24 Burst results for "Sam Harnett"

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Inland. Good morning. It's now 5 51. This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Lily Jamali. Latino voters overwhelmingly supported Joe Biden for the presidency. But a growing share of Latinos voted for President Donald Trump nationwide and here in California. That's according to an election Eve poll of more than 5000 Latinos. Across the U. S. Is Farida Javal a. Romero reports David Hernandez, a 72. He was born and raised in L A and chairs the Los Angeles Hispanic Republican Club. He says he voted for Donald Trump because he was the better candidate for the economy. Fiscal policies and prosperity over the past Mama's four years that it's really been a deciding factor, he says. Many Latinos working industries hard head by covert 19. Like construction and the restaurant industry. And he says Latino Trump supporters agree with the president's push to reopen the economy faster. Well, there is a concern over the disease itself. There is a more immediate concern that they're not going to be able to pay their rant that they're not going to be able to take care of their families. We won't have a full picture of how Latinos voted for a couple of months. But the American Election Eve poll gives a glimpse it found that 16% of California Latinos supported Trump in 2016. This year. It was 22% Holster. Gary Segura of Latino Decisions, says Democrats didn't do enough to engage with thes voters there. Wass et les outreach by the gunner had on blind yapping. So if you look at where the bite campaign really invested money in talking to the team knows it certainly wasn't in California. Still, the poll found that while a majority of white voters supported Trump nationwide, almost three quarters of Latinos turnout for Biden is like he knows where the only voters the election results would be blindingly clear. Larissa Martinez, the Castro is with only those US one of the advocacy, non profits that sponsored the pole. Another thing That's clear, she says. Latinos are a growing force the siding presidential elections and should not be ignored for the California report. Tomato On Tuesday, California voters passed prop 22 by a large margin backed by $200 million from Silicon Valley companies like Uber and Door Dash. Measure makes it legal for these big companies to classify workers as contractors. Sam Harnett joins me now, and Sam prop 22 passed with a ton of support 58% of the vote. I think that caught some people by surprise. Yeah, me myself. Included in the polling leading up Tio Election Day showed to be 46 42%, which is actually not a great place for a proposition to be in. But then you got to remember the gig company spent over $200 million and advertising and marketing works. The other thing to keep in mind is that we may be in a state with people who consider themselves progressive or liberal. But you know, the consumers in the state also really loved these gig. Applications They love taking their phone out and getting a cheap ride or getting insta card delivery. And the yes on 22 campaign was very Clever in crafting a proposition that assuaged any moral worries that people hadn't using these APS. I mean that the campaign was designed to make people feel like Ah, yes vote was a vote for Social justice and that it was a vote to improve the working conditions of the people on these APS, despite the fact that organized labor was opposed to it. This could have major implications for the future of work. And there are critics out there who were saying a whole new category of low rights workers has been created here. What's your sense of what prop 20 Two's passage means for the workforce? Absolutely. I mean, I think it is correct that this is not uber and let's continue to classify their workers contractors. This's big companies, creating a new sub employee gig, contractor worker category and right now in California, because a prop 20 to that category is limited to workers doing delivery or transportation through APS. But as we have seen with the regular independent contractor worker category, which was created on DH, used mainly by professionals at the beginning that has now been taken advantage of by corporations and used as a way to not play for employee benefits. So we saw independent contractor used by corporations and you can bet that corporations are looking at this new good worker category and thinking of ways that they can get in on it because it's way cheaper than paying for employee benefits. Looking at public markets, uber and lift. Both saw shares get a big big boost from investors on news that prop 22 had passed. What are the next moves that we could expect from these companies or they're going to try to take this national or even international? Absolutely. I mean, uber and lift have made no secret that they have want to get this third way in trying into federal labor law lift in its celebration, email prop trying to said that they're going to go national with this and try to get this passed everywhere and actually get companies have already gotten thiss. Third category into law in red states around the country. They've already been successful on a state by state level and they're definitely gonna go nationally. California was the first place where the government really pushed back and was on the brink of regulating these cos in a way that made them class by their workers employees. So I think other states on DH internationally. Other countries were looking to see how it played out here, and it played out in favor of big companies. All right, Sam Harnett. Thank you so much. Yeah, Thankfully, will California continues to see an uptick in new Corona virus cases, the state added more than 5000 new cases on Tuesday. Since October, California's test positivity rate has ticked up to 3.3%. Health and Human Services Secretary Dr Mark Galley called the state's increase slow and steady compared with the huge case surge in the Midwest. He credited California's gradual color.

California Donald Trump Joe Biden Sam Harnett president DH Lily Jamali Farida Javal Los Angeles Hispanic Republica Gary Segura US Wass Midwest Romero Larissa Martinez David Hernandez
"sam harnett" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR News in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly, president Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are campaigning in several Midwestern states today with four days left until election Day. Elections, officials say time has about run out for voters in many states to get their mail in ballots where they need to be. By November. 3rd. NPR's Sam Green Glass has more In dozens of states mail ballots must arrive by Election Day. And that includes a handful of key battleground states like Michigan, Wisconsin and Florida. Election officials in states with those stringent deadlines say voters should now deposit their mail ballot in an official dropbox hand, deliver it to the election clerk or vote in person. Wall Street open lower moments ago, with investors continuing tow away the uncertainty over next week's presidential election and spikes in the Corona virus in the U. S and Europe. NPR's gyms are, Oli says. For many Americans, the recent declines in stocks are of little concern only about 55% of the country owned stocks for everybody else. What's happening in the market is has been overshadowed by these very substantial problems in the economy Since the pandemic, the most important thing is jobs and wages and income. Not stocks. Yesterday, the Commerce Department reported record growth in the U. S economy during the third quarter. Right now, the Dow's down more than 100 points. This is NPR news. And on this Friday morning, you are listening to K C R W I'm Cherry Glaser with this local news update. A number of new covert 19 cases in L. A county appears to be on the rise again. 745 were reported yesterday. His case here. W's Lori Parole explains that the highest single day total of new cases since late August along with the new infections, another 19 people died from the virus in L. A on Thursday. After declining for several months. This high number of new cases could be evidence that the virus is spreading like county public health director Barbara for rare calls the numbers very concerning, she says A new spike in cases could trigger increases in hospitalizations and deaths and threatened reopening efforts. Officials have said that social gatherings inspired by watching the Dodgers and Lakers win championships are troubling. According to the Times for SoCal counties, Imperial San Bernadino, Riverside and Ella are among the top five in the state. Seeing the highest number of new cases per 100,000 residents with Halloween this weekend and Thanksgiving approaching, officials say they are extremely worried that holiday get togethers could further fuel the spread of covert 19. K C. R w I'm Larry Peral just five voting days left in this election cycle. And here in California polls are close on proposition 22, which would allow ride hailing and delivery companies to keep classifying their workers as independent contractors. Sam Harnett reports on how each side is trying to win over undecided voters in the final stretch. According to the most recent polls, 12% of voters are still undecided over prop 22. The race is so close, their choice may end up tipping the scales. The yes campaign says it's having drivers participate in text and phone baking events. The no campaign plans to hold rallies for gig workers outside Dodger Stadium and the Oakland Coliseum. Both sides are essentially making the same pitch to voters, says Jessica Levinson, a law professor and political commentator at Loyola Marymount University. So both sides are really duking it out over the same issue in a way, which is what's better for workers. Since both sides are trying to claim the same thing. This has become a battle of messaging. Thegame companies on the yes side have almost $200 million to make their case compared to about $20 million on the nose side. Coeds Sam Harnett reporting..

NPR News NPR Sam Harnett Lori Parole Dave Mattingly Washington Joe Biden Commerce Department Cherry Glaser Europe Larry Peral Jessica Levinson president Trump Dodger Stadium Dodgers Michigan Oli
With Prop. 22, Uber and Lyft hope to keep drivers as contractors in California

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:56 min | 1 year ago

With Prop. 22, Uber and Lyft hope to keep drivers as contractors in California

"Proposition. Twenty two is on the ballot in California right now, it's an initiative sponsored by Uber Lift Jordache and other Gig work platforms that would exempt at based ride hailing companies, Uber and lift basically and food delivery companies from a new state law that requires them to classify drivers as employees. Instead of independent contractors give companies have poured nearly two hundred million dollars into the yes on prop twenty. Two campaign that makes it the most expensive ballot initiative in state history they also threatened to leave California or dramatically raise prices. If it doesn't pass a loss loss, though could embolden other states to insist that APP companies hire their drivers. So let's dig into this fight in quality assurance. The Friday segment where we take a deeper look at a big tech story Sam Harnett is a reporter for. In San Francisco. The good companies are saying if this doesn't pass, we're going to have to potentially suspend service in California and if it passes Uber lift and the rest of the companies will be able to continue operating. The way they were we're operating before their workers would be contractors that means they wouldn't have basic employee protections, unemployment shirts, workers, compensation, and the way this proposition is written, that will be pretty much locked in. There's this seven eighths provisions, which means if it takes seven days of the Senate and assembly in California to make any changes to this proposition and local jurisdictions, cities and counties couldn't make any changes to give gig workers more benefits. Do these sort of same restrictions. This kind of like overturn ability does that apply even if the companies are forced to classify their workers as employees? Well, if you know if proposition twenty, two dozen pass workers will become employees but you know these companies still have billions of dollars and they're gonNA, keep fighting this to claw I mean they see this as an existential threat to their business model so on the one side, if prop twenty passes, the gig model looks pretty solid I mean maybe something federally could lead to a change maybe there could be a lawsuit over procedurally in in the proposition like maybe that seven as provision I mentioned. But it's going to be there on the flip side. If proposition twenty, two dozen pass, you can expect another self of the GIG. Companies. Pretty Pretty. quickly I mean. This is a California ballot proposition but I wonder what implications could it have if it doesn't pass for the GIG, economy nationally Oh huge. I think everybody nationally and internationally is looking at this case you know over the last couple years, you've seen the California Supreme Court the California legislature, and now the attorney general go after these companies and tell them that you know your workers are actually employees and they need basic protections, and if the GIG companies are successful and using the ballot box to defy the three branches of government and maintain their business model I, think a lot of other states and a lot of other countries are going to see that as well the companies they want right

California Uber Lift Jordache California Supreme Court Sam Harnett Reporter San Francisco Senate Attorney
It’s a Ballot Fight for Survival for Gig Companies Like Uber in California

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:55 min | 1 year ago

It’s a Ballot Fight for Survival for Gig Companies Like Uber in California

"Twenty two is on the ballot in California right now, it's an initiative sponsored by Uber Lift Jordache and other Gig work platforms that would exempt at based ride hailing companies, Uber and lift basically and food delivery companies from a new state law that requires them to classify drivers as employees. Instead of independent contractors give companies have poured nearly two hundred million dollars into the yes on prop twenty. Two campaign that makes it the most expensive ballot initiative in state history they also threatened to leave California or dramatically raise prices. If it doesn't pass a loss loss, though could embolden other states to insist that APP companies hire their drivers. So let's dig into this fight in quality assurance. The Friday segment where we take a deeper look at a big tech story Sam Harnett is a reporter for. In San Francisco. The good companies are saying if this doesn't pass, we're going to have to potentially suspend service in California and if it passes Uber lift and the rest of the companies will be able to continue operating. The way they were we're operating before their workers would be contractors that means they wouldn't have basic employee protections, unemployment shirts, workers, compensation, and the way this proposition is written, that will be pretty much locked in. There's this seven eighths provisions, which means if it takes seven days of the Senate and assembly in California to make any changes to this proposition and local jurisdictions, cities and counties couldn't make any changes to give gig workers more benefits. Do these sort of same restrictions. This kind of like overturn ability does that apply even if the companies are forced to classify their workers as employees? Well, if you know if proposition twenty, two dozen pass workers will become employees but you know these companies still have billions of dollars and they're gonNA, keep fighting this to claw I mean they see this as an existential threat to their business model so on the one side, if prop twenty passes, the gig model looks pretty solid I mean maybe something federally could lead to a change maybe there could be a lawsuit over procedurally in in the proposition like maybe that seven as provision I mentioned. But it's going to be there on the flip side. If proposition twenty, two dozen pass, you can expect another self of the GIG. Companies. Pretty Pretty. quickly I mean. This is a California ballot proposition but I wonder what implications could it have if it doesn't pass for the GIG, economy nationally Oh huge. I think everybody nationally and internationally is looking at this case you know over the last couple years, you've seen the California Supreme Court the California legislature, and now the attorney general go after these companies and tell them that you know your workers are actually employees and they need basic protections, and if the GIG companies are successful and using the ballot box to defy the three branches of government and maintain their business model I, think a lot of other states and a lot of other countries are going to see that as well the companies they want right

California Uber Lift Jordache California Supreme Court Sam Harnett Reporter San Francisco Senate Attorney
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Contractors. Acuity reporter Sam Harnett joins me now to explain and Sam Why don't we begin with just how big of a deal this is? This is a really big deal. I mean, if you'll remember the state Attorney general is already suing, uber and lift in that lawsuit, there's going to be a hearing on an injunction today and the injunction would force uber and left to start classifying the workers as employees right now. The other lawsuit, which was filed yesterday by the California Labor Commissioner. That lawsuit is seeking back pay for all the years that uber and Lyft drivers have been allegedly misclassified as contractors. That is a lot of years. You know, at least what, 10 years of back pay. How much money is that, Sam? Well, you're talking things like overtime payment. You're talking about drivers who weren't making minimum wage sometimes. You're also talking about employee benefits like potentially healthcare and unemployment insurance, So it's hard to pin the figure down. But we're probably talking about hundreds of millions of dollars because there are hundreds of thousands of uber and lyft drivers in California, And as you said, this goes back years. And what are uber and lift saying about this right now, I mean, uber and lift had been saying all along that they want to keep operating as they were operating. They say that they're giving driver's flexibility and independence and as soon as 85 became law this year uber and let's start fighting to get an initiative on the ballot that would exempt them from that law so they could continue classifying the workers. As contractors and uber lift another good cos I've already spent over $100 million promoting that valid proposition. Maybe five, of course, is the official name of the law in California that essentially turns all of those many drivers into employees. Before I let you go, Sam, you know, I know that a lot of drivers are having an especially hard time given what's happened to the business of right healing during the pandemic. How much time is it likely to take to sort all of this out? Well, first you got to remember. Some of these drivers have been waiting eight years to get paid for things like overtime or unemployment benefits on there's these two lawsuits now and it could take years to work out the details and get people they're back. Pay. If it is found that they were indeed, Miss classifies contractors all along, ladies Sam Harnett covering tech for us in Silicon Valley. Thank you. Thanks..

Sam Harnett California California Labor reporter Attorney Silicon Valley Commissioner official
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Number to call eight six six seven three three six seven eight six or join us by emailing us, forum dot org or going to our website kqeDorg slash forum. Click on the segment or tweet us. Our Twitter handle is at forum like to know your thoughts about Uber lift drivers going on strike tomorrow. And that's of course, right ahead of the IPO. Kate conger with us by phone here. Technology reporter for the New York Times and Sam Harnett in studio with Silicon Valley reporter cake and stock also about lot of these complaints that have been coming in Sam there is a concern maybe about regulation playing his way into this. Yeah. I mean, Uber lifts have been very successful. From the beginning. You know, critics say these companies really that it wasn't a technology invented that really they succeeded because of regulatory arbiter. Treize which is basically they said, okay. We have these rules Regling taxis noise cities, but we'll make an app, and we don't really care and has been a big part of what is it giving them a leg up and a lot of initial investor capital investment capital, so regulations in terms of I think the biggest scare for these companies regulations in terms of employee status, again, if drivers were made employees that would be a big hit on the company pushing for greater share the drivers money that could bring on regulations was what I was suggesting or could bring on minimum wage demand for minimum. Right. I mean, I think the drivers they have been getting attention about about their plate. I mean, you hear stories of of drivers who are in the bay area. We're sleeping in their cars. You see a lot of drivers. Now are talk to drivers who drive in from as far away as the Destot to drive you're on the weekends. And you're starting to hear those stories, and I think they're resonating with the consumers at the same time. It's so easy. Right. So I I am very skeptical that many consumers they might post on Facebook or Twitter. Okay. I'm not gonna use the app, I'm style with drivers. But they need to get somewhere on time. They just pick up the phone. You know, good point convenience off enrolls. Let me go to the question from a listener Kager this k- congress. This is William who writes, I truly don't understand the economics ride sharing companies. Billions in losses yet Wall Street valuations in the three digit billions, this business model reeks of labor exploitation and the investment is already stale. Right. So the way that these companies are valued, I think can seem sort of absurd, especially, you know, to folks like me, they, you know, we only deal with money, and whether or not there's money in our checking account or not, but the way that is looking at this is very long-term plan. And they're kind of looking at Uber lift like social media companies on that. And then they think as long as these companies are growing in users as long as there's more and more writers who are on the platform. Eventually that math has been a level out, and they're gonna make money, and you can look sort of as a comparison to Twitter, you know, they went public in twenty thirteen and then they didn't become profitable until twenty eighteen so you had to five year gap, where they were just losing money losing money and losing money and other finally turning that around, and it seems like investors are much more comfortable with that kind of long-term loss than you know, an average consumer would be if they're thinking I'm losing so much of my own personal money every day. There's also been criticism about higher. More and more drivers, which means sometimes in many cases, less money for the drivers who are already behind the wheel. Here's a listener writes San Francisco writers download the fly will app and take a cab during a strike. It has all the features of the ride hailing companies, and you'll help cab drivers whose business has been.

Twitter Sam Harnett reporter Kate conger William Treize San Francisco New York Times Regling Facebook three digit five year
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Uber and lift drivers in San Francisco and eight other cities will stage a one day strike tomorrow ahead of overs long anticipated IPO on Friday, which is expected to raise about nine billion dollars. But drivers say they're not sharing in the wealth. They say their wages and working conditions are getting worse and drivers are turning off their apps for the day. And they're encouraging writers to do the same. Joining us to discuss the strike in the IPO. Sam Harnett, he's Silicon Valley reporter for VDI. And he's here with us studio. San welcome. Yeah. Nice to be here is always always nice to have you here. We also have k- conquer with us online technology report of the New York Times and Kate. Welcome back to form. Good to have you as well. Fatemi that have you sim. Let's talk to you first about what's happening here. I mean, the timing can't be. Day for this IPO. So you can almost expect this. But what do you think is gonna happen here? I'm not asking you to be pressure. But I mean, first of all not only with the drivers, but are people going to turn their abso-? Well, here's the problem. Right. Unlike workers and other industries any gig worker can just sign onto this app. If they want to right. So I think it's really hard organize a strike where you get everybody on board. I mean, they're in the bay area alone. There are tens of thousands of people were signed to drive on Hoover and lift so getting them to agree not to sign on and do some rides. It's really difficult, especially when you consider that. Uber has surged pricing. Let's say allow drivers decide not to drive and other drivers see, hey, you know, the rates are going way up, and I can make more money. So it's very difficult for them to orchestrate a real strike. They are getting support. They're getting support from politicians. Bernie Sanders come out and made a statement on behind the driver's here. And another of other public figures wonders just how long how far that will go. Right. I mean, I think they're, you know, this has been brewing for years. This this discontent with drivers and the stories coming out that their their take home has been going down and down and down. I mean, you saw in Los Angeles Uber cut the rate per mile from eighty cents a mile to sixty cents a mile now at the same time. They did increase. What drivers make while? They're waiting for a ride. But but drivers saying this is one more cut in a series of cuts, and the company is said, let me go to you on this Kate they've lost by one point one billion in the first three months of this year in the same period. Earlier Hoover had a three point seven billion dollar profit. So house is going to affect the IPO offering St. thing. Well, I think so the prophet. You mentioned sort of a strange blip for them. They had sold off some of their businesses overseas to turn a profit. But you know, the company is generally unprofitable. And I think investors are expecting that. They're not expecting to see a profit from the company in terms of how much this strike will affect the IPO. You know, it's it's hard to predict I think Sam raises a really good point that there will be financial incentives for drivers to break the strike. There will be search pricing. But you know, I think also knows that drivers had a section is a big risk to the business. And if drivers are unhappy that creates a lot of problems for them, and they mentioned this in regulatory filings for the IPO, you know, they say if drivers are unhappy that's going to eventually start to affect our bottom line talking a lot about over PEOs prices gone about fourteen percent below the initial price hasn't it. Price has dropped significantly. Correct. So affect Samuel away in here. Again in terms of with the strike is going to do. I mean, I think Uber's IPO perspectives. One of the first things they said, I is that if drivers are considered employees their business model is going to suffer. So they're really worried about workers being reclassifies.

Sam Harnett Hoover Kate San Francisco Bernie Sanders New York Times San welcome Samuel Los Angeles nine billion dollars seven billion dollar fourteen percent three months one day
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now is five thirty. It's eighty news. I'm Tara Siler two of the Google employees who organized a mass walkout of the company. Last November say the tech giant is retaliating against them. Some twenty thousand Google workers walked out to protest sexual assault allegations among other things these allegations of retaliation come as tech workers are increasingly speaking out against their employers over a range of issues K CUNY, Silicon Valley reporters Sam Harnett is here to walk us through these latest developments and Sam what are these two workers saying happen to them to workers? Meredith Whitaker in Clare Stapleton Meredith Whitaker leads Google's open research initiative and Stapleton is a marketing manager at YouTube, and whether saying is after we helped organizes protests the way we are being treated our job is changed. I mean, no one is overtly said, you know, to them. Hey, we're doing this for X Y Z reasons, but they're saying, hey, you know, this stuff started happening right after we organized the walkout, clear Stapleton said. She. She she's she was told she was going to be demoted. Meredith Whitaker said she's been taken off certain projects that she was working on just were treated in a different way Stapleton said she went so far as the higher lawyer to advocate to have her position reinstated. So what's Google saying about these allegations by these two women thing they release the statement and said we prohibit retaliation in the workplace and investigate all allegations. And the spokesperson added that there has been no retaliation here in this case, and the walkouts been part of this increasing activism by tech workers. Give us some background here. What are worker so fired up about? There's two main types of issues on the one hand, it is what these companies are making who they're working with you, see at Salesforce. There was a protest against the company working with customs and border control at Microsoft. There was protests against its contracts with the military things like data collection. Having monetize users data. These are things. Tech workers are speaking out against the other hand, it's issues of power at the company workers, you're saying, hey, listen, you know, tech is supposed to be the place where everyone's opinions or heard. But really we feel like there's a lot of power concentrated at the top. You know, the CEO's are making decisions on us as workers don't really have a voice so things like that also a lack of diversity at tech companies and issues of sexual misconduct, which is what sparked vetted initial walkout back November. And how did Google respond to the protest last fall? And the demands by the workers, then so on one hand there was a our facing support. Right. The CEO allowed all the workers at Google to walk out. There was no direct retaliation of workers wanted to walk out. They even a seeded to some of the demands they got rid of mandatory arbitration for workers, which was a big issue. But on the other hand, the company has been doing some stuff in private sort of push back against workers. And one of the biggest things is that they asked the National Labor Relations board if you make it more difficult for workers at Google or at any company to use internal company forms and communication to talk about workplace issues. So this this is how the Google employees organized a walkout. They went on the internal Google forum and started talking to people about issues at the company. Google wants the National Labor Relations board to make it more difficult for workers to do that. And to make those spaces these internal software companies are not protected spaces. So that would impact all workers not just workers. Exactly. So Sam what happens next. Well, in the workers side, they're saying that they're going to have an open forum at the company and to create a space where other workers who feel like they're being retaliated against activism can speak out, and they have to wait and see how Google handles this. And what they do. Okay. Can't you d Silicon Valley reporter at Sam Harnett?.

Google Clare Stapleton Meredith Whita Sam Harnett Meredith Whitaker National Labor Relations CEO Tara Siler Salesforce assault Microsoft YouTube reporter marketing manager one hand
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The time is eight twenty two it's morning edition on I'm Brian watt. Broadcasting this morning and the next couple from our Silicon Valley bureau in downtown San Jose today to stories about work workers to be more precise. Silicon Valley has a reputation for pampering it's prized workers with relatively high salaries benefits and free food. But that's usually only if you're an employee contractors don't share in those perks. And there are tens of thousands of contractors in Silicon Valley doing everything from security and cooking to accounting and coding. Sam Harnett reports on how contracting became such an integral part of the tech industry. How does it feel to be contractor Eddie big Silicon Valley company? It feels like I'm not the kids table. This worker doesn't want to use her name for fear of reprisal. She works at Google where like most big tech companies. They're reportedly thousands of contractors. They don't work directly for the tech companies, but for third party staffing firms. They were different colored badges earn less than their employees counterparts as to pay for things like writing the shuttle to work right up like looking through the glass at people having this sort of wonder experience which giving loads and loads of perks and benefits. Right. They're looking at it. But we still get effectively doing the same work. Google says it uses contractors when it doesn't want to build out particular expertise for particular deliverables, and when it needs temporary support UCLA economist Christel says there are lots of reasons that the investor dependent quick pivoting companies of Silicon Valley have embraced contractors. They cost less. They can be brought in and let go fast. And they don't increase the employee headcount, which investors like to see stay low Silicon Valley, and the tech sector is definitely way out in front of of most other sectors in terms of this kind of hiring independent contracting has been increasing across all sorts of industries since the late seventies. Until he says, the company springing up in Silicon Valley have an advantage there new, and they don't have employees or unions to push back on the contracting model these companies start out with a tabula, Rasa. There is no history of well, you always used to have employees in the ninety s silicon valley's contracting surge ran to a snack workers filed a class action lawsuit against Microsoft for how it was permit temping its workers after almost a decade of battling the lawsuit Microsoft settled for ninety seven million dollars probably used to work in staffing at Microsoft and now runs on contracting dot com the website where workers can rate contracting firms. He said, the Microsoft lawsuit was a big lesson after the lawsuit enough to Microsoft lost. Every. Contingent staffing department in any every large company kind of started setting up rules around how to best utilize contractors Chouan says to avoid legal trouble companies. Now, do two things they pushed for short term contracts a year or year and a half at most. That means contractors are shuffled from company to company never settling into what could look like a permanent job and John says tech firms encourage the staffing agencies to offer some kind of benefit package to workers something that would make the employees field a really employs staffing agency. But some contractors in Silicon Valley are asking for more clear pathways to permanent jobs. They start organizing with groups like the tech workers coalition and Silicon Valley rising. I'm Sam Harnett news now to a different set of workers in the south bay who were really just trying to get paid ever go into a restaurant in one person. Maybe two doing all the work to keep it running for about a year mug. Elite Motta was. Is one of those people. She did it all in a restaurant on alma street in San Jose called Los Pinos Altos, ADA Garcia, Kasey Neda Emesa. You're developing social dilemma, Nina is Easter Alamos Alamo Villanova Jay, she was a cashier waitress and cook she.

Silicon Valley Microsoft Sam Harnett San Jose tech workers coalition Google Brian watt Villanova Jay Motta Eddie Chouan UCLA Easter Alamos Alamo Kasey Neda Emesa Christel Nina John Los Pinos Altos
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That's the exact same. There is no red. In fact, there's actually a tiny spot which will be gone by tonight. Trump says the US would leave two hundred personnel in one part of Syria and an additional two hundred near the border with Israel NPR's Windsor. Johnston says the Middle East will be high on the agenda. When Trump host is rarely Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu early next week. The White House says Trump and Netanyahu will discuss their countries shared interests and actions in the Middle East, the US and Israel have closely aligned themselves on foreign policy with Washington, maintaining its military financial and diplomatic support to the country. This is a challenging time for Netanyahu. He's seeking a fifth term in office. While fighting his recent indictment on of criminal charges, that's NPR's Windsor, Johnston reporting a human rights group says the United States may have committed war crimes in Somalia NPR's. Ada Peralta has more. The United States says it has not killed any civilians since April. Two thousand seventeen but Amnesty International says when they looked at five of the more than one hundred airstrikes, the US was involved in the found fourteen civilians were killed. They say they were farmers and children who had nothing to do with the Islamist group. Al Shabaab, the US? Amnesty says has a responsibility to properly investigate the incident and provide families some restitution that's eight a Peralta reporting, the president of the European Council. Now says he believes a short delay to Britain's departure from the EU is possible. The leaders meet tomorrow, here's NPR's Joanna kakissis European Council. President Donald tusk spoke to reporters in Brussels after talking by phone with British Prime Minister, Theresa may may ask him to delay Brexit until June thirtieth to says he believes it's possible. We cannot give up seeking until the very last moment a positive solution to says e you leaders have shown immense patients with Britain. And I am confident that. Also will not lock the same patience and goodwill at the most critical point in this process, all of the remaining twenty seven Member States must agree to a Brexit extension. Joanna kakissis. NPR news Berlin from Washington. This is NPR news from K Q E D news. I'm Brian watt. The California trucking association just suffered a major loss the US supreme court declined to hear it's appeal in a case brought arguing that truckers are contractors instead of employees cake. Sam Harnett reports for decades truck drivers have argued that they aren't independent owner operators, but employees with benefits like workers comp and overtime pay over the last eight years. California's state labor secretary Julie SU has largely agreed awarding the millions of dollars for being misclass-. The California trucking association has filed numerous lawsuits against her decisions. One made it to the US supreme court which sided with soup the court affirmed, the California could indeed. Determine that truckers. And there are more than one hundred thousand of them in the state are being classified this fight. Over trucker classification is expected to continue in the courts. I'm Sam Harnett. Katie news. San Francisco prosecutors have decided not to file charges against giant CEO, Larry Baer after a video caught him in a physical fight with his wife about three weeks ago bear caused his wife. Pam to fall to the ground in a struggle over a cell phone advocates for domestic violence survivors have since called on major league baseball to discipline bear he's on temporary. Leave the Oakland A's played in early and far away opening day game against the Mariners in Tokyo in the wee hours of our morning here. But as fans went to the mad oak barnyard in Oakland to watch..

United States Israel NPR Prime Minister Benjamin Netany NPR Trump Middle East Ada Peralta California trucking associatio Johnston Windsor Al Shabaab Britain Sam Harnett Amnesty International Washington Oakland Joanna kakissis European Counc President Donald tusk California
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:07 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Brian watt tonight in Oakland at lake Merritt. Another bay area vigil will honor the lives lost in the mosque attacks in Christ's church. New Zealand over the weekend some of the stuff. Stories of the fifty people who were killed on Friday emerged in as investigators. Learn more about the massacre some of silicon valley's most popular companies are facing scrutiny over how they responded to the gunman's decision to share his violent crime with the world on their platforms. They're seemingly wasn't a lot that Facebook, Google and Twitter and others could do quickly to stop it. He Silicon Valley. Reporter Sam Harnett joins me in Sam how are companies grappling with this problem. Well, this has been a problem with these companies since the start Facebook Twitter Google with YouTube. They all said, hey, we're open platforms. We don't have gatekeepers. We're getting rid of the editors, and this is about people posting content and consuming content. And so since the beginning they've had a problem with people posting extremists content because guess what extreme content does very well on these platforms it gets attention. And so since the beginning they've been trying to deal with this. And what they ended up doing is hiring tens of thousands of content. Moderators who are human beings. Trying to sift through the content and find out what should be on the platform and not and guess what those human content moderators can't keep up with how fast spreads on the internet. How does their business model factor into this a situation like this? Well, just like traditional media these companies make money from advertising and to make money from advertising, they gotta have your eyeballs. These commend said, hey, what does really well on our platform is really controversial stuff. So they're being incentivized because they want more people on their platform to allow stuff to kinda gets up to that line. So they're in this bind where they're making money when stuff's engaging which can then be violence, sexual nature intense, and it's really kind of baked into their business model. So they do have these checkers that you mentioned an army of them, really. But it just doesn't seem like that's the kind of gatekeeper that's called for here. Right. I mean, these are people hired to make sure the content follows the guidelines. They aren't editors with news judge. Men, and again Facebook is trying to split this difference between being this open platform and a media organization, and if it doesn't commit to one or the other it seems hard to understand how could do a good job at either Silicon Valley. Reporter Sam Harnett. Thank you. Thanks, brian. There's a new battle brewing along the shores of the San Francisco Bay perhaps one of the biggest yet involving development on the bay a seemingly bureaucratic move by. The Trump administration's Environmental Protection Agency could revive the contentious plan to develop fourteen hundred acres owned by Cargill salt company, creating a new community virtually at sea level cries from this battle even made it to Capitol Hill where peninsula congresswoman Jackie speier said she was outraged. This administration has completely hijacked the jurisdictional process away from the experts on the ground. Putting politics ahead of science no surprise here with some. Background and a preview of what next is Paul Rogers managing editor of science. He's also been covering this for the Mercury News and Paul give us a thumbnail sketch of what Cargill has in mind for Redwood City. Well, ten years ago, the company announced plans to build a twelve thousand houses for up to twenty five thousand new residents this site, which sits east of highway one oh one right up against the bay as a big one. It's one and a half times the size of Golden Gate park. But that proposal sparked one of the biggest battles over bayfront development in the past generation and eventually amid opposition from environmental groups and some local residents who are worried about traffic cargo withdrew the plan in two thousand twelve so this development idea a lot of people thought it was dead. How does it get back on the table now? Well, you know a century ago. This site was part of San Francisco Bay it was underwater. But then it was. Psyched off decades ago and filled in before modern environmental laws, so environmentalists say the levees should be breached, and it should basically just be restored. As wetlands for wildlife and for flood control. They argue that under the federal clean water act, which prohibits the filling of waterways the site can't be developed and the Obama administration a couple of years ago through their EPA. Agreed but they never finalized the paperwork before Obama left office. And now, the Trump EPA has reversed that view and announced on March first that the site is not bound by the clean water act. So that basically removes the main federal hurdle to development, and that's what congresswoman speier is mad about exactly as you heard congresswoman speier, and by the way, she is the congresswoman who represents Redwood City, she says that Cargill executives and lawyers worked behind the scenes with the Trump administration. So they could get there. Away in violation of environmental laws. All right. So doesn't this idea of building a brand new community right on the bay kind of fly in the face of all the warnings? We've been hearing about rising sea levels. Well, critics say, yes, but Cargill and its development partner, which is a company called DMV associates out of Arizona. They say that with levees and other engineering that some of the site can be used to address flood control concerns in some maybe used for other uses like housing. It's important to note though, that cargo hasn't yet come up with a new plan. Basically, it says the old one is dead. And that in the coming weeks and months it will be holding public hearings to gather input from local residents. And then it'll come up with a formal proposal and submit it. If the local authorities wanna stop this, can they yes it needs a permit from the Redwood City council right now the land is not zoned for housing, and the mayor of Redwood City told me a few days ago that he does not support housing there. However, any company that owns land can always SU if they feel that their property rights have been violated. That's one possibility. The other is that cargo could be working to drive the value of the land up for an eventual sale someday to the federal government, the state government environmental groups. They would basically be getting more money if they decide to go that way and sell it to be part of a wildlife refuge, science managing editor, Paul Rogers. Thank you. Thank you. You're listening to morning edition on K Q E D, I'm Brian watt. More news after a break funding for scientists provided by the National Science Foundation. The FDA Bechtel junior foundation the Templeton religion trust and the. Durken. Charlene caps and L foundation now at eight twenty nine we'll take another look at commute.

Brian watt Facebook Redwood City congresswoman speier Silicon Valley Cargill Sam Harnett Environmental Protection Agenc San Francisco Bay Paul Rogers Trump administration Reporter managing editor New Zealand lake Merritt Oakland National Science Foundation federal government Twitter
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's seven thirty. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. House Democrats are moving ahead with the resolution that seeks to block President Trump's declaration of a national emergency along the southern porter. They formally introduced the resolution this morning on Capitol Hill, the president hopes his declaration will free up more money for a border wall. The White House says President Trump plans to keep two hundred troops in Syria as peacekeepers has part of a US withdrawal from that country. Here's NPR's Ruth Sherlock. The biggest significance would be if it convinces other European partners to stay the main intention seems to be to boast to create a sort of buffer zone that would protect the Kurdish controlled parts of serious that the US is allied with against an offensive from tacky US Kurdish allies, say they're pleased with the president's decision. They worry a complete withdrawal of the US military from Syria will create a security vacuum allowing Turkey to launch an offensive against them. Trump spoke. By phone yesterday with Turkey's president President Trump meets with China's vice premier today at the White House says the latest U S China trade talks near their conclusion producers of the Fox TV series empire say they're removing actor Jesse small let's character from this season's final two episodes, smell let this facing felony criminal charges in Chicago for filing a false. Police report in connection with an alleged assault on January twenty ninth. This is NPR news from Washington from news. I'm Tiffany Cam. High more than a dozen advocacy groups have filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission against Facebook over in-app purchases on games targeted at children. Sam Harnett reports from our Silicon Valley desk, consumer advocacy groups are asking the FTC to investigate whether Facebook violated the children's online privacy Protection Act by allowing players do buy things inside games like farmville in candy crush court documents from lawsuits settled in two thousand sixteen were just. Sealed through freedom of information act request by the center for investigative reporting. These documents show that Facebook employees called the practice friendly fraud and referred you kid spending, lots of money as Wales a casino industry term. A Facebook spokesperson says the company has safeguards in place and.

President Trump president US Facebook NPR White House Washington Syria Turkey Federal Trade Commission Dave Mattingly friendly fraud Ruth Sherlock Tiffany Cam Sam Harnett China assault
"sam harnett" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KCRW

"Investors put one hundred and thirty billion dollars into thousands of companies in two thousand eighteen many of which companies most probably aren't gonna make it. And some of the ones that go under leave behind a trail of debt. That's what happened with the San Francisco based food delivery company munch ary, which now owes tens of thousands of dollars to local bakers and chefs in a Sam Harnett reports from much collapse has become a cautionary tale for some other fast growing startups. It took almost a decade for the nor Astrada to nurture three babes bake shop and into a business with one thousand employees and a million dollars in gross sales. She's baked a lot of pies these are chocolate the contest is. And then here, we have bourbon pecan ties, we have two kinds of cross in general. We throw sells the local restaurants, and until recently to montre it sold and delivered prepared food direct to individuals mostly in urban areas, you made a majority of the food, but also bought some from local bakeries and restaurants last thanksgiving country ordered a thousand pies. From Estrada, and she baked them all herself, I actually work the graveyard shifts and my baby at that time was two months old. So I left him at home, and I would work here from ten pm until eight am just keeping the ovens full. She says Montreal her twenty thousand dollars for the order, but the check never came in mid-january montre closed and Estrada says the company didn't tell her in other vendors shutting down she says, she only found out because she'd once used montre as a customer I have purchased a sandwich from them before. So I'm now on their list serve and I received an Email from them at the same time as all the other customers of they're saying that they regretted turn for us that they were closing down start in two thousand ten over the last eight years expand to a handful of major cities, including San Francisco Seattle in New York it raised a hundred and twenty five million dollars in venture capital, which it sucked into things like pie orders and.

Estrada San Francisco Sam Harnett Montreal Astrada Seattle New York twenty five million dollars twenty thousand dollars thirty billion dollars million dollars eight years two months
"sam harnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Investors put one hundred and thirty billion dollars into thousands of companies in two thousand eighteen many of which companies most probably aren't gonna make it. And some of the ones that go under leave behind a trail of debt. That's what happened with the San Francisco based food delivery company Muensri, which now owes tens of thousands of dollars to local bakers and chefs in a Sam Harnett reports from K Q E D much res collapse has become a cautionary tale for some other fast growing startups. It took almost a decade for Lenore Estrada to nurture three babes bake shop and into a business with nine thousand employees and a million dollars in gross sales. She's baked a lot of pies these are chocolate Akon highs. And then here, we have bourbon pecan pies, we have two kinds of cross in general sells the local restaurants, and until recently to montre it sold and delivered prepared food direct to individuals mostly in urban areas, you made a majority of the food, but also bought some from local bakeries and restaurants last thanksgiving montre ordered a thousand pies. From strata, and she baked them all herself, I actually work the graveyard shift and my baby at that time was two months old. So I left him at home, and I would work here from ten pm until eight AM just keeping the Evans full. She says Montreal her twenty thousand dollars for the order, but the check never came in mid-january montre closed strata says the company didn't tell her in other vendors shutting down she says she only found out because she'd once used Montreal as a customer I've purchased a sandwich from them before. So now on their list serve, and I received an Email from them at the same time as all the other customers of they're saying that they regretted to inform us that they were closing down. Started in two thousand ten over the last eight years it expanded to a handful of major cities, including San Francisco Seattle in New York it raised a hundred and twenty five million dollars in venture capital, which it sucked into things like pie orders in advertising..

Lenore Estrada San Francisco Montreal Sam Harnett Muensri Evans Seattle New York twenty five million dollars twenty thousand dollars thirty billion dollars million dollars eight years two months
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Me. I'm Sam Harnett, Stinson and Molina's aren't the only places where people are worried that short term rentals are eroding rental stock for permanent residence. It's been an issue all around the bay area and the state cities and counties have come up with a range of ways to try and regulate them. But it's often a controversial issue to help us. Put this story into bigger context. We have Sam in the studio with us. Hi Sam by Tiffany. So let's go back to Stevenson. It's clear that he's unhappy with the short term rentals there, what kind of regulations would he want to see? So he'd like to see something like we have here in San Francisco, and to San Francisco, they pass them regulations in two thousand fifteen they were pretty strict they put a cap on how long you can rent your place. It can only be ninety days they made it. So you had to be permanent resident that hotel taxes had to be collected. And the deal is in San Francisco. They pass those laws in two thousand fifteen but they didn't really start getting enforced until two thousand eighteen when the CD force these companies short term rental companies to tell them everyone who is renting out a place. So how did the city do with enforcing these rules? So for three years, they couldn't really force it because they didn't really know who had an Airbnb or VR be who didn't right. And this is always the problem. These short-term rental companies do not voluntarily tell cities and counties. Hey, here's a list of all the people who do doing short term rentals. So after San Francisco passes regulations, the company sued the city, they had this big legal fight and finally two thousand eighteen the companies agreed to tell the city which people were renting on these sites. And then he could actually enforce the force the rules. Okay. So they didn't have to do with Steve dead, which is drive around everywhere in San Francisco and try and find out which one with an Airbnb or not right? San Francisco longer has to do that. But most cities and counties. We still have to which gets to the big problem. Right. Like, if you're a tiny little community think of Stinson and Bellini's like let's say Steve didn't decide to do this himself and take this project on because you wanted to change Stinson Bellina, let's say he didn't do that. How would the city or the county or town pay for that? You know, this is a big burden on local governments. And now there's actually some private companies. There's this company called hosts compliance that a county or city can hire to do exactly the work that Steve did. And these companies they go on Google earth. And you look at images and they match those images with with the listings online. They scrape all the data from these websites. They help enforce regulations by sending things from the county and the city to people who are violating. Let's say nightcap like renting their place out for too long. I'm so there's a whole industry now built on trying to help cities and counties. Regulate these companies. Okay. So where else has the short term rentals like Airbnb become a big issue in California? So, yeah, it's become a problem all over the state, but particularly up and down the coast. You saw in Los Angeles in Damara, which is just north of San Diego Bay both passed regulations to try to deal with this in Monterey. And there's been a big fight over it. And if they pass them regulations there and just recently in south Lake Tahoe voters, actually just approved an ordinance which would ban all short-term rentals outside of certain Torres zone. And as you can guess there's a big lawsuit in the works because everybody who had houses who wanted to rent them. A lot is going to lose a lot of money. All right. Thank you Sam. Thanks definite. You're listening to morning edition on cake. I'm Tiffany campaign six twenty nine now and time for another look at bay area traffic.

San Francisco Airbnb Steve dead Stinson Bellina Sam Harnett San Diego Bay Stevenson Tiffany Molina California Lake Tahoe Los Angeles Damara Torres Monterey Bellini ninety days three years
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:14 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to forum. I mean, a Kim. The California Supreme Court last year opened the door to more workers. Like drivers for Uber to be deemed employees rather than independent contractors. And now a San Diego legislator has introduced a Bill to codify that ruling which would be a big win for labor. But some contractors and business groups oppose the Bill that's ensuring that classifying workers will be a dominant issue in Sacramento with a new governor who's supported both by labor and tech. Joining me now to look at the situation is Sam Harnett. He's a Silicon Valley reporter for K Q E D. Good morning. Sam. Also with us as Caitlyn Vegas. She's legislative director of the California labor federation. Good morning. Caitlin bega. Get money and also Marla kinda meets who is with us. She's with Tuscan strategies. Good morning Marley Marl economy to good morning. Well, Sam I'm going to start with you. So can you just give us a quick review of the court ruling that happened last year and the ABC tests that emerged from it? Right. As you said me, this court ruling was deemed a huge win for labor advocates in. What was it made it harder for a company to argue that their workers are contractors now if to argue your workers a contractor you have to prove three things that the ABC's, right? The is that the workers free from control and direction of the company be that the work that the worker is doing is outside. The course of what the company normally does and three that the work that the person is doing is something that the person does outside of this job. So if you look at it like an Uber model, right? You'd say, okay. Is the Uber driver doing something gets cord? Uber's business is the Uber driver. Free of control from Hoover is in control of that worker or not. And is that Uber driver do that kind of driving outside of working for Uber. And it would have to prove those three things. All three have to be mad. Right. Well, Caitlyn baguette? Why are you supporting the effort to make this ABC test state law? You. Thank you for the question. And thank you for having on the new supreme court decision. Not april. I think worker advocacy perspective from the labor perspective. We thought that it was really a long time coming because what we've seen as a graduate stanchion in the use of the independent contractor model and innovative that has dot com. Conditions in many many industries and shifted a lot of this. Awesome. The traditional employment relationship onto the backs of workers. And so the decision was issued. He looked at it as an opportunity to bring workers into employee status into the middle class into on the right to minimum wage right to the right to get unemployment benefits. If you get laid off from Arthur spectators, I would say one of the best court decisions in many decades for ensuring workers rights what we're trying to do the Bill AB five Dynamex is the live land ABC test is to walk what we're trying to do with this Bill. Actually wine enshrine that. I'm make clear how important that is an and clarify the way that it will be applied in state law. That's number one. Number two is create the opportunity for us to have conversations with the house. It makes it a unique impact on the Dynamex rolling who want to work with us on that. Before I go to Marla kind of neat to Sam Harnett. I just wanted you to remind us what the dynamics company was doing just what the case was quickly. So that understand why this is being called the Dynamex decision. Right. Dynamex was a trucking company. They had a bunch of truckers that they were saying, we're independent contractors. The truckers said, hey, no, we're doing we're trucking. We're we're doing a job. Of course, if the normal course of business, so we should be treated employees. So we can get overtime workers compensation again T minimum wage, excetera, etc. And so that was the court case to the supreme court, and it was judged that the drivers had a case now Marla kinda meat to this dynamics decision labor, saying an important decision in terms of protecting workers rights and also that the Bill is necessary to provide clarity, essentially, do you agree. I think the Dynamex decision is very important very impactful. There's no doubt about that that certain, but you have all across the country. You've had independent contractors for decades. It's an established type of type of work arrangement. And it's very common in a lot of different industries because it's the best fit for that industry. And there are a lot of workers who prefer that model because it's the best set for that particular worker the dividing line between who's a contractor who's an employee has always been a murky one to put it mildly over decades tests have been created. And those tests have been interpreted by the courts, and you have had industries and people who are in the workforce b basically build their lives their income around these different types of work models based on the current state of the laws. They understood it. The problem with Dynamex is that it is taken that bodies lawn. I agree with Caitlin it. It's essentially throwing it out the window implementing a whole new test. And one of the problems is that. They did this through judicial Fiat not through the legislature. And I'm not aware of any other situation where a test like this has been changed just by a court decision rather than through the legislature. So the problem is every industry and every contractor in California that thought they knew what the rules were there all left in a state of confusion and uncertainty. And again, this is a model that a lot of people prefer and a lot of people have a built built their careers around. You mean, the model pre the supreme court decision correct because tended contractor model, and it because you're saying if I'm understanding you correctly that it gives more freedom for the employer and the contractor to figure out a solution or working situation that works best for both. Correct. I don't think everybody should work as an independent contractor. That's not a model that works for everyone. But nor do I think everybody should be forced into an employee model. There are a lot of people that prefer working as a contractor because of a lot of the things you just identified. It gives them a lot more. Flexibility and control over where when when they wanna work how much they want to earn their a lot. I've talked to a lot of people who actually left jobs as employees to become a contractor because they make more money doing it. They may be building their own business or a lot of different reasons. Why people prefer that work model? And I don't think we should just throw that out. Well, if you'd like things to be coming from the legislature. Why don't you support AB five which is the Bill that wants to codify? This supreme court's decision. Is it just because you feel that to be too intrusive law right now AB five is what I refer to the shell Bill. The actual content of the Bill hasn't yet been developed. It's something that I believe discussions are still ongoing about so I think whether I personally would think it's it's a good Bill or not is yet to be seen because we don't yet know exactly what it's going to say. And Sam Harnett, can you just clarify what has happened to the legislature? So we. These are placeholder bills. There is the one from from the San Diego legislator Llerena kansallis Fletcher. But there's also another one, correct? Yes. There was another Bill that came at the same time, which would basically rollback Dynamex Melissa Melendez assembly Bill seventy one so basically two competing bills got got put out at the same time. Yeah, they're both in the legislature. I think what's interesting is that I mean, just basically set up a how basically shows how important this decision was. And how much media reaction was there was on labor. Labor wanted to sort of codify the ruling and the business some members of the community want to roll it back and go to the old test. But we don't know for sure what the content of these bills will be at this point Ed as still fairly in a skeleton states because they were place holders or was your we speak more specifically to that. But for my understanding yet or not completely hashed out yet. Caitlyn vega. Do you have a sense of what was in the competing del? That was reduced by Republican lawmaker. I believe as she mentioned for Sam mentioned was just a repeal of the Dynamex decision. If I could just respond to some of the points made I would be the first to say absolutely people who want to work as independent contractors and want to start their own businesses and are perspective. That's not what the next case about the Dynamex cases about a particular business model where a company says I'm gonna go into package two or three or I'm going to go into trucking. But instead of hiring any employees to do the work, and instead of me having any responsibility for those workers, I'm gonna pretend that they are their own businesses. I'm gonna call them independent contractors. And then I'm gonna tell them what to do and how to do it. And I'm gonna make all the money off the transaction, and those workers will have no safety net in place. Oh, we'll have no rights and protections like other workers. And so not only is it a model that is exploited to the workforce. It's unfair competition to the vast majority of employers who follow the law, most employers are not engaged in this classification. And so I would just say if so my perspective, the Dynamex case is not about whether or not and should have independent contractors. Of course, there's your ball for independent contractors. I think the taste is very about this practice of misclassification and ten developed a clear simple test. So everyone understands what they will are and again, Caitlyn Vegas legislative director of the California labor federation Marla kinda meets who is with tusks strategies and has been working with companies on the independent contractor issue for four years. Now Sam Harnett is a Silicon Valley reporter with and I'd like to invite you our listeners to join the conversation. We're looking at how the battle over classifying workers as either employees or independent contractors. How could play out in San? Conference in Sacramento, there are two competing bills now making their way through the state legislature. And we want to know what your questions thoughts concerns are around what it means to be an independent contractor in the state of California. Do you support the supreme court ruling and feel like independent contractors have been exploited by employers as Caitlyn Vega was saying that are deliberately trying to miss classify them or do you want to say an independent contractor and are worried the law could make that harder. Give us a call at eight six six seven three three six seven eight six or a law could make that harder post. Your comments on our website, KiKi dot org slash forum on Facebook on Twitter at forum or Email us at forum KiKi Dee dot org. Sam Harnett on this question of misclassification, how do employers the ones that do engage in say trying to classify workers differently. How do they go about it? I know that the Uber way of doing it has been studied quite a bit. Yeah. I mean, we should back up one step and just explained to that classifying someone as independent contractors saves a company a lot of money, right? I mean, this is just companies make a lot of money a lot more money. If you're a contractor versus employee point just quickly what contractors contractors have to pay their taxes. They're not guaranteeing minimum wage. They don't get overtime. They'll have benefits like workers comp. So employees employers have to pick up a lot of that slack. And there's a bunch of studies. But some numbers thrown around a bit is that it's a one third is expensive Davin employees as a contractor so businesses want contractors cheaper. Now that has been going on the economy for a long time that companies have been trying really hard to get rid of employees and get contractors because they're keeper with the companies like Uber you seen an evolution of that. And it's been a lot of people have called it a platform capitalism, which I think is an interesting turn for it. And basically Uber came on the scene and said, hey, listen, we're not a tax company. We don't have drivers. We don't hire drivers do our business. We're a tech company, and we make a platform or a marketplace that connects riders to independent drivers in that case, they're not corridor business because we actually make tech where tech company, and this is an argument that successive gig companies handy post mates lift even have used this argument to say, hey, these these people doing this job are actually contractors, not employees. And so that models kind of ramped up something. That's been happening in the economy for for quite some time. Well, Marla of neat to your thoughts on how really employers just want to save money. So I disagree with that. I think that this is a model that has ramifications not just for the worker, and as as both I think he agreed. There are people who I think can benefit from that. And find it attractive for the company, if the only implication is not.

Sam Harnett Dynamex legislature ABC California Supreme Court Caitlyn Vegas California labor federation Caitlin bega Sacramento San Diego Caitlyn vega California reporter Marla director Caitlyn baguette Bill Kim
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sam Harnett on this question of misclassification. How do employers the ones that do engage in say trying to classify workers differently? How do they go about it? I know that the Uber way of doing it has been studied quite a bit. Yeah. I mean, we should back up one step and just explained to that classifying someone as independent contractors saves a company a lot of money, right? I mean, this is just companies make a lot of money a lot more money. If you're a contractor versus an employee quickly. What contractors contractors have to pay their taxes? They're not guaranteeing minimum wage. They don't get overtime. They'll have benefits like workers comp. So employees employers have to pick up a lot of that slack. And there's a bunch of studies. But some numbers thrown around a bit is that it's a one third expensive Davin employees as a contractor. So businesses want contractors because it's cheaper. Now that has been going on the economy for a long time that companies have been trying really hard to get rid of employees and get contractors because they're cheaper with the companies like Uber you seen an evolution of that. And it's been a lot of people called it a platform capitalism, which I think is an interesting term for it. And basically Uber came on the scene and said, hey, listen, we're not a tax company. We don't have drivers. We don't hire drivers do our business. We're a tech company, and we make a platform or a marketplace that connects riders to independent drivers. And that case they're not corridor business because we actually make tech where tech company, and this is an argument that successive companies, you know, handy post mates lift even have used this argument to say, hey, these these people doing this job are actually contractors, not employees. And so that models kind of ramped up. Something has been happening in the economy for for quite some time. Well, Marla kinda neat to your thoughts on how really employers just want to save money. So I disagree with that. I think that this is a model that has ramifications not just for the worker and as both I think he agreed. There are people who I think can benefit from that. And find it attractive for the company..

Sam Harnett Davin Marla
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:21 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My heart tuna. The only thing. Isis got involved with as China's how to dress we should cover our selves and keep our voices other than that. Everybody is living their own life, even shoddy the man who fights ISIS alongside the US says most of the people he knows who joined ISIS aunt terrorists. They're motivated by local reasons like to fight other militias in the Syrian civil war, and he subscribes to the common conspiracy theory that the claim that ISIS is a global threat is a cover story the loon. How do I mean, this is for the media things that are said on TV? And then there are things that happen under the table. The real reason the US is in Syria. He thinks is for the control of land and oil US officials have repeatedly denied claims like these in a statement to NPR a spokesperson said the US mission in Syria is to achieve the enduring defeat of ISIS and the US says it tries to avoid civilian deaths, but his fighting. Relentless enemy that hides among civilians, but Syrians in this camp. Don't believe that reasoning. Puzzle mode and the man who lost his four year old go Abdullah says this matters because if locals don't support the war is just going to create more extremism. Jennifer is our children used to few the word day. Now, it's normal for to see that bodies. Now, they stand over dead bodies picking up the limbs with us young children picking up limbless this season because the stoops. And he says someday the fear will be replaced by anger reached, look and peonies northeast Syria. It's been more than two weeks and protesters continue to fill the streets in Sudan, they were spurred by the government's announcement that it was ending food subsidies prices for things like bread and fuel skyrocketed now demonstrators who've been met with live bullets and tear gas say they want president are more ambitious years nearly thirty year reign to end he says, he's not going anywhere. It's now Cush Cush is a Sudanese American journalists based in DC he joins us now. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you. So why don't you just breakdown for us? What these protests are about and why they're happening. So these protests started on December nineteenth in the northern city of Atbara, mostly by high school students who went to school found that the price of bread had tripled for the breakfast and just started to protest and the same. Thing happened in other towns outside of Khartoum, and then moved to Khartoum it was ignited basically by the high prices of bread, but does been political discontent in the country where longtime sold a number of issues altogether, styled up and people are protesting both economic and political issues issues of freedom so issues of conflict civil parts of the country dissatisfaction with the idea that supporters of the president might amend the constitution to allow him to run again in twenty twenty. I think all of these issues have contributed to a great deal of frustration in the soothing street, and what's been the president's reaction so far to these demonstrations like protests before in twenty eleven twenty twelve and twenty thirteen the reaction has been quite violent. The government. Also acknowledges says that it does realize that the cost of living has become very high for most Sudanese and says that he will try to increase will increase the minimum wage. Wage and take measures to improve the economic situation. What does that mean that they're doing those things, you know, it's a carrot and stick approach the government officially says that it is not against peaceful protests. Okay. But it alleges that there are elements of military groups that have caused destruction. And that it is using force against that. That's what the government says true. Not from what we know not not from activists that we've spoken to how much of the country is with these protesters. So I'm seeing a lot of reporting on the actual demonstrations. But is this do they have the support of most of the country? That's a good question. And it's hard to assess. I think it's relevant that it started outside of Khartoum outside of the capitol. And especially in a town like out better that is in a state, but which is considered a stronghold for the party Sudanese professionals have started organizing as well as political parties have withdrawn from the official coalition government and supported the protesters. So it does seem that there is wide spread support throughout the country among activists and politicians. So what's different then two thousand twelve and two thousand thirteen what makes these protests different in two thousand eighteen thousand nineteen twenty eighteen was specially very difficult year for many Sudanese many had hoped that the lifting of US sanctions in October twenty seventeen would bring in foreign investment would make the economy better. It did not. For a number of reasons when I was in Sudan left in two thousand fifteen one dollar was equal to about ten pounds in the back market. Mid December twenty eighteen pound was eighty pounds to a dollar. So the price of the skyrocketed it was just a very difficult year. So again, it's just this deep sense frustration that people have reached rock-bottom. Journalists is mild Cushman. Thank you for being with us. Thank you. You're listening to weekend edition from NPR news from K Q E D news. I'm Tiffany Cam. High more rain and heavy winds are battering the bay area today. And if you're looking to download an app to stay on top of the storm be aware the city of Los Angeles is suing the Weather Channel over how it's app collects themselves user data. Sam Harnett reports the lawsuit claims the company is tricking users into giving up their personal information. The Weather Channel app asks users to allow it to track their location to provide personalized weather forecasts. But the app which has been downloaded over one hundred million times then cells that data to third parties. A spokesman for IBM which owns the weather company denies any wrongdoing. Jeffrey, Chester of the center for digital democracy says monetize and data is often the primary goal of an app apps are in fact that secret data weapon that sends your information back home to advertisers. And data companies gesture says to artificial intelligence efforts like Watson IBM is following companies like Google and Facebook into the growing business of gathering and selling user data. I'm Sam Harnett, Kikuchi news UC Berkeley officials say a student on their football team has died cow announced yesterday that defensive back Brice Turner died after being hospitalized for a medical emergency. During a non team workout near his home in southern California. Last week, the cause of death was not immediately. Given the nineteen year old Turner spent the.

US government ISIS Khartoum president Syria Sudan NPR Isis China Sam Harnett Brice Turner IBM Atbara California Abdullah Jennifer Los Angeles
"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"sam harnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Next. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm deal Willman. The labor market is roaring along. According to the Labor Department's monthly jobs report out this morning. The economy added about three hundred twelve thousand jobs last month. However, the unemployment rate rose to three point nine percent NPR's. Emily Sullivan reports despite big stock market declines in December employers kept hiring the numbers easily topped economic. Forecasts. Hiring picked up at the strongest piece ten months workers paychecks got a boost last month to average hourly earnings were up three point two percent from a year. Earlier outpacing inflation. The report is a strong end to a years worth of positive labor market reports. But we'd by government spending increases and tax cuts. The strong numbers also stand in contrast with a volatile stock market and concerns that the US may be affected by global economic slowdown. The Labor Department has been funded throughout the partial government shutdown. Emily Sullivan, NPR news, Washington. Congressional leaders are expected to meet at the White House today with President Trump to discuss the ongoing partial federal shutdown the shutdown is about to enter its third week with hundreds of thousands of workers going without pay in the first day in control, the House Democrats passed a collection of measures aimed at reopening government, but without offering funding for a border wall with the decline of ISIS, the Iraqi capital of Baghdad has become much safer so much. So that on Friday. The Iraqi military took the first US commander and more than three years for a walk downtown NPR's. Jane Arraf went along absolutely fascinated. Get your general Austin ran forth is the deputy commander of U S forces in Iraq. He doesn't normally get to walk around downtown. Let his Iraqi counterpart general Jalil. Wanted to show him and us how safe Baghdad is these days grand fourth and a group of soldiers and marines where no body armor walked around the heart of Baghdad's cultural scene, they stopped for lemon tea at historic teahouse the same place. The owners four sons were killed in a two thousand seven explosion while a couple of people in the street were hostile more of them wanted to take selfies with the Americans after all it's been sixteen years now since the US toppled Saddam Hussein Jane Arraf, NPR news, Baghdad documents and data belonging to hundreds of German politicians were hacked and posted on Twitter before Christmas NPR's psoriasis or Howdy, Nelson has more from Berlin. German news agency DPA reports a fax number and Email address belonging to Angela Merkel as well as several letters to and from the chancellor were leaked other members of political parties in the German parliament were also affected with one notable exception. Those belonging. To the far right alternative for Germany party. Cyber authorities are investigating the hacking, which apparently included no politically sensitive documents on Wall Street at this hour, the Dow is at five hundred three points or two point two percent. This is NPR from news. I'm Brian watt. The NCAA college football championship will be at Levi stadium Santa Clara on Monday. His Sam Harnett reports the game is expected to draw less of a crowd than it. Usually does. It's the third time that Alabama is playing Clemson in a college football championship. And this go around may have the smallest attendance for one the teams are far from home. This is the farthest west of college football championship has ever been held. The bay area is also not known as the hub of college football enthusiasm. Tickets are selling it far below what they normally do still tens of thousands of people come for the game and events local transit will be affected in San Jose. The children's discovery museum light rail station, we closed from Friday January fourth through the morning. Of Monday, January seven I'm Sam Harnett, Kikuchi news, sometimes the fans and bands of big college football are just as entertaining as the game. If you want to experience that the San Jose mckenry convention center is hosting the playoff fan central. It opens today at noon cost a little money. The quad located at plaza. Displays are shabas will also open today and serves as a meeting place for fans with live deejays merchandise store other concessions that site is free will be open to the public through Sunday in pro hoops, the warriors lost to the rockets and overtime last night. In college hoops, the Stanford men lost a UCLA last night. Cal lost USC. Both of those games were in LA in women's college hoops, Saint Mary's lost last night to seventeenth ranked Gonzaga tonight. Number eighteen Cal hosts UCLA number six Stanford..

NPR Baghdad US football Labor Department Emily Sullivan Sam Harnett Washington Austin Jane Arraf UCLA San Jose commander Stanford Saddam Hussein Jane Arraf
Concern spreads over White House ethics lawyer stepping down

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 4 years ago

Concern spreads over White House ethics lawyer stepping down

"East Bay congressman marked as Sonia says he's alarmed by the news that President Trump's top lawyer is stepping, down Trump, announced yesterday. On Twitter that White House counsel Don Mcgann is leaving the Sonya. Has worked with Mcgann in his capacity as a member of the house oversight committee he says Mcgann defended attorney general. Jeff Sessions and special counsel Robert Muller and that made him a target. Of the, president this is, really unfortunate again is unquestionably, a conservative. Republican but, he's also a person principle and The ladder doesn't work well in this. Administration disown, Yay says he supports legislation to better protect the special counsel, from being fired by the executive branch in a. Tweet Trump says his. Decision to fire him again had, nothing to do with Muller or

President Trump California Sam Harnett Don Mcgann Robert Muller Special Counsel California Chamber Of Commerce Dynamex Oakland Mike Zampa San Francisco Jeff Sessions Twitter Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez Congressman White House Staff Attorney Sonia Uc Hastings
Bond agencies file referendum as California moves to eliminate bail for suspects awaiting trial

All Things Considered

00:46 sec | 4 years ago

Bond agencies file referendum as California moves to eliminate bail for suspects awaiting trial

"Nuns at an orphanage in Vermont. People believed that these things can be possible in a way that they simply didn't believe in the nineteen nineties. So the Trump administration is pushing for more logging to reduce the risk of wildfire. Say, even more actions needed. The forests are much to dance because we've tried to keep fire out for about one hundred years and we visit Aretha Franklin fans who are dressing in tribute to her today, channeling the Queen of soul. Those stories coming up in this hour of all things considered. After these headlines from eighty news. I'm Tara Siler one day after governor. Jerry Brown signed landmark legislation to end cash bail in California, the bail industry filed a referendum today that would ask voters to repeal the law, Kate Cutie, California politics, and government reporter Marie.

California Bill Senate Sam Harnett Jerry Brown Aretha Franklin Oakland Peter Jon Shuler Vermont Oakland Police Department University Of California Tara Siler Twenty Twenty California State University Salonpas Cupertino Marina Lagos Lehigh John Pedder San Francisco
Facebook, NPR and Donald Trump discussed on 1A with Joshua Johnson

1A with Joshua Johnson

03:07 min | 4 years ago

Facebook, NPR and Donald Trump discussed on 1A with Joshua Johnson

"NPR's quil Lawrence the council on a Slavic American relations is asking for the removal of the executive director of intergovernmental affairs fair for. Sure it was first reported by CNN that for. Sure posted comments on social media in support of then candidate Donald Trump's proposed ban on Muslims entering the US in one post he. Said Trump quote realizes we have a Muslim problem in this country For sure also spread false claims that President Barack Obama's birth certificate was forged for sure is an army veteran and a former state Senator. From Arizona where he was a coordinator for the Trump presidential campaign the department of veterans. Affairs didn't respond to a request for comment quil Lawrence NPR news, scientists say they've discovered a lake on Mars NPR's Joe palca has details the lake is located near the south pole on Mars it was discovered by an instrument aboard the European Space Agency's Mars express spacecraft in orbit, around Mars the instrument uses radar to. Probe beneath the Martian surface Roberto, Oro say is senior author. On the paper in the journal science describing the discovery lake is one point five kilometers deep. And material Bobby is whole water is mixed with, dust finding liquid water suggests there may be places where. Life might exist on what is now a dry barren planet but, just finding, water doesn't prove that life does exist on Mars Champaka report This is NPR from geeky weedy news I mean akin Facebook is settling a lawsuit over how it let's advertisers target ads based on race sex and ability. Sam Harnett reports on how this could impact who sees what on. Facebook, Washington state filed the lawsuit after an investigation by the attorney. General's. Office it found that. Facebook's micro targeted advertising model allows advertisers to do things. Like avoid targeting adds to save black, people or Muslims critics call this digital redlining here's Jeffrey Chester. Of the center for digital democracy this settlement should open. The door for, the Washington state and other interested in Agee's to begin policing the just. The basic business model, of Facebook and Google and. The other internet giants which is all based. Upon discrimination in the first place Facebook denies wrongdoing while the settlement only applies to Washington state Facebook says it, will be making changes to its advertising system nationwide I'm Sam Harnett kqed news Several hunters point homeowners and. San Francisco are suing the landowner and. Developer Len, are five point and Tetra tech the firm accused of falsifying data related to the toxic, cleanup had the former navy shipyard their complaint alleges the company's engaged in fraud and negligence, by failing to warn prospective. Home buyers of, environmental hazards on the site, Linda Parker Pennington move there in two thousand fifteen over the last several months it's been clear that we were duped and that. Corporate greed kind of overtook. The safety of the people who chose to move. Out here based on a dream Eleanor five points spokesman declined to comment a Tetra tech spokesman said the complaint is without merit.

Facebook NPR Donald Trump Barack Obama Sam Harnett Washington Lawrence Npr CNN Tetra Tech Linda Parker Pennington Mars Discovery Lake United States Executive Director Joe Palca Department Of Veterans ORO Arizona
Facebook Reveals Apps, Others That Got Special Access to User Data

Glenn Beck

01:27 min | 4 years ago

Facebook Reveals Apps, Others That Got Special Access to User Data

"Parts for the two girls held inside the demonstration was put together by moms take action for immigrant families san francisco a group formed through their mutual outrage at children being separated from their immigrant parents seema patel brought her two daughters to the demonstration we hold our kids closer every day imagining what so many parents are going through right now the group plans to hold more demonstrations in the future the trump administration has said it will end practice a family separations at the border but will keep its zero tolerance immigration policy i'm michelle wiley news a new state law means big changes for some silicon valley companies cake ud sam harnett explains the legislation allows california residents to have more control over their online personal data it's almost certain your personal online data has either been hacked or sold a third parties you've never heard of now california residents will be able to ask any company from those like google and facebook to healthcare providers what data they collect what's done with that information and they can also ask for it all to be deleted data compliance lawyer michael morgan says there are a lot of questions for companies how will they separate california from the rest of the us how will they prove they've actually deleted your information data is complicated and it resides in a lot of different locations that is no easy thing to delete all of it polls have shown strong support for more control and rights over private information california's new law will go into effect in twenty twenty privacy advocates hope it will compel companies to change the handle user data everywhere i'm sam harnett kqed news us environmental protection agency heads scott pruitt was in san francisco this morning for meetings with local agency staff and state air regulators cake ud's peter jon shuler reports pruitt's unannounced visit comes amid tension with.

San Francisco Sam Harnett Google Michael Morgan California United States Peter Jon Shuler Seema Patel Michelle Wiley Facebook Scott Pruitt
Ex-YouTube Engineer Builds Site To Figure Out What Content The Video Site’s Algorithm Recommends

01:55 min | 4 years ago

Ex-YouTube Engineer Builds Site To Figure Out What Content The Video Site’s Algorithm Recommends

"The website favors videos like these cake you idiot silicon valley reporter sam harnett madame at a cafe in berkeley shallow had big aspirations when he started studying computer science he thought major advances in artificial intelligence would be great for humanity so it went into computer sales pitch the most complex topic i could find which was at the game of go go a complex japanese board game which computers by the way can now crush even in their best human opponents shallow graduated and got a dream gig job at youtube but then he noticed something deeply unsettling youtube is filled with videos that supported theories about everything from the earth being flat to vaccines causing illness youtube employees of best people were like students say until their lives on then what they do is kill science it was two thousand ten and shallow was working on the algorithms recommended videos he wanted to change how they operated still optimistic i was like okay i'm just going to propose solution they're going to see that they work shallow says he took his ideas to his manager they say yeah i wouldn't do that by where you acre failed even though he was fired shallow couldn't let the youtube problem go so he started algo transparency it's a website that shows people what videos you recommends most often has sections dedicated topics like national meetings elections and science topics with a lot of problematic videos according to shosholoza analysis if you search is the earth flat or round this is the video most favored by the recommendation earth is flat it means that the origin of man is deliberately being covered up from us things that everybody else's laying yoga to spend all your time on youtube so fussy algorithm it's super could win super cool for the algorithm.

Youtube Reporter Sam Harnett Berkeley