35 Burst results for "Salmon"

"salmon" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:08 min | Last week

"salmon" Discussed on Slate Money

"They didn't grow up with money at all. But. They were able to really move up and I think the reason is because of the time that they grew up in, there was a time where they had access to very good schools. My Dad was able to put himself through medical school by painting houses. You know the types of things that you could do at that time if you were white. We're just they're the type of things that are almost no other period history where possible right the the circumstances of the family grew up in afford you the privileges long-term determines like your trajectory whether you in hurt the wealth or not. That is that's the typical situation and there was this like bubble postwar bubble here in the US at least where you could like bust out of that. Social Mobility. So how how is a lot of people are saying because of the shift since the mid century where people could go up and social mobility and if the house stopped and if that's an if there is a change, which is what we've just been talking about some kind of mechanism to stop you know how do you deal with the inevitable backlash the political Backlash of angry people who who said you know this is what we expected. We expect that we could work. We could give our money to our children. You know now we can't. How would you deal? How does this odd? Zimmer that transition. But yes, let's let's let's talk about the social mobility aspect of it and the fan this aspect of it you know especially when. You know I mean to take. The extreme example you get. Couples. Lake. Jared Kushner and the van could trump who? Both of them in that own rights of. A Christmas, probably a billionaire and his. Vancouver's were probably hundreds of millions and they. GOT that wealth entirely by being born into a rich family, and now the sitting in the White House making public policy for everyone else and. There's something that entirely on elected. even among elected. If you look at the net, worth of the, Senate is super high. If you look at the, you know Roosevelt's and the Kennedys and the kind of people who get elected in history they quite rich Johnson wasn't. Came wealthy ask through the radio and TV, always exceptions. By people who are not super rich when they become electric, the rich are over. And and there is this way in which the power is is is in large held by the. People who have done the best out of this unfair system of family inheritance. I mean you see that also again with our family where you know who? Came to Britain in eighteen forty. But by eighteen twenty that now member of parliament the now you know chairman of various nonprofits and foundations. You know they're taking part in the high levels of society and they couldn't have done that without that privilege. There's no those the benefits and now they can canabal leaves of power. To whether it's their interest, the family's interest business interest, and that's exactly what they did and you can see in the over the next eight years you know how they use their advantages. To directly benefit family. I I always say that it's a lot easier to turn power into money than is to ten money into power, but that was. I think for Jewish immigrant family, even more important once you start getting the money, you very very hard to try and turn that money into positions of authority within the broader culture in places like the parliament and the law because that's that's a way of really like entrenching yourself in society in a way that money can be confiscated. The. That's a magnificent episode on Family Wealth Thomas. Thank you for coming in to talk about well, the best, and maybe hopefully we'll. have. Come out in the United States. Will not be fine. That'd be brilliant. So thank you this for coming in. Thank you. Just made me for producing and. World few next week on slate money..

parliament United States Vancouver Jared Kushner Senate White House Zimmer chairman Roosevelt Britain Kennedys Johnson
"salmon" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

06:10 min | Last week

"salmon" Discussed on Slate Money

"And. So there was no way that they could ever like modify so. Right because it just seems like you're you're very misaligned incentives here. So so it's it's kind of interesting the way it worked in practice and the reason why it lasted as long as it did. Is that very early on in the history of the fund. We sold seven Gluckstein cigarettes to NABISCO. We'll see to imperial tobacco imperial tobacco that was it and that gave us a large chunk of money which sat in the fund should explain that galaxy was the biggest tobacco retailer in Europe may in the world of the time, they were the starbucks of tobacconists. So I mean, they had an enormous amount of money in a disposal, and then in the of that, we created new company called Lions which was. Funded a little bit with the Salmon Gluckstein money, but a lot with just public equity offering. So it was we didn't own most of the company, but we had we've talked about a lot on state money the jewel class. Jack, we controlled the company and we uncontrolled the company, but we had all of the senior management positions with basically helped men who are members of the San found that was talk. There was two boards there was the working board, the them who the company, and then there was the family board. We always met the day before the wedding board and they had they had all the power I. Mean they those those voting there was. There was voting shares nonvoting and so the the way that the. System worked financially was kind of interesting. Is that the salmon man paid themselves quite generously for running lions, which was a successful company and I don't think the The salaries were crazy out of line, but they got well paid and they didn't obviously have to compete with anyone else to those jobs and. They could live on the lions salaries and the whole family was basically living on lions salaries all of that money from Essen GPS and g sale could just get invested and grow, and you could you could make a bunch of different investments. You never really needed touch it, and so you can even use some of the income from that to sort of like pay out extra to buy houses and that kind of stuff and so financially, it made a huge it was very attractive to the mend to join this system because they got a very well paid job at Lyons if they wanted it and then they go be. Effectively, share of this huge pool of money that they would otherwise not have sheriff. So you know you really needed to wait pretty much a century. More than the century before the number of men in the family had grown so big and the amount of money in the family had become diluted across. So many people and also lions had been sold. So we making those salaries anymore before like the you know Andrew, and his brother. Neil you? No the the two guys who left Oh. Yeah. pull. Yeah Andrew Pool basically said, no, it doesn't make financial sense anymore we would do better off outside the pundit. You also question about why it kept going what was the incentive? So the beginning was it was a unifying system which wasn't ready well, then it became this incredibly affluent way this easy way of making money. So that was the incentive and then off the second. World. War will happen was even though the financial incentive wasn't that there was an enormous moral and. Ethical pressure from the family elders, which said you need to do this for the family would not as a Felix said, nobody owned the it was passed down the generations and so you're not doing it for yourself. You're doing your grandchildren, your great grandchildren, and so when funny did break up in the nineteen thousand, nine, hundred s the emotional turmoil was extremely she had. A management consultancy toughest institute, we help the with psychological workshops had to work through because they felt they were being disloyal to the heroes. These grandfather's these great grandfathers and it really was very much a male culture. I mean there was some very notable women in the Mimi was won- Elena was another one who was the? As in many Jewish families there are a lot of big. You know powerful Matrix in the in the family they just. And they they were pals behind the front but they didn't actually have the jumps and I'm curious how is this? How unique is this other other examples of these types of structures I e you know some I haven't found anything like it and even more interestingly, the tax authorities had never seen anything like it, which is one of the reasons one knows about it try like we we kind of had some expensive legal advice saying that it was all legal and we didn't need to pay any taxes and that kind of job you pay income tax on the income you get paid the. Fund itself wasn't paying taxes. No capital gains. So it was it was sitting in this kind of tax limbo for long moments and and one of the reasons why? Why? When I was growing up it was understood that no one talked about the fund. I mean you told specifically not to talk. And, one of the main reasons for that was that like well, we had good legal advice and it was legal and find like no one wanted the tax authorities to start asking any questions because who knows where that might end up, and so it was only after the fund. Got Wound up in you know and dissolved and no longer existed that someone like Thomas was able to come along and write this book. So, there was actually there was declared no one was paying taxes on any of the money we were paying taxes income, which was a very minimal amounts of money very small because because remember your income didn't even need to cover your mortgage because you didn't have a mortgage. On your home or your medical bills or your schooling or your travel or your painting or your call because.

Andrew Pool lions Gluckstein Salmon Gluckstein San Europe Lyons Essen GPS Jack toughest institute Neil Thomas Felix Elena
"salmon" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

02:09 min | Last week

"salmon" Discussed on Slate Money

"Hello I am Felix Salmon of Axios I'm on vacation this week, which is good news view because this means that you finally get to hear an episode. We recorded a couple of months ago pre cove it with my cousin domus hotting. This is something which I've been hinting at for a little while, but it's all about family wealth and it is kind of fascinating. I think you'll enjoy it. But obviously, if we're not talking about covert or anything like that, that's because it hadn't happened yet enjoy. Welcome to the Salmon Legacy edition of sleep and money or guide the what is normally the business and finance news of the week. But this week we have a special guest in the UK. Mr Thomas Haunting. you on my cousin am You have written a book about our family yes. It's about the Samsung Galaxy family and their businesses, J lions, and the Tobacco Company summoned Gluckstein and the book is named Legacy and is available on Amazon? Although not from US published yet we're holding out hope for that I am Felix of Axios and also the Salmon family I'm joined by emily pack of Huffpost whose own family history we're going to talk a little bit about hello we're joined by Anish Manzke raking views who. Comes from a long line of farmers. and. What we're going to do is we're GonNa talk a little bit about the kind of unique. Salmon family structure which. Is, having great difficulty getting brain around and then we're going to talk a little bit more broadly about this whole concept of. Inheritance wealth and how it drives society all of that coming up on slate money..

Felix Salmon Axios Amazon Samsung Galaxy Anish Manzke Mr Thomas UK emily pack Tobacco Company Gluckstein
Gov. Newsom asks Warren Buffett to back removal of Northern California dam

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:28 sec | Last week

Gov. Newsom asks Warren Buffett to back removal of Northern California dam

"Governor Newsome has appealed directly to investor Warren Buffett to support demolishing for hydro electric dams on a river along the Oregon California border. The goal is to save salmon populations that have dwindled to almost nothing. The governor on Wednesday wrote Buffet urging him to back the Klamath River project, which would be the largest dam removal in U. S history. Dams are owned by a Pacific Corps, an Oregon based utility owned by Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway company.

Warren Buffett Governor Newsome Oregon California Border Klamath River Berkshire Hathaway Company Oregon Pacific Corps Buffet U. S
Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

Seattle Now

08:31 min | Last week

Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

"Pregnancies are good news for the southern resident killer whales and right now, it looks like there are three whales including j thirty five who could give birth. But there's a long way to go today. We're GONNA talk about the lives of these orcas and our complicated relationship with them here to do that with us is Linda makes she's the environment reporter at the Seattle Times Linda. Thanks for joining us. Thank you, Trish. So give us a quick recap on J. Thirty five for people who weren't here maybe when her calf died. So J thirty five or Takuma really is the ORCA whale who changed the conversation about this very small population of whales and very sadly trish as I talked to today that population is even smaller than it was two years ago when she gave birth to a female calf and it live for only one half hour, and then she did something that scientists know these animals do as well as other, very, highly intelligent. Socially, bonded animals they grieve and she just refused to let that baby go. Now, this calf is probably six feet. Long weighs about three hundred pounds, and for seventeen days, she just refused to let it go and she had to decide to retire. She went down for breath to pick it up once again and carry it some more, and it really did touch the hearts. People around the world and even though these southern resident orcas have been listed as dangerous since two thousand and five. Suddenly people really did understand for the first time, just how fragile they are, and the fact that these aren't just random black and white wildlife. These are families with very, very close bonds. And why do you think that we feel so attached to these orca because I grew up in the Eighties and Wales were such a big deal. You know every girl had little whale necklace and why do we feel so attached I'm gonNA, make a sound for you inherit comes. That is sound of a whale breathing. They are mammals like us, and that's sound when you hear it, it's like a sound from the beginning of the world. It's It's a magnificent presence to be with these whales and you and you understand as you observe their family bond says, you see the way they take care of one another. You know they're so superior to people they. They have brilliant diplomacy. They share space in the ocean without ever warring or committing any acts of aggression against one another. They've families together for life. It's really quite remarkable and they've been around don't forget this for six million years as a species. So these are in every way our elders and mentors for how to run a successful society and don't forget this. They were doing just fine until we showed up. How do we raise up the cause of the ORCA of the environment here without doing the thing that we tend to do a lot of as humans, which is just the help that hurts, how do we walk that line? Actually, this is easier than ever I mean, let's remember how we got to know these southern resident whales. Well, it was the capture era which by the way was not that long ago. Free, willy. Oh. Yeah. Anybody could go out and catch themselves a killer whale for an aquarium or for that matter, sell it for profit anouar in the world until as recently as are you ready Nineteen, seventy six. So wow, that's really recent. Recent and the only while who've had survived that time is still alive and she's still at the Miami Seaquarium and the fiftieth anniversary of her capture and Penn cove is on August seventh. Wow. This is recent time and ironically it was through seeing these so-called killer whales up close in captivity and realizing their incredible intelligence and they're gentle personalities that people went through a whole change in their understanding about these animals and today they're not only revered but protected and I said it's easier than ever to love these animals without loving them to death God look at what you can watch the documentary footage that's out there to enjoy these animals is so much. Better than anything that has ever been available. The amount of knowledge we have about them is superb growing by the day and you know you can watch them from shore. The idea that you need to spend the money by the way and get on a boat. Go after them. You know that's not the only way to enjoy these whales and I think that it's important to. Show some restraint and also some respect for their space. So. J thirty five is pregnant. Again, this is a good sign but two thirds of pregnancies in this population are lost. I learned this lesson with birds in my backyard last year in a nest so. This is not the time for a baby shower. We have a long way to go here. That's so well said. I would think about it. This way this time to hold space for these oils to hold them in your mind and think about what you can do to help whether it's something that might feel small but adds up such as be involved in local land use decisions in your community. That's where all this getting decided about how much of the puget sound lowlands we retain and how much we pay of over. You know these tedious things that we don't think matter like Oh, the king, county flood control district. Well, you know what they're up to. They're thinking about the future of the Green. River. which is upstream from the Duwamish, the green flows into the duwamish Seattle's only river. It's very important Salmon River for the whales and so things like paying attention to what's the local flood district doing what is going on in my local community? By Way of development? All of these things make a difference especially if all of us do. and. Read learn about these animals become informed. Educate Yourself. You know there are lots of ways to get involved and stay involved and play heart in whether. Tele. Calf actually. Does get born and does survive. To me, that's our work song as a region. May Her next calf with? So J thirty five. How will scientists track her pregnancy? Will very remotely fortunately. The scientists who do this work are John, Durbin? And Holly Fehrenbach, and they're they're a team of scientists who came up with a new method. using drones to photograph these Wales from at least one hundred, few of them and remote Louis activated. So they're far from the whales. So nowhere near them, the whales don't seem to show any notice of these drums when they're flying. And they take suspect hack your pictures, and there's something about the angle from above That's very different from a boat. You can see not only the shape of the whales. You can watch their behavior, their families. I. Make It takes your breath away and it is an entirely new view of the lives of these Wales and when it comes to keep track of j thirty five and the other pregnant whales. They're going to do is take another peek in September. DID THEY FATTEN UP? Did they pump up or are they going into winter in good shape? Are they look stressed or are they looking skinny? Most importantly with regard to her? Is She nice fat around? They'd like to see her a lot rounder in September than she is now for early in her pregnancy, these whales carry their babies, believe it or not for eighteen eighteen months Linda I read that and I thought. Oh. My Gosh Holy. Mackerel A. And actually then the real work starts because they've got to feed not only themselves, but they've got a lactate and that's a very, very high fat milk. So she's got her work cut out for her so they'll immature September and we will all cross our fingers that she's even bigger. And then you know she's either. Going to be carrying another kappa which time. I, don't know what I'll do. Or, we'll see her romping with a baby. You know We'll see what happens next I. do think that we ought to kind of hold our breath. A little bit chances are are high that things won't go well, but it doesn't mean that she couldn't surprise us and we might have some more good news. Let's remember there have been two berths to southern residents and let's remember Linda are bar for hope, is pretty low. Sleep. Vote through. Isn't it for the? Thought, I'd get a good peach these days and I'm just thrilled. Good Peach. Tomato. I'm good.

Linda Orca Wales Trish Seattle Times Takuma Puget Sound Reporter Miami Duwamish Salmon River Seattle Penn Cove Holly Fehrenbach John Louis Durbin
Kanye West's NJ ballot petition falls short, complaint says

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | Last week

Kanye West's NJ ballot petition falls short, complaint says

"Kanye may not make it onto the New Jersey ballot after all, according to a formal complaint filed with the state. Kanye West petition to appear on New Jersey's ballot as a presidential candidate fails to pass legal muster because signatures are incomplete and in some cases appear written with very similar handwriting. Election law attorney Scott Salmon, a registered Democrat, filed the objection. Of the state division of elections after reviewing the more than 1300 signatures the wrapper had submitted. New Jersey requires presidential candidates to get 800 signatures to appear on the ballot. Salmon tells The Associated Press that he counted more than 600 that were in some way defective. There has been no comment from Kanye West tonight. The division of Elections did not respond to the report in The Associated

New Jersey Kanye West Kanye Scott Salmon The Associated Press Attorney
Game Scoop

Game Scoop!

05:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Game Scoop

"Okay? Let's talk about what we've been playing I know at least seventeen on Ivan playing ghost of Sakina just their view. Our interview a came out this week. got a nine from Mitchell ends. Everybody seems to be really really enjoying it. I know I. Am that also true for both of you? Hands Down like gotta be the most gorgeous game I've ever played. It's very pretty. It's very pretty. I mean there's just there's firefly's everywhere. They're like little butterflies. flapping around the attention to detail is amazing, but like even when you're walking over yellow like yellow leaves from from falling from the trees you can see. They're like sweeping up behind you and they go faster as you run faster. It really is amazing to look at 'EM SALMON I. We're talking about this at some point off. Scoop. and Sam mentioned like it's such a bummer when it's nighttime because you don't get to see all of all of this like loveliness and all its glory. But. Yeah, understand are really cool, but sunny day really really makes things amazing in that game, and then there's these moments where like I I mean they sat when you go into a story, they set the time for that and that's like a trick they're using because sometimes you're like in the the golden forest area, and everything's like autumn looking because y'all. It's like all seasons at once in that game. And and you. The Sun is like as big as the screen is. Gold and everything is silhouetted in, and it's just like it's unbelievable, but it's still an open world game, and that'll just happen. Naturally were moving around. It's like the thing that breath wild did which I thought was really cool. Which says well is the wind like like these Grassy Plains, the wind looks amazing, sweeping through them, and there's giant fields of flowers, and you keep like our. That's probably going to be the most beautiful. Beautiful place in the game and then they went up it with like another field of flowers has cool rocks in it or something, or they have like a swarm of starlings that is the most realistic depiction of a swarm of birds have ever seen in any games in any way just looks incredible analytical. All three of those elements that you mentioned are also gameplay elements. The bird heads the flowers and the wind. The wind actually really liked that. They use the wind to tell you where to go. Yeah although really cool mechanic. Yeah, it's really windy and my Sushi Malvo because I'm just like. Wait. What direction wait am I going the right way? My Hair's total again. Just miserable, be a nice summer fall, maybe autumn or Spring Day, but it's just a little bit chilly because of that wind. I'm playing it coming immediately coming off of last part too, so it's a little bit interesting. compete playing those games one after the other last of his party was really like shooting for the stars and trying to get do something different. Give you an original experience play with the way narratives working games play with your expectations, trying to do all this new stuff or as ghosts of Sushi. Shema I feel like it's just a very traditional open world action game, which isn't a knock against it at all I just feel it's like the AAA open action game refined to perfection. It's honestly the breath of fresh air that I was hoping for following the. Exactly that kind of air. Thank you. Breath of fresh wind. Because I mean aside from all this stuff about like the last of us being this really like dark and brutal world that depicts humanity in such a like depressing perspective go Sushi Shema is pretty much the opposite of that in a lot of ways but I like like I'm going really slowly through the main story beats actually because I. Love The side quests in the site. I'll give you something different. level you up in different ways, or you can get legendary armor and weapons with some of the. Specific side quests so I I just love being in the world and spending as much time as possible searching everywhere like looking for all the little elements of the story that are living in these tiny pockets as opposed to the loss of us, which is just as like grand big cinematic experience, also you use triangle really dominantly in the last of us for like access points like opening doors, or whatever, and then in goes Chima. You are, too, so I have definitely accidentally hacked the hell out of my poor horse, trying to mount it, which which sources you big or jumped off the Horse I. Yeah! I picked the white horse and I named him Nobu for trust. three two three horses that you get to choose from Black Arstan puffy. That's exactly what I have class. Hacking I. Aside from the beauty of the game. I think there's a little bit of like Damon was saying like what? What's an open world RPG going for like it is trying to? It's more like assassins creed in anything else, but I I personally like it better than assassins creed I think it's like a a because I like the sword combat. Now it's been frustrating for a very long time, but now I have like these multiple stances. Stances them switching through. It's really fun. I found the way that I like to play, which is rolling a lot and dodging instead of parrying which I just suck at I'm just so bad at that and a better fighting games, too. I always knew like I. Play Friends. Wednesday got good at blocking and like street fighter two. I'd be like well. I can't play anymore I. Just don't like I'm out

Ivan Mitchell Grassy Plains Shema Black Arstan Chima Damon Scoop. SAM
Washington DC - Maryland teachers unions, PTA call for virtual-only start to school this fall amid coronavirus pandemic

Derek Hunter

00:48 sec | Last month

Washington DC - Maryland teachers unions, PTA call for virtual-only start to school this fall amid coronavirus pandemic

"The Maryland State Education Association, the Baltimore teacher's Union and the Mail and Peeta all putting pressure on Maryland leaders to make the fall semester. A virtual one. M. S. G. A president Cheryl boss said Making the decision now would give every school district six weeks to plan. Governor Larry Hogan and state Superintendent Dr Karen Salmon have not provided a recent update on their plans has start as the start of the school is approaching Baltimore County public schools proposing three plans for starting classes in the fall. Maryland public schools Most published their recovery plans by August 14th. The first day of school in the county, September 8th. Prince George's County will announce they're reopening plans at noon today. Charles County students will not return early on in August. The school board voted last night and agreed to start the school year with virtual learning August

Baltimore County Maryland Maryland State Education Assoc Charles County Baltimore Peeta Cheryl Boss Dr Karen Salmon Larry Hogan Prince George Superintendent President Trump M. S. G.
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | Last month

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Aniakchak

Travel with Rick Steves

04:44 min | Last month

Aniakchak

"The any AC national monument and preserve gets the fewest visitors of any national park, and it boasts no rangers. No trails and no waiting in line. All the more reason Christopher Solomon went out of his way to hike a few summers ago. Chris, welcome great to be here. Is this actually a national park or what's the technicality they're. Technically Rick any act check national. Monument and preserve is its name and it. It is not a national park, but it is the least visited unit of the four hundred and one properties in the national park system, so nobody goes there white. Why do they even bother thinking of it? As part of the system you, you'd think that the least visited might be something like the Martin Van Buren national birthplace right, but no It's Antioch Chat in two. Thousand Twelve Anne check had nineteen visitors last year might have picked up to a hundred or so and you were there with how? How many people in your party three of us three of us now? Where is it and how do you get? There visualizes for me if you look at the map of Alaska Alaska? has this big tale that kind of frozen, fourteen hundred mile tail, that wags westward at come shotgun, and that's the Aleutian islands and the base of that tail is the Alaska Peninsula, and that's where any act check. You know if I wanted to go there next week. Where would I fly? What I just rent a car and drive there, or how'd I get that so one of the reasons rick? Not, very popular is it's hard to get to from Seattle where I live. It took US three flights to anchorage to King Salmon to Port Heiden which is just an airstrip built for World War Two in the middle of nowhere on the Bering Sea and then we backed packed with sixty five pound packs for twenty two miles to reach the centerpiece of the the. The National Monument, which is a gorgeous volcanic crater, so ease of access is not one of its selling points. Is it worth the trouble? Yeah, I was thinking about this on the drive over here and how to summarize it. I have had the good fortune to travel all over the world as a travel writer, I was with a photographer who shoots pictures all over. Over the world and beautiful places we agreed we'd never seen a place as unique as okay. How can you write in? Your article is just gorgeous about this that it was mind-bending. Lee Gorgeous is the desolation that's part of it, or what makes it better than just going to any national park, so maybe to convey what it's like I need to tell you just. Just a little bit about its geologic in human history, which is more interesting than it sounds about the time. The Egyptians were ruling the world. A seven thousand foot volcano blew its top with a with a force of ten thousand nuclear bombs ruined the bigger eruptions we we know of, and then the volcano collapsed on itself and created a crater that could swallow Manhattan. That crater filled with water, so it looked like crater lake national park, then that lake blew out in his biblical flood in over the next couple thousand years, this lost worlds was sort of created inside that crater, and it just went kind of unnoticed, except for the native peoples for thousands of years until nineteen thirty, when this man called the glacier priests arrived, and the Glacier priest was father, Bernard, how he's one of these Jesuit priests who was cut from the old cloth, swashbuckling sort of Jesuits, and he, he barnstorm all over the forty-ninth state, having these wild adventures by Bush plane. Plane by dog sled is write ups win the Saturday Evening Post and the National Geographic and in nineteen thirty, he wrote about visiting Antioch Check, and he described it as paradise found this this lost world where orchids bloomed in the volcanically warmed soil, and the rabbits were gigantic, and they came up and walked right up to his crew, which was a bunch of the Santa Clara football players, and and they felt bad killing them to eat them, but they did anyway. Did you read his writing the in preparation for your trip so I? Did I read about his writings about the great? Great Moon Crater of the earth called it, and then what happened is he wanted to go back the next year nineteen, thirty one and any act check blew up again, and he goes back and talks about it no longer in these Milton, s Kinda paradise found terms, but but in this dante-esque hellish terms describes himself peering into this blackened inferno, and then they go into the crater a couple months after it's blown up again, and they nearly die of poisonous gasses, and they're, and they're put their beans on a funeral and their beans Boileau, and they shove a thermometer in the ground. Ground thermometer explodes, and it's just this hellish wild landscape. That's the setting we go back eight years later. Just kinda see what it's like, and a lot of the soot has washed off from that nineteen thirty one explosion, but it has this kind of Sier Flinty beauty desolation sublime.

Great Moon Crater National Monument Crater Lake United States Rick Antioch Check Alaska Christopher Solomon Lee Gorgeous Alaska Peninsula Chris Sier Flinty Martin Van Buren Seattle Aleutian Islands Antioch Chat Anne Bering Sea Writer
Young Great White Sharks Eat Off the Sea Floor: Study

60-Second Science

02:05 min | Last month

Young Great White Sharks Eat Off the Sea Floor: Study

"Of a Dorsal fin cutting through the surface is iconic. But scientists studying the stomach contents of young great white sharks off the coast of Australia. We're in for a surprise. When they learned that the predators seemed to spend a lot of time, patrolling the sea floor. They have predominantly fish based diet, which is not unexpected for juvenile watch shocks, the most important price basing we have been fibers Australian Salmon University of Sydney Graduate Student Richard Grainger. He and his team sorted through the stomach contents of more than fifty juvenile white sharks that died after being entangled. Entangled in shark exclusion, nets meant to protect swimmers. The expected finding was just the diversity and importance of bottom dwelling species, things like stock cases which their selves in the Santa Quite strange, looking fish and flathead, but also seeing rights, people actually did not have a good idea of the particulars of great white shark diets as Grainger points out the sharks enjoy protections throughout the world, so most researchers estimated their diets through the chemical markers that they can ethically access by taking small skin samples. These measurements indicate at what level of the food chain the predators feeding, but not the actual critters that make up their meals. That's quite a lot of evidence that lots of different animals, so even cannibals noble have proposed self select different prey foods based on a particular balance of nutrients. Grainger hopes that by further understanding. WHAT JUVENILE WHITE SHARKS TO EAT! He can begin to piece together. How and why they make? Make their predatory choices. The study was published in the Journal Frontiers in Marine Science on the sanding and predicting when shocks might be more abundant in certain areas would be an end goal, avoiding or mitigating human shark conflicts means understanding the sharks nutritional goals, and if researchers can anticipate, where, and when sharks are likely to spend their time hunting, they can better protect humans from getting bid and sharks from getting killed.

Sharks Richard Grainger Australia Journal Frontiers In Marine Sc Graduate Student Australian Salmon University O
Russia stages grand WWII parade ahead of vote on Putin Reforms

Ron St. Pierre

02:26 min | Last month

Russia stages grand WWII parade ahead of vote on Putin Reforms

"Russia stages a grand World War two parade and it comes ahead of a vote on a Vladimir Putin that could extend his rule for quite a long time and joining us now with details to some unknown fox news morning salmon morning run yes a baby a few days for about a minute to ten at the moment these are two really big events in the Russian calendar that would pose a spoon from as early as this year because of the corona virus outbreak first that parade yesterday which took place on the same day Russia's coronavirus case numbers past the six hundred thousand mark that imitated insisted that it was still the right time to host this parade there's barely a facemask insight is fourteen thousand soldiers troops across at red square in Moscow a spectacular at parade but striking for seemingly a lack of social distancing and coronavirus proportions taking place at this parade he didn't hailed the state union victory over the **** in nineteen forty five this is something that is celebrated every year in Russia the huge national holiday and this is the seventy fifth anniversary date a big round number the market and Putin told about how the Red Army stepped up and came to the world's defense in World War two he said it's impossible to imagine what would happen to the world if the Soviet Union hadn't been back to defend it that is something essential at the pigeon has tried to restate hi many game during his time in office yesterday said we must pass this on to our children grandchildren and great grandchildren so I shot of national pride one day before voting began this morning in the national referendum on reforming the constitution that the package of measures that Russians are being asked to vote on that taking the mole in one on one of these measures is to reset the clock on president Putin's time in office he's currently required to step down in twenty twenty four well this would mean if this passes in the next week or so he'll be allowed to stand and run for the two tabs and if he wins and didn't think anyone would will ask he would have ruled Russia thirty six years the time twenty thirty six comes and then the next step is to ten X. by the voting starts today spread over seven days to try and avoid crowds at the polling center the game because of the pandemic the main banking days next says that and can expect results shortly after that

Russia Vladimir Putin Moscow Red Army Soviet Union
150 cannery workers forced into hotel quarantine without pay

Morning Edition

00:19 sec | Last month

150 cannery workers forced into hotel quarantine without pay

"A new lawsuit says about a hundred and fifty seasonal workers hired by an Alaskan cannery are being forced to quarantine without pay at a Los Angeles hotel after three of them tested positive for corona virus the lawsuit says the workers most from Mexico and southern California have been stuck at the crown plaza LAX since June tenth they were hired by north Pacific seafoods to work at a salmon cannery in

Mexico California North Pacific Seafoods Los Angeles LAX
'One Of The Best Nature Shows': A River Transformed After Dams Come Down

Environment: NPR

03:02 min | Last month

'One Of The Best Nature Shows': A River Transformed After Dams Come Down

"Maine. Every year. Dozens of aging dams are removed from US rivers, and that can bring dramatic transformations downstream. Murray Carpenter takes us to Canada Back River in Maine where the federal government ordered the removal of a large dam two decades ago to see what happens when a river is allowed to run free. Along the Best Cook River, the first thing you'll notice or the birds. Eagles are everywhere waiting on gravel bars and chattering from the trees. Old Bunch of birds there they're bald. Eagles those are all bald eagles. That's conservationist Steve Brooke who began pushing for dam removals in the Nineteen Ninety S as I'm looking down the Sebastian River I see. The number of Bald Eagles flying. Catching fish from the river, the heat themselves their family, when Brooke and others began talking about getting rid of the dam on the back and another on this tributary, many mainers didn't see the point. There were hints of this Sebastian Cooks former productivity, three thousand year, old fish traps built by the walkie people were found in an upstream lake. But Brooks has many had never seen a large river system in its natural state in the Pacific. They're restoring rivers because they still have runs of Pacific Salmon here on the East Coast, the rumors have been dammed since the seventeenth century, and so it's very hard for people to understand what's missing part of what's missing for many northeast rivers L. Wives. The half-pound herrings up from the ocean despite? Now in some places it looks like this river is paved with the fish just like in historical accounts from before the industrial revolution, the expression as you could walk across the river on the backs of fish, and it looks like you could, because it's solid fish all the way across, and all the way downstream for as far as you can see gail, whipple Hauser is a biologist with Maine's department of Marine Resource. She says After the dams came down, fisheries managers helped the fish over dams further up river. And the alewife population exploded. The increase was just amazing. From four hundred thousand to like a million and three million five million. Just amazing now the Sebastian Cook has the nation's largest run, avail wives and blueback herring. There's even a commercial harvest mostly for lobster Bait. And other migratory Fisher using the river like striped. Bass Shad Lamp. Ray and Dave Scott lives nearby and is fished along the river for nineteen years. Sometimes, he just puts his rod down and watches rate about two miles from my house is one of the best nature shows just come down hit. Relax sometimes just to watch the birds. And there are lots of birds flying. One Hundred Ninety Eagles recounted along the river in mid. June Steve Brooks says the Sebastian Cook shows what could happen elsewhere when other Dan's come out to bring back free flowing rivers and wild native fish.

Best Cook River Bald Eagles Sebastian River Canada Back River Eagles Maine. Steve Brooke Sebastian Cook Steve Brooks Sebastian Cooks United States Murray Carpenter Pacific Shad Lamp Blueback Herring Pacific Salmon East Coast RAY Fisher
"salmon" Discussed on Peace Out

Peace Out

05:46 min | 2 months ago

"salmon" Discussed on Peace Out

"RC. So from your hips. You're going to slowly. Raise your self up. Until you're sitting up. To do this, we're going to grow at the same speed as these bubbles. If you hear them bubbling slowly like this. Move Slowly to match. If you hear them, get faster like this. You can start moving a little faster, but not too fast. Ready. Here come the bubbles. Let's start rising up slowly. Keep listening and keep growing. Are You fully upright now. If been lengthened up a little more. There's probably still room for you to grow even taller. If you're sitting down. From your hips! Up The spine and right through the top of your head. there. If you're standing. You could sit down again. Now that we've grown bigger and stronger. Where at the next stage of the Salmon's life cycle? And now we're called smoked. smolder big and strong enough now to swim downstream where rivers meet salt water oceans. Salmon use their sense of smell to protect themselves. They're able to sniff out nearby predators. When they're in the ocean, they're predators can include dolphins. Seals Wales..

Wales
"salmon" Discussed on Peace Out

Peace Out

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"salmon" Discussed on Peace Out

"Seven. Three comment Nah pasture some aleinu promenade San. Which means how are you? I'm feeling happy right now because we went for a walk this morning. That usually makes me feel relaxed. What makes you feel relaxed and happy? Maybe it's doing something kind for someone. We have a couple of kindness stories today from listeners who wanted to share about a time. Someone did something kind for them. I here's Abbie Hi my name's Adam. Sold. I live in Neil, you are. and. Reo. Kindness scarring. His one. Man Arrow on the beach. and. He brought the beach chair one for him I'm from me. and. I like him a lot. I think he's the best friend. I could keep. I miss played a area. My friend, I can't wait until of corona thing Lozo. Thank you avi. I'm sure Arielle misses you, too. He sounds like a very good friend and I can't wait for this. Over to. Thanks for sharing your kindness story abby. Now here's Amelia. I, my name is Amelia and I'm ten years old and I'm from Delaware and when someone showed kindness to me is where my mom helped me with my schoolwork, and I also love your show. I listened to it almost every night. Peace Out and peace within. Thanks Amelia. How lucky you are to have your mom able to help you with your schoolwork. Thank you for sharing. A lot of parents and caregivers are now having to do a lot more helping with online school assignments. There are many things that can be frustrating about being home right now. which is why responding with kindness is more important than ever. When we react to something, someone sadder done without thinking about it. It could lead to a saying or doing something that will hurt others. And while it might make you feel good for a little bit. I'm willing to bet that feeling won't last long. However! If we take an extra moment or two to think about how we will respond that lets us think about how to make better choices in our actions and gives us time to choose helpful, not hurtful words. Even when it's hard. It might help to remind yourself to take some deep breaths before saying or doing anything. Give it a try next time. Here's one more kindness story. That was sent an e-mail. It says hi. My name is Armani. I am nine years old. I listened to peace out every night. It all started on my second day at my new school. I had no one to play with. I came up to emily. She is now my best friend. I asked her if I could play with her. And of course she said yes. ps, I love the science episodes. Thank your money. Starting at a new school is definitely not easy time, so glad that emily was such a good friend to you right from the start. And thank you I love the science episodes to. It's fun to read up and Research on constellations and g odes, and for this episode. Salmon! I learned so much writing these stories to. Thanks again to everyone who sent in a kindness story. We will definitely listen and read each one and reply, but it just might take some time. All right, let's get started everyone. Let's sit up in a comfortable position. Rest your hands on your knees. or in your lap. Breathing. As, you up, nice and tall. Gently Roll your shoulders back. Lift Your Chin a little. Look forward. And close. Your eyes if you'd like. For comedown count down. You can just keep breathing as you listen. Or you can try time your breathing with the numbers. Breathing in when you hear number. And breathing out in between the numbers. Ready. Ten. Nine. <music> seven <music> six. Five. Four. Three. Two <music>. <music>!

Amelia aleinu promenade San Arielle Neil emily Delaware Salmon
Salmon Run Home

Peace Out

05:31 min | 2 months ago

Salmon Run Home

"Seven. Three comment Nah pasture some aleinu promenade San. Which means how are you? I'm feeling happy right now because we went for a walk this morning. That usually makes me feel relaxed. What makes you feel relaxed and happy? Maybe it's doing something kind for someone. We have a couple of kindness stories today from listeners who wanted to share about a time. Someone did something kind for them. I here's Abbie Hi my name's Adam. Sold. I live in Neil, you are. and. Reo. Kindness scarring. His one. Man Arrow on the beach. and. He brought the beach chair one for him I'm from me. and. I like him a lot. I think he's the best friend. I could keep. I miss played a area. My friend, I can't wait until of corona thing Lozo. Thank you avi. I'm sure Arielle misses you, too. He sounds like a very good friend and I can't wait for this. Over to. Thanks for sharing your kindness story abby. Now here's Amelia. I, my name is Amelia and I'm ten years old and I'm from Delaware and when someone showed kindness to me is where my mom helped me with my schoolwork, and I also love your show. I listened to it almost every night. Peace Out and peace within. Thanks Amelia. How lucky you are to have your mom able to help you with your schoolwork. Thank you for sharing. A lot of parents and caregivers are now having to do a lot more helping with online school assignments. There are many things that can be frustrating about being home right now. which is why responding with kindness is more important than ever. When we react to something, someone sadder done without thinking about it. It could lead to a saying or doing something that will hurt others. And while it might make you feel good for a little bit. I'm willing to bet that feeling won't last long. However! If we take an extra moment or two to think about how we will respond that lets us think about how to make better choices in our actions and gives us time to choose helpful, not hurtful words. Even when it's hard. It might help to remind yourself to take some deep breaths before saying or doing anything. Give it a try next time. Here's one more kindness story. That was sent an e-mail. It says hi. My name is Armani. I am nine years old. I listened to peace out every night. It all started on my second day at my new school. I had no one to play with. I came up to emily. She is now my best friend. I asked her if I could play with her. And of course she said yes. ps, I love the science episodes. Thank your money. Starting at a new school is definitely not easy time, so glad that emily was such a good friend to you right from the start. And thank you I love the science episodes to. It's fun to read up and Research on constellations and g odes, and for this episode. Salmon! I learned so much writing these stories to. Thanks again to everyone who sent in a kindness story. We will definitely listen and read each one and reply, but it just might take some time. All right, let's get started everyone. Let's sit up in a comfortable position. Rest your hands on your knees. or in your lap. Breathing. As, you up, nice and tall. Gently Roll your shoulders back. Lift Your Chin a little. Look forward. And close. Your eyes if you'd like. For comedown count down. You can just keep breathing as you listen. Or you can try time your breathing with the numbers. Breathing in when you hear number. And breathing out in between the numbers. Ready. Ten. Nine. seven six. Five. Four. Three. Two

Amelia Aleinu Promenade San Arielle Neil Emily Delaware Salmon
Demonstrators voice concerns over spearfishing incident

Native America Calling

03:47 min | 2 months ago

Demonstrators voice concerns over spearfishing incident

"This is national native. News Antonia Gonzalez last month. A man shot off a gun near tribal spear fishers on the lake in northern Wisconsin for many that brought back memories protests over native spear fishing rights in the nineteen eighties and nineties. The man involved in the recent incident says he was shooting at a squirrel on his property, but is now facing misdemeanor hate crime charges. Some tribal members want tougher prosecution Ben Meyer explains the protest Monday morning in front of the violence. County courthouse was silent, but noticeable people like Shannon Retana held signs, demanding justice for tribal members and. And respect for treaty rights were tired of the hey. Tight racism is hatred and feeding, and allowing that to continue for so long is it's unacceptable and we're not going to stand for. We won't tolerate it anymore. On the night of May. Second Retinas and three others were practising their fragile protected right to spearfish for Walleye off reservation this time on little Saint Germain Lake on shore, sixty one year, old James Kelsey fired a shotgun. He says he was firing at a squirrel on his property Retana doesn't buy it, so that's why may shirt says he's not a squirrel. Now clearly, he's not a squirrel. He's a man. No one was hurt by the shots, but police arrested Kelsey that night he was charged with two misdemeanors, including a hate crime but Chelsea's attorney Steve Lucarelli, told me his client really was firing at a red squirrel on his property. These were two unrelated events. And assumptions of the meant that they are related. There's a reasonable explanation for what occurred. The attorney said he's concerned. The episode is being blown out of proportion, but Chelsea's bond includes restrictions on guns, alcohol and going onto tribal lands, the case comes against the backdrop of protests over the spear fishing rights of Ojibway tribal members which started in the nineteen eighties, and at times, became violent and racist. Britney lured all elected flambeau tribal member. Holding a sign on Monday says she had hoped the North Woods was passed those days I was just hoping that I would read about it in the eighties and never. Never really thought I had to relive it from national native news. I'm Ben Meyer and Eagle River Wisconsin the leader of a tribal group tackling transboundary issues as retiring Tis Peterman has led the Southeast Alaska indigenous transboundary commission since two thousand seventeen I work projects all my wife just said it's time to take time for myself. A few months after the commission was formed in two thousand, fourteen, the Mount Paulie mine spilled waste into British Columbia waters incoming executive director Fredrik Olsen says there are other minor activities that feed into Alaska's rivers and Salmon Habitat. Everybody already knows about Mt Holly about just a miniscule. Little. Blip on the map compared to read mine. Which is operating in a sticky river watershed right now. The Commission is working to address issues on both sides of the border. There's a lot more transboundary issues than mining. You know there's also this the cruise ships to ship waste. There's oil tankers. There's murdered and missing indigenous women. On an on Olsen has worked as the commission's outreach, coordinator and board chair. The US House Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior Environment and related agencies will hear about the healthcare response to covert nineteen and Indian country. A hearing is scheduled Thursday to gather testimony on the Indian. Health Service response and the use of emergency covid, nineteen funding witnesses include leaders from the Indian Health Service the National Indian health, board and the National Council of Urban Indian health. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Shannon Retana James Kelsey Ben Meyer Fredrik Olsen Chelsea Wisconsin Indian Health Service Antonia Gonzalez Attorney National Council Of Urban Indi Antonio Gonzales County Courthouse Saint Germain Lake Us House National Indian Health Steve Lucarelli Britney Mt Holly North Woods
Halep lays Grand Slam ghosts to rest

The Tennis Podcast

06:00 min | 2 months ago

Halep lays Grand Slam ghosts to rest

"Hello and welcome to our fifteenth and final edition of Roland Garros relived Catherine feeling when I say that. Wistful. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa stop missing the past sort of like A. Double again I will. Note that is. Are You you're right I'm all right I can believe it's the fifteen. Well when I came up with the idea, let's just keep doing the daily podcast. Slams that we promised we would at the start of the, even though there's no tennis by watching lots of action, the past I thought it'd be easy. Turns out then we got lots of ideas about how to do it. Including interviewing everybody, we possibly could find relevant to each match, and that's what we've done again today. for Simona halep against Sloan Stevens 2018 final, and we've got down K. Hilas special guest coach to Simona Halep, and yes, it's been a long and tiring journey to get through today fifteen of these podcasts. We've enjoyed it immensely. I think it's fair to say. So let's get cracking with this one. This match has a lot to it. Doesn't it the whole saga because? Simona. Is it three Grand Slam. She already played. At the to that point and not. Finals yeah, yeah. She played the two, thousand, fourteen and final, and lost in three to Sharapova. She'd played the two thousand, seventeen, French Open final and lost in three Ostapenko, and she played the twenty eighteen Australian Open. Final just a few months before they send those to Wozniacki all three senators. She played well in all of them. She had a lead in all of them and lost all of them. And it was becoming a real. Saga actually. Can help get over the, line. 2018, you say. You want some facts about two thousand eighteen. We. Well, it's not long ago, so you can probably remember most of this Prince Harry and Meghan markle married. Thing right I hosted a semi. Gathering in the garden, did you did you was on the invitation? To, clarify with a few friends and family that I wasn't like a rabid royalist, and it was just an excuse to make some cake and sausage rolls. The I remember seeing the pictures. Wasn't invited that. We can handle it. aretha Franklin and Stephen Hawkins' both died toys. R.. US went bankrupt. Not Quite sure why that to my list, but it is. I'm not sure nothing either. Toys R. US went bankrupt and student Matt's became Grad Matt became Matt. Two thousand eighteen was a big. And formation. Toys R. US, they might. How do you feel about that? No I think it was pressed. Until Lo que, but so I was reading it. I won't saw. Phillips scattered toys R. US In writing when I was about five. States have good stories. Did you speak for? Him! I remember being very excited because it was circuit in the gopher. Time, I was at my dad. That's a long time ago yet. Longtime Gay and I think it was. Joseph in mazing technical latrine time as well right Matt, wasn't even Baby Matt at this point. He's never even heard of these people. You don't know Gordon the gopher is Dima. No. Right so. Just, minded ninety correction. You didn't mention that freedom got promoted into anti eighteen. Thank you for pointing that out. Rather than to. And it didn't last long. It's as relevant as toys R. US, thank you I so. Yes, so we have this final on our hands between SMYRNA HALEP and Sloan seems and it was one that. I was I was looking forward to. A tennis match in. It's just in its own right of these two players battling it out because I thought it could be a really good final. And, should he? I think it ended up exceeding all of those expectations and You're quite right Catherine when you talk about the number of finals, the the salmon halibut already been in, and it was similar to play as we think of that. We've already covered here in this running relived series like even lendl trying to win. A A I slam Andy Murray course. It took him a few guys. Goran Ivanisevic but Simona Halla. Yeah, she already had three. She'd had Darren K Hill by his side for awhile by this point, so let's hear from him about the journey that led to this moments. Together for about three us before she played that particular foreign against flown in two thousand and nineteen and I guess the memory of what happened in two thousand, seventeen, against Ostapenko, as well was brought in the full fun of Amazon so for her to go out and do what she did. And now they say that both of you most destinations. You can't get there unless you go to refund pain a tough road and that was kind of the journey that some had had even before I came along. She might the final. Open and lost Marie shower. Piping, a great match on six four on the third added chances in that one, and then to lose to paint code and then the Knicks Jay come back, an inbetween that of course remember the final that she applied at the open against the Yankee which was another great match, and just even getting to the final at the Australian Open was itself, so I I think that helped a lot. She learned a lot from that particular tournament, and when she got to the final at a French. Against Launch, he had a little extra confidence and belief in a self to finally get it done.

United States Simona Halep Simona Halla Sloan Stevens Matt Catherine Roland Garros Ostapenko Grand Slam Australian Open Aretha Franklin Marie Shower Phillips Joseph Prince Harry K. Hilas Lo Que Andy Murray Knicks
"salmon" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

03:15 min | 2 months ago

"salmon" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"On So we got the SAM. Got The LAMPEY STURGEON. Ula Con all cut off and there is another big service that these features provide that is one that's often overlooked. And that is that. They are feeding predators along the way as adults as young as eggs. Everything that can eat them eat And particularly salmon that die after spawning. What they're really doing his bringing nutrients from the ocean and leaving it on the land and their decaying carcass. Dan So when we look at like the state of Washington on the West Coast we have some of the world's fastest growing forests are temperate. Rainforests sequester more carbon for Hector Amazon rainforest. And do it faster and they do it through the darkest oldest months ear year. Something that are kind of sports adapted do so when we're looking at the deciduous of the tropics that are sequestering carbon successfully in the summertime and then we've got our time four sequestering it in the wintertime. We're doing a really good thing. We're we're hitting problem for both. Do will the reason that in western Washington reason our forests can grow so incredibly fast is Sam. Six and a half million years salmon coming up the rivers spawning and dying and leaving nitrates nitrites. Ammonia phosphates TASSIE. And all that stuff that they got out in the ocean the leave it there in the soy at the same time we talk about unsustainable desert agriculture in eastern Washington. As you know it's a desert technically with the scab land which means all of it at one point was molten lava that Gould down and became rock and normally in a scam land. You can grow stuff like sage. Maybe you can gross stuff like Yucca. But you're not gonna be able to grow all kinds of fancy western prompts wealth in our scab land with enough water we can grow grapes that rival the finest regions of and with Enough Sun. You can grow any grape. You want whenever you want absolutely and in eastern Washington. We'd throw most of the country's apples waco most of the entire Regions Cherries. We can grow all these crops there because for six and a half million years Santa have been swimming off the Colombian snake rivers spawning and dying and leaving those nutrients from from the ocean on the land in the soil in a place where normally it would be pretty nutritionally debt. I'm where there isn't going to be any sort of fertilizer whether Arkansas nitrates and ammonia phosphates asking but the salmon did this and they did it for us for free it was just this conveyor belt of nutrients from the ocean the land so when we put off these these systems dams that blocked them from doing this when we harm the ocean populations through phishing when we destroy the near. Shore Habitat Estuaries from development. We're clogging our arteries we are. We are stealing from ourselves. Yeah one of the really cool things about about population. Salmon is that they bounce back from natural disasters amazingly fast. They've evolved in a part of the world that is browns who earthquakes landslides volcanic eruptions. You name.

Washington Salmon Hector Amazon Sam West Coast Gould Dan Santa Arkansas
Salmon fishing opens in SF, Berkeley — with social distancing rules

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Salmon fishing opens in SF, Berkeley — with social distancing rules

"Bay area health officials are allowing salmon fishing to operate in San Francisco and Berkley just in time for Memorial Day weekend in the East Bay Berkeley charter boats is offering fishing trips the boat operator has cut the number of passengers allowed on board to ten people from twenty five and they're sanitizing the boat before passengers board Scott Sutherland is with Berkeley charter boats he says the city of Berkeley didn't give any specific guidelines except the passengers maintain social distance we determine our own number of passengers that we are going to take and that's where we build data the boat operators also requiring face

San Francisco Berkley Scott Sutherland Berkeley East Bay Berkeley
Crews in Seattle work to salvage sinking boat at Ballard Locks

News, Traffic and Weather

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Crews in Seattle work to salvage sinking boat at Ballard Locks

"A thirty three foot boat sank at the bottom locks late Friday everyone able to get off the boat there Friday afternoon right now secured to the side wall there on salmon bay that's fresh side fresh water side of the locks crews are working to salvage that boat an oil boom was put into place you have a fireable signal fuels been spotted in

Salmon Bay
Copper River Salmon Is Here, and Seattle Health Care Workers Are Among First in Line

News, Traffic and Weather

00:15 sec | 3 months ago

Copper River Salmon Is Here, and Seattle Health Care Workers Are Among First in Line

"Despite the outbreak in northwest tradition lives on the season's first shipment of copper river salmon arrived in Seattle yesterday from Alaska and this morning there was a big salmon bake for more than two hundred healthcare workers on the front lines of the corona virus fight

Seattle Alaska
As Copper River Salmon Arrives in Seattle, Health Care Workers Will Be Among First Served

News, Traffic and Weather

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

As Copper River Salmon Arrives in Seattle, Health Care Workers Will Be Among First Served

"Well as they're insured in our forecast looks like it's going to be much cooler than a record temperature in the barbecue opportunity we had last week but I know there's some great oven bake recipes for copper river salmon I mention that the north was tradition lives on through the corona virus pandemic the for shipment of copper river salmon has arrived here in Seattle fresh fillets right from the river from Alaska in fact this morning some chefs are preparing more than two hundred meals for health care workers on the front lines of the coal that

Alaska Seattle
"salmon" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

10:15 min | 4 months ago

"salmon" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Around the deck in their snapping Heinemann kicking him and stop and take him over to the tender thrown in canvas bags and they take them away completely different from the Fisher that I went to the drift net. Fishery or two in the Court of Alaska. It's the Copper River Salmon which they catch out in open ocean in the Gulf of Alaska when the regulators have Found THAT ENOUGH. Salmon have made it into the Copper River to spawn. You know they'll get it opener fifteen hours or something. Beezer like real Well they're small ships you know. They're they're one person operations about thirty feet now spool of and Spill on the front and They Christie sync with great care. They take him out of the net and they bleed them macgill's essay take them out and they slide them into an ice hold on nowadays summer using a hold with a slush instead of ice because it surrounds outer and they take really good care of it. And that's the difference in price and there's also issue that you spoke about about the condition of the fish that's entering the river. Yeah yeah well I mean as I said that Fisher different rivers different and a river like Copper River which is a big tough long river. It has big fish. More fish has to go through to get to the spawning ground. The higher quality officiant is a lot of the Bristol. Bay Rivers are fairly small rivers. The don't have to go through a lot once the Bristol Bay to get up to their spawning grounds. And so they're not. They're not as bigger stronger. Fat and I mean there's this different quality of fishing in different rivers. Did you mark? Did you taste tests those two fish? Could you tell you don't have to I did but you don't? You could look at them and tell them you really get but just the amount of fat coming off him. Yeah just you know the whole way that they look you know the the Copper River Salmon are beautiful Also I have to say in fairness that the the Copper River people are brilliant marketers. And you know I remember I. I got nowhere on this but I I have roots in Gloucester Massachusetts and I was trying to convince Gloucester fisherman to go out to Cordoba and just check out how the copper river fishery is done how they market their you know they've managed to create in people's heads the idea that that's a species of fish. Yes absolutely absolutely and it has a little to do with the fact that it's the first run in Alaska so it opens the season but it's also also has to do with the fact that they guarantee the quality that is fit fish really carefully but it's also just plain old marketing. Yeah you know. I think a lot of American readers when when they're gonNA talk into a book about Salmon. I think they're expecting to see a bunch of stuff about Alaska right but to you also spend time discussing salmon fisheries and the history of Salmon in Japan the history of Salmon in Europe. Can you give a snapshot of of Salmon as a global resource? Like who has them? Who Don't northern fish and they're also in the southern hemisphere but they're not supposed to be their fake day. They were planted in places like New Zealand. Australia and Chile. I'm not there by nature by nature their northern uniquely all Salman absurd uniquely Northern Hemisphere Salmon cannot live in water that is over sixty eight degrees. Can't live in an account reproduce it so that dictates og going rivercenter fairly far north And also it's one of the problems about climate change the Pacific Salmon are from California to Alaska. the in northern Japan. A KINDA and In Pacific Russia the Kamtchatka the Kamtchatka peninsula become chapter peninsula and Alaska are the two healthiest salmon runs in the world. And the reason for that. What are these places have in common it? Hardly any people Short growing season so there's almost no agriculture so those rivers are undisturbed at wild. That's interesting I is you. We've talked about earn an observation. I've had about wildlife conservation that at if you go back in American history a bit you see that we had wilderness and wild things sort of in spite of our best efforts to get rid of it like we just it took us a while the concrete all right like we sort of had the appetite an intention to go get it all. We just haven't gotten around to it and eventually we got around to it and now we have oftentimes the wild things that we have and the wildlife that we have is now. Because we've made a very conscious decision to have it. Yeah we understand that it's costly to have it but we insist on having it and we make sacrifices to have it is Russia you hear about the Salmon in the brown bears and in in Russia and Siberia. Are they still in the phase of they just have because they haven't gotten around to killing it off yet or are they sacrificing for it? Now the There are serious commercial fishing. Go I got in Kamchatka. In other parts of Russia and also the area is very rich in oil and so far. They've sent away from the Kamtchatka but there are some areas near there. That were very good. Salmon places but have been damaged by oil and mineral exploration the. Yeah it's just It's it's a remote You know it's like why don't we all move to Alaska? I don't know we don't. That's what saves the last Guy. I think they like it that way. What how are the runs in Japan? Are there good. Salmon runs in Japan. There are some there are some good in in in the north mainly in China which is the northernmost island. You can walk out and stand on the bank and look out and there's much of salmon spawning there in this in the In cities you can see the salmon spawning in rivers there an avid unique species of. Massu or sometimes in English called Cherry Salmon because it it runs around the time of Cherry Blossoms. What's it what? What was it most closely related to of Pacific Salmon? Oh I don't know it's maybe like a Sockeye or something I don't know it's a it's a very very good heating salmon and Kind of unique species. It shows up a little bit in other places in Asia. A little bit in the come chop gun a little bit in Korea but it's mainly a Japanese species. There's there's a lot of problems in the Japanese salmon fishery like something like ninety five percents of the wild salmon in Japan. Have some Hatchery DNA in them all really. Oh that's not good. No when you were when you were map and your book out and and trying to think of what areas to write about in what salmon to pay attention to. I'm asking this as just a person that grew up as a kid in the Great Lakes. Did you have? What were your considerations around talking about your reluctance or ambitions to talk about the make believe Sam like the you know. We have several species of salmon in the Great Lakes. That remove their do you do you feel that. It's irrelevant to the conversation. Does it thank you? I do feel that it's it doesn't it doesn't speak to the preservation of wild runs. It's like it's like farm salmon. I mean a lot of things. You can say pro and con about farm salmon but one thing that's clear is it has nothing to do with whether Salmon Wild Salmon will survive. I mean it's a completely different thing. Well except that it does have something to do with wild salmon surviving because it could possibly make them not survive. Correct the far far. Yeah okay. We're getting into that now or later..

Copper River Salmon Pacific Salmon Copper River Salmon Japan Northern Hemisphere Salmon Alaska Cherry Salmon Russia Court of Alaska Gulf of Alaska Fisher Great Lakes Kamtchatka Bay Rivers Bristol Bay Heinemann Bristol New Zealand Pacific Russia
"salmon" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

08:50 min | 5 months ago

"salmon" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And it's it's not totally clear. I would say that Alaska which you mentioned I find to be completely crazy. I don't think it's true that Alaska Needs Hatcher to preserve. Its its sevenstock. They're doing quite well. And I don't know why they wanted to risk adding a dubious hatchery. Fish and other places like Maine. They need them. Mark Kalinski we're GonNa take a break and when we come back I wanNA talk more about possible solutions to this Pending crisis we're talking to mark Lansky I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point. We'll be right back hi I'm Summar od. And I am the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour. I am so excited because we are working on. A bunch of new amazing episodes. Were exploring big ideas about reinvention making amends and the psychological effects of climate change our first show drops March thirteenth. Please join me. This is on point. I'm Anthony Brooks. We're talking about salmon and their role as a remarkable natural barometer of our planet's health according to our guest he's marker landscape he's author of salmon a fish the earth in the history of their common fate spectacularly beautiful book to look at an important book to read We also have pictures at our webpage at on point radio DOT ORG. If you want to go there and Mark Kurlansky. I want to talk a little bit about solutions. I WANNA ask you first question about dams because this seems complicated to because of course dams are a source of alternative power. That moves us away from fossil fuels. So there's part of me that thinks dams good But your point correctly the dams destroy the rivers and the salmon that that count on those rivers for Habitat. But how do we square are thinking about hydroelectric power where it stands in our effort to move away from fossil right well that is the argument of hydroelectric power? That it's a better alternative than fossil fuel. Actually there was a time when People were talking about how all these hydro electric power can be replaced by nuclear energy But then it was seeing that there were two any problems with that The this whole dams are extremely destructive. And you know to say that It's better energy than fossil fuel. It is but why are we pretending that? That's the only alternative available. I mean there are all these alternative energies that are growing. And getting better all the time and and the goal should be to replace hydroelectric energy with With these other things. Is there no such thing? As a damn that accommodates fish I know in the Pacific northwest. They have fish ladders and some of these dams to those work at all Sometimes yes sometimes no depends on the dam and how good the ladder is and There's all sorts of problems with ladders to like You Know Sea Lions and seals which love to eat salmon. You know they're no dummies. You know so they just go and hang out at the base of the ladder exactly exactly. Yeah let's go to Yolanda. Who's calling from Hollis New Hampshire? You'll want to go ahead. Thanks for the call. Oh No thank you for taking my call great program. I another listener so I had a question. What can I do Chest the ESA not person. I tell my kids thirteen and fourteen. You have to exercise your voting rights so educate yourself and vote accordingly which I will in November that Shoot that I. We eat a little meat Should I continue to buy? Why the common or should we stop eating it you know? I don't want to kind of blithely contribute to the demise of this magnificent fish And assume that Oh if it is available in the supermarket that means it comes from but it's possible sources so what is a small late sm small way what can I do And my family can do To kind of help the fish. You're such a good question and it was on my list of questions for you to mark. Should we stop eating salmon? Well certainly shouldn't stop eating wild salmon because wild salmon is generally In in this country one of the few countries where it's available commercially It's it's pretty well managed and You're not really wiping out the population by eighty what comes on the market Farm Salmon is more questionable Because there's all sorts of environmental problems with farm salmon I think Farmed Salmon has a has a contribution to make and and you know they. They need to get their act together. They need to talk a little bit about that. Water the challenges associated with farmed salmon. Because I've been led to believe following up on your Lanka's excellent question when I go to the supermarket. I always look for wild salmon. I'm glad to hear you tell me that. That's that's okay. In terms of sustaining species. What exactly is the problem with farmed salmon which I'm always being steered away from. Yeah well you know when when I wrote my cod book I was completely against it against farm salmon and the reason was that is Fed Fishmeal. Which is You know fish from the worst kind of factory. Trawlers ground up and fed They eat a lot of it so that you know when you eat a farm salmon. You've actually killed more wild fish than if you just ate a while back but there. They have been aware of that problem. And they're reducing the amount of fish meal in feeds and doing lots of interesting science about alternate protein and may some day arrive at the point where farm salmon aren't eating any fish at all They could do that now with the Fisher wouldn't taste very good. It's a have to figure out how to do it and still have a product that people want It's about fifty percent now. So is that a future. That should be pursued. Though yeah problems too there's a crustacean called sea lice they They feed on Savon. But they're not usually very serious. They'll get you know one or two. And the head of a sabotage. All fishermen know that when you're fishing in the river if you get a salmon with a couple of Eli sounded. That's a good sign because they fall off in the fresh water and if you have a fish that still has the sea lice on. It means that it's pretty fresh from the ocean. Which is the best fish but the problem is that you know? A farming pattern has two hundred thousand fish. And if you have you know some of these places have like three. Four pence is huge amount. You know it's like leaving honey out and you know finding that there's a Lotta insects and they don't just feed on the farm seven. They'll feed on any wild salmon that surround so that's a huge problem in some of the salmon escaped from pens. And if it's most farm salmon are Atlantic Salmon and if it's in the Atlantic where the wild salmon the same genus. They will enter breed and weaken the species. Because I farm. Savon you know. Farmers don't use natural selection they use human selection and farmed salmon have been selected genetically to do only one thing and that's grow really fast. It's a stupid fast growing fish and then my question is what about this instinct to look for a river in return to where these Fish were born. Of course that doesn't apply to farm. Well that's the whole problem with Forbes. I know they don't have those instincts and they don't have those skills. So what happens when it crosses with a wild fish you know it deteriorates the species fascinating Eileen is calling from Bago Main Eileen go ahead. You're on the air. Thanks so much for the call. Thank you I live for seventeen years in Alaska. fifteen a little Indian village ruby on the Yukon River. My son is a tribal enrolled. Quite couldn't ask Baskin. Indian and his father operated a fish wheel last summer declare Cook River down the way on the Yukon had all kinds of hundreds of Salmon coming back full of row but.

Farmed Salmon market Farm Salmon Salmon Atlantic Salmon Anthony Brooks Alaska Mark Kurlansky Mark Kalinski NPR Maine mark Lansky Hatcher Yukon River Pacific northwest Cook River ESA Hollis New Hampshire Eileen
"salmon" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

09:31 min | 9 months ago

"salmon" Discussed on The Big Story

"This is a story about fish more accurately. It's the story about all the fish that aren't there that we never knew should be worrying about declining. Inclining fish populations might feel like a modern problem from the era of big industry and climate change. But it's not in parts of Canada. Uh River System near Prince George in British Columbia. Canadians have been worried about the health of their fish for more than a hundred years as early as nineteen twelve. British Columbia officers were counting sockeye. Salmon in these creeks and rivers and what they found troubled them and and then the research disappeared for more than fifty years boxes of handwritten journals. A picture of what a robust salmon population looked like felt like can even smelled like all shut-away somewhere forgotten about until someone decided that we needed to dig that research up so that we could figure out just how much we don't know though the past and the present and probably the future of one of Canada's most iconic animals Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story Alanna. Mitchell is a freelance science journalist who looked into the salmon journals. Mcclain's Hi Alanna high. So why don't you just start by telling me about these field journals. Like what are they. Described them how these little odd black notebooks with. Just you know that are a hundred years old. They started to be filled in a hundred years ago by fisheries officers. NBC At the mouth of the Skien River and and and these fisheries officers were hired by the province to try to make sure that fish. We're going to be okay because here was this. This new sockeye salmon fishery or relatively new it would have been going on for a few decades then but this the BC government government wanted to make sure that things were going to be. Okay so they ask these fisheries officers go and you know see what was being caught. And and so these officers would take samples of the fish going into the cannery and they would you know. Write down their weight in their sex and their size and then they would scrape a a few you know just a sort of a smear of scales off the side of one of these fish and and glue it into the into the notebook. Yeah with slime and blood and style right and and then you know go onto the so five you'd have five entries per page and then they'd go onto the next patient and they and just doing it. Fish fish fish fish not every single fish by a sample apple of the fish. Just to see you know who was who who was being caught and you know what what effect it was going to be was going to have on on the population so eventually these notebooks were then analyzed by one of the Great Fish. Biologists of the world's name was Charlie Gilbert and he was at Stanford University and he was the one the BC government had hired to oversee this project to see how the fish were doing. And so Charlie Gilbert would then look at these these notebooks and assess the population relation based on what he found in these notebooks give reports to the BC government. But how Fisher doing first of all. It's just interesting to me that even back then governments were concerned about levels of fish. Yeah the other thing that is so captivating is just the idea of the. My editor at Maclean's was talking about this. The tenderness of you know these fisheries officers with you know. They're they're little notebooks and they're they're INC fattening pens and you know just doing this. Real hands on Quite careful work. So what happened to those journals posters while they they started in nineteen twelve and they went until nineteen forty eight and then the that whole program just just stopped but in the meantime the notebooks themselves vanished from sight and the only reason that we still know about these notebooks was that in the nineteen eighties of fisheries. He calls himself a sockeye oceanographer and he used. His name is skip McConnell and he used to work for the federal government. That's a movie character. It's it's he's he's he's a wonderful wonderful person so he he had read some of these original reports because he was looking at the health of the salmon and he had read some of these original reports and thought well. Where are these notebooks? And so he started looking for them and they've been gone for fifty years by at this point absolutely out of sight out of mind but he thought you know they must be somewhere and so he started looking in archive so he phone down to Stanford and said you know. Are these archives down there Erin and Are Are these notebooks down there and they said no no. They're not here went up to Alaska. You know he phoned all over the the west coast basically and confined these things and then he was a he started asking every fisheries biologist. Matt do you know what happened to the notebooks and finally one of them said Oh. Yeah they're in the during the back office here in Vancouver in Cooper at that. They're just in the back now so he went and looked at these things. Okay this is the scene that I just I just love this so he opens the boxes and here are all these little notebooks and he opens them up and inside. Are these scales. Yeah Century Old Sockeye Salmon. I and skills that were you know scraped off the side of fish on. Its Way to the KANTER. I mean these are things that shouldn't even be in the world right and they're they are the observed in these notebooks and he's westbound them and of course what we know now and what Gilbert's didn't know back them is those scales are just a gold mine. I've information. So what do they tell. Tell us now that we couldn't well it turns out that there are a record of not only the DNA because of course they're you know they're they're flesh right salmon there flashed they've got all the DNA but they also we now know well actually Gilbert new then but Gilbert New Gilbert knew that they were a record we didn't know that the health the DNA. Okay perfect what he figured. At one of his great additions to science was that he could read the rings that are in the scale. So the scales grow along with the Salmon and they contain information about where the SAM lived in how old it is and so that's what he was looking at but today of course we know that there there are there flushed they have DNA. And that's that's the great finding in the modern era. What can we do with that knowledge? He ask what you do. What what the way I found out about? It is that this. PhD Researcher at Simon Fraser University. Whose name is Mike? Price wrote a paper on about his analysis of these scales or at least least of some of these skills so he looked at scales from nineteen thirteen to nineteen twenty three. I think it was something like thirty four hundred fish. He looked at from that period and he route through using the DNA that's contained in these scales he reconstructed populations of of of what happens with with Sockeye. These are from the Skien river system them and they they geographically separate populations and so he reconstructed the size of these populations back in nineteen thirteen and then he compared them the same populations to what's happening. How big populations are today and that? That was in this paper. I probably don't even want to know that. Well he was looking at. If you take this this is really interesting. Concept Fisheries Biology which is which was developed by another brilliant Canadian biologist. His name is Daniel Pauly and he said you know what we have to know not what. The populations were a couple of decades ago. After we'd been fishing these things and you know altering the habitat of fish for all these all these decades. We have to know what the original populations were. Because if we just if we just look back to the nineteen sixties and we're looking from what could be A deformed baseline instead it's where we had data from before we had to have on sockeye salmon in the skin and throat BC from From the nineteen fifties and sixties and that was thought to be you know Pete Population and people like Daniel polly are saying. Wait a SEC. What if that wasn't pete population? What if decline decline from that era to today are not the true declines of the population? That could that could be meaningful. We could we could be masking some of the threats. We could be delaying some of the conservation issues. And so that's what might price was looking at. He was saying well. Let's see what the originals populations were back from you know nineteen twelve nine to nineteen twenty-three. Let's just look and what he discovered. was that the populations of absolutely crashed. Like how much are we talking. Well the range was between fifty six percent but to ninety nine percent within these individual populations ninety nine percent. Once you get to ninety nine percent. You're talking about you know a total collapse. That's that's something that may not not even beach inadequately at that. That's not just in fish. That's in any population conservation. Biology now has standards on these things so once you get to ninety nine percent you're really you're really in tough shape. Meanwhile we're still fishing. These fish episodically it depends on how many comeback through the like so they have this formula. And if you're a commercial shaw fishery and there is a commercial fishery of sockeye salmon in the skien watershed you have to there. Have to be a certain number of salmon that return to the fresh water from the ocean. Shen before there's a there's a threshold and if there aren't enough fish then there's a zero.

Charlie Gilbert Great Fish Skien River Canada Pete Population Uh River System Alanna BC government BC British Columbia Jordan Heath Rawlings Mitchell Gilbert New Gilbert shaw fishery Daniel Pauly Prince George NBC Mcclain
"salmon" Discussed on Weeknight Kitchen with Melissa Clark

Weeknight Kitchen with Melissa Clark

07:19 min | 11 months ago

"salmon" Discussed on Weeknight Kitchen with Melissa Clark

"I and weeknight kitchen is all about getting real food on your table now I guide is Melissa Clark bestselling Cookbook Author Food Columnist at the New York Times and always the person with the answer for should have for dinner so let's get into her kitchen move my my oven wrath time getting ready to broil because I am going to show you how to make Vietnamese caravel salmon and I want the oven rack six inches from the heat source not too close so it'll burn but not too far away because you know you need it to cook so to make the getting to meet Carmel Salmon I need of course salmon and have these beautiful salmon fillets and I keep the skin on and you're going to find out why later skin's going to get so crispy I also have coconut oil I have Cilantro I have fish sauce soy sauce ginger chillies it line tons of lime for Sydney and all of these ingredients and I put them together by first making a sauce and then adding the salmon to that loss and letting the whole thing cook on the stove top and men in the broiler to get the skin really crisp so the first thing you might be thinking when you hear Vietnamese caramel salmon is sweet and fish that doesn't make any sense but just stick with me okay because it's a very traditional Vietnamese dish in Vietnam it's made with catfish bone in pieces catfish and the CARAMEL is made by cooking sugar until it black ends or almost black ends and when you cook sugar to that degree you actually cook off a lot of the sweet so it's not super sweet it's slightly sweet and then it spiced with a lot of black pepper and so you have this very pungent peppery caramel sauce sticky it's so good and then you add the catfish to that and similar it for forty five minutes or so and the catfish practically falls apart and it absorbs all of that amazing sauce my version is a little bit faster because I'm using salmon salmon works really well with the sweetness of the sauce is in itself a very rich sweet fish and if you add even more sweetness and also acidity to balance it all out it actually takes the flavors beautifully plus who doesn't need another weeknight salmon dish I mean you can make this thirty minutes from start to finish it is perfect for Wednesday you know what am I gonNa make for dinner on Wednesday hump of the week another reason I probably really liked this dish is for me sweet and fish is actually actually comes very naturally culturally for me I grew up Jewish and Gupta fish and pickled herring both of those dishes combine sugar with fish and I love them both so to me this dishes just like it's that perfect meeting point it's the acidity sweetness it's the salmon and it's fast and easy okay so first step here is to coat the salmon fillets with a little bit of fat you can use any any oil that you have I'm using coconut oil is coconut oil it the coconut flavor goes really well with lime and fish sauce it also works well with high heat I happen to have some so even better but I've made this dish with olive oil and you know no neutral oil rapeseed and it works with whatever you have so you brush the fillets make sure to brush both sides both the flesh side and the skin side this is especially important for the skin side actually because the aim with this dish is you want the flesh to be tender but you want the skin to get super crisp and the fat is going to help you with them I using a silicon brush here because then I can throw the dishwasher it's just easier vacuum listen to me throw it in the sink now I'm GonNa just very lightly salt both the skin side and the flesh side and again I am planning Ethan Skin because it's going to get crisp so you gotta season it if you're going to eat it both sides and just a little bit of salt you don't need much because the other ingredients are pretty salty lake the soya sauce and the fish sauce so a late sprinkle kate is going and just hang out with salt is going to start to dissolve and it's going to start to season the fish while I make the caramel sauce on the stove just rinse my hands I've got how many hands now it's actually kind of hard to get the smell of salmon off your failures especially locks like smoke salmon and I have a trick you use code coldwater not hot water and soap and then you use anything stainless steel like I happen to have a little stainless steel anti stink thin mice thank you it's a little it's a tear shaped thing that you actually use to wash hands but if you use a stainless steel spoon works exactly the same it just gets the smell of fish right off the fingers sorry let me grab all my fish sauce my soya sauce I am GonNa Use Light Brown sugar you know I could make a traditional Caramel for this dish be regular sugar and cooking it down until it lies but I really find the flavor to be pretty similar using the brown sugar and it's easier this is very important I'm going to make the sauce in an oven not an oven safe a broiler safe skillet so I'm gonNA use my trusty cast iron skillet because that way I can stick it under the broiler and I don't have to worry about the handle burning or anything like that Ah for this recipe there's no oil in the Panadol I have oiled up my salmon but I don't have to oil my town I'm just GonNa pour my fish sauce soya sauce I've got graded lime zest I've got grated ginger and of course my lime juice right into the pan so I got it over medium heat and I'm going to add I'm also going to add a tablespoon of water which is going to help dissolve the Brown Sugar and I'm just GonNa Kinda whisk it up a little bit and let it bubble really just until the sugar melts one to two minutes that'll thicken up a bit to care now you're going to have to trust me when I tell you that us is getting thicker and the sugar is dissolved. Now you're GONNA add my salmon to the Pan and I'm going to add it skin ride up because the skin is what's going to be closest to the broiler when I transferred this to the oven I'm just putting the fillets in right next to each other but and now I'm just going to let them cook for about four to six minutes I want them halfway cooked then I'm GonNa Finish them under the broiler get that skin nice and crispy and you'll be right back to do just not.

Cookbook Author Food Columnist New York Times Melissa Clark forty five minutes thirty minutes six minutes two minutes six inches
"salmon" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"salmon" Discussed on 1A

"Tucker Malarkey a journalist and author of the New Book Stronghold One man's quest to save the world's Wild Salmon Tucker welcome to the program. Thanks so much Joshua now the book chronicles the work of Conservationist Gaito Rar the head of the Wild Salmon Center as he traveled to protect the most productive wild salmon watersheds in the Pacific North Rim and Gaito joins us now to welcome to the program. Thank you Kito. Let me start with you in a bit of your story. I wonder what made you so fired up about salmon as I understand it you were one of those kids that was way more interested in rolling around and getting dirty and looking at animals outside than you were in being in school well I grew up in a family of fly fisherman and my aunts and uncles and grandfather. That's what we did you know as a family on the deschutes river in Oregon is go fly fishing and so I became very passionate and I'm also extremely interested in the natural world and I disappeared worked in the tropics for the first part of my career and then came back after Grad school to find that you know most of our salmon runs were declining dramatically and in fact in the Pacific northwest most of them were on the <music> soon to be added to the endangered species list so I became you know this was an issue that hit really close to home you know for me and my family I mean we grew up on these rivers and we were losing something that was very precious to us and precious as you mentioned into all the communities of the Pacific became quite focused on it and it's my my passion in my you know my main preoccupation. When was the first time that salmon became a passion for you? was there a moment when it Kinda clicked. Oh boy you know we have a <hes> trout are part of the salmon found. I'll never forget me my first Rainbow Trout. I mean there's no painting that can capture the beauty of the shoulders insides of a wild rainbow but I'd say my first steelhead which is an ocean going rainbow. I'm having them break my line and completely destroy my attempts to catch them but also we tucker and I used to watch the migrate up a little creek next to our cabin on the deschutes and spawn and just be amazed at this fish came thousands of miles across the North Pacific ended up in this little desert stream along the deschutes river in Oregon Yeah Tucker you and veto have known each other for quite some time what made you decide to focus on his journey and write about it well yeah. It struck me. That GITA was the perfect vehicle for such a big story. I'm he's not wired like most people he was born really plugged into natural systems and for the first half of his.

Tucker Malarkey Wild Salmon Center deschutes river North Pacific Oregon Pacific North Rim Joshua Rainbow Trout Pacific Gaito Grad school
"salmon" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

The Upgrade by Lifehacker

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"salmon" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

"And now it's time for the interview where we interview someone this week I chat with axios financial correspondent Felix salmon about socially responsible. Investing Felix is a financial journalist and commentator who focuses on economic and social issues he looks and I go over all the terms you might have heard floating around when people discuss socially responsible investing stuff like impact investing shareholder, activism negative screening. We talk about the various ways in which people try to do. Good while making money is ethical investing even possible under capitalism. What is socially responsible, investing socially, responsible investing? Is this wonderful have your cake and eat idea where you're investing which means that you're putting money into something with the expectation that you're going to get even more money out in the end. But at the same time, you are making the world a better place in you improving the states of the world somehow without having to actually spend any money on it. In fact, you're making money while doing so that's the idea, and obviously this is not actually possible to do this and do now harm. There's a case to be made that the world is a better place for capitalism broadly, the if you look especially what's happened to China over the past twenty years or so if you unleash entrepreneurship or have you wanna put it the capitalist forces will bring people out of poverty and make people better. Off and healthier in Richmond live longer than more likely to be educated and all of these things. So in that sense. It's not completely impossible that capitalist things like investing can help drive positive outcomes. So the question is basically is the plug limb insofar as many problems in the world is the problem, a lack of capital, and is the solution that a bunch of socially responsible. Investors are gonna come along and provide capital web before there was no capital. And now suddenly a whole bunch of you know, one outcomes will image, and that's still up for debate. The one thing which is clear is that a lot of what people call socially responsible. Investing isn't even that the there's a lot of people who love to talk about socially responsible investing. And then really all they do is just invest in stocks and bonds, which will sit on the stock market, and that just doesn't make any. Insensitive, all what sort of stocks and bonds, do people think are socially responsible to invest him. So there's this idea that there's like good stocks bad stocks, the if you invest in the stock of a gun manufacturer over tobacco manufacturer the nets bad. And if you invest in the stock of a solar panel manufacturer, then that's good. And so the idea then becomes if you invest in good companies, which are making the world about a place by the stock of good companies that are making base that's a socially responsible way of investing as opposed to investing in. Cobb an extraction or something like that? Right. And on one level, I'm sympathetic to that. I think the best immoral reason why it can feel a little bit through morally Icke to be collecting evidence from Exxon Mobil, while we're busy protesting global warming. And so I if you say like for more reasons, I don't want to own Exxon Mobil stock and.

Exxon Mobil Felix salmon Richmond China nets Cobb twenty years
"salmon" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"salmon" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"Of money on car insurance. Nj Scher wasn't ever gonna make that pro soccer money news or. All right. Thanks to add. Salmon's always fun having him on. Yeah, forgot to call it the horse mass. But I, I was I had Kentucky Derby at a box of stuff I moved and there was a mask. It was a horse mass, but it's from the godfather. Did just get back from Italy? No, it was. It was I saw horse mask and then I remember there was a mass, but I forgot it was a dogma that would make a lot more sense. We didn't ask them about a second home in Utah either. Yeah, that's right. The compound seem compound that's. So we touch Mississippi's also join join the fun as well. We've got to touch on that city's in. Yep. And then Rhode Island's around the corner Tober I believe, and West Virginia will be West Virginia football season. And then when New York decided to get out of their six month hiatus of sabbatical, then they'll finally ruled in January. Yeah, we got a running file with them all. I've seen things on a high. Oh, and Michigan. Connecticut is still connects, Connecticut would be big. I think it'll be big air in two thousand nineteen. I would be surprised if there was anywhere, especially before football season surprised to shot that was up and running outside of those. Right, right. All right. So things coming up on chock Purdham got a story on sort of the evolution within the media. Yes. So it's, I think the rough headline right now is kind of how sports betting went. Mainstream will workshop that, but. Not bad to start, essentially looking at just how the media including ESPN other companies along with daily fantasy and fantasy.

"salmon" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

NewsRadio WHAM 1180

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"salmon" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

"Cowboy dryden one win ritchie arrested as display all at once red eye giant cashier ladies and gentlemen jim salmon john carr and you to two to eleven eighty as a phone number home repair clinic run along up next is ken at says cracks around the drain we've all seen most of them don't leak but gelga coulter oh okay we'll see hi ken good morning have the problem i have a culture marvel vanity top and fine radio cracks walked around the drains and set areas also discolored yeah i want to know whether a repair is possible short of replacing the top well there's two reasons for this in my opinion and you're the expert on this john so correct me if i'm wrong here over tightening can be part of it but quality can also be a part of it no matter how tight you make it i i don't know if i go with the second one what happens is there's a plastic insert in that in the mold when they're porrini cultured marble tap and it just when you when you tighten at drain down which is the nut below it you put a lot of pressure on that plastic and it goes into the unit itself and it cracks and unfortunately answer is there is no fix you can get in there and you can sort of bleach those things a little bit away but you're gonna they're gonna come right back as soon as the the next goes hits it there is no fixed to that that's the negative of cultured marble but they're they're very inexpensive in this scheme as well you know it kind of depends how big a top is it what color is it it's what's called white on white inches by twenty two inches what was what was the with i'm sorry twenty two inches in what what that would be the single ball so twentythree by twenty two all right so so there's a twenty four by twenty two and you're talking about ninety nine dollars eighty nine dollars to fix it since deletion yeah seventy three inches wide and twenty two well that's that's a whole that's a quite a bit more expensive than it is single bowl double double i got one that's just like that it's cracked and i'm doing a bathroom remodel in that same bathroom so i'm going to replace it but but you're talking about in the threes three eighty nine hundred ninety nine for that white is inexpensive but that that's that's what happens that's a nice size i could replace them myself but what worries me is the current top was put on with construction that he says that you can get that off that's a year razor knife and from underneath a hammer to no no no just razor knife all sides that'll come off that's why i never use construction and he said when i do it i'll use a an kach something that just gives you from sliding sideways especially with the seventy three ways enough where it anything on there will keep it from sliding on you but where are you what part of town are you we expect to sell the house soon and i'm worried that a good inspector like gm with pick up on the problem well most of those things don't leak so i would just describe that as you know there's some cracks in the bowl and it's not leaking and it's ugly gel coat so they also make an appliance touchup pain if you wanna be that guy stop it s he he didn't say that can he did not say it good luck good luck can thank you thanks for calling you just partially stroked out on a client's paint on a loss top nope he didn't say i wanna give an an update on the legality of the skyline turns it doesn't matter well okay fine mr i don't care about the law in the middle of the night and in the middle of the lake either.

Cowboy dryden ritchie ken twenty two inches seventy three inches eighty nine dollars ninety nine dollars
"salmon" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

NewsRadio WHAM 1180

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"salmon" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

"X ed what do you do for a living i'm a painter all right you got plenty of money just get a plumber over take a look at your don't handy you don't need a plumber for toilet if it doesn't go well i'll just replace the toilet that seem as the toilet itself you can replace that toilet cheaper than you can call in that plumber to fix it so yeah the toilet originally anyway when we built the house when two thousand now so you're doing that water in buddy that will lead you in the right direction all right thanks for calling we appreciate that and with that we're gonna take a quick break we're way long we'll be right back it's been two hundred forty two years has been going on for years and still we work to form a more perfect union to the constitution the first amendment begins here newsradio wam eighty for john welsh your yard would look more like the surface of the moon than it already does that is true i have to give him credit for that i mean he he called me when his crew was over at your house doing tuneup yard mulching the bads and all that says we're going to be here awhile does it they did a great job this yards a mess straighten it out and made it look like it's at least fifteen or twenty s looking best looking one i think nineteen came john welsh is a landscape aficionado who should be here right now right and he's a heart's caper hearts scape means pavers paver walkways patios outdoor kitchens retaining walls some of the most beautiful hard scape installations i've ever seen including some at the salmon ranch john welsh is probably floating on a.

john welsh salmon ranch two hundred forty two years
"salmon" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

NewsRadio WHAM 1180

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"salmon" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

"Downtown rochester here's jim salmon well during the american revolution the legal separation of the thirteen colonies from great britain in seventeen seventy six actually a cure occurred on july second when the second constant continental congress voted to approve a resolution of independence that had been per proposed i can't read today and i apologize in june by richard henry lee of of virginia declaring united states independent from great britain rural good morning every and welcome to the home repair click on this fine pre amble to the fourth of july weekend please welcome our own version of nevertrumper giancarlo good morning sir good morning buddy how are you good how you doing good you're you're not in a good mood you are hurried your hair's all messed up did you get enough sleep to be able to pull the show off or what fairly early i mean midnight or so after voting for independence congress turned its attention to the declaration of independence a statement explaining this decision which has been prepared by a committee of five thomas jefferson as the principal author congress debated and revised the wording of the declaration finally approving it two days later on july fourth a day earlier john adams had written to his wife abigail describing the whole thing so are you a patriot interested in american history whatever or or is it all about the party and fireworks i'm not gonna win the matter what i say there so if you how do you say they are you a patriot are you a patriot you love your country full of course i love my country what kind of a dumb question is i don't believe it's a dumb question there are people out there in the street to interview every day that don't love their country jimmy the reason i can't talk to you about are you a patriot because you you use it politically okay we're patriots we believe this and you're not a patriot you so you lose i love my country all right no politics involved okay so what are you going to do on the fourth of july i'm doing it right now i told you wanna radio eleven o'clock i'm starting the float on the water party oh okay and it will continue until i don't know eight or if you'd like to get into your home repair clinic we're starting off kind of rocky here this morning however.

rochester britain richard henry lee thomas jefferson john adams abigail cure virginia principal two days
"salmon" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"salmon" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Yeah getting killed when they might be turning up down there later i seemed very getting that right oh well the sport in commercial seasons were closed for king salmon in southeast alaska starting in log guest yep last year there are a handful of the transboundary rivers in southeast alaska like the stickiness and the taku when the eunuch rivers that drain from british columbia into mainland southeast alaska the the king salmon runs and all those rivers are pretty bad shape right now and so they closed the fisheries in south east to maximize retire yes yes and a lot of those fish feed sort of locally so even by the time august came round last year most of that year sponsors we're already or if not all of them already in the river but i think that they were closing that to preserve you know immature fish in that sort of coastal southeast and that that'll lose to that sort of canada us interplay of salmon management yeah there are some through our some treaties on those rivers to believe yeah like just because it flows out in your country doesn't mean that you can run the show yeah you can run the show when we need to our fish have our fish cross the border and come back to where a lot of habitat in canada yeah do you have any things that you wanted to wedge in that we didn't get to know i had a list but we got to really where's your list on my head.

alaska canada