24 Burst results for "Sam Harris"

Was the US' Decision to Withdraw From Afghanistan the Right One?

Making Sense with Sam Harris

01:53 min | 9 months ago

Was the US' Decision to Withdraw From Afghanistan the Right One?

"Well we're about a week into the tragedy end fiasco afghanistan which is in part the topic of today's podcast. As you'll hear. I'm not entirely sure what i think about our withdrawal that is. I'm not sure what i think about whether or not it should have happened. I can honestly inhabit both sides of that debate but how we withdrew the lack of preparation. The lack of foresight the lack of consultation with our allies like the british are failure to extract. The tens of thousands of afghans. Who helped us are the interpreters and their families whose lives are now in jeopardy because of our bungling our failure to ensure the safe passage of our own citizens. All of this is such a shocking betrayal of our obligations and our own interests the chest beggars belief. It's almost impossible to imagine. A greater indication of american decline and a greater gift to our enemies to the jihadists globally who must feel absolutely triumphant at this moment and to china and russia who must now no to moral certainty that they can always call our bluff because we simply are no longer a competent superpower. We have been visibly spooked by our own shadow here. So if china invades taiwan this year or next or the year after. I think it's safe to say that. Are frantic withdrawal from afghanistan will surely be one of the reasons why they felt they could

Afghanistan China Russia Taiwan
Separation and Harmony With Garrett Vandenberg pt3

The Bible Says What!?

01:53 min | 10 months ago

Separation and Harmony With Garrett Vandenberg pt3

"They special guest is returning guests. Garrett vandenburg welcome back to the show. It's could be back man. I'm happy to be chatting here again. Absolutely it's great having to back good seeing hope. Everything's been all right today. We just kind of want to start off with. Let's describe the the dvd that garrett believes it the deity that i believe. Well i mean so we. We use the word god to talk about to talk about something but i think the problem is i a lot of people. Get kind of when they think problems. A lot of people can get into when when the the atheist christian dialogue about this is that usually like i look at the conversation that sam harris or look at any of those guys in kind of the the. There's like a great four horsemen of the apocalypse. Right there was docking hitchens harris and lawrence. Krauss i think guys. It's always the case that the god that they're arguing doesn't exist doesn't exist like i usually agree with these guys when they disproved the existence of particular. God that's because they're they're quantifying a particular thing they're saying. Well you know if these are the features of our of god exactly then well that that's not real. Yeah there's there's something i mean. This this is a problem is a really philosophical problem though. Because as soon as i described the very specific features of you more me you can push that description to a limit and then you can say not see that that person you're talking about they don't really exist because you just described them wrong. That's that that there's there's a logical contradiction in what the way in thing you just described

Garrett Vandenburg Hitchens Harris Garrett Sam Harris Krauss Lawrence
Ricky Gervais to Sell Subscription to New Podcast

podnews

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Ricky Gervais to Sell Subscription to New Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the wreckage of our show with me. Because of is steven merchant blue and the little round headed buffoon. That is karl pilkington. Ricky surveys is to launch a new podcast called absolutely mental with neuroscientist and philosopher. Sam harris available from the tenth of may according to deadline. It'll be paid for at fourteen dollars. Ninety nine for the season. The story says listeners will be able to add them on their podcast players. But no word yet sewn whether he's using apple specifies subscriptions the ricky surveys show got an award in the guinness book of world records for the world's most downloaded podcast way back in two thousand and sixty two hundred sixty one thousand standards per month. He then sold his show on itunes for six dollars. Ninety five four quotes at least four installments.

Steven Merchant Karl Pilkington Sam Harris Ricky Apple
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Take someone who. Yeah the mentally unwell. They have to take the homeless in the san francisco bay area. How bad is their day. And then take someone living in extreme poverty in indio sub saharan africa. How bad is there. What the typical day. Yeah i wouldn't wanna make a claim the the that homeless person in the us as a better life than the extreme poor. I think it's it's not so hard to just hit rock bottom in terms of human suffering and i think that the homeless and the barriers to seem to have really terrible lives and so the question. The question in times of the difference of the how promising is a cause is much much more to do with this question of whether the low hanging flu already being taken where you know. Just think about the most sick you've ever been and how horrible that was and imagine you know and now think about that for months having malania for example and that that could you could have avoided that for a few dollars. That's an incredible fact. And that's where the real differences. I think is in kind of the cost to solve a problem rather than necessarily like the kind of per person suffering. 'cause rich countries are in general happier than poor countries. The worst of people. I mean especially in the us which has such a high variance in life outcomes. Yeah the worst. The lives of the west off people can easily be much the same. i guess. There's some other concerns here. That i have which and this this speaks to a deeper problem with consequential ism which is which is our orientation here. Not exclusively and and people can mean many things by that term. But there's just a problem in how you keep score because you know. Obviously there are bad things that can which have massive silver linings right which they have good consequences in the end and there are apparently good things that happened that that actually have bad consequences elsewhere. And or were in the fullness of time and it's hard to know when you can actually know that you can assess what is what is true the net how you get to the bottom line of the consequences of any actions but like when i think about the knock on effects of leading a place like san francisco become a slum effectively relate asia's think of like the exodus in tech from california at this moment i don't know how deep or sustained it'll be but i've lost count of the number of people in silicon valley who i've heard are leaving california at.

saharan indio san francisco bay africa flu us san francisco asia california silicon valley
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"To the podcast. This is sam harris. Okay so to. Dan bringing you a conversation that i originally recorded for the waking up app and we released it. There's a series of separate lessons a couple of weeks back but the response has been such that i wanted to share it here on the podcast and put it outside the paywall. This seems like a better holiday message than most as i think. Many of you know waking up isn't just a meditation app at this point. It's really the place where i do. Most of my thinking about what it means to live a good life and this is about generosity about how we should think about doing good in the world increasing looking to use this podcast and the waking up app to do more than merely spread what i consider to be good ideas as their primary purpose. Obviously but i wanna help solve some of the worst problems we face more directly than just talking about them. And i wanna do this systematically really thinking through what it takes to save the most lives or reduce the worst sovereign or mitigate the most catastrophic risks and to this end. I've taken the pledge over at giving what we can which is the foundation on effective altruism started by the philosophers will mccaskill and toby ord both of whom have been on the podcast and has pledged to give a minimum of ten percent of one's pretax income to the most effective charities have also taken the founders pledge which amounts to the same thing and have had waking up become one of the first corporations to pledge a minimum of ten percent of its profits to charity and the thinking behind. All of. this is the of today's podcast. Of course there is a bias against speaking about the sort of thing in public or even in private right. It's often believed that it's better to practice one's generosity anonymously because then you can be sure you're doing it for the right reasons. You're not trying to burnish year reputation as you'll hear in today's conversation. They're very good reasons to believe that. This is just not true. And that the imagined moral virtue of anonymity something we really need to rethink. In fact i've just learned of the knock on effects of the few times. I have discussed giving to charity on.

sam harris toby ord Dan mccaskill
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Foundation to give advice to both myself and anyone else once you understand the pressures that drive this behavior then you sort of have the framework for reversing matt and creating new habits so as we already described this both external and internal pressures on the external side. Because that's one's a little easier is just the accessibility. There's no doubt that. The accessibility is driving a lot of this behavior. Because that tree is so close so some of the things and some people do this and go to extreme measures to do. This is start limiting some accessibility just to make it a little easier. So you know if you can't not look at your phone when you're at a traffic light. Maybe she put the phone in the trunk of your car. Maybe you should not work with all your browsers open or if you really writing an article. That has a time pressure on it. Maybe not keep you know twitter slack. Open at the same time and so limiting. Accessibility is just a really simple way to start decreasing that switching tendency a little more complicated is on the internal side. How do you monitor and and manage the anxiety and the boredom and a desire for high higher degrees of productivity. That are driving you from that side of the equation. And for their. What i experimented with with myself was just practicing like many things in life They don't come necessarily without effort practicing the art of sustained attention and single tasking. And i started doing this. You know couple of years ago as you know sort of now speaking about the book and that content publicly. And just saying okay. I'm going to challenge myself. I have an hour. That i'm gonna quit everything except this one source of my attention is one focus when i started doing that at the beginning. Who's really hard to was shockingly hard. Because they felt this desire to like just go and check facebook or just go and talk to someone even if it wasn't technology and so what i started doing and what i advise people based on my own experience is start with small periods of time that you're doing singular focus and feel what happens understand the boredom and the executive work through it and stick with it and then take that break make that break not about necessarily going on social media getting into these additives. Like sinkholes just take you away from your goals but rather stretch to some light exercise. Close your eyes meditate. Look at nature through photography or real nature these things. I think have a lot of support for being really healthy little breaks and then get back into that focus and see if you can extend that over time. I think it sort of similar to someone learning how to become like a long distance runner. Like you can't really stop by running for miles. And what's intolerable to you on day one because it's painful or maybe even boring after a while you start enjoying that feeling and i think it i. I've discovered it's like that with this as well. You could single task sort of like an insurance runner where after a while it's just effort..

matt twitter facebook executive
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"My pleasure. Thanks for having me so You are a neuroscientist with many diverse interests and several irons in the fire. Maybe you can summarize what you're doing now professionally sure so i've had Sort of strange career of fun adventure. I'm trained as a md and a phd neuroscience. I'm a. I'm an irala gist. And ombu professor. At university of california san francisco where i direct efforts at a research center that i started called neuro scape and what we do is look at the interface between technologies and neuroscience and health then i also have started a couple of companies along the way and including a venture fund all in the same general goal of trying to help improve the function of our brains and frequently through these technology. And you also wrote the book. The distracted mind which covers a lot of ground that. I think. We're going to want to revisit here because this is such a fascinating moment where we are seeing the evidence all around us that our technology is. It's always a two edged sword but it just seems in the information space especially so at the moment. So i mean obviously would not want to give up our connectivity and our our access to the the totality of human knowledge which has been delivered by the internet and smartphones. And the rest of what we've got here but it's so clearly fragmenting. Our lives and it seems rewiring our brains into just different expectations of reward different havoc patterns and they were all a somewhere on a spectrum of pathology and we know that there's no bright line between having a normal mind at a normal brain and having a condition like obsessive compulsive disorder or narcissism amazed. Just these are the we were talking about bell curves and gradients not bright lines here but it does feel like our our use of technology you know actively and passively is pushing us in on direction so i think we'll we'll get into this and then talk about how technology might also be a remedy for all that ails us here. Let's start with information. Mean you you point out in your booklet. We are information seeking creatures. How do you think about our relationship information. No well yeah you know. It's it's interesting. You write a book and you try to make it timely. Obviously in as as you know books take a long time until they eventually come out and you always endanger of it not being relevant anymore. By the time it gets into people's hands and If anything i've seen it become more relevant as you just referred.

san francisco professor university of california
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Welcome to the podcast. This is sam harris. Okay well it has been two weeks since the election and those of you don't spend a lot of time on social media may not be seen how crazy it is out there. All i can say is we appear to be living a very dangerous moment and trump and his enablers in their desperation to hold onto power or making our situation much more dangerous elaborate on something. I tweeted after became obvious. That biden had won the election. This was around november. sixth. I think i wrote. There's a needle that we really must thread. Successfully contempt for trump and his enablers government is a patriotic necessity contempt for seventy million trump. Voters is a serious error. Life is complicated. So i want to spell out a little more because i you people are threading. This needle successfully was attempting to threaten and some people have confused. What i was saying there with people like ao see seeming to for vengeance against trump supporters. She went so far as to encourage people to keep lists of everyone who had supported trump in any capacity. I think it's quite clear that nothing good is waiting for us. Down that path. Over seventy million people voted for trump and there are many reasons for people to have done this or to found that they just couldn't vote for biden and trump is as much a symptom as a cause of the division in our society. Now he's not stolen. He is not hitler. He is a vindictive little con. Man who got plucked out of carnival. Somewhere by mark burnett and put on television for over a decade. Trump is the quintessential american fake. And it's been astounding to watch such a bizarre and insubstantial person accomplish one crazy stage dive after the next because there were millions of upraised hands waiting to catch him and bears wait so there are real social problems at the bottom of all this that we have to address and we won't address any of them by writing off everyone who voted for trump as racist or otherwise irredeemable but there are many people in my circle friends and colleagues and podcast guests who are making the opposite error. Many of them are almost exclusively focused on the problem of the far left and this is causing them to significantly discount the harm the trump has caused and is actively causing our society. Some of these people are trump supporters. But many aren't and they've been taking. The trump teams allegations that the election was stolen through massive voter fraud way too seriously and they're extending the principle of charity to trump and to the rest of his team that is frankly delusional again. There is a needle to thread here and many people don't appear to even see it. Insofar as i've noticed what others in the so-called intellectual dark web have.

trump biden sam harris mark burnett
How To Stay Centered When Youre Skiing Off a Cliff With Angel Collinson

10% Happier with Dan Harris

06:16 min | 1 year ago

How To Stay Centered When Youre Skiing Off a Cliff With Angel Collinson

"Great, to meet you yeah Sundays to meet to shout out to my friend Josh Simpson for mixing our mutual friend Josh MCI totally. Thanks Josh. How did you get into meditation? Well. I was always really interested in Buddhism growing up. I'm not sure why I ski raised at a pretty high level from a young age and I've found that it was just something that I was already doing to clear my mind before competitions. But really what got me into it was when I started doing some more of the quote unquote extreme stuff and also finding my spiritual identity or just the way that I wanted to relate to life in the way that I wanted to find meaning for my own life and I'd heard a lot about meditation and I was dating a boyfriend that helped get me into it and that was about ten years ago. Would your practice look like now? Now, I have a lot of time that I spend on the road and I really liked to use APPs yeah I, really love your up. I also really love Waking Up Sam Harris's up I'm here. I mean he's really good friend and he's a great teacher. Yeah. Both of those are awesome nurtured head space but there's something about the APP that keeps me accountable I. Don't necessarily need it for today practice, but sometimes, it just has more accountability to make me sit down for at least ten minutes every day. But usually I like to do some different sort of breath work and. Short visualization stuff. You know that's really helpful like visualizations, a tool that I use both in my meditation practice when I'm trying to still the crazy chaotic water sometimes that life. Presents us with and you know visualization also like every day in my skiing practice when I'm trying to visualize my lines and stuff I take time in the morning to kind of run through the ideal scenario that my life would like that the run would look like and sometimes it's three minutes and ten minutes sometimes it's forty five, but it's just whatever I can make time for. Okay to use the term line. Yeah. So. What does that mean? So, align basically refers to the run that you ski down the mountain. So what I do is it's called big mountain skiing other people that aren't familiar think of it as extreme skiing, but they get dropped off in helicopters and it's up to us to choose the way down the mountain and. Everyone's second. I'm sorry to interrupt you because you're underplaying this I just watch the videos you you just like casually said, yeah we get dropped off in helicopters like it's no big deal. A helicopter takes you and put you on top of really stand place where nobody's supposed to be like don't even yaks of their. Whatever mount goes nothing. Is like the tip of a sort of a at the top of a mountain but it's kind of like a ridge. It's a running ridge and this line I saw you skiing they dump you out of a helicopter and you ski down and then like there's like a little avalanche following you and you're jumping off rocks. It's crazy. For you. I'm still here. Yes. Don't do it again we'll have to wait. I can't imagine how your parents feel watching this anyway. So you're saying line is they dropped off the helicopter and then you kind of it's actually not a straight line you're skiing down you have to ask you can't. It's not like a well groomed straight line course you're skiing around obstacles Yeah it's pretty challenging art to master because what we do is we fly into the basin of a mountain Rangers Cirque and then all the athletes stand at the bottom and we look up at the face right the mountain face and there's cliffs there's a little sub ridges. There's all these things that you kind of have to get image in your head of how you want to navigate through the obstacles and how you WanNa. Make your unexciting how you're GonNa manage what you just called the avalanche we call it Slough. It's loose moving snow that isn't technically an avalanche, but it can. Sweep you off your feet if you cross under it. So it's this whole navigational plan that you have to make in your head from the bottom. But then when you fly the top get dropped off on top a lot of times, there's blind rollovers you can't actually see the markers and so it's kind of this art form of piecing together. What you thought was that little cliff, the tip of that rock that should be really easy to identify and making share. You know you're fifty feet to the right of that and kind of doing that the hallway down it's yeah, it's exciting. That's one way to. I I watched a video of you and I recommend everybody watch these videos because it's. Just to say somebody. A big mountain skier or an extreme skier does it zero justice? You actually need to see it and we'll put in the show notes. I. Was watching a video of you and you can see exactly what you just described. You're standing there looking at the face of the mountain and you can tell your very concentrated. You're taking it in and it sounds like internally you're visualizing. Go, and then I saw you put abandon over your whole face. Was that part of Leser messing around. Okay. Happens more often than the visualization to be honest. But so you're looking you've been doing this long enough. You've been doing this a pretty a pretty small and you're looking at them. So you you're able to really take in what am I seeing here in is this feasible but then I've also read that you get in the helicopter to go do the thing and sometimes you just referenced it sometimes, you see oh that what looked like a little cliff is actually something different, i? Don't know if there is such thing as a little cliff but anyway and do you ever decide oh? No No, I'm not doing this thing. Yeah. I think that's also where meditation has really helped me because sometimes it's easy to let what you think. You're capable of or what you think. You can accomplish for that day get in the way of the reality of things you know maybe it's the conditions or maybe it's you're not firing on all cylinders or whatever, and being able to back down actually as. People ask you like what's your proudest moment you know and I would say it's times when I stepped away from stuff that I really wanted or knew I was capable of but had to have the self awareness to be like this isn't the day for it and you know we learned the hard way too. That's how you learn how to trust your intuition is. Follow it and things go wrong and then you're like Oh that's what that was trying to tell me

Skiing Josh Simpson Josh Mci Josh Sam Harris Slough Leser
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

05:25 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"At least understand what the issues are. Because the story is still unfolding. There's a new piece of reporting every single Dan something horribly guys are doing, and I very consciously wrote the book is sort of chapter one to put you in a position didn't matter if you know anything about technology tonight is just it's designed to to put you in a good place. And if you know my goal in the. The whole thing in in our conversation. Here is to recognize that we're all imperfect. And I don't think there is a one-size-fits-all thing. I would encourage people don't put your whole life into any of these products. Right. I mean, don't you know, I stopped using Facebook messenger. Right. 'cause I'm just going. I can't give them everything. And I think this notion if you're using Google docs, and g mail. I mean, seriously, it's like you're basically walking naked through the Google plex. And and it's not just you being affected. It's everybody interacts with you. And that that I find you know, that to me those are the things we really have to look at it. And so if you asked me, what scares me from democracy point of view, Facebook, still scares me a lot. But in general, Google scares me much more because they have a big impact on democracy, much less. Well, understood and their impact on everything else is much much greater because they're so big in five G smart devices in there. So big at AI Amazon terrifies me because having been just a monopolist in the old world. They're now making us a conscious move into this surveillance capitalism world with with Alexa, and with their products and with their Ed services. And so, you know, and I worry a lot about Microsoft because they've sort of been able to Daij, you know, be under the radar, and you know, some days I wake up and going with the helmet doing. I'm one guy. I know bunch of really smart people, and we're trying to do this thing. And then I realized that wait a minute. I couldn't get ten people in a room three months ago. And now, my typical book event, I'm going across the country. Now, you know being Portland and Seattle and Austin Nashville, Raleigh, Durham and Toronto and New York City and Miami. I mean, all these different places, I'm calling Baltimore Annapolis. And I'm getting hundreds of people every night. And it's like it's not they're not coming here to see me. They're coming here. Because this is an issue that's on our minds. And and I just happened to be one of the messengers. And so all I know is we can win this thing. I'm really optimistic and was really cool is that this is a problem. So big. That the business opportunity of fixing it is going to reenergize our entrepreneur economy. Like nothing has in twenty five years. And it's going to be amazing because we need to have versions of all of this functionality. That doesn't hurt anybody. Here. We can move fast and break things including Facebook. Well, I'm hoping that the the next step is to move a little slower and not breaking thing. Right. Because I think what it's really about is kind of move slower and repair things. And and you know, I just think that these these are brilliant people. Okay. And I don't think they're bad people. But I do think that the culture they operate in is really deeply deeply flawed in both morally flawed ethically flawed, and and quite obviously, socially flawed. And you know, I just wish that they could find somebody to get the message through because I think Mark and Shera. Will Larry and Sergei are one good night's sleep away from the piffling where they realized that wait a minute. They can't do one percent as much good with a foundation if they could by fixing things they created right? And that's what I really wish for all of them. It's like I get a good night's sleep. Have the piffling be the hero in your own story now as well. As a great place to end lesson Roger has been fascinated, and you are the hero in your own story. And I'm I'm wishing you a very successful book tour this time around so get sleep yourself because I know what book tour looks like. And it can be a beatdown. We'll Sam e you have no idea how much you inspire me. And how much you have influenced me over the years with your writing with the podcast, and it is such a great privilege just to be able to interact with you this way. And you know, I'm still I'm still early in the learning curve and I- everywhere, I go, I meet people who will make me smarter. And all I can tell you you you're one you're one of the first in every day, you're one of the most influential. So thank you for this. if you find this podcast valuable, there are many ways, you can support it you can review it on I tunes or Stitcher or wherever he happened to listen to it. You can share it on social media with your friends, you can blog about it or discuss it on your own podcast, or you can support it directly, and you can do this by subscribing through my website at Sam Harris dot org, and there you'll find subscriber only content like my ass. Manny thing episodes as well as the bonus questions for many of these interviews he'll also get advanced tickets to my live events, you'll find all of these things and more at Sam Harris dot org and thank you for supporting the show listeners. Like, you make it possible.

Facebook Google Sam Harris Dan Alexa Microsoft AI Amazon Manny Portland Daij Annapolis Baltimore Roger Shera Mark Austin Nashville Seattle Larry
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"In Facebook's case across all their platforms three billion Truman shows where each person gets their own world their own set of facts with constant reinforcement where they lure you onto the site with rewards, right? Whether it's notifications or likes to build a habit, and for many people that turns into an addiction. I always ask people people say, oh, I'm not addicted. I go. Okay. Great. When you check your phone first thing in the morning is it. Before UP or while you're peeing because everybody, I know is one of the other, and you know, we're all addicted to some degree. And then once you're coming back regular they have to keep you engaged. And this is the stuff that was not happening until roughly twenty eleven which was this notion of, you know, before twenty eleven what they had to keep people engaged with zinc, right? They had they had social games that was the big driver of usage time before twenty eleven and but what they realized was that appealing to outreach and fear was much more successful than appealing to happiness because one person's joys another person's jealousy. Whereas if you're afraid or outrage, you share stuff in order to make other people also freighter outrage because that just makes you feel better and Tristan had this whole thing figure it out. And you know, we obviously shared that in Washington. And that was you know, an important stimulus. But when I. Think about the problem. There's all that's one piece of it, which is the the manipulation of people's attention for profit and the natural divisiveness of using fear and outrage and filter bubble said isolate people that you know, if if you start out vacs antibac- curious, and they can get you into an anti vaccine group within a year, you're going to be in the streets, fighting vaccination. It's just how it works that cost. It reinforcement makes your position more rigid and makes them more extreme, and we cannot help that it's is about the fundamental. It's not a question of character. Whatever it's about the the most basic evolutionary wiring. I just want to cover this ground again, not to be pedantic. But I do have the sense that there are many people who are skeptical that this is really a problem or there's something fundamentally new about this. I want to just cover a little bit of that ground. Again, you've use this phrase filter bub. A bunch of times if I recall that actually came from ally Peres, Ted talk where many many of us were first made aware of this problem. He might have mentioned Facebook. But I remember him putting it in terms of Google searches where view to Google search for vaccines, and I do one we are not going to get the same. Search results your search history. And all the other things you've done online are getting fed into an algorithm. That is then now dictating what Google decides to show you in any query, you know, and the problem here is that. And I think I think it was Tristan who know either astonishing journal near you might you might correct me here. One of them said just imagine if when any one of us consulted Wikipedia, we got different facts, you know, however, subtly curated to appeal to our proclivities on any topic, we researched there, and there could be no guarantee that you and I would. Be seeing the same facts. That's essentially, the situation we're in on social media and social media is the and and Google, and this is obviously the the majority of anyone's consumption of information at this point. It's actually, and so I if if we take that is one part of the problem. So when ally I talked about filter bubbles, he used both Google and Facebook and showed these examples in how how essentially these companies were pretending to be neutral. When

Google Facebook Tristan Truman Washington Peres Wikipedia Ted
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Most senior people at Facebook and a good friend of mine, and they said, we'll Danna work with you. And he's just saying to me Roger. Were platform. Right. The law says we're not responsible for third parties do because we're not immediate company. And so we, Dan, and I talk numerous times, and then the election happens, and I just go completely ape. And I'm literally the morning after the election. I'm screaming at him that the Russians have tipped the election using Facebook, and he's going. No, no, we're cool because section two thirty of the Communications Decency. Act says we're a platform we're not responsible for third parties. I'm going you're in a trust business. I mean, I'm an investor. I'm your friend. I'm not trying to be hostile here. I'm trying to save you from like killing this business that you gotta do it. Johnson johnson. Did when that guy put poison in bottles of Tylenol, nineteen eighty two in Chicago. Which is they took every bottle of town off the shelf until they could invent and deploy tamper-proof packaging. They defended their customers, even though they didn't put the point. In they weren't technically responsible. And I thought Facebook could Vert a potential disaster into a winning situation by opening up to the investigators and working with their the people used the product understand what had happened and for three months, I begged them to do this. And Finally, I realized they weren't just never going to take it seriously. And that's when I went looking for you know, like I didn't have any data. I mean stand by you know, how hard this is when you're talking to really really smart technical people. You got a lot of data and all I had was thirty five years of spider sense. And. I went shopping for France. And that's when I met Tristan Harris, and that changed everything because I was looking at this as a issue of civil rights and an issue of democracy and shift one hundred sixty minutes, and he's talking about brain hacking, and the use of manipulative techniques, persuasive technology to manipulate attention and create habits that become addictions, and then how that makes people vulnerable and how filter bubbles can be used to create enormous economic value. But at the same time increased polarization undermine democracy, and I had chance to interview him on Bloomberg a couple of days after the sixty minutes thing, and I call him up immediately after the show stow-n-go, dude. Do you need a wing, man? 'cause I'm convinced he's like that messiah of this thing. He's the guy who gets it. And I thought well, maybe I can help him get the message out. And so that's how we came together. So. That was April twenty seventeen and we literally both dropped everything. We're doing and committed ourselves to seeing if we could stimulate a conversation, and it was really clear we were gonna folk some public health 'cause I was I was certain that Tristan's idea was the root cause of the problem. And so that's what we went out to do. And the hilarious thing was he may have told you this, but it began with going to the Ted conference ally. Pariser the man who identified filter bubbles and rotea amazing book about that God Tristan onto the schedule of of the Ted conference two weeks before the conference itself. It was amazing. What he did? Actually, it was Chris Anderson got in touch with me having heard tryst on on this podcast a few weeks before the Ted conference. And that was also part of the story was outstanding. Well, thank you for that. Okay. So I I did not know that piece of it. No, it was super gratifying to see that effect. Because all my guy wanted Tristan's voice amplified. Okay. Well, so then we owe it to you. So I look at this as as so that's really funny because it then that's perfect that explains a lot of things. So anyway, we go to the take convert right? We're thinking thousand people there. We're going to make this theme. Big. Story overnight. Right. We're going to solve this two weeks from the day. We meet we go to Ted, right? He gives us impassioned thing. You've seen the you've seen the tedtalk here. And you know, we go round to collect business cards. I think we came out of there were two right? You're here. You're talking to people whose job depends on not understanding what is all about. Oh my God. It's just it's actually right. And so we're just like completely traumatized because we don't know anybody who's not in tech. And and

Tristan Harris Facebook Dan Ted Roger Johnson johnson Chris Anderson France Chicago Bloomberg two weeks one hundred sixty minutes thirty five years sixty minutes three months
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Welcome to the making sense podcast. This is Sam Harris. Okay. Very short housekeeping here. Many things happening in the news. The Muller report just came in. I think I'll do a podcast on this one. There's real clarity around it uh, get some suitable scholar on. So I will defer that for the moment and just introduced today's guest today. I'm speaking with Roger McNamee Roger has been a Silicon Valley investor for thirty five years. He is co founded successful venture funds, including elevation where he's partnered with U2.'s Bano as a co-founder a whole day BA from Yale an MBA from the tuck business school at Dartmouth. But of relevance today is that he was an adviser to Mark Zuckerberg, very early on and helped recruit Sheryl Sandberg to Facebook. And he is now very energetic critic of the company and many of these platforms, Google Amazon Facebook. Et cetera. We focus on Facebook in particular. We talk about Google to some degree. But this conversation has a very deep look at all that is going wrong with digital media. And how it is subverting tomography making it harder and harder to make sense to one another. It's a growing problem that I've discussed many times on the podcast. But today's episode is an unusually deep dive. So now without further delay. I bring you Roger McNamee. I am here with Roger McNamee Roger thanks for coming on the podcast. Oh Sam what an honor to be here. So I got connected to us through Tristan Harris who who's been on the podcast, and who many people know has been dubbed the conscience of Silicon Valley. And but I also realize another podcast guest. Who I also got through Tristan is another one of your partners in crime Rene Directa who gave us a fairly heroin tour of the Russian influence into our lives through social media and other hacking efforts. So, you know, both of those people, and they have they really been allied with you in your efforts to deal with the problem that we're about to talk about which is just what is happening on our social media platforms with bad incentives and arguably unethical business model. Sales. So as to all to reliably corrupt are public conversation, and you very likely undermine our democracy. So let let's just just start with your background and and house at that. You come to have an opinion. Yeah. And and knowledge to back it up on on this particular problem yet. So Sam I began my career in the tech world professionally in nineteen eighty two. And when I when I was going back to college in nineteen seventy eight I dropped out for a period of time. My brother had given me a Texas Instruments. Speaking spell, you know, the toy for teaching kids how to spell, and it was brand new that year in Hansa to me in Christmas time, nineteen seventy eight and says, you know, if they can make this thing talk with a display and keyboard, you're going to be able to carry around all your personal information device. You can hold in your hand and probably will take that law. So this is one year after the apple two three years before the IBM PC. And I think rough. Seventeen or eighteen years before the palm pilot, he planted that seed in my head, and I couldn't get rid of it. And I spent four years trying to figure out how to become an engineer discovered. I was just terrible at it. And so I got a job being research analyst covering the technology industry, and I ride in Silicon Valley just before the personal computer industry started. And that was one of those moments of just pure dumb luck that can make a career in a lifetime. And in my case it did both. So

Roger McNamee Facebook Sheryl Sandberg Silicon Valley Sam Harris Tristan Harris Google Sam Yale Muller Sam I engineer apple Mark Zuckerberg research analyst Rene Directa heroin
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

10:28 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Ho Kay. Well, that was fun. I really enjoyed that. After listening to that audio. I realized that I have a lesson on the waking up app that clarifies a few points. I was making in the QNA section of that event. So I'm going to include that here this Nana guided meditation, this is a short talk on a related topic. And in this case, the topic is the mystery of being and is only if you want more information on the waking up course, he can find that at waking up dot com. Of all the solar systems in this universe that might sustain complex life. We find ourselves in this one. It took billions of years of evolution on this earth to produce the people we now, our our brains and bodies have evolved through millions of generations reaching back to creatures. Totally unlike us to animals, so strange that we wouldn't even want them as pets and finally to single celled organisms. For ages the world got on without us. But now, we're here, and among all the possible people that could exist we are among the tiny minority that actually do and all the periods in human history where we might have appeared we live in this one. Arguably the first in which it was possible to understand our circumstance in a truly universal sense for the first time a person's view of the world need not be dictated by the mere location of his birth. Or the religion of his parents for the first time, the barriers of language geography have totally fallen away. At this moment, you have instantaneous access to more information that even the greatest scholar a world leader did a generation ago, and yet on some level, we confront the same mystery of our existence that Socrates where the Buddha faced the fact that you are you the fact that you exist in this moment, here's a miracle of. Sorts. There's something fundamentally inexplicable about it. There's no mount of knowledge that seems adequate to dispel the mystery of our appearance here, and whatever, you know, whatever you believe, whatever you have done or hope to do you have this moment of conscious life to contemplate you have this minute this hour this day, and it will never come again. So wanna talk for a few minutes about the intrinsic mystery of this circumstance. It really is the mystery of being in science and philosophy. We often claim that we're in the business of getting rid of mysteries. And there is of course, a sense in which that's true. If we don't know why people are getting sick, for instance. And we discover the virus that's causing it will then the mystery has been solved, but there's another sense in which mystery never recedes. And if you pay attention, you can see that it's an ever-present fact of even the most well understood phenomena, the philosopher Bertrand Russell described are most rudimentary knowledge of the world as knowledge by acquaintance. For instance, the color of a table standing before you and here's a quote. The particular shade of color that I'm seeing may have many things said about it. I might say that it is Brown that is rather dark and so on but such statements, though, they make me no truths about the color. Do not make me know the color itself any better than I did before so far as concerns the knowledge of the color itself as opposed to knowledge of truth about it. I know the color perfectly and completely when I see it. And no further knowledge of it is even theoretically possible, thus the sense data, which make up the appearance of my table or things with which I have acquaintance and things immediately known to me just as they are in quote. Now, what Russell seems to overlook here is that this basic knowledge to which no knowledge can even be theoretically added is a place where we uncover an intrinsic limit to understanding when we consider any facet of experience in this case, a vision of color, if we can then stem, the tide of our thoughts long enough to merely observe it. As it is the fact that we're in total ignorance of what it is can become obvious. What is the color blue not as a function of wavelength of light or neuro physiology? But as it is directly perceived. We're really left with nothing to say. But that it's blue, which of course, does nothing to clarify things. In fact, is not even blue which is just a word. It's a noise we're making what we see before us as whatever it inevitably is. Focusing on this distance between concepts and experience is a means of sneaking up on a truth is generally described in Buddhism as the truth of emptiness, the idea that no thing has intrinsic independent existence in the way that it seems now there are many ways to come at this insight into emptiness. And frankly, this line of inquiry may be too steep for some of you at this point. So I encourage you to return to it after you have more experience in the practice of meditation, but it is worth reflecting on even in the beginning. The moment was suspend the conceptual associations. We have with a given object or perception our knowledge about it. Our direct experience of it can grade into this experience of just pure mystery were left with this wordless intuition of consciousness and its contents about which nothing more really can be said right now as you listen to me, speak, pay careful attention to the. The process of listening the feeling of sitting in your chair look closely at everything around you. I'd like to suggest that while, you know, many things about the present moment, you do not know what anything in itself is. Look at your hand. What is it? We can define this part of your body in language. You can call it hand, you can consider the fact that it's made of bone and muscle and threaded with blood vessels nerves. But this is only a description about the object that you're now looking at if you simply look at your hand and ask yourself, what is it? You might realize in a moment of rare open-mindedness. That it is an absolute mystery. It is in fact as mysterious appearance as any you could ever hope to find. Now, there are scientific arguments that can be a raid against the mysterious -ness of any object, but can point to the fact that the atoms in your hand were born billions of years ago in the belly of a store, and in fact, some of these atoms may have inhabited several stars in succession is even possible that some atoms that were once in the bodies of historical figures like Churchill or Cleopatra are now in you. In fact, it might be descriptively true to implicate the entire universe in your hand or in any objects being what it is. But no such litany of concepts or connections can account for the mystery that looms whenever you just look at something closely. Anything however, commonplace and realized that while you might have volumes of knowledge about it. You don't have the slightest understanding of what it is in itself. No, others have noticed. This fact, Walter Benjamin the German literary critic stumbled upon this mystery Marseille after smoking has Sheesh for the first time, he distilled in the phrase, how things withstand the gays. And all things really do withstand the gays we confront the mystery of being in every moment, but we don't notice it because this mystery is tiled over with concepts. Now, meditation isn't about understanding things conceptually is the ability to experience things more clearly prior to concepts. It is the knowledge by acquaintance that Russell spoke of here. Take into the ultimate degree. And the more you practice it. You'll find that it really is a new form of intelligence it leads to another way of being in the world and one that can allow for kind of psychological freedom that a continuous entanglement with concepts doesn't. There's a famous parable from the Buddha meant to get at this difference Amana struck in the chest with a poison arrow and a surgeon Russia's to assigned to begin the work of saving his life. But the man resists the first wants to know the name of the Fletcher who fashioned the arrows shaft and the type of wood from which it was cut and the motive of the man who shot it in the name of the horse upon which he wrote in a thousand other things that have no bearing at all upon its present suffering or limit survival. So this man needs to get his priorities straight his commitment thinking about the world results from a basic misunderstanding of his predicament. And then we may be only dimly aware of it. We to have problems that will not be solved by more thinking. if you find this podcast valuable, there are many ways, you can support it you can review it on I tunes or Stitcher or wherever he happened to listen to it. You can share it on social media with your friends, you can blog about it or discuss it on your own podcast or you can support it directly, and you can do this by subscribing through my website at Sam Harris dot org. And there you'll find subscriber only content like my ask me anything episodes as well. As the bonus questions from many of these interviews, he'll also get advanced tickets to my live events, you'll find all of these things and more at Sam Harris dot org and thank you for supporting the show listeners. Like, you make it possible.

Bertrand Russell Sam Harris ho Kay Nana Buddha Amana Walter Benjamin Brown Russia Marseille Cleopatra Churchill
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

07:43 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Balls, and we have we have been reaching into. This earn rather compulsively low these millennia pulling out either white or gray balls and the white balls are inventions pieces of technology, memes, cultural norms institutions that have no real downside. Right. These just make our lives better and the gray balls are inventions. And they're like that have benefits and costs. Right. So being able to split the atom is one right? You like can produce energy, but it can produce bombs and waste when you produce energy. And so their their goods in harm's that come from these inventions what he answers to consider is that that there's a black ball or perhaps many black balls in the urn of invention. And we just haven't pulled one out yet. And a black ball is a technology, which is synonymous with the end of civilization. Right. And he goes into great detail about what what sort of thing, this might be and what we would need to do to stabilize civilization in the face of this possibility. And so the first thing you're asked to acknowledge that seems rather plausible that there is a black ball or two in the earn of invention. Right. There are things we could discover that we can't undiscovered that could spell are doom because it becomes so easy for one deranged person to destroy the. The lives of millions or billions. So what one example is that he calls it the easy nukes case. I mean, just imagine if it were just a fact of nature that split in the atom is much easier than that. In fact, is and it turns out it only took taking two pieces of glass and a magnet and running some electric current through it, and then you've got an atom bomb right now if it were that easy to make an atom bomb one in a million people would make one more or less every day of the week. And we would just see cities going up in mushroom clouds, right? It would be the end of civilization if it were that easy to make an atom bomb. So we're just lucky that it's hard enough to refine the fuel and to build bombs, certainly large bombs if climate change were going to be much worse than it seems likely to be if we're if we were talking about at twenty degrees centigrade rise in temperature over the course of the next fifty years unless we got our act together. It just may. In fact, be the case. We can't get our act together in the face of that risk. And we're done for right? So we're we're relying on luck in many many places. So what the punchline of this essay is that the only scenario whereby we can actually deal with this risk and respond to it. Should it? Come to pass a mission, we realized or should we have the time to realize that we have pulled a black ball from the urn is to have what he calls a state of turnkey totalitarianism, and hyper technological surveillance obviously enabled by some AI that we have not yet built. But he's imagining us surveilling one another at all times in as reasonable way as possible with the data anonymous and all the ways we would want an anonymous, but basically to deliver a system where we could intrude on your behavior very very quickly. Minority report style where we you know, there's an AI at every moment of the day watching what you're doing with your hands right in a world that has pulled the black ball. If it is trivial easy for anyone in this room to weaponize the flu of nineteen eighteen because all the data's out. And you've got something on your desktop that can do it. Right. And we can't unin vent. This thing. Then we need to know what you're doing with your hands. So the net result of this essay for I'm going to have Nick on the podcasts at some point. But the net result of this essays to suddenly make me open minded to something which if described in the absence of having considered the earn of invention, and some of these examples sounds like just the most dystopia and horror show imaginable. Perfect surveillance and inability to turn onto a Taliban ISM at a moment's notice. How could that be at all desirable? It becomes at least potentially desirable. If you grant that it may in fact, be the only stable state for civilization. In light of what we're currently doing. And what we're currently doing is just reaching into the earn and pulling things out as fast as we can without giving any thought really to what's going on. So anyway, that was a very long answer to question you almost asked. Thank you. Thank you. So Sam I recognize that free will is fake. And in the first few pages of waking up, you kind of put words to conviction. I had already held when you talked about doing and DMA with a friend, and how it made you realize that you might as well have just been him. We make choices, but we have no choice as to which choices we'll make. So it's more. It's not as accurate to say, we're constructing the cosmos than it is to say, we are written Issing, the cosmos, a body is like a c- innovator and your seats simply determines the angle from which you experienced the universe. So whether you're experiencing existence as Sam Harris or Kim Kardashian. There is a Sam Harris out there doing humanity. The good that's a Sam Harris. Does we might not want to use those specific people as Zampa because you haven't really. Complained about being you. But let's imagine a person who just does whatever she thinks will help others and just really always feels and never accustomed to the sheer personal pain that comes with never doing what gives her pleasure and always soccer facing for others and the joy in causing others. Happiness, never manages to outweigh all this for her. So she goes to her grave having had a terrible time here, so that's a unpleasant life. But it's a great thing that people have lifted my question to you is what you live her life or life where you just get whatever you want and the awesomeness of what you get all these scales. With exactly where how spoiled you are in any given moment, so you'd never bored and you never get burdened by guilt. From the fact that you're dragging everyone down. So keep in mind that no matter what you pick both lives happen. Feeling the burden of three thousand people bore into my skull with their impatient. Gaze at the moment. So I let me let me summarize the question. I think you just have. But thank you. It was it was a good one. The the issue here is that actually there's a name for the first condition you describe which is I don't know how current it is in the literature, but some psychologists have talked about pathological tourism. Right. So that we have we have our truism, which is great. And we want more of it we, but we can there are people who are so self sacrificing that it seems like a symptom of depression. Right. I mean, there are people who have been those. I think it was a New Yorker profile on a guy who he's I'm sure he's even more. He's more famous than my forgetting his name indicates, but he wanted to be essentially a compulsive organ donor like he gave away one kidney. He was giving away. Whatever he could give away and then a certain point Dr stopped him, and

Sam Harris Taliban Zampa soccer Nick Dr c- innovator Issing Kim Kardashian twenty degrees fifty years
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

08:53 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Welcome to the making sense podcast. This is Sam Harris. Okay. Very brief housekeeping today once again, just a reminder that if you're using the waking up your reviews and feedback are greatly appreciated please put reviews in the app store, and please send detailed feedback. Whether it's feature requests or bug reports. Directly to us at info at waking up dot com. And again, all of that is super helpful. Okay. Well, today, I'm bringing you the audio from my live event with Danny conman at the beacon theater in New York a couple of weeks back. This was a sold out event in a very cool old theater. I've actually never been to the beacon before, but it has a storied history and music and comedy. Anyway, it was a great pleasure to share the stage with Danny Daniel, conman, as you may know is new Merida's professor of psychology at Princeton University and also meritous professor of public affairs at Princeton's, Woodrow Wilson school of public, and international affairs. He received the Nobel prize and economics in two thousand and two for the work. He did on decision making under uncertainty with Amos Turkey. Unfortunately, I died in nineteen ninety six and he was a legendary figure who would have certainly shared the Nobel prize with Danny had he lived longer. They don't give the Nobel pasta. Mostly indicates I think it's uncontroversial to say that Danny has been the most influential living psychologist for many years now, but he's perhaps best known in the general public for his book thinking fast and slow which summarizes much of the work. He did with Turkey. Michael lewis. Also recently wrote a biography of the conman Turkey collaboration and that is called the undoing project anyway, Danny, and I covered a lot of ground the beacon. We discuss the replication crisis and science systems one and two which is to say automatic and unconscious cognitive processes and more conscious and deliberate of ones we talk about the failure of intuition, even expert intuition, the power of framing moral allusions anticipated regret, the asymmetry between threats and opportunities utility of worry. Being removing obstacles to wanted behaviors the remembering self versus the experience himself improving the quality of gossip and many other topics. Anyway, Danny has a fascinating mind. And I think you'll find this very good introduction to his thinking. Of course, if you want more his book thinking fast and slow also awaits you. If you haven't read it, and now, I bring you Daniel common. Well, well, thank you all for coming really an honor to be here. It's a Dan has a special honored to be here with us. Thank you for coming. It is. It's it's often said and rarely true that against needs no introduction. But in your case that is virtually true. But we're going to talk about your work throughout so people will if if the for the one person who doesn't know who you are you will understand that they have the end of the hour, but I guess by way of introduction. I just want to ask. But what what is the worst thing about winning the Nobel prize? Question actually. Many downsides to it. Okay. Well, nobody wants to hear your problems down. So how would you how do you think about your body of work? How do you summarize the intellectual problems you have tried to get your hands around? No, it's been just a series of problems that occurred that they worked on. There was no big program when you look back. I mean, you see patterns, and you see I is that had been with you for a long time. But there was really no plan. I was you know, it's you follow. You follow things. You follow ideas? You follow things that take a fancy to really. That's a story of intellectual life. It's just web thing after another judging from outside, it seems to me that you have told us much of what we now think we know about cognitive bias and cognitive illusion. And really the the the picture is of human ignorance having a kind of structure, it's not it's not just that. We get things wrong. We get things reliably wrong. And because of that whole groups who are markets society is going to get things wrong because the error is don't. Cancel themselves out me bios becomes systematic. And that is obviously has implications that are that touch more or less everything we care about. Let's just want to track through your work as presented in in your now famous and well read book thinking fast and slow, and I just want to try to tease out what should be significant for all of us at this moment because human unreason, unfortunately becomes more and more relevant. It seems and we don't get over these problems. And I I wanted just to to begin ask you about they problem that's very close to home. Now, what is called the replication crisis or reproducibility crisis in science in particular, social sciences, and in particular psychology, and for those in the room or not aware of what has happened, and how dire the seems it seems that when you go back to even some of the most celebrated studies in psychology there reproducibility is on the. Order of fifty sixty percent in the best case. So there was one study done in that took twenty one paper is from nature and science, which are the most highly regarded journals and reproduced only thirteen of them. And so let's let's talk about the problem we face in even doing science in the first place. Well, you know, the the key problem. And the reason that's had this happens is that Lisa is expensive and it's expensive personally on it's expensive in terms of money. And so you wanted to succeed. So when you're a researcher, you know, what you want to find and and that creates biases that are not fully aware of. And I think a lot of those assembly self-delusion that is you know, there is a concept that's known as be hacking, which is people then me, honestly, deluding themselves about what they. Find and there are several tricks of the trade that people know about them, you're going to do an experiment. So instead of having one dependent variable where you predict the outcome. You think two dependent variables. And then if one of them doesn't work your sleigh with the one that does go. You do that and things like that a few times, then it's almost guaranteed that your research would not be replicable. And that happens. It was discovered in medicine, and it's more emboldened in medicine than it is in psychology. Somebody famously said that most published research in medicine if false fear amount of of public psychological research is false to even some of the most celebrated results in psychology like priming and the marshmallow test. And in the. Yeah. Probably. It's actually they get celebrated in part because because they're surprising. And the rule is, you know, the most apprising the result is the less likely. It is to be true. And so that's how celebrated results didn't get to be non replicable. Right. Well, and the scariest thing I heard I don't know how robust this study was. But someone did a study on trying to replicate unpublished studies and found they replicated better than published. Studies. Did you hear this? I don't think that's applicable.

Danny Daniel Nobel prize Turkey Sam Harris professor of psychology Amos Turkey Woodrow Wilson school of publi New York Michael lewis Princeton University Dan Merida professor Princeton researcher Lisa fifty sixty percent
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Well, that's not it's nothing that my colleagues, and I have been talking about. But we've been promoting this for a long time. Why can't we, you know, tax credits tuition vouchers contribution to a 4._0._1._K account for a potential donor stranger donor, or you know, here's fifty thousand that you could give to charity. You know? The idea is to not make the donor excuse me, the recipient the one who has to buy it make the effectively the government or some third party the purchaser. I say that with scattered quotes around it. So that everyone needs a kidney would be eligible not just people can afford it. And for the potential donors. You know, you'd build in a probably a year long waiting period. Because what what don't what's what's the worst thing that can happen is is is someone who is desperately poor rushing into this kind of thing. And then regretting it. Someone porn sick rushing into it is never going to get through the clinical screening. So we have to worry about that is just because they'll be ruled out as donor because they're not healthy enough. But someone you know, desperate who's running rushing into this. You don't want because you don't want anyone regretting it would be awful. She regretted giving a kidney afterwards. So you build in a waiting period and lots of education. What's clearly informed consent? And you know, that's basically the plan you could have an income floor. So that I don't prove that I don't wanna discriminate as poor people who would like to who would like to receive some sort of incentive for help saving someone's life. But that's one model. But anyway, these are the kind of plans we we've written about we've we've talked about and I've run up against the institution called bio f. Mix I found that not all of them. But mainstream bioethics is very hostile to this idea. And it it's been it's been a good fight. But what what's the best argument you hear from bioethics against this position. Well, there are two arguments. There's the Leon cat and Michael Sandel kind of argument, which is the arguments from corruption which are basically is wrong. It's just wrong. The body should be inviolate. You should commodified the body. I'm sorry. I can't say this with strata voices. I'd like because I so contemptuous of it. But that's what they will say while I can't speak for San Dell on this point. But this is Leon cast who thinks there's a moral dimension to the sacrilege of licking ice cream off an ice cream cone, you knows that the cat like tongue in of the cone represents some kind of desecration of traditional values or the degeneracy in the public space. You know, he's got discussed issues. And a very active and Tyrian Salau would imagine. They may be part of it refines degrading. I have to say in fairness that Leon with my colleague here in eight. Yeah. I and he lovely man, a beautiful writer and someone who really will engage with anyone, and we so we've we've very very politely disagreed, and I disagree with him profoundly on this because it matters more than eating ice cream my God. And you're right. So the arguments from corruption boil down to even though no one is harmed..

Leon Michael Sandel Tyrian Salau San Dell writer
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"So it was it's history is that it is kind of a hybrid of of a clinical phenomenon and a political statement because it was largely it was promoted most vigorously by antiwar psychiatrists itself. Avowed anti-war psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton Higham ship town. I believe it was a psychoanalyst and also some feminists. So it was partly put kind of enshrined as an official diagnosis of tomorrow. The how dangerous war could be as a social phenomenon. Also, how dangerous domestic violence can be to women, and that's not legitimate from a social social you. We know that. But it also just saying it helped propel it into the. Sam. But it's also a very legitimate clinical condition as well. But what would tend to happen at the VA was that everyone who had been in war with everyone who had been in Vietnam. What ever be fell them when they came back whenever they were suffering with struggling with when they came back was immediately attributed. It was almost like there was before. And after your life was completely telescoped. There was life before this event and after this event and everything that happened to you afterwards. Everything you did afterwards was then seen in the light of your works -perience, which is which is as bad as seeing everything a light of identity politics because again, that's not necessarily true for everyone. And and so that was that was highly problematic. We'd have people who, you know, had had trot problems had nothing to do with their war experience. But again was seen through that limbs, they then they weren't courage. They were given the diagnosis. They were. Encouraged to get disability. They then on the disability that took them payments that took them out of the workforce, which and you know, work is one of the best therapies there is it's socializing. It's organizing, it's you know, if you don't work, you're confidence arose your skills atrophy on it. It's a sense of purpose. It's modeling for your children. It's almost everything. And it took these guys out of the workforce. And it was so everyone meant well. But it was so so poisonous so p PTSD got to be very problematic as as a diagnosis at the VA at that time and remember in the Vietnam war only fifteen percent of all men, so calm. I keep saying men just because obviously the fighting forces were men, but only fifteen percents combat when a nightmare for the fifteen percent most of them. But and and then another percentage were in dangerous jobs like driving. A truck was dangerous. You could be ambushed. You could drive overnight you date. So I'd say that was the kind of job that could put one it was for post traumatic stress disorder, but not on our patients and met some of them weren't even in the war. You know, they were Vietnam era, but but we all caught up in the primacy of post traumatic stress disorder and how did warped people's lives. And sometimes it did there's no question about that. But then the last thing he wanted to do is get people to cycle of invalid ISM, which you just reinforce with payments because again, they leave the workforce. So I mean, hopefully, the VA now when hopes the VA is considering a situation where they would begin to separate the clinical. They have to let me back on let me back up a tiny bit. You could walk into a VA, and you can still do this and say, I think I should be on disability. They will use. That call the veterans benefits administration as opposed to the veterans health administration and all render the Veterans Administration and the veterans health administration is very separate from the veteran's benefit administration. So you could walk in you could that they will have you seen clinician, but it's a sectional exam. Frankly, you can look up PTSD in the DSM. So you know, what to say, and or or let's take a case where someone truly does have PTSD just probably more common than someone faking it, although that is that is an issue V8. grapples with but some poor man or woman who was in a horrible situation, and is very fragile and thinks they you know, doesn't see a future for themselves thinks they'll always be psychologically, crippled comes to disability agent and says I you know, I can't function..

Veterans Administration PTSD Vietnam Robert Jay Lifton Higham official Sam DSM fifteen percent
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"So I try to do a local tenants thing and never it just Deloitte, just six never worked, and I kind of gave up, but then I actually contacted JD Vance who would hillbilly allergy. And and I said is there some place in Ohio that basically could use a psychiatrist for a year who's interested in helping we with the addiction situation or general psychiatry general psychiatry as well. And he found this wonderful town. And so I've been there since September. So that yeah. So I I wanted to be of course, it just wanted to be helpful because I know there's such a lack of manpower, although they have been doing quite well with their nurse practitioners. Some telemedicine there should be more telemedicine. But some I've met some excellent counselors they are so haven't pressed with their little workforce. But I'm also very interested in the sociology of the town. And in fact, that's kind of intrigued me even more after say of, you know, grow grew up in New York. I was always that. I I went to school at Cornell. That's a small town with the school empties out. But it's it's very urban in a sense as a microcosm because it's a major university. So I've never really lived in a small town. And it's it's it's, you know, can imagine this extreme it's very different. There's gotta be Trump country. Right. Very much. Yeah. And highly religious, I I'm actually Jewish atheist which I I've become best friends with these Baptist couple. And so I've gone to church more in, you know, for months I had ever well never gone to church before. And because I'm so fascinated by this. I. Personally can't quite grasp the dynamics of belief for myself. But it is so so deeply so profoundly if they're both their life in my other friend is my other good friend that I've met is a pyschopath Lian, Reverend wonderful woman in her seventies highly vital. I think a little left of center sentiments seem to be that. And so I'm just trying to grasp this, but they're wonderful people. And and so that is so I think we're that fits in to my experience clinically or in the clinical domain is that some people who are doing the treatment, and who are running the social services member the scale here small of the people here are so they're so dedicated I I'm some touched by it. And and a lot of them seed is a calling and autumn see themselves as servants. And I mean in that biblical and just doing magnificent work, and I come back on beaten DC this week. And I just went to our methadone clinics. I love our staff to death here. But the the just so different in the midst of this DC bureaucracy, which is enough to make you use heroin. I made it's just it's just horrific the turnover in the clinic is so high the micromanagement from the DC government is ridiculous Medicaid rule. Some of them are ridiculous. And and down there. They know they're nimble enough to to get through the bureaucracy when it exists at the federal level because there is there is Medicaid and they've made their own bureaucracy, which is pretty damn flat and the main institution that I'm working with is call the community action organization L tell you when I first heard of and I thought, oh, that's that's nice. It's a coalition of you know, social service agencies, but it turns out. That the community action organization or the community action. Programme was a an integral part of the war on poverty and in nineteen sixty four LBJ was very devoted to that program. And the idea I mean in one exists in every county in the country was anti-poverty effort it failed miserably failed miserably in the urban settings within about two years. He walked away from it because it got so politicized. It's it's it's main virtue was supposed to be local involvement, and in the big cities that turned into a racial was a lottery tension it turned into a social Justice project and the mayors were highly resentful of of folks getting so much power. But in this small town, and I think in other small towns, it didn't work that well either, but not because of the inner city dynamics, but but in iron ten Ohio, it's a triumph, and and I've just lucky enough to be working..

Deloitte JD Vance Ohio DC government DC New York LBJ Cornell methadone heroin two years
Kids and Tech: Tips for Parents in the Digital Age

Making Sense with Sam Harris

01:54 min | 3 years ago

Kids and Tech: Tips for Parents in the Digital Age

"But but Kraft is something that tries to help. Parents kind of walk a line between this you know, we try. Not to abandon you. We want you to know always here. But it's listen, you know, a lot of parents do that in it works. I mean, it appears to say you're punished of you're not having your cell phone, but we don't see those kids and those who the kid know those kids, you know, comply. He tried as best you can try to try if you can to change the social network that your child is with it's so hard to you know, once parents get into a cycle with children were the resentful and they're on. And maybe they have good reason to be resentful. Maybe they've had difficulties at home, but they can't break through to them. Try to enlist some other family member who may seem to have a better reputation that reputation I made a better relationship with them. Or is this all very very difficult. I wish I could give you a prescription. I feel like I'm rambling here bet. It's just not always good to get the Alaska. It's hard. It's really hard and one of the things that. God bless these mothers are so many now mothers who are lost their kids, and they are on call for these parents. They are cold for family members Beth Macy wrote a book called dope. Sick. Questions about the way, she sometimes described the disease process, but she captured brilliantly devastating this for families. And how it's mobilized so many parents there's a group called shatterproof that I don't think they're finished yet. But they are about to have a report card on the quality of these treatment programs because some of them are not as good as others. But I'm sure people could be in touch with them and and get advice. So there are there. You know, there are these possible options for getting advice, but it's very tough.

Kraft Beth Macy Alaska
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"You know, that of course, reminds me of one of the number of mantras in the addiction world these days in one is we can't arrest our way out of this. And and I prefer to say we can incarcerate our way out of this. I I see no value incarceration. But when someone commits a crime, of course, not a violent crime, but a crime, you know, their citizens to and they've wrong someone, and they are in the criminal Justice system. Mm-hmm. But I believe than we do everything in our power to divert them may. That's the word a diversion means to they're not going to jail or not adjudicated the traditional way, but go to a treatment program. So these are court ordered treatment programs, and with usually what the carrot at the end of expunging the record and people can usually get their records expunged, especially if they know about it, if the if the program doesn't do it automatically, and you know, when this is done, well, it can be quite -ffective. You have the leverage of the judge. These are judges who were very involved they meet every week. They're almost they have therapeutic than Taliban some of them. In fact, these are called problem solving courts. And and they use that they take advantage of the virtues of a sanctions and incentives, and it really is a page out of behave. One on one with swift certain, but not severe consequences. So if someone does for example, you know, hand in a urine, that's that's has drugs in it. There will be some sort of consequence it won't be severe. And it'll be immediate and people are quite responsive to that. And it seems to work. I mean, the theory that it works better for people who aren't stimulants. There is a was as a program called the Hawaii opportunity probation enforcement program operation hope and it started in the gosh, the mid two thousands. I think with the drug court judge whose caseload docket where it was almost exclusively methamphetamine users. And he had extremely good results. His his probation officers were trained in in relapse prevention therapy, and he met with these people, and he was very interested in their lives, and it's very moving to hear their their exchanges. These judges are. Really devoted to these folks. And his results are very good. Now, we're waiting for good results on on drug courts now that deal with opioid addicts. And I don't know how I mean. We're still waiting. There's a lot of variation in these courts how good the judges how attentive he is how the timeliness with which these incentives and sanctions are applied. And that's so important for behavior shaping, you know, as you know, but these can change people's lives being getting arrested for something then being in these these these drug courts, so I think the criminal Justice system has an enormous role to play here. But but through the lens, hopefully, you know, leveraged as a form of therapeutic intervention has opposed to pure punitive. Do you recommend friends and family members who perform interventions follow a similar logic? Is there the the analog to a swift and certain consequence there are a carrot and stick approach to behavior modification, and how what are the dynamics there it so well, let me just mention for people who are really interested in this look up Kraft K have me see..

Taliban Kraft K methamphetamine Hawaii
"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"sam harris" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"It's it's obviously a precursor to over simplification, and when you're in the clinical world in policy world, that's usually a recipe for a bad policy. And it's also a a recipe for politicization because it can fall it can foster victim narrative because someone if there is a certain level explanation that can be traced back to a perpetrator, then it becomes a victim narrative and anytime again, there's someone to blame. And in the case of of the opioid crisis much. There's been much focus on of course, the pharmaceutical companies, and I do think they bear some responsibility. Don't get me wrong. But it also is very much fits into two litigating. So, but of course, as a clinician I most concerned with how it how it may undermine the best kind of care so pretty much everything I've written about. Yeah. It it goes to these kinds of oversimplifications and what's being left out. Now, we have to be more nuanced run Priscilla, let's start with addiction because there's obviously an enormous problem and many people listen to this pod. Gas will either have some firsthand experience with it themselves or know somebody suffering with some version of it. What should we understand about addiction at this point, shall I should reference another podcasts, I did which I don't know? You may have heard do, you know, Johann Hari the journalists? So he's written a couple of books at one on the war on drugs and addiction chasing, the scream and other of depression. Yeah. Loss connections. Yeah. You know, he came on the podcast. And can you know, he he's a yeah. He's a great speaker and very interesting guy. But you know, he's taken a line through both of those topics that seems to deemphasize the role of biochemistry, and, you know, the disease models certainly of addiction and puts the blame for more on the lack of meaning and lack of connectedness that someone may experience in their life, and he draws. A lot of motivation from a few experiments one is famously described as his the rat park experiment, which as you probably know about so in the aftermath of that podcast. I received some angry pushback from people who didn't like that line at all. And at EMI in in you'll haunts defense. He doesn't actually discount the role of biochemistry. But if you get him talking, he can certainly seemed to my one question off, the top is is there much daylight between your view of addiction and the one he's putting forward, and whatever your view is. What do you think people should understand at this moment about a little daylight? I I agree with you. I think when could walk away from his excellent work. I admire him very much, but you could walk away from that with a perhaps an undue emphasis on the the cultural, social, psychological dimensions. However, I think that. Refresh say my profession or the addiction field has over medical is to diction. And I I don't say that as as someone who is not in thrall to the technology of brain imaging. But I think we have I think we have over medical is it to the point where we put too much emphasis on the I'll call them anti-addiction medications people call it m a t and I'm referring there to methadone buprenorphine. And then there's another medication now trick zone which is an opioid blocker. These are all excellent medications, and I use them every day. I'm an prescribed them, and it occasionally there is a patient who gets on methadone, and I would say he would fit the classic medical model, which is to say that addiction is something almost imposed on you, even we call it a person with substance use disorder, and I realized in medicine we have to we have to give things shorthand names. But he I even cringe sometimes when I hear that because it makes it sound as if it's something that happened to you and addiction is is a very intricate, and and deeply personal kind of affliction. So for example, basically, I see things on a large spectrum..

methadone Johann Hari Priscilla EMI buprenorphine
High profile creators leave Patreon

podnews

02:18 min | 3 years ago

High profile creators leave Patreon

"Patriot a crowd funding platform used by many podcasters has removed a number of far-right creators, including Milo Yannopoulos and Cal Benjamin youtuber better known as Sargon of Akkad for what patriot claims is hate speech. However Sam Harris host of the waking up podcast one of the top grossing patriot creators has deleted his account in response accusing the company of political bias and other patriot creators, Dave Rubin and Jordan Peterson have promised to build an alternative platform, quote that will not be susceptible to arbitrary censorship. There are reports of many patriot supporters leaving the platform in protest, if you're one of them and you'd like us to Bill you directly we've worked out an alternative if you want it, please let us know. Updates at pod news dot net. And we'll sort that yesterday. We reported that apple podcasts has mysteriously removed many reviews and ratings from their service those that contacted us. Reported losing around half their ratings and reviews issues was seen throughout the whole app. Store. Not just for podcasts. Some noted that review removals were seemingly at random and not related to a purge on automated or spammy reviews at time of going to press podcasters report that their ratings are back to normal. And are they actually important to you need ratings and reviews to get into the what's hot section in apple podcasts. Daniel j Lewis has been checking the data, and he knows the answer. You'll find it linked from the show notes Jew under what Adam curry, thanks have NPR's RAD podcast analytic service. Do have the gall to say, we won't know who you are. When this takes place is just a lie of epic proportions life, she addresses as you can feel it. You'll know what phone you have this more in his podcast. Meanwhile, surprisingly to many pocket costs have confirmed that they have no plans to include rat in their roadmap the podcast app. His part-owned by. NPR TNT in cadence thirteen launching a companion podcast to crime television drama. I am the night the podcast called root of evil will be eight episodes focusing on the real story and real people behind the dramatized crime series, and resonate recordings. Have added a tutorial on how to use audacity feel podcast

Apple NPR Milo Yannopoulos Daniel J Lewis Dave Rubin Sam Harris Jordan Peterson Adam Curry Cal Benjamin Bill TNT
What is the difference between sex and gender?

Waking Up with Sam Harris

05:15 min | 4 years ago

What is the difference between sex and gender?

Mardi Hazelton Marty Mardi Hazelton Mardi Mardi Professor Of Psychology Ucla Mari Hazelton Ian Biological Google Lucian Researcher Lucien Subsumes