are Not Happy With Sony Pictures

"I have no understanding of this but everywhere I look today the people are mad at spider man what what are people angry and spider man people we do well they're not mad at spider man they're mad at Sony okay I only own spider man Sony owns the rights to spider man yeah and they look sort of leased it to Marvel for a certain amount of time it took not tomorrow but to Disney right so spider man could be in the Marvel universe okay so when they made this collection movies yeah Marvel you know there's like nine hundred characters yeah you'd think people would long for one less character right now the next time they have one of these Marvel movies where all the all the super heroes get together to do something to make can't be in it right like I think the next one should be called lunch lunch yeah all your favorite superheroes dine together is it there with the hulk yeah maybe brunch yeah kind of a long long look started drinking early yeah so spider man if it if the next movie is brunch super hero brunch then and it's a Marvel movie spider man can't appeared right so why are people who they met Sony this is concerned it's only because the first two spider man films that were directed by Sam Raimi were very well done and successful yeah he's the guy told me like water yeah and then the third one was kinda crappy and then they did to more than it is another one like the animated one I did well the animated when Sony did and I was in that it was fantastic okay but the people are mad because the precious little Marvel universe get busted up was yeah was he a legitimate member of the Marvel universe it was just a bit rights were owned by another company so they to work it out or do you mean in in like bag that was in nineteen seventy eight was always part of it was so I happy mothers and stuff like that sold spider man separately to Sony and so he'll yes hi to me may first right spider man was like them and I better angry well yeah you know people get mad over hell to get mad about this disease is that going to be in the Avengers anymore and I can't wait one last still nine hundred super hero has the same answers was never to be the same yeah okay well I never watch the superhero movies so I have no idea people are asking me are you happy it's going back to Sony and I said no I'm just happy that you're upset yeah like who cares right bill either make a good movie or they won't right all it means is that he can't appear in the collection movies right correct maybe they'll do something snarky like have a poster of my on the wall probably the other superheroes are meeting to figure out you think that they would just get together once and say you know it basically this is it will save the world and they will impose our own government to make sure that things don't get out of hand again and then they can all retire that's the movie I want to see super heroes retired just hanging out on the beach the metal detectors just like everybody else trying to find bottle in a nude beach when he's in his sixties plenty of things that could be done writers do your writing and today