35 Burst results for "Salman"

How Party Leaders Get Ready for the Election in Pivotal Pennsylvania County

All Things Considered

04:06 min | Last week

How Party Leaders Get Ready for the Election in Pivotal Pennsylvania County

"Pennsylvania, a working class area in the northern northwestern most corner of the state. Has long been solid territory for Democrats. Then in 2016, Donald Trump eked out a narrow victory. Now in 2020, the county is again seen as pivotal NPR national political correspondent Don Can you sat down with Republican and Democratic leaders in the county? Jim words. A 41 year old college professor, was named Erie County Democratic Chair two years ago. He wasn't in charge when Trump won here. Still, he's fixated on the numbers just 1967 votes, so a really narrow margin and so for me for the last couple of years, it's been staring at those numbers. There are so many what ifs. What if Hillary Clinton had run a better campaign? What if there had been better turnout in the city of here? But words also gives the trump campaign credit for its use of digital targeting for getting people to make personal contact with friends to find new voters for trump factor in their social media presence in their online presence, and the kind of targeting they did, in some cases with the help of foreign actors and others, it had a very significant psychological role. What says the Democrats goal this year is not to mimic that Trump campaign. It's to build on the enthusiasm Democrats showed in the 2018 midterms and to reach beyond the traditional base. To that end, Erie County Democrats have set up field offices out in rural communities. Words talked as he unloaded boxes of lawn signs from the back of his jeep bed once not jobs. We've made a lot of efforts over the last two years to really talk to connect with rural voters. And these offices or an opportunity to help us put some roots down in places that we should have been for a long time. As for Democratic strongholds, voters are highly motivated this year, he says, and having a woman of color Kamala Harris on the ticket helps boost energy as well. He adds that with co vid driving unemployment up to 14.8% in the county. That should also give some blue collar voters who backed Trump. Last time. Second thoughts now to the GOP effort stickers these, you know, ceramic coasters styles, you know whatever, and hats. We've just gone through. That's county chairmen viral Salman 73, year old retired school superintendent and farmer showing off Trump merchandise at county headquarters. They even have trump 2020 masks despite the resistance of many trump supporters to wear them. Both Republicans and Democrats are having to find new ways to reach voters amid the pandemic. One GOP tactic Trump Boat Regatta Out on Lake Eerie What Salman says they're still doing is much old fashioned door knocking as ever, maybe more if there's a newspaper box out by the road, put it in, but otherwise they go to the door and knock leaves the bag on the door. Somebody comes They stay, you know, way back and with mask on and so forth. Democrats, meanwhile, are being more cautious on that score. Salman says he thinks voters see Trump as better at rebuilding the economy post pandemic. He acknowledges that Joe Biden with his Pennsylvania roots is a very different candidate than Hillary Clinton. There's no Biden equivalent to the lock her up chant at Trump rallies by. I think he's a nice enough older fellow. But look at his record. We've got enough years We've got four or five decades. Is to look at it. It doesn't compare both of these party chairs, no, that Erie County is in play and even with the pandemic, limiting traditional campaigning and providing a powerful political issue, They insist they can still do what they need to do to reach the voters. They'll need to win. Don Gani NPR NEWS Erie, Pennsylvania.

Donald Trump Erie County Erie County Democratic Chair Hillary Clinton Salman GOP Pennsylvania Joe Biden NPR Erie Don Can National Political Corresponde Kamala Harris Don Gani JIM Professor Lake Eerie Superintendent
Saudi court issues verdicts in Khashoggi murder

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Saudi court issues verdicts in Khashoggi murder

"A Saudi court issued final verdicts on Monday in the case of slain Washington Post, columnist sounded critic Jamal Kashogi after his son who still resides in the kingdom announced pardons that sped five of the convicted individuals from execution. While the trial draws to its conclusion in Saudi Arabia. The case continues to cast a shadow over the international standing of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman associates have been sanctioned by the US and the UK for their alleged involvement in the brutal killing, which took place inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The Riyadh criminal courts. Final verdicts were announced by Saudi Arabia state television which aired few details about the eight Saudi nationals and did not name them. The court ordered a maximum sentence of twenty years in prison for the five. Another individual received a ten year sentence and two others were ordered to serve seven years in prison. A team of fifteen Saudi agents had flown to Turkey to meet Kashogi inside the consulate for his appointment on October. Second two, thousand, eighteen to pick up. That would allow him to marry his Turkish fiance who waited outside. The team included a forensic doctor intelligence and security offices and individuals who worked directly for the Crown Prince's office according to Agnes. Cala MoD who investigated the killing for the United Nations Turkish officials alleged Kashogi was killed and then dismembered with a bone saw inside the consulate and his remains put in a tandoor oven. His body has been found. Turkey apparently had the consulate bugged and shared audio of the killing with the CIA among others. Western intelligence agencies, as well as the US Congress of said the Crown Prince Baz responsibility for the killing. He also maintains the support of Donald. Trump. Likely for his preference for the eight billion dollar arms deal. He had just closed Saudi Arabia's trial of the suspects has been widely criticised by rights, groups and observers who note that no senior officials nor anyone suspected of ordering the killing has been found guilty. The independence of the Rianne Criminal Court has also been questioned.

Saudi Consulate Saudi Arabia Saudi Court Jamal Kashogi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salm Turkey Rianne Criminal Court Washington Post Riyadh Us Congress Donald Trump United Nations Turkish Istanbul United States Agnes CIA UK
Saudi King Is Said to Have Successful Gallbladder Surgery

PRI's The World

05:08 min | 2 months ago

Saudi King Is Said to Have Successful Gallbladder Surgery

"Moving onto Saudi Arabia. King Salman is spending some time in the hospital there this week Saudi state media report he had surgery to remove his gallbladder, and it was successful nothing life threatening, but whenever an eighty four year old national leader is hospitalized for whatever reason it raises questions for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Those questions about what a possible succession might look like the World Sharon Jafari reports the modern day kingdom of Saudi. Arabia was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, two, and since. Since, then it's been ruled by the same royal family succession has mostly gone from father to son or brother to brother eighty four year old King Solomon took over from his brother into fifteen. Joseph Russell was the US ambassador to Saudi Arabia back then. Oh, yes, I got to know him very while this describes Kim Samoan as educated Matt. It says the king loves to read to his grandchildren so whenever he went back to New York while says he would buy books as gifts for some on. In the old culture of Saudi culture books never had pictures. That's because the ultra conservatives in the kingdom considered images to be un-islamic, so made sure I brought books a lot pictures. One time was false, as he brought by another bound copy of one thousand and One Nights, a collection of middle. Eastern folktales, and the king loved it. At the opportunity to work with online, I grew very fond of him, but while Kingston Mon- might be the most powerful official in Saudi Arabia. It's his son. Crown Prince Mohammad Bin, Salman who runs the kingdom on a day to day basis. NBS known is next in line to the throne. Nowadays, the process of succession is overseen by a special group of authorities yes-men. Faruk is with Carnegie in. For International, peace in Washington, the previous king had established what they call the allegiance council, which is basically a counseled from the surviving sons of the funder for NPS to become kings. She says this council would initiate a process for members of the royal family to pledge allegiance to the new king, but right now there's a problem. The Allegiance Council doesn't have had the last one died, and I think the position has been vacant for over two years now and one member at least of the allegiance council is under arrest Prince Amit faulk says NBA has been controversial figure since they want his made it his mission to consolidate power and supply line any potential competitor. Nabil Nura an expert on Gulf affairs says MP's has arrested an intimidate viable members of the royal family also rounded up hundreds of businessmen and activists. He was to show that he is the guy for the position, and he wants to make sure that there are no challenges in his way to the throne occupied. Was it all after. that. The king went to the hospital state TV showed him holding a cabinet meeting from there. That's to show that the king is alive and well, and still in charge, but nobody says it's an open secret that MBA's is actively pushing to become king while his father is still around. Why well a number of things one of them is related to the US actually Hamad bin. Salman wants to make sure that he ascends the throne while president. Trump is personally that states trump has been supportive of the crown. Prince says it's not clear if joe. Biden would do the same besides the American election does also the G. Twenty summit in November. It could be a critical moment for MBA's to show that he is in charge. And some people from the Royal Family might not be happy with Hamad bin Salman, being king, so hammered. This might ascend the throne while his father is still alive to make sure that everything goes smoothly. So where does all this leave the US? Saudi relations Yes menfolk says NBA is a controversial figure in Washington DC. She says it's not internal policies that have raised eyebrows NBA has has been the war in Yemen and according to the CIA or did. Did the kidding of Washington Post columnist Jamal and unfortunately like many things inside Washington there is polarization and the debate is very much politicized, but let me tell you that the concern, the uncertainty about the rule of Mohammad Bin, Salman is certainly bipartisan. People differ on what to do about it, folks. Some things have not changed Saudi Arabia remains a key player in the global oil market and president. Trump has boasted about selling weapons to the king. Now with the possibility of political transition in both countries on the horizon, there are big questions about the future of the relationship between the two longtime allies.

Saudi Arabia King Salman Crown Prince Mohammad Bin NBA King Solomon Royal Family Allegiance Council Donald Trump United States Nabil Nura Washington Dc Joseph Russell President Trump Sharon Jafari Prince Amit Faulk Washington Post Hamad Bin Mohammad Bin NBS Washington
"salman" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

07:07 min | 2 months ago

"salman" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Ability to blend the deeply serious and the absurd with his signature sense of humor. Are Interviewer Steph Opitz the founding director of the LOFTS Word Play Book Festival in Minneapolis. Here's Rushdie. Who begins this episode with a brief description of his novel key shot? What I wanted to do was to write Some kind of a panoramic novel that which which went across the country, an a the the two of books I've written immediately before this will more or less more or less entirely set in New, York City and an an I remember thinking. Even, while I was writing the previous book, the Golden House that that I needed to leave town needed. I needed to get out of the two onto area code. And so I had this idea of wanting to writes a kind of road, noble. and. And then by just by chance I I had. I was asked to read and write something about Don Quixote, and so I looked at that book, which I hadn't really read since I was a college student. And I! It gave me the idea for. A version of Don Quixote and his such. Oh Panza as being my. The people would go across the country for me. And very quickly, they became not very like the originals. You know actually my Sancho. Has I. Think More in Common With Pinocchio that Sancho Panza in that. He's an imaginary child created out of his father's need for a child who then wants desperately to become real and. And the thing I liked about my away. My character of key shot developed. Is that he's incredibly optimistic, but he's absurdly optimistic, even when there's really no reason for it. And I thought if I can just launch that spirit of optimism. Across the country. At, at what might not be the most optimistic moment in its history now? Than the kind of the contrast of the tension between those things would be interesting, so so basically he does he. It's a road novel in which these to. These two kind of buffoons Travel across America and and in the ANA quest for love, and and the bitter will read. Riches is from the beginning kind of explains a bit about that. You will see. He's somebody who's obsessed by somewhat deranged by watching terrible television. that once lived. At a series of temporary addresses across the United States of America traveling man of Indian origin, advancing years and retreating mental powers who wanNA controversies love for mindless television had spent far too much of his life in the yellow light of tawdry motel rooms, watching an excessive at had suffered a peculiar form of brain damage as a result. He devoured morning shows daytime shows late by talk shows soaks, situation comedies, lifetime movies, hospital, dramas, police series, Vampire Zombie cereals. The dramas of housewives from Atlanta New Jersey Beverly Hills in New York the. At the Romance Season Corals Hotel, fortune, princesses and self styled shows that could vote the cavorting of individuals made famous by happy nudity, the fifteen minutes of fame, according to young persons with large social media, following zone accounts of that plastic surgery acquisition of a third breast, or that post rib removal figures that mimicked the impossible shape of the Mattel companies. Bobby Dall or even more simply their ability to catch giant carp in picturesque settings while wearing only the tiniest string bikinis. Just cut down to a little bit here. As time passed. And he signed ever deeper into the quicksand of what might be termed the unreal real. He felt himself becoming emotionally involved with many of the inhabitants about other brighter world membership in which he thought was. His claim is to claim by right like latter-day Dorothy contemplating a permanent move to Oz. And unknown point he developed an unwholesome because entire be one-sided passion for certain television personality. The beautiful Ta adored Miss Salma are an infatuation which he characterized quite accurately has love. In the name of the so-called love he is, he resolved zealously to pursue his beloved right through the television screen into whatever exalted high-definition reality she and her kind inhabited and Bhai deeds as well as grace to win her love. He's he's crazy. I will say the the strange thing about during a virtual environment is. You can't hear the likely. Applause around the world right now after. His little new comments, giving up the right hand side so. We'll take that there. High. Something that I feel like I. Obviously, it's alluded to section, but goes into much more depth throughout. the character of shot is going crazy from watching TV. Did you go crazy from watching as much? Bravo as you have seemed to have watched will. The strange thing is this has not been my. My my television of choice most of my life. But once I had this idea that it's not just TV it is, it is in particular reality. TV that the sort of Lampoon's. I felt that I. You know I have to do my. Research I caught I describe. What's in his head? Unless I know what's it is head shot? And so I did have to watch. Substantial quantities of bachelors and Bachelorettes and all that yeah, and now I don't have to. I'd love for you to. Talk about the role of the narrator and the story within the story. And, what the responsibility of the reader is to understanding? Your Raw Salman outside of s I feel ain't how much complication going on there. It's kind of a Russian doll of a book in there is A. Story, the story, in which we've just been talking about the key shot story, we discover at the beginning of trump to to. That that story is being written by. An author who is the central figure of the frame story? She like you know suits. and. You. Tell you the truth I wasn't planning to do that. You know when I when I first thought of the book I thought it would just be the story of key shot in his Sancho making this. This is crazy.

Sancho Panza Don Quixote America Golden House Steph Opitz Rushdie Minneapolis founding director York City Bobby Dall United States Salman Miss Salma New York Dorothy Atlanta Beverly Hills
King Salman of Saudi Arabia Admitted to Hospital

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

King Salman of Saudi Arabia Admitted to Hospital

"Has been hospitalized. Theeighty four year old king Salman bin Abdulaziz has been admitted, according to state media after suffering from inflammation of the gall bladder. In the latest report, they said only that he was undergoing medical checks. King Salman has led Saudi

King Salman Abdulaziz
Saudi King Salman admitted to hospital in Riyadh

NPR News Now

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Saudi King Salman admitted to hospital in Riyadh

"Arabia's king. Salman has been admitted to a hospital in the capital Riyadh NPR's Bruce. Sherlock has more. Saudi Arabia's royal court says the eighty four year old, King Salman has an inflamed gallbladder. The statement carried on the country's official press agency says he's undergoing medical tests at the king. Faisal Specialist Hospital in the capital Riyadh. King Salman acceded to the throne and became the Custodian of Islam's two holiest sites in two thousand, fifteen, his eldest son, the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman is next in line and has been the country's de facto ruler in recent years wreath, Sherlock and PR

King Salman Prince Mohammad Bin Salman Riyadh Sherlock Faisal Specialist Hospital Saudi Arabia Arabia Official
Saudi Arabia's King Salman admitted to hospital for tests

BBC World Service

00:12 sec | 2 months ago

Saudi Arabia's King Salman admitted to hospital for tests

"King Salman of Saudi Arabia has been admitted to hospital in Riyadh for tests of the Saudi state News Agency said the king, who is 84 had been suffering from inflammation off the gold bladder.

King Salman Saudi Arabia Riyadh Saudi State News Agency
Trial of 20 Saudis in Jamal Khashoggi Killing Opens in Turkey

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Trial of 20 Saudis in Jamal Khashoggi Killing Opens in Turkey

"Turkish court has opened the trial in absentia of two former aides of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and 18 other Saudis over the 2018 killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Kasogi. Circus prosecutors a seeking life prison terms for the defendants, who have all left Turkey. Saudi Arabia has rejected Turkish demands for the suspects extradition and put some of them on trial in the kingdom. The proceedings have been widely criticised as a whitewash with Jamal CAS showed his family later announcing they've forgiven his killers. The trial in Turkey will be closely watched for possible new information. Including the whereabouts of the late columnists remains

Turkey Jamal Cas Saudi Arabia Jamal Kasogi Crown Prince Mohammed Turkish Court Washington Post Salman
Turkey trial of Saudi suspects in Jamal Khashoggi murder begin

Hugh Hewitt

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Turkey trial of Saudi suspects in Jamal Khashoggi murder begin

"In absentia to former aides of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed, Bill Sutton, Salman and 18 other Saudi nationals over the 2018 killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal has shown taking the witness stand at the beginning of the trial in Istanbul when Mr Hachioji was murdered inside the Saudi consulate almost two years ago. Has bean his fields, say Teacher Vegas. She is hoping that the trial would reveal significant new evidence on DH finally reveal what happened to Mr Haji's mutilated remains. Also in court is for U. N. Special reporter Agnes Kalama, who has denounced on earlier Saudi trial behind closed doors of those accused off killing as a mockery. That trial absolved

Saudi Consulate Mr Hachioji Crown Prince Mohammed Mr Haji Agnes Kalama Washington Post Bill Sutton Istanbul Jamal Salman Reporter U. N.
Turkey: Saudi suspects tried in absentia for Khashoggi death

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Turkey: Saudi suspects tried in absentia for Khashoggi death

"He's called this opened the trial in absentia of two former aides of Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman and eighteen other sound the nationals over the twenty eighteen killing a Washington post columnist Jamal Khashoggi Turkish prosecutors are seeking life prison terms for the defendants who have all left Turkey Saudi Arabia has rejected Turkey's demands for the suspect's extradition and put some of them on trial in the kingdom the proceedings have been widely criticized as a whitewash with Jamal Khashoggi is family later announcing they've forgiven his killers the trial in Turkey will be closely watched for possible new information including the whereabouts of the late columnist remains I'm Charles the last month

Salman Saudi Arabia Turkey Jamal Khashoggi Charles Washington
20 Khashoggi murder suspects on trial in Turkey in absentia

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

20 Khashoggi murder suspects on trial in Turkey in absentia

"A court in Turkey has begun the trial in absentia off 20 Saudi Arabian nationals accused of the murder of the Saudi journalists. Jamal Khashoggi. A vocal critic of Saudi Arabia is Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was killed inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul two years ago. The BBC Shoddy Alka chief, is there You're in Turkey. There's two ideas. The 1st 1 thinking that this is a simple IQ trial coming when there is no more evidence, and those whose child in this case is not in Turkey, and the body ofthe German did not found yet, but the other part looking for it as a political trials, where the relationship between Riyadh on Ankara is very bad, and also they think that maybe Turkey needs to send a message. To Saudi Arabia. Maybe this will push this case forward and push for Arial toe cooperate in the investigation.

Saudi Arabia Turkey Saudi Arabian Saudi Consulate Crown Prince Mohammed Jamal Khashoggi Murder Istanbul Riyadh Salman BBC Ankara
Khashoggi’s Son Says Family Pardons His Father’s Killers

BBC World Service

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Khashoggi’s Son Says Family Pardons His Father’s Killers

"The son of the murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi has said he forgives the people who killed his father the announcements likely to mean that the five people on death row in Saudi Arabia a granted clemency but his fiancee has said that no one has the right to pardon the killers all the people that ordered the killing while several campaigners have suggested Mr how shocked she son has been placed under pressure to make the statement chillingly the reports Jamal Khashoggi walls a fierce critic of the Saudi government in October twenty eighteen he was mad at and this man that's inside the Saudi consulates in the Turkish city of Istanbul the journalist had gone to the building's got to documents about his divorce in the following months the Saudi authorities gave different accounts of what happened before announcing he'd been killed in a radical operation which hasn't been state sanctioned that's been disputed by international intelligence agencies with the U. N. saying there is credible evidence that crown prince Muhammad bin Salman Khan and of the Saudi officials were responsible but after trial shrouded in secrecy five men who've never been identified was sentenced to death the latest intervention by son of Jamal Khashoggi means those men and now unlikely so as of the executed Salafi showed she writes on Twitter that he and his brothers had forgiven the father's killers during the month of Ramadan the Saudi media outlets Arab news says the announcement may spell the men from the death penalty but doesn't reverse the conviction or mean they would be punished it's been widely reported that the children of the meta journalist received a multi million dollar homes from the Saudi government as well as monthly payments that's been denied by Salafist so G. he maintains he has full confidence in the justice

Jamal Khashoggi Saudi Arabia Saudi Government Istanbul Salman Khan Twitter Salafist
Pompeo says he didn't know fired IG was investigating him

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:16 min | 4 months ago

Pompeo says he didn't know fired IG was investigating him

"Once again today. Mike pompeo refused to say why he requested the firing of State Department inspector. General Steve Levick. Who was conducting multiple investigations involving secretary of state? Mike Pompeo that includes Mike pompeo's use of a federal employees at least one federal employees for personal errands and Mike Pompeo's approval of an arm sale to Saudi Arabia. But today Mike Pompeo claimed he has no idea what investigations the inspector general has been working on. Mike pompeo knew about at least one of those investigations because Mike Pompeo refused to be interviewed for one of them and instead submitted written answers about the arms sales to Saudi Arabia. Nbc News reports that Mike Pompeo held two dozen elite dinners at the expense of taxpayers attended by influential Republican Party. Figures and leaders. Who would be likely contributors to a POMPEO presidential campaign in twenty twenty. Four Jars Cussin' now is Ben Rhodes former deputy national security advisor to President Obama. He is an MSNBC political analyst of been the A we have a secretary of state recommending requesting the firing of the Inspector General in his department who is investigating the Secretary of state and you have a present the United States who is trying to affect that firing claiming he has no idea what it's about. Yeah I mean it's truly extraordinary. Lawrence in the common thread is speaker. Pelosi alluded to is. They don't like anybody looking into what they're doing. They don't like Congress investigating napping oversight. They certainly don't like independent Specter's general looking what they're doing. There's an irony in this lawrence as well. Mike Pompeo was one of the leaders in the Republican Party in Congress who spent Literally Years Investigating Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server when she was secretary of State. Now we know of multiple potential wrongdoing Mike Pompeo the use of State Department resources for his personal political interests as well as perhaps flouting the laws and protocols without arm sales go forward and moving forward with significant transfers of weapons to Saudi Arabia. So there's a lot that the American people deserve to know and trump in Pompeii or doing whatever they can to prevent them from knowing how their tax dollars are being spent There are reports indicating that there were senior department officials who were advising the secretary of state not to use an emergency waiver for those arms sales to Saudi Arabia and go through the normal process of consultation with Congress That seems to be a certainly in in in in policy terms and in effect the most serious of these investigations that were aware of its very serious lawrence and you already situation where Congress has voted multiple times to prevent the United States from continuing to support a warn Yemen lead by Saudi Arabia that has killed tens of thousands of people in that has failed to achieve any of its objectives and that is in support of a Saudi crown prince who brutally murdered a Washington Post journalists. This emergency declaration doesn't make any sense Lawrence. It doesn't hold up because the situation in Yemen has basically been the same for several years. Nothing is different this year than was the case last during the year before. And what it seems to me is the way these arms sales move forward is the State Department has to license him and then they have to notify them to Congress and Mike Pompeo just decided he didn't want to go through the normal protocols which are in. Us Lockyer up so this is a separation of powers issue a constitutional issue and it also raises questions once again learns as to why this administration is always eager to do the bidding of Saudi Arabia despite all the very real concerns that we should have about the conduct of both the warned Yemen and the nature of Mohammed bin Salman. And but I want to get your reaction to the reports we have about these dinners paid for by the taxpayer which clearly have a political intent in them. An clear possible future campaign intent in them. Well there's

Mike Pompeo Saudi Arabia Pompeo State Department Congress Lawrence Republican Party Yemen Steve Levick United States Political Analyst Hillary Clinton Msnbc Ben Rhodes Nbc News Specter Pelosi Advisor
Cured Trout with Gsli Matt

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:47 min | 5 months ago

Cured Trout with Gsli Matt

"Name is. I'm shift from Iceland's run to restaurants in Iceland skull and Reykjavik the capital city and then in which is located on a tiny island on the south coast of Iceland called Westman Islands. I'M GONNA share a recipe with you. It's a cute trout similar to Colombo lex methods but using trout and standard Salman and using a little bit different herbs. So what I like to use instead of the traditional until is to use really good salt and Arctic time. Arctic Time Her. That is hard to find. It's only grossing in Iceland Greenland and the Faroe Islands but the flavor notes are almost like a lemon thyme mixed with lavender's and I've actually tried to do with those herbs instead and comes out really good as well so they can be substituted instead of Dr Time from softer which is sustainable cease. Company is to them and they have different flavor mixtures and one of them is Arctic time the recipe itself. Kosher three parts she sold with this Arctic time and one part raw sugar and for every fillet says the health lemon. The recipe is simple. So you have fillets of crowds. You just make sure it's completely debunked and take off the excess fat that is on then you take the fillet and you great health lemon over and then just covered slightly with a mixture of sugar and salt time. Just have to make sure it's completely covered. Keep it covered for eight hours if the phillies really. You're using Salman's of trout. It needs to stay up it longer. Then you just basically scrape off the salt and put it in the cooler and especially if you can put it on the cooling rack and under the fan inside the cooler that way it air dries pits and makes the texture of the cure trout. A little bit better so basically the time to make it as little more than one day after that the texture of the face gets a little more tense. And when you cut it down you can use it on act benedict on just grill toast or even just on its own with. Maybe a little bit site source of homeless. That is grated into either yogurt or cream. It's really simple recipe to make but it's really delicate than lights. I hope you enjoy

Iceland Salman Iceland Greenland Westman Islands Phillies Colombo Faroe Islands
Big Banks, Airlines, March Retail Report

MarketFoolery

11:15 min | 5 months ago

Big Banks, Airlines, March Retail Report

"It's Wednesday April fifteenth. Welcome to mark. I'm Chris Sale with me today. The one and only Andy Cross could see my friend. Hey Chris how're you doing in there? I got coffee. I'm good good to we got. We got a lot going retail. We've got airlines. We'VE GOT ENTERTAINMENT. But we're GONNA start today with the big banks because it's earning season and the as an industry. The big banks sort of lead the way Goldman Sachs and Bank of America both out with first-quarter reports Goldman Sachs profits down. Forty Nine Percent Bank of America can take some small solace in the fact that their first quarter profits. Were only down forty five. Yeah it's it's the real headline I think from the banks. Chris is just the reserve the loan loss reserves. They're taking now in this quarter so when you look across almost all the banks. That's been the biggest hit to the prophet picture. The revenues were somewhere in the flat. Picture for example Goldman revenues were flat. Gp Morgan's revenues were down like three percent wells. Fargo was down down about eighteen percent so the revenue lines weren't such the concern. It was really much more profit picture as you mentioned. And we're just seeing that show up in the earnings per share of these companies but the biggest part for that or these loan loss reserves that these companies have to the banks have to set aside in the expectation that the economic crisis. The pandemic that we're facing is going to cause some of their clients both on the consumer side and the commercial side to not pay their bills and so they had to set aside reserves for that. So when you just look at like what happened with with Goldman their earnings down forty six percent and they set aside nine hundred thirty seven million dollars this quarter. That's almost as much as they sent. Set aside for all of two thousand nineteen and that's four times the amount that aside in the first quarter of two thousand nineteen and you see the same thing across all of the the big banks. Gps set aside an additional six point. Eight billion dollars. It's four point. Four billion in the consumer side mostly for cardholders and the rest on the on the commercial side and across the entire company. That say this is ten billion more in reserves than a year ago. So you're seeing these banks really start to ramp up their preparation for what they expect to be. A very tough market of the next year I would also think in the case for every one of these banks has an investment banking arm. Goldman Sachs is the clubhouse leader and I would think that as we are in this environment where it's really hard to imagine any company going public in the next say at least two months Probably closer to four to six months That's one more thing that a bank like Goldman Sachs has to worry about. Yeah Chris absolutely right. So there's just these very high margin parts of their business that are going to start to see. Oh the fluctuations if not complete drops because that market has really started to soften. What's interesting on the Goldman side and Goldman's really going through this this reform under the new? Ceo Their new their new CEO. The bank is really kind of struggled. It's such A. It's such such known as such a class name in the banking space but the stock has actually struggled and the returns on equity have actually trailed their peers over the last few years. There's a real push by the new. Ceo David Salman to start to really invigorate Goldman Sachs again. So we had this whole plan when he became. Ceo after Lloyd Blankfein just recently and then obviously the pandemic hit so but a bright spot to Goldman or big part. Their business has always been there. Trading revenues and. That's actually been kind of a little bit of an Albatross for them over the past couple years but that actually was a bright spot in the first quarter of the same thing with J. P. Morgan Goldman's trading revenues were up twenty eight percent and JP Morgan is trading revenues. Were up thirty two percent so because of all the volatility because of all the frenetic trading activity were seen in the markets from both institutional clients and consumer clients for the big banks. It's mostly institutions were. We saw these results pop up for some of these. Larger banks like Goldman G. P. M. So that's that was one small bright spot in a quarter. That obviously is showing a lot of pain. Jp MORGAN LONG-SERVING CEO. Probably the most respected name and finances. We've talked about Jimmy Diamond. Chris who had suffered a emergency heart surgery a few months ago and came back to the job right in the middle of the as the pandemic starting to really get going. He put out his earning his his His annual letter. He talks about every year and really try to set the tone for the market ahead of what we the financial institutions and banks will see over the next year because there's obviously a lot of concern With just the just the plumbing and the financial picture of US banks. Let's move on to the airline industry because several airlines including Delta American jet blue and southwest have said that they have reached agreements with the US Treasury Department on part of that twenty five billion dollar plan for payroll grants. Obviously this is Good news for those airlines and The people who work there but it really does seem like this. I don't WanNa call it a band aid but it seems like it is a A relatively short bridge. That'll get them through the next couple of months. Hopefully but all the airlines really seemed like they have their work cut out for them Chris. I think I think bridge a bridge. If not band aid bridge I think is a good term apropos because So of the two point two trillion dollar in the stainless package that was signed into law. Last week were in late March. Now the the airlines are starting to work with the Treasury Department to figure out how they can access that and both in grants and loans and as you mentioned a pretty much all of the airlines all the major ones are going to start tapping into this and this is obviously Anita step for businesses. That are really struggling. You're seen bookings that are downed. Seventy ninety percent capacity in the company these companies have they have taken capacity out from their business both domestic and international. So it's really started. There's a heavy fixed cost and these businesses and when they have nobody flying and nobody buying tickets especially business travel which is really slow down. You're starting to see it now. Show up in the potential future of these businesses. But back to your bridge comment. I think these the airlines when I look at almost all the industries that operate and you think about the recovery patterns. I don't know if we're going to be in a v-shaped recovery or more of a U. shape slow growth recovery of both in the US and worldwide. But I do think. The airlines travel companies of all the industries. They will really be in the most flat shape recovery and I think it'll take a while for consumers to be able to come back into the travel mode get used to going back into airplanes. Get used to going back into airports. Airports Basically over the last ten twenty years have become big retail destinations. And you're seeing now foot traffic in the airports drop off a cliff and that's hurting the retail establish establishments inside these airports so that industry is just going to go along a long way to recover. They they needed this. They needed to be a tap the US government to help them support their business. Because without that you would see massive bankruptcies in the Industry Savan to the retail industry because we got the march retail report. And it was. I think every bit as bad as we were all expecting retail across the board down eight point seven percent in the month of March. That is the worst in history. Worst drop in history and context third on the list is the drop in retail that we saw in November. Two thousand eight and this was more than twice as bad in terms of percentages. And you start going through this. And the and of course the lone bright spot is grocery stores up around twenty seven percent but some of these other numbers in here you look at clothing and clothing accessory down. Fifty percent motor vehicles down twenty five percent. These are not but I kind of like we saw with the monthly jobs report for March and we knew that it was much worse because it really the only started They stopped collecting that data mid month. Same thing with retail. I mean I'm looking at one of my thoughts when I was going through. The march retail report was my God. How much worse is April GonNa? Because then we'll have a full month of this crazy was really devastating report. I guess not too surprising considering what we had seen in in late February and obviously there's our own consumer behavior but just for some context first of all that eight point seven percent number. Chris you mentioned is just a drop from February. So it's a month over month seasonally-adjusted number but historically that if you go back. They've collected this data since nineteen ninety-two if you go back. Usually that month-on-month change is in a small less than a percent change so the average is about point three five percents. So it's it's pretty tight. It's a very tight range. You're talking an average of point. Three percent with a standard deviation so changed from an average of less than a percent. So you really talking a very tight range here. You're talking last month. We saw a drop of eight point seven percent so it's significant compared to the average and not in way outside this the norm of what we see the last few decades so like you mentioned the worst number before this was in the great financial crisis when it was when when the number of fell three point eight and three point nine percent back to back. So we're talking twice as much as that drops it just context that about how significant this was just knowing wh- how we have changed as consumers. It's really pretty. It's evident and now we're seeing a show up in the number so as you mentioned some of the areas really got hit just really just a very significantly and then you see you see spots like grocery stores actually have a very significant ramp because as we continue to spend more and more at the groceries try to stock up in preparation for the quarantine that we are all facing and now still face and then you see things like food services and drinking places down twenty six percent from the month before and obviously just showing there that the real impact and that's having ripple effects because when you talk about ten to twenty percent of the global of the US employment is somehow tied to entertainment travel that area getting back to our airlines business.

Goldman Sachs Chris Sale J. P. Morgan Goldman United States CEO Goldman G. P. M. Jp Morgan Andy Cross Bank Of America Ceo David Salman Gp Morgan Us Treasury Department Fargo Lloyd Blankfein
OPEC, Russia approve biggest-ever oil cut to support prices amid coronavirus pandemic

KYW 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

OPEC, Russia approve biggest-ever oil cut to support prices amid coronavirus pandemic

"Deal Russian president Putin president trump and Saudi Arabia's king Salman of all agree to support a new OPEC deal to cut global crude oil production or oil producing nations plan to cut output by a record amount representing about ten percent of global supply to support oil prices during the corona virus pandemics oil industry analyst Tom Kloza says this could cost Mr trump some political points I think he opens himself up to criticism particularly as election looms if he's aligning himself with president Putin and with the Saudi Arabia Mr trump says the OPEC deal will save American

Saudi Arabia King Salman Tom Kloza President Putin Mr Trump Opec Analyst
Saudi-Mexican clash halts record oil cut deal despite Trump pressure

Bloomberg Best

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Saudi-Mexican clash halts record oil cut deal despite Trump pressure

"Room of global deal to cut oil production and save the market from a corona virus induced breakdown proved elusive today a diplomatic initiative led by Saudi Arabia suffered repeated setbacks after two days of talks the kingdom still is not resolved differences with Mexico that would allow its agreement for a record ten million barrels a day supply reduction to proceed president trump says he's trying to referee the dispute between the Saudis and Russia you know called president Putin and king Salman I think there's a very good call we're gonna see what happens but it was a very good girl yeah they'll probably announce something either today or tomorrow one way or the other could be good could be not so good earlier in the day meeting of energy ministers from the group of twenty ended with the statement that supported measures to stabilize the market they did not commit to any specific supply

Saudi Arabia Mexico Donald Trump Russia Salman President Trump President Putin
Saudi Arabia Declares Cease-Fire in Yemen, Citing Fears of Coronavirus

BBC Newshour

06:23 min | 5 months ago

Saudi Arabia Declares Cease-Fire in Yemen, Citing Fears of Coronavirus

"Now they can be few countries in the world less well equipped to deal with a corona virus outbreak than Yemen years of civil war and outbreaks of other diseases have left it with a devastated infrastructure food shortages and few functioning medical facilities in that context we now have the unilateral Saudi announcement of a two week cease fire that started a few hours ago it says to supports the efforts towards combating the spread of the virus so is this a glimmer of hope for the people caught up in the conflict Hisham al may see is a Yemeni analyst currently outside of the country it's a very welcome move to be honest I mean a lot of people on the ground have been calling for a cease fire for a while now after hearing of the corona virus pandemic and fears that it might keep him and and it's going to basically devastate the population because we don't have health care to begin with but the the thing is that people are skeptical because over the past few weeks there's been if men uptick in fighting and they're not sure if the fighting factions within her to this he's from and currently this is a unilateral announcement of a ceasefire how likely is it that it will be reciprocated by the who sees what is the thing that was announced it was unilateral but it comes on the heels of local factions calling for a cease fire for the past two weeks so it was sort of like a reaction or response and deputies have welcomed it the government has welcomed it but the thing is that in the past forty eight hours the Yemeni government has been pushing fiercely and several strategic positions in Yemen and it's going to be quite the challenge to de escalate and does them does fry fighting fronts what would well let's talk then about the the the challenges ahead in terms of de escalation because about that requires at least a reminder all of the complications of this war over the last five years just outline for us the key players and how complicated it it is going to be to de escalate the thing is that that there's no two sides to this war as it's portrayed in the media the fact that the reality on the ground is that their multiple factions and there for several areas that they're fighting in Yemen in the past few days there's been an uptick in fighting with the Hokies taking over new areas and the government are pushing back to liberate them what do you make of it has made advances are quite significant advances in the past twenty four hours so it's going to be quite the challenge to convince the Yemeni government to de escalate at this very moment they might slow down a bit but it's it's designed to be a cease fire total ceasefire the next twenty four hours to forty eight hours I'm given given the fear over the corona virus itself how much has that taken hold in Yemen I mean how how much of an incident is that all of the code nineteen what so far there are no registered cases in Yemen they're not in the north not in the south but people in Yemen and in the fighting factions having witnessed how it devastated to every other country and realizing the limited capacity that we have in Yemen they realize we actually need peace we need at least a temporary cease fire in order to prepare for a possible outbreak so on the one hand there is a desire even amongst the the myriad of factions that peace is required if this virus does take hold in Yemen but on the other hand there is also you could argue just the the habits of five years of continuing this wall exactly there's a there's a propensity for cease fires not to last for about two weeks three weeks in the past and from the pacifiers that'll last for long but the thing is that now we could actually capitalize on the culture pandemic of the crises that the silver lining here is that this is going to bring all the factions to the table where they would coordinate a response to the call to conduct in depth through chat table trust building measures could happen there and they could start working together and that could pave the road to some sort of negotiations to build up a road map if you will for a long term peace the the the critical word that you used in that also was trust they really hasn't been a great deal of that to date so that's very true the thing is that the various factions don't trust each other old to the point that it became nearly impossible to bring them to the same table and this is been very much a war that is Mohammed bin Salman's war he was the defense minister when the war began and there has been a huge amount of money and investment in this war why is it that you think that that the Saudis and the Gulf allies have not been able to subjugate the who sees the thing is that Japanese game is very complicated damn it's actually a Yemeni war to begin with but the roots of this concert school way back to almost thirty years this is a power struggle between multiple factions such as between the parties and the government of the thirties in the seventies with between Yemenis themselves and dabbed people from outside the region and within the region as well they got involved in a Yemeni conflict you're going to get any conflict and if we as Yemenis don't strike a deal with among some selves it's gonna continue forever and how likely do you think that is how hopeful are you about the ceasefire here's the thing we're not left with much in Yemen but hope we've been trying to do this for the past five years we've had several initiatives we have had several peace meetings in Geneva and in Kuwait and deb we've made some progress but it always falls apart but we cannot give the hope we cannot give up we need to continue doing this and right now because everybody's scared was the culprit that does not discriminate and it's going to hit us equally all the factions and it's going to devastate the country there is that sense of responsibility what everybody needs to make some sacrifices but they need to compromise for the greater good so I'm hopeful I was Hisham al MACA Yemeni

Yemen
Sports radio personalities are running out of things to say during the pandemic

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Sports radio personalities are running out of things to say during the pandemic

"American the MLB rob meeting Parker deaths commissioner makes for the rob his from group living the of Manfred corona twenty talking virus nations announced sports pandemic the league's on the who radio investigation chaired hooked up by but to Saudi one the thousand corona of Arabia's the red virus Sox king were pandemic in alleged Salman another grim is cheating broad milestone the sports kingdom is complete for to a which global a complete is presiding outbreak man standstill Fred over appeared it's the on G. taking ESPN twenty normally lives is here Wednesday in March and night wreaking says you know you and havoc have revealed it's it organized all on the league economies has extraordinary you wrapped have MBA up and its meeting months ordinary going long to life advance strong look at global Boston's you in have March recognition efforts potential madness to tackle of involvement the college scale the pandemic basketball in of sign the threat stealing and its baseball the economic Senate late the season commissioner implications Wednesday starting did Boston not so reveal it's on of a people the PowerShell league's lose verdict it's their incomes a smorgasbord two but point said it two would have of been be trillion closures small announced dollars sports before curfews the start in of economic the but and twenty now lockdowns this twenty rescue year regular package the nothing virtual is season while exchange steering confined the aid red to Israeli Sox comes to parted businesses apartment amid criticism ways with Parker workers manager does that the and a world's three and former wealthiest health hour Astros show care each systems nations bench night coach on Alex Fox have not Sports Cora taken then radio in the cohesive January misgivings I don't action over on think both I'd his ever involvement sides say to combat this about before whether in Houston it the goes but virus too thank sign far you stealing or Tom with not Brady scheme far economic enough his impact moving I'm to given Tampa I on just people call can't Bay block around days the of world difficult negotiations he's I'm gave Charles us something de to talk Ledesma the about most debate people and the argue virus causes so thank mild you or moderate Parker symptoms said he agrees but for some with the move this it week can cause to postpone severe illness the Olympics and death mark I'm Charles Myers the last Los month Angeles

Cora Brady Astros Fred MLB Los Month Angeles Charles Myers Ledesma Tampa TOM Houston Parker Alex Fox SOX Senate Boston Espn G. Salman Arabia
"salman" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:43 min | 6 months ago

"salman" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"At the same time that Mohammed bin Salman was doing this he was also all offering regulations that would allow women to drive for the first time in Saudi Arabia member that and he was it was allowing women to meet in public without permission of their husbands he was allowing them to go to lunch together without their husbands or security watchdogs being around and this was all designed specifically to make the western world look or think that Saudi Arabia was modernizing westernizing so as to be more easily seen as a place to invest money well the the the plans were visionary and they were Y. as in Saudi Arabia everybody needs to diversify you never want to have all your eggs in one basket even if it is Saudi Arabia and oil because especially with the rise of the United States and fracking they are not any longer the go to place in the world if you want oil or to even accept the price or the supply Saudi Arabia used to be able to stop the supply thus the demand and determine the price for oil around the world a world OPEC well look this is the cliff notes version of what's happened over the weekend and toward the end of late last week Mohammed bin Salman Khan was triggered something set the guy off and he decided they didn't there was an effort to destroy all pack a year or so ago that bombed miserably and it involved if you remember the oil market was flooded with supply and the price of crude came way down the pricing gasoline came way down you might refer people very worried about how the producers are gonna stay in business it was thought that this was an attack on fracking which it was fracking still cost more to get oil out of the ground than traditional drilling of wells well now we throw into the picture Russia Mohammed bin Salman has made the decision on the strategic realization occurred to him that if he's really going to corner the oil market he's gonna really do damage he's got to do damage to Russia Russia is a massive producer of oil but Russia's royal infrastructure is old and outdated and what really is happening here the reason why the market's down thirteen hundred points today is oil Mohammed bin Salman Khan is flooding the world oil markets with cheap Saudi crude and his number one target is Russia and shale oil which to an extent is the United States I'm sure that his effort here is not intended to do grave damage dust I'm sure he's been telling everybody in washing stick with me on this our common enemy Russia because Russia in the Middle East as Syria and Saudi Arabia look it's Mohammed bin Salman the start of the war in Yemen at which ended up getting one of their oil depots blown up a few months anyway this very very complicated global geo politics I gotta take a break I just so I know I'm on Rush Limbaugh radio radio again you're listening to the Edward taxis in can be a pain but it is worth it when you open.

Salman Mohammed
"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

"We might do but exactly how you make it work. It's it's up to you and then the what is scary is that you do take which they like and they say okay well. We got that you'd like that. Not do it a different way. I think different way so so anyway it was there. They're very very good at making they were very very good at making me feel comfortable and relaxed and so on and so it was just the most enjoyable the two days so i wanna make you a little uncomfortable because i have no doubt that you're going to get the nobel prize one day and i know that did you probably don't wanna talk about it. Which is why. I want to talk about it okay. Does it occurred you. Do you think about it. I mean you know i would be lying. If i said never oh catch me but i don't think about it very much because you know the world is full of wonderful and deserving writers and only one per year gets that thing and so there's many many more candidates sure worthy candidates than we'll ever actually receive it. Of course you know and and i've been i remember years ago. Starting out newspaper asked me to write an article about all the great writers who did not win the nobel prize and in the end. I didn't never wrote the article but i did do the research and it is an amazing win. The nobel prize started tolstoy was alive and the first russian to win the nobel prize was yvonne benin <hes> who but they so the people who didn't get it stopped but tolstoy tolstoy ibsen strindberg checkoff joyce post kafka nabokov baucus is not fair kafka's welfare because posthumous writing right yeah but all the rest of it's fair of rare and then of course an enormous thomas shortage of women winners of course <hes> so. I thought well if that's if those are the people who didn't win in. I'm happy to be in that club of course suit so rich you that he loved to be well. It's a million dollars. That's alright. That'd that'd be nice yeah but boris used to say that that you say you say the nobel academy makes a habit of not giving me the nobel prize every october so the you have to treat it like it's like all prizes you know. They're very nice when you win and they kind of don't matter when you right so had you know my my i used to go to <hes> read to my son's class in school and i thought when they got to the fourth grade raid i would read this little boy he story and they would get it and they would find it fun and they seem to hang on my every word and and they finished <hes> this girl razor that was great. What was it about is for kids now but he he is a great great writer and and one of the writers that i read ben is young and i still at university who had just explosive effect turn me but he's exactly the wrong kind of writer for me to use as a model because i don't write like that. That's not my character. It's not my personality the very very cerebral philosophical playful texts which i love but i started out trying to write like borges was absolute garbage. Yeah just had to revise. That's not the kind of writer i am you know. Sometimes you love writers and realize that that's absolutely not optus direction. You should go in yeah because you'll gift whatever it is does not lie in that direction so you've had so much success with your writing. What is your superpower superpower. What are you doing what are you. What are you have in you that you're doing so well you know. I think the answer is the answer is hard work. I mean it's just being in the habit of work so that even when i'm not writing a book kind of writing a book you know i'm still thinking about about the business of writing and what might be next and so on and then i mean a novel is the marathon you know the novel..

nobel prize writer nobel academy tolstoy tolstoy ibsen kafka optus ben yvonne benin borges boris million dollars two days one day
"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

"Everything. I've ever wanted to ask tony morrison so i said yes. I'll do it and this is one hour. Interview could find britain bbc. Archives is one of the most interesting hours that i've spent a lot of things. She said which became very useful to me. Was she talked about the relationship between her writing and jazz <hes> she she talked about how i said. I said i said do you actually use. I said so much of jazz is improvisational. <hes> i said so. Is that a technique that you use a she said well. I want to make it look like that but at another time she said that she did think of her writing as being formerly like jazz you know and and in the sense that there is a there is a kind of architecture but there's a lot of looseness in the architecture which you find in the act of playing my own the process as a writer has become more and more and more like that <hes> when i heard her say that i remember thinking at that point in my life i needed a lot of architecture catastro- i needed to really have worked it out before i could start writing it and then listening to her. I thought you know there's something to that to the play. I got to try that and ever since then it's become more and more and more i think true of the way that i write i discover things in in the act of writing them and then be a very good critic yeah then to say i don't like this. I cut it out but not active thinking of in writing as an active discovery has become more and more the way i think about ellison ravel's yeah well. I mean you know there's a problem of writers who only have one book but i thought i thought invisible man is colossal book yes and and some of his essays i really like the posthumous novels as well which is yes whatever that is i mean i have one reason i have a soft spot for the for june. Teeth is that that's my birthday. Okay okay. I was born on june. The nineteenth okay and i quite like it. The june teeth is june team for and there's a ralph ellison novel with that name okay but it's impossible to know if if that's the book that ellison one yesterday there was a short story of his i loved it just published in the long defunct magazine american review. He has a story called cadillac swan on bay. I love that story so bureau yeah <hes> and invisible man is just a it's a it's a great book and and baldwin baldwin that there were periods of my life when i would intensively read baldwin and i came very close to meeting him and then chickened out a wife i was i was a kid i had never published anything and i was in sample divorce way and he had recently moved there. I was in the little bistro oh and they would and i said i said is it true that james baldwin lives here and they said oh literally the american rights and they said yeah he's just down there down. There and i thought my god james baldwin lives just down. There and i actually what you went to the house and then i didn't have the courage during the doorbell. I thought you know i'm nobody i've ever published wish to book by. Should i bother him zillow's so close very close so i was on the opposite side of the door from james baldwin you wrote that paul simon's graceland the song had impact on this book how well there's a character nicknamed the human trampolines that's so that's one that's one reason what <hes> but also because i heard him talk about the origins of that song where he said that you know he came back from africa with all all this music that was it was supposed to be an african album yes and and he said he there was this one bit of music..

james baldwin writer ellison ravel tony morrison baldwin ralph ellison britain zillow cadillac swan africa american review paul simon i one hour one bit
"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

"Both i mean i bet three american in counter-terrorism chiefs and all the countries so i thought you know i'd really should do this because i know these people now there. It is and well maybe you now. You're karadzic. Maybe maybe there's another spy novel toronto's. You know the world is constantly telling you that you are a great writer. You're one of the best of all time middle is sort of stuff. I wonder what that voice does to you. When you actually sit at the head you don't hear it because the world tells me other stuff through which is less flattering. You don't hear it surely much with his writing is so difficult to do well that when you're sitting there facing that challenge you're not thinking about anybody else says you're just thinking about how to make this thing work doc and i mean this book for example. Was i mean it's a very it's a very ambitious book tries to incorporate many different kinds of literature sure and it has a very large panoramic sweep at it. It's trying. It's trying for a lot and the trouble about trying for a lot. Is it if you could put it off. That's great and if you can't you fall flat on your face. You know it's like a it's like high wire with no net so so you're too absorbed by trying to not fall off the high wire to worry about what people say about you know at times in writing novel you kind of i kind of try to see the entire thing once which intellectually is very difficult very difficult the do you get that moment of trying to hold it. All your mind wants to make sure all it's it works and that just it's really hard. It gives you a headache. It's true but it is also true. I think that in order to do the thing you do have to hold a very large about it doesn't matter how many notes you make right you have to hold a lot of it in your head because because it's like it's like the matrix is incredibly complicated located connections between characters events and places and and and <hes> you know themes that cetera and you've and you've somehow got got to balance all that in your head and and see exactly what needs to come next you know and and actually when you so. I thought i'd found sound like when i finish a book. There's this moment when that matrix in your brain disappears <hes> and it's kind of like having your brain removed because you realize that the thing you've been thinking about has occupied almost all your thoughts for the last two three. He is yes suddenly. He's not in your head anymore. <hes> but you think i don't have anything to think about. It's it's it feels. It feels stupid listening to sit back and be a little more granular. How do you write a sentence well. My favorite answer to that is when ernest hemingway was asked this by the paris review and he said the most most important thing a writer needs is a really good shit detector. You have to know you will hand. You have to know when it's bad yes because if you don't know when it's bad you don't know when it's good so so that's the first thing is you have to. It's strange. It's like it's schizophrenic because the actor active writing the sentence comes out of one thing in your head. Which is the creative thing you know. The actor judging whether the sentence is good or not <hes> comes..

writer ernest hemingway toronto paris review
"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

"You've got to look at it in the face so i wanted to do that to do you think that <hes> in america we are in a moment that is shaped by a particular take your individual or has america shifted to be more trumpian and this virus this cancer will continue after he's out of the oval office i i actually did. I began by thinking that he was more of an effect than because that's i began my thinking that the the rift is is there any way yes the rift in the country was there anyway and he was he was a product of that yes that of course he's become. He's extremely skillful. Oh at exploiting that and twisting the knife in that wound and making an making it the the rifts deeper and and and more difficult to who he'll so. I do think that even if he were to evaporate tomorrow we'd still have a problem. Yes i mean he he has has definitely made it comfortable to be overtly racist and to challenge the existence of racism and that's not going to just sort of go away off doc the democratic fresno and the strange thing. Is you see that it's although this novel for the most part takes place in in america some bits of it takes place in in in london linden. Some backstory stuff is in india but mostly in america but this problem is in all those three countries now that's to say the the current indian administration which is just won a landslide election victory it is very popular is very divisive of setting catching hindus against muslims with very wide acceptance of that happening because he's popular you know the whole brexit nonsense in in in britain is also about disliking farmers and thinking how much nice age would be if they could return some fantasy england in which there weren't any unfortunate brown people around and when the when the country ruled the world and of course ignoring the fact that one of the consequences of the country ruling the world's that they were looting the countries where the brown people came from you know and that the wealth of england was based on on on that so these are not exactly the same phenomenon but they're they're linked that link to your of globalism zone fear of immigrants yeah exactly and i mean i've been an immigrant more or less. All my life sure so. I'm biased. I mean i feel like in some ways. I don't recognize america and in some ways. I'm like no no you do it was always just right there under the surface and now it's just come out we do you feel like i don't really recognize this place right now. It's the same it's exactly what you said i mean i do you must have been reading as i was this sixty nineteen project we the weekend times yeah and one of the things that writer after writer in that project says is that the floor in the idea of america was was there from the beginning because it was not an equal society <hes> you know it was it was a society based on crime and and in a way black people fighting for freedom way which was fighting to make the country the thing it was supposed to be great you know which which it wasn't right and so yeah i think in a way you know countries have original sins that i mean the original say of of britain is colonialism. Eh the original sin of america is slavery and to what extent do we deal with those things as culture you know <hes> i mean interestingly getting the after world war two the germans went to through a very serious process of self examination in order to deal with the fact of of nazism and i think the british have never done that about colonialism and i think this country still has a long way to go definitely has not done sunday at all what south africa did in terms of their truth and reconciliation. We've done nothing not all that exactly..

america britain england fresno writer london linden india south africa
"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

"You know that that allows me. I don't know whether it gives you more power because i think that's fashion in literature as there is in everything else and that great wave that went from the sixties seventies eighties with in which cut magic realist stuff was very hot. I think is not really like that now now. It's it's in a way more little see conservative time yeah right now <hes> but this book i don't really think of as quite being in the category of magic realism i think of it as actually coming from in some ways a much older classical tradition i mean the one of the things about don quixote which was a starting point is how incredibly strange and modern it feels you know don. Quixote and sancho panza are characters who know they're in a novel right. I do have opinions about the novel that they're in right very rhetoric and i thought you know he thought of this four hundred years ago right <hes> and and so my book is it pays it's all managed to don quixote but it goes on its own on a kind of different journey a so but it's inspired by this this old old literature which is the tradition of the picturesque novel in which you have the you know the word pecoraro originally means a kind of rogle scam or rascal osco and the pickerel goes on adventures but in this book you take this four hundred year old texts and you play with that story but you're commenting being on today yeah right i mean it starts with the sort of meditation on television an obsession with television taking you into a surreal world. Anna's part of your is part of your assessment of the modern world that we are being blinded to reality by television well by the junk culture of our our time of which television apart in particular reality television television that i like advocate addy like i'm an addict of loyd order as we watch much much much too much of it. There's a lot of it. There's a lot of it to watch. Thank your favorite show probably okay. I could give you other examples. Surely you love black mirror. Actually i haven't watched as much of it. I should say you're kind of show. It's what i've seen. It was terrific yeah yeah and i like. I like curb your enthusiasm but i really really. I really really like loader s._v. But so i mean i'm not immune to television. I'm talking about junk television you know and and and all the other stuff that is ancillary to that like some of the problematic areas of the internet the enormous untruthful -ness of of the internet and i'm the kind of bad madness of social media what happened just taking all that because i was thinking you know four hundred years ago the elder services was taking on what he thought was the junk culture of his time <hes> and say how these these awful novels about knights in shining mama rescuing damsels in distress were corroding the minds of people in his time so then i thought well if i wanted to take something on in that way what would be my target and and and the book started dotted from that i mean you talk about this. World of of anything can happen. Is that what you feel like. We're in because you talk about like the criminal who could become a king jack king who could be massive criminal. We've seen that over and over in recent years yeah. It's it's such a strange moment where it's as if all the things that we fought over like the rules of how things were are they just gone and and nobody nobody really knows what the new rules are all might turn into you know and so we just anything can happen. You know reality show star. Could that'd be president actually in the ukraine. A comedian who played who played presidents comedy shows television ran for president in one really yeah. Oh so you have to have somebody who plays the president talk tv who ends up being president you how long this book take you two and a bit years..

don quixote president Anna sancho panza ukraine loyd four hundred years four hundred year
"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"salman" Discussed on Toure Show

"It when you have dinner with your friends who are writers you don't ask each other about your world railroad. You've got a fool road gray and i thought this would be an excuse for me to ask tony morrison everything. I've ever wanted to ask tony morrison so i said yes. I'll do it and they're just one hour. Interview could find ended in the bbc. Archives is one of the most interesting hours but i have spent one of the things she said which became very useful to me. Was she talked about the relationship between her writing and jazz. I said so much of jazz is improvisational. I said is that a technique that you use and she said ah i wanna make it look like i do that. Salman rushdie is one of the great writers of our time. His novels are funny and brilliant earliest and engaging as hell. I love midnight's children. I love the ground beneath her feet and i love his new novel keynote. Which is a modernisation of the don quixote. The story that digs into how t._v. is ruining modern america and how crazy the country is now rusty says we're living in the age of anything can happen where criminals criminals can become king or even president amen to that. I've known salman for years and it's always a joy to talk to him. So let's go it salman on rushdie on tori show and my work i use magic realism as a way of getting ed the dynamism and the colorful of black culture and also to try to stand apart from from the european tradition. What is it in in your life that you have seen that makes you say okay. Magical realism is a way of expressing yeah well. I think you know what it is this that the realist novel came to fruition in and became influential at a time when writers and readers kind of essentially had the same picture of the world okay get that's to say the right. The writer could assume that his readers would see the world broadly speaking in the same way that he did and there was an agreement about the nature of the real. You know an hour of that agreement comes. The real is not but we don't live in that time anymore. There is no agreement about what the world is like. The world is a a very contested space. It's it's contested politically nationally racially in in all sorts of ways you know and and so you there isn't that agreement anymore between the writer and the reader or there isn't necessarily in agreement about what the world is like and so that undermines ends the foundation of realism you know and and you have to find other ways of telling a story ways of telling a story which which assume that there may be many truths you know they may be more than one truth and that some of those truths might be in conflict other truths <hes> and <hes> it's. It's so comes out of that somehow. Does it give you more power as a writer or does it. I don't think there was a moment when it when the in the modern manifestation which really away started in latin america brain that moment the so-called l. boom as it was called <hes> <hes> those writers gained enormous attention by the use of these techniques because they seem to readers to be reflecting the world to feel like the world that they lived in. I mean before i ever went to latin america. Latin american friends of mine would say the thing about garcia. Marquez is not fantasy then when i went to latin america i discovered that they were they were right that actually it's it's like that and and i thought the same about roy started out writing mostly about india south asia but india-pakistan and and i felt about that part of the world that the reality was so extreme and extraordinary that in fact my books felt to me he likes understatements rather than exaggerations and again what happened with those early volkswagen midnight's children when they were published they were read in the west as magic realist they were read in india as history book and it's not what i'm saying that people people read the world differently and and i've always sort brought with me that knowledge of how the world is read differently..

Salman rushdie writer tony morrison don quixote america Marquez volkswagen india asia garcia roy rusty president one hour
"salman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"salman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Is it possible to determine which ones are the right tools? Like, you said you've got your tools laid out there by the pool. How are you going to figure out which is the right one to us next? Again, it always goes back to planning. But but I'll give you often angel toes give it two out of three things. So you either get liquidity safety or growth potential. So if you think about a Bank account, very liquid very safe, no growth, no interests. I hardly at all as about stocks. Very very liquidating. Salman a second literally nanosecond. Yeah. Then you get the growth potential GM safety. Well, as the fourth quarter twenty eighteen showed us, no, no, no safety. And so it's it's trade-offs things like annuities. They they give you a growth potential and safety. You have less liquidity. Okay. So is that good better indifferent? Right. What what is the issues with all those? Well, again, it goes back to envision what you want your retirement to look like what are you want to be doing how you're going to be living your life? Well, let's say expense. That's going to cost you, and then let's figure out. Okay. Let's figure out how all these. Tools come together. And we'll create this blueprint to worry less wealth. We're going to create a blueprint that includes an income plan to see how long your money's gonna last and make sure it's always gonna be there. Look at an investment plan of which tools, should you be using to create that income tax ramifications of all those various tools lay of the healthcare legacy issues, and that's the five areas the blueprint to worry, less wealth. And.

Salman GM
"salman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"salman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman and this is the world good to have you with us as Monday the disappearance of Saudi journalists, Jamal kashogi so many different angles from Turkey's investigation of what it says was kashogi brutal murder to the way Saudi Arabia's rulers treat reporters at the heart of the story, though is arguably the most powerful man in the kingdom crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, and that's where we start with a closer look at the prince or m b s some column before the kashogi affair. He was getting rave reviews in the western media as a young leader bent on reforming his old kingdom, a country wants a frayed of change. Now it seems changing all at one reform in Saudi Arabia country offering playing Hamad bin Salman is air to the Saudi throne, and he is architect of some of the major social, economic and political thirty. Two year old explained his progressive agenda in the altar, conservative kingdom, especially when it comes to France's making unpreced. And changes within Saudi Arabia? No, but crown prince's image as reformer is being questioned. Shoddy Hammeed is with the Brookings Institution. He says he never bought into the idea of the crown prince as a reformer. No, I didn't. And I think a lot of us who work on the Middle East were skeptical. We've seen the whole narrative of the young enlightened modernizer, and that hasn't worked out well in the past, and we westerners, we love this kind of idea, and we wanna find the good era of who can give women their rights and open up society. And I just wonder, how long will it take before we get past these allusions? So what is the background of Mohammed bin Salman the Saudi story specifically, and what suggested to you that NBS was not the reformer, some in the west hoped he would be the Yemen war has been going on since the Obama administration. So we've seen this disastrous war which has led to. One of the worst humanitarian catastrophes of our time and NBS in particular is associated with that war. He seen as the architect of the Yemen intervention, so that should have been a warning, but also the Saudis basically kidnapped the Lebanese Prime Minister last year and tried to force him to resign. And that's not even me being hyperbolic. So these are signs of recklessness. These are signs of a young leader who doesn't feel constrained and who doesn't know when to stop. It took the disappearance of Jamaica Shelby for a lot of people to take step back and look at this reality in Saudi Arabia, I'm curious to know shoddy what other events in recent months or the last year do you feel we should mention of this other side of MB s? So important side of MB NBS is the crackdown on dissent. What we saw in the pre m b s era was Puckett's of dissent. What's different about m b. ES is that even those small pockets have been rooted out in a very aggressive way, and that's what's led to this fairly recent phenomenon of some Saudi intellectuals either going into exile or thinking about exile, and kashogi was part of this because he feared for his safety and quite rightfully so. And we've seen, why is this kind of the DNA of Mohammed bin Salman is this who were getting to know. And we should mention also the rights of women to drive car in Saudi Arabia. But at the same time, a lot of women's activists in jail. So he hints at the arrival of social reform, but on political dissent. That's just not going to be tolerated. So he has opened up society in some ways. But as you mentioned, I are ni is that he's also cracked down on the very women rights activists who were calling for the changes that he himself made when it comes to the right of women to drive. There's a way to look at his reform side along. With his very strong authoritarian tendencies because he sees himself as the great modernizer of Saudi Arabian and because this is has personal stamp, he doesn't want anyone to come in the way of that, and he feels that he can only do that by pushing things through very aggressively..

prince Mohammad bin Salman Saudi Arabia Jamal kashogi Saudi Arabian Yemen Marco werman Brookings Institution Middle East Turkey France murder Jamaica Shelby Prime Minister Puckett m b Obama administration Two year
"salman" Discussed on Your Mom's House

Your Mom's House

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"salman" Discussed on Your Mom's House

"I'm looking forward to these days being dad and having the kids fart in the car. And now you know, torturing mom, yeah. I know why you pick this clip. Why? Because this mirrors are real life yesterday on the way home from dinner. It was pretty bad. Lock me through what happened. This is a liquid asp ranked by. It's that spray. We've, we've people have said this that it's not nearly as volatile as what you've got in your real s will. Yesterday was an interesting day because it was a travel day. Always recipe cross country travels. Just bad things happen. Sure. Met the hotel early. Yeah. Eating breakfast. Having you have for breakfast. I had a mom 'let k with veggies. Yeah, spinach, onions, mushrooms, you don't eat those very often. Not true. Eight that had some bacon. Yeah. Greasy coffee. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And you're up early early too early, does something to your guts? I know what it is. I know. And then I shit at the hotel, then I drive more than an hour get to the airport. Have another like half Coffey another coffee, and I just started as it now. I just started, honestly, I got on the plane with it. I gave it to a flight attendant, right. I can you say, because usually once I drink my morning coffee and then I shit, I don't really want. Copy, right? Why I was like, I don't really enjoy this and I slept for a few hours. I don't know. But your whole, your whole digestive track is messed up that day? Yeah, it really is just waking up super early. If it would mess my son up to it would hurt my son just hurt, and then I got back here eight something here. I don't know. Then we went out, what do we have for dinner? I'm I had seven. Oh, sound Salman? The hard l. I had the Salman and then yeah, on the way out of there just fun is because we say Salman as a joke and that one we're out in public. So many people say Salman the hard l. and it's not right, including the server, it's it's incorrect. Yeah. Do on this album? I do and I go. Can you make it medium rare? He's like, they don't make take temperature change for the Salman here. Salman that and I hear library allot -til a lot tweeted directions for things. We said like, we'll be like intentionally really safe. Instead of it. Okay. It's jokes so so wait a minute. So we remember this, we, we had our Salman. I had some seafoods two. And then on the drive home go. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So far did well, it's not just a far it was like an atomic say, but it was real. And you had your head out the window. You like Like my my way. way. First of all, here's a shit thing you do is you don't give me any heads up. There's no warning, and then you don't cross ventilation which everybody knows if you're going to in a car, all the windows have to be down passenger, Android, you gotta cross ventilate that fucking thing. It was hot. It was hot. It was high and it smelled like dirty diaper. Like it's smells like our newborns farts. I gotta give it to me. It was nasty. Give it up to me. It was real nasty. What did it feel like coming out? Was it hot? Yeah, no, I knew it was as it came out like I told you, I'm going bad. Yeah, I know. I was saying that I smelled it too..

Salman Coffey
"salman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"salman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Champagne landed salman care here smelly around would go semantic focus people screened two young man is encounters job the service sterling.

Champagne salman
"salman" Discussed on My Black Friend

My Black Friend

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"salman" Discussed on My Black Friend

"Laura suck all right leases or he we're going to try to continue to do these old emo try to concentrate of how about the word yolk like a joke he spoke is weird added area it doesn't bother me though yolk gurgle not gurgle i'm good on allrace i'm i'm good uh uh phlegm it hague silent letters i'm gonna tell you the one i had the most o k salmon i'd own let me see if it's on here i don't see salmon salmon a lot of samad person yeah it's weird i don't i don't see salmon on here that's interesting i i could see that when you just is it just knowing that that el is there yeah is there in can't say it you could be a salvo on yeah i read it and i go is salman the great i'm eating salman but is not is salmon in his sight if you say salman you're like some fog in like hick hamma um fetus kurd none of these are that bad this one i don't like smear i like smearing smear bothers me you know word i really eight eight pap smear oh oh what a what a horrible maim oh oh you're like said it all out this one i definitely don't like squirt i scored is year where it bothers me scored a much rather say ski i think it's so we all eve squirt now to me is just dude that talk about making girl squirt and then you like read these things that show that like that's actually like just it's like a certain percentage says urine coming out and it's like.

el salman Laura samad
"salman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"salman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Salman two two yes and woo union.

Salman
"salman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"salman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Salman two two yes and woo union.

Salman
"salman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"salman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Salman two and two.

Salman
"salman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"salman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"The reason salman with me you live to home indeed who rented you know he hits you do god them if they're not as the buzz words and the guy go that had seen that there were only god i did not see by new crimes the apology by not long volume made me the as yet the cincinnati be has any he said he's in length budget blinds oh jeez not low argued either me tell you that then he how razali's elyahou histories of his we have not been these as the reason we have oh we've got you farming on size loss lets you buy me let anxiety all dumb india lab side on prime i i but he argued frans nielsen the the high emme huawei they agreed amelio amelio whoo mm his the the decision that he can't holy no in this okay oh god one the streamed.

salman cincinnati huawei razali frans nielsen