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"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Originally this had been announced under the title. Molly yes when did that change and why it changed partly feedback from distributors here in the US Because Street? Who said do you realize molly is the name of a street drugs that everybody is? GonNa think this film is about drugs and I kind of resisted dot feedback for awhile but also some other feedback. I got was that it didn't give enough of a clue really about what the film was going to be about. It didn't help people into it. It was a female name. And as you know man at the center of it but then fought for me. Her right to her name. Molly is important. Because although we're in his head she's the one who's holding it together emotionally on the fact that at the end of the story. He suddenly remembers hunt name and says it is an incredibly moving of the stories so there was good reason to call me but there was also very good reason to not call it molly and so finally decided on this title. That would at least give people clue that when we're seeing we'll be on the lives of the guy had these are the roads not taken. These are the life you didn't live. I saw an interview with you. Where once said ideas are to a penny? Yeah how do you know when the idea is the one you wanNA pursue when I'm still passionate about after euro two it has to withstand the test of time because you have to live with for a long time so it can't be something you're GonNa get bored with or or wish that you'd never taken on in the first place so it's like that if I'm still really intrigued by occupying I think one of the things that I've learned from talking with. So many filmmakers over the years is that every film you make ends up affecting you in some way. What's your takeaway having completed this project? Having completed this project is. I'm really looking forward to doing comedy next on my four D. written it so I think it's good to deal with subjects that have sadness or loss lisa part of life but will so there are other ways of dealing with this subject. I didn't feel it's Don's right from one subject to the next one way of telling the story to the next. I never want to repeat myself. I'm not interested. I feel I've had the experience not moving onto something else where there's something else new to learn here and not very much at the beginning of its life. Its trajectory in the world on. So I don't yet know how who's GonNa welcome it how it's going to be received. You never do. No I was just talking to a Spanish speaking journalists somebody from one of the Latin American countries and I was very interested to know how it was for him. And how it might be received by the Latino Latina community and it was very gratifying to hear the him. It was a great relief to hear some Spanish spoken a length. Not just like Papa my mouth or whatever and the Spanish speaking characters were not made or chauffeur's they were very complicated. Rounded human beings have been interesting and difficult transition. But it's very early days. I I'm finding out whether someone is GonNa loud in people's hearts and minds who's going to want it who's GonNa find themselves it who's going to recognize it. I don't know yet but has the process of telling this story changed you in any way. Yeah film I feel like I go into a universe. Somehow University of my own making in I start with a blank page and then it ends up. Kinda world on the film these people in it and inhabiting it doing things and speaking in it you know. I can't blame anyone myself for what exists up there on the screen. But I think I became through making it even more interested in whether cinemas a medium movies on on not like a doorway into the mind on minds of so mysterious. If you could put a recording device inside your mind and listen to watch sports in there it would be much more complicated than this film. You know the way off saw stance. From Associati from one thing to the next day memories the imagination the thoughts the visions Minds our new universes of such complexity and since the very beginning of making films. I've kind of wondered if we could have a Mak- film that function like the mind in a way so it's part philosophical part practical question but that's punishable. I was attempting to do this one. So you said you kind of move from style to style that you've tested one boundary and you're looking for the next. What drives you from style to style. Well it's interesting. You should ask that because I actually never think of it as a style really. It's like I think. Of what form does this story need or idea need in order to be told so? It's a consequence of things much deeper in the idea or in the story and then I try and find the necessary form for that so I don't think of it as something adding on to the top of the subject matter so just being how you know many things over. His style is kind of interesting if you like but rather as something that is it must be told this way on the has ended on with it looking palms if I'm exploring different genre and different ways of telling things rather than having one signature thing signature way of making films but for that reason because I'm trying to find out how must be told. What shape does this? Some need comes out of that. Feeling of necessity. And when you're developing that how does a movie tell you how it should be told? I suddenly meditates on it and I think I work out. You know I try this try that I tried to think that the first thought is not always best. You know what would be. Another way of. Doing this would be doing that. I look a lot of stuff. I look at photographs and look at other movies. I listen to music and I gradually find it. I I always loved the matter of the scope to look a block of stone and sees what form is waiting inside that block to be found and I experience making a film a little bit like that. It's like I'm finding something I'm not necessarily inventing it but I'm finding something that was hidden and that to be found. Thank you so much to our guest. Today Sally Potter Who's written and directed the roads not taken and also to our producer for joining us. Jenny thank you so much for calling in Sally Syndrome. Nice talking with you. Thank you very much. Hollywood unscripted is created by. Kurt comb media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law CO hosted by Jenny. Curtis with guest. Sally Potter produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The score for the roads not taken featured as the music. This episode was composed by Sally Potter and provided courtesy of Sony Music. Entertainment the executive producer of Hollywood scripted. A Stuart Halperin the Hollywood unscripted theme song by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love Creek. How media.

Sally Potter Molly Jenny Hollywood US Curtis Sony Music Latino Latina community Love Creek University of my Stuart Halperin Don Malibu Film Society Papa Eric Dick executive producer Sally Syndrome Mak Kurt
"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:24 min | 3 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Your collaboration with Robbie Ryan talked to us about how you use cinematography to create those sharp divisions between past present and the different stories that were being told simultaneously. The script is the starting point of everything and I try and think of it as the Bible in a way for everybody that works on the film. They're going to find clues about how to work and Robin. I worked with the script and look I thought about it and thought about how we want to use the camera. I watch seeing how it seeing where that's coming from. We decided to keep close to. My Hobby is character. Close to Al's character and see or experience. The things that we were in so to speak through that is through their bodies so for example. If he's feeling like a very small person big landscape than the camera can be far away seeing him as a small figure in a big landscape but if he's in the street overwhelmed by the sound of traffic will be pledged him close to his face anxiety in his face as the chains go by and caused by an and noise is disturbing his equilibrium. So that was kind of law if you like the Visual Law and then we go very practical power to weed tested a ton of different lenses cameras filters different kind of focal length and did the tests with each the actors to see what worked and didn't work on film so it became very practical but we tried to keep the consistent way of shooting and it was a very short shuttles so most of it was hunt held or when it was started it was like resting on a sandbag rather than try. You know we were trying to just shoot. Shoot shoot in the number of days that we had. And he's a genius. He's incredibly flexible. Has a wonderful I. He's really far on is always on the most of the storyline. That was taking place in Mexico looked and felt so vibrant and colorful as compared to the scenes in York particularly inside the apartment which were yet very muted. That's not in the design of the film. So that's what I prepared a a great deal with callers. Conti the production design. We talked to my colleague pilot for each of the stories so we chose environments in a sense the in story of Mexico That was to do with you know occas and reds and oranges. The costumes were kept within the Color Palette. The House was painted. The interiors were painted within not color. Polish and saw Greece on the other hand was everything was like the color of the Greek flag will blue and white which Greece is like the white Patriot buildings and the blue sea and unsawn surreally. The Look of the film is primarily worked through the triangle of the direct to the production designer on this Mataafa. An acoustical design and I try. We don't talk to each other and try and create a kind of unified visual world. Also when you would transition into a new scene there was often very clear gesture or something that would bring you into the next scene. Yeah was that written into the script. It was all in the script. It was all in the script but then things change. Circumstances change weather changes the changes in the country but I tried to stay with the same principle. That is like his buddy or some other element or word was always taking risks floating through into the next scene. Robin being a hard cut into the next scene so that we would feel that his mind was like a river flowing this way that way and we were following this flow which indeed could be you. Know he would turn his head to the left in one world and arrive fully that gesture to the left in the next world for example that kind of thing but a lot of those transitions were in the original script. When you originally writing that did know you would be one of the editors no. I'm always in the cutting room. Ninety nine point nine percent of the time with it we worked together. It's kind of collaboration. But my hands are not on it. I'm working through the work of the editor. Just as I'm looking through the world called the cinematographer through the wealth of the production design. And that's the job of the direct not necessarily hands on you guide and get people into the vision that you have and that becomes the basis of the collaboration between you. In this case the edit took longer than it was going to take and so the first editor I was working with me how to leave under the point. I need to sit more in the addressees. I still had somebody else. Actually pushing the buttons for me so to speak but that's why in the end. I'm listed amongst the attitudes because it was a great degree of editorial responsibilities and I sometimes have so. What were the challenges that you ran into impose that were causing the process to take longer than you had originally envisioned because it was so complex how to tell the story in a way that people would be able to follow quite simply and when I tested it when we'd gone quite a long way down. The line untested it with some audiences. Some people followed it with no mature but some people really have the loss of trouble. Is this in the pastas and the president is flashbacks. Is this in his mind? What was happening here. What was something of that and I kind of watched and listened? Thought you know what I'm going to have another go. I'm GonNa see if I can streamline it so that the questions may still be there and people's mind but they will be. That's an interesting kind of confusion that resolved by the end the pieces of the audit together the end rather than alienated kind of confusion. On I mean I hope I succeeded in that and also to make Shaw Lot. We kept really is close to what was important and the story as a possible. It's interesting were recording. This and the week that Westworld is getting ready to debut on. Hbo And in an interview. One of the producers said the audience confusion is a feature not a bug. That's good that's good. Yeah I mean I feel that way. I love watching stuff that I don't understand because I know that he's going to exercise my mind in a way. That's it's pleasurable for me. Nice pleasurable but I know that not. Everyone has that pleasurable relationship with ambiguity. You know so strange. One to navigate second-guessing audience. Well together I like testing film because I think I want to know. Is it reaching people? I'm not doing this myself. I'm doing this to communicate so I want to know but at the same time I've learned to nostrum previous SOM thought responses to a film can change over time. It can be different from one country to another film. The people didn't get when I made it ten. Twenty years later Sunday people get and it gets revived re-released or people start writing about it so it can be a medium with very long tail but I like the comment from the West Mall people absolutely you also composed for this film. Yes while you were writing and while you were shooting. Is that also when you were thinking of the music or does that come after as well? That was in the coaching room. I didn't know whether needed any music at all. It might have been data just silent. I didn't know or whether it should have. Music was coming out of the scenes in particular or whatever but when I was in the classroom I found that I kept hearing Sutton Hamas melodic lines and Sutton instrumental found on those musicians. I've worked with Multiple Times Fred. Fresca Qatar is that what we think is on six. Am So maybe more. And so his sound founded. His Guitar has become the musical identity of film. But I wanted somehow to create something that brought together The Electric Sound Guitar with all. Its mournful ness in the way that plays a kind of melancholy beauty in his guitar. Sound with a more traditionally classical string quartet sound these individuals subtler applying the string instruments. Bring those two songs together. Then I started to experiment with composing along those lines on my lunch. She wrote about five times as much music as ended up in the final film wrote and recorded it but yes. This was not something I had planned to the beginning on at one point when I was putting it together I put this under a pseudonym people are going to get really annoyed by compose music as well and then I said Oh. For God's sake you know. Do I need to hide you know? Let me just do it anyway? Let's see how.

editor Robin Mexico Greece Robbie Ryan Visual Law Al Sutton Hamas Hbo Conti Mataafa Fresca Qatar Shaw Lot unsawn surreally Westworld president York West Mall
"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

03:31 min | 3 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"I would imagine that the process of putting fingers to keyboard in creating the script must have generated a lot of mixed emotions because of the experience with my brother. You mean yes. Undo said very close friend who had multiple SCLEROSIS WHO. I was very close over twenty thirty year period. Actually until she died she died the same year as my brother out. Chandler's would each them through to the end so yes of course the feeling of loss the feeling of grief defending of the fan of the illness and do you know why van on all the things that anybody experiences who has people close to them they lose for one reason or another who unfairly suddenly seemed to be struck by illness but precisely because. I know that it's Universal. That experience we will face it one moment or another disability activists called it. The rest of us are temporarily able blooded until something happens. You know and that's not doing me saying it's just a real life thing. It's a human thing with strong but we're also fragile bodies a fragile. And how do we cast of people around us who we love when they're sick? You know it's a big big problem. Social cancer the older Kaffa parents and so on and so forth nearly everybody's wrestling with a woman at some point in their life so I was having those feelings but I knew I was not alone in having those feelings and so it was something to explore. Now once one is actually writing. I was getting on with it and then shooting much much later by. Then it's about crossing the best possible film. It's about structure character. You know now to development and call a pilot design clothes you know. All the other obsessive broke patients filmmakers. So by then feelings Feelings are irrelevant. They may have been the starting line but in trying to cross the properly you have to have the detachment of the August and then maybe much later in the process like when I was editing. It like six months into the process. I suddenly found myself having feelings about one particular scene and it will most took me by surprise because it was so changed from my original experience. It was so transposed into another setting and other country. You know the characters take home very different shapes but I was still able to see. This was this was. Yeah I had feelings in some ways. Then it's like helping you process all of those feelings. No I processed the feelings to the way one processes feelings by talking Basset with friends or family order in therapy for me. The filmmaking process not a way for me to process my life. It's a way for me to do. I do as dedicated filmmaker. I love filmmaking. But I don't really use it to purchase my life is like impose it that way but I think to stay. Rooted in feeling in general sons is essential otherwise. You're going to be a filmmaker. You know doing things that you don't care about so it's important to care about it but it snows the therapeutic vehicle. It's something else altogether and I think people get very confused about that. People often confused for example novels with the writer of the Nevada. Stu everything in the novel because it has deep feeling Moss Bay port of something. That person's already on themselves. But it's not. We use our lives as material because life itself is the raw material of the world. We do if it's going to reach others. It must be.

Basset SCLEROSIS Moss Bay Kaffa Chandler writer Nevada
"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

10:42 min | 3 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host. Got To law of the Malibu Film Society. Joining me today in the studio is our producer. Jenny Curtis Hi Jenny. And this is our final episode of the season. Our guest today is Sally Potter. Who has written and directed the roads? Not Taken starring. Javier Bardem L. Fanning along with Salma Hayek and Laura Linney welcome. Thank you very much indeed. Over the past several years we've had a steadily increasing number of films that have been dealing with dementia and I know you've had some personal experience with it. But what was the new territory? What was the difference that you wanted to get across with your story? I wanted to explore really the mystery of the mind. The sale is not necessarily only a really difficult and tough tragedy. Although there's often great difficulty involved but the fact that we don't really know what goes on in the mind when somebody seems to disappear. I ASK MYSELF THE QUESTION. Or maybe they're going somewhere really interesting. Not gave if you'd like a doorway into thinking differently about the mind about lives not adverts not taken us the title That somebody might be slipping in and out of different kind of a win. Says even of power lives the lives. They could've lived existing at the very least somewhere within the mind so it was using it not so dementia is not like the sum total of the stories. Not just about somebody with dementia but rather somebody in a state of mind in relationship with in this case of Dourson taking care of him and we're exploring that state of mind also through her is to know that you did. Dedicate this to your late brother. Nick and that he severed from frontal lobe dementia. Yes from a young onset dementia. He was very young when he got something. The symptoms took him over quite. He passed on within two years. As I understand it you were very involved in his care. Yes I was. So how did that inform the story that you wanted to tell me? It was accompanying him. If you like has his kind of witness and keg it there were other people carrying for him to but but being responsible for his car and going with him opened my eyes to many many things first of all how badly somebody in that condition is often treated as if they're becoming less than human song and I found that I became incredibly protective of ten. And also the people say as more and more hard to communicate with somebody in this state. Well I found. It was not the if I went into. Let's say his speech patterns and treated them like poetry and wrapped with him and stay in these fractured language. Other people couldn't understand that we could understand each other perfectly well also that we laughed alert through the you know sometimes humiliating experience. He was having. I tried to turn them into a joke into a kind of human comedy rather than human tragedy so I learned a great deal. Of course I was deeply deeply saddened by his loss and booze grieving and so on but I wanted to find a way of telling a story that might by transposing it and transforming it into something else might first of all be useful for other people who've been through similar experiences. Carrozza whatever semi off different questions about the mind the mysteries of the mind uncertainty from all the neurologist. I talk to all the specialist so that period I gradually realized there is still a great deal to learn about this and many other mental states and a great deal more respect owed to the people who are living with this illness but I didn't want to a portrait of him so the character portrayed in his from heavy. It couldn't be more different. Touch Lee is very different. The story is held by a father daughter relationship siblings so it went through many processes of transformation. But that's where it sprung from. The father daughter relationship is obviously the core of this film and the character portrayed by Al. The daughter is so incredibly sympathetic to what her father is going through to the point of sacrificing everything else about her life. It seems. Well it's left open at the end. Exactly what she is prepared to sacrifice. And what isn't but what we see is that she's split. We see the consequences that so many women face in their lives whether that's mothers caring for their children. How can they also have a life a guilt free life following their own trajectory and she is a doors trying to do the right and loving thing for her father's the guy she loves? She loves her father and Heart is kind of a King Fan and for his suffering but she also loved her and work on. She wants to do that for the very end. We see a signal that she's trying to do both she's trying to do both wants to an intends to do both. Did you start creating the story while you were caring for your brother know afterwards while I was coming from I was actually making another film so I know exactly what it's like when you're working and answering the phone and rushing out of the late at night is early in the morning to deal with crisis or something? I know not speeches like at first time but no when I was in the middle of it was kind of overwhelming so it was only later when I started to do all right. Just do which is transformed some of the biggest expenses they fought in the life and starts work with it and see what you can do it. Put it back out into the world in a way that will make sense others but at the time no. I couldn't now separate from the making of the movie. There is the business side. Was this a hard sell to either investors or to the actors that you approached it was very hard sell to investors not such a hard sell to the two because they could see in it the potential to explore an incredible range of profound human experience really even in the smaller parts like Salma. Hayek you know it's small but every good actor knows there's no such thing as a small part and for her. It was really interesting to play a Mexican woman that she recognizes as a total human being and not stereotype and so on so no. The actors were very enthusiastic and eager. Hardworking and intent I think for investors. It was difficult to see how this might work. Because it's quite a complicated structure to run. These kind of power lives into weaving through the mind of this but also because the subject of dementia or mental illness is kind of taboo. You know there have been some films. Yes but it's still a difficult area that people don't we want to look at and this was coming out in such a different way. It's not really the main focus of the thing. It's not dementia. The main focus of this loud. The many faces of love adores for her father. An ex wife. I somebody who she still loves. But it's no longer responsible for and so on and so forth so yeah I think it wasn't self-sided but there were enough. People who were finance who passionately committed to it from the very beginning core finances and then others came in late and talk to us a little bit more about the casting. Yeah but you want to know was how they are. Your first choice. Who WERE OTHERS CONSIDERED FOR? This role did consider others now conveniently forgotten once. I've ended up with somebody. How could I even thought if anybody else on that? It's often like that. Sometimes it takes bit of trial and error and kind of figuring out and initially I was thinking of somebody English speaking and it took a while for me. It was like a Eureka moment when I thought no this will be much more interesting. If it's a Latino person who's not only looking at life through the filter of this illness but looking at it through the filter of another language so in a way the issue of translation between the mental state and how people understand the more communication difficulties the feeling of a border line if you like a physical border between Mexican America and the United States but the border inside the mind between one state and another one thing became a metaphor for another. And I've thought many of the performance is that have you done in particular how he was in in your research foam beautiful which I think is an extraordinary film. How in it so I approached him with the script on T. was IGA take it on with some trepidation that he was eager to take it on. Vr BARDEM and Selma Hayek. They know each other in real life. Did that affect their casting or the way they interacted onset. She's very very close friends with penelope. Who Dare is hard to? But they made a decision early on while they were on such a while we earn Russell and working together the they would create a kind of professional distant as if they didn't know each other outside. But I think there was joking and sense of humor and kind of the rough and tumble of the fact that they do already know each other. That probably be helped shelley the ease with which they worked together and because SAMA is Mexican and she's playing Mexican and he's playing Mexican. He was looking to her for example to make sure his accent was correct and that everything he did aside was authentic to her as a Mexican individual. That was very helpful for me to so yea they worked off each other very well and in a very short space of time you know. We shot all of those things together in three days but we prepared for months beforehand and those people who like to prepare. Of course ELLE FANNING. You had worked with on. Ginger and Rosa eight years ago and she is outstanding performer. An outstanding professional young twenty one year old now Thirteen I I work with her and she brings a dedication and infuse the ousman lightness to to a role and is able to imagine herself into the shoes of others experiences. She's not hot directly herself. She somehow manages to empathize with and imagine in an incredible sunset way. And she's Joyce who was used as an extraordinary form. Did you have in mind when you're creating the character? When I was writing the script I was deliberately not allowing myself to imagine any particular actors in the row but rather let the characters themselves come to life under my pants so to speak to find out who they were. Now that's partly. Because if you get fixated on a particular actor. Will you know writing? And it doesn't work out for one reason or another show delaying or you know whatever you disappointed whereas if you allow the character to come to life and then start to think well who could play. This might take this car during the different direction. That can be very enlivening and now what I usually do. Once I've got somebody committed to the pot in principle I then what with them find out how it fits retailer it slightly to fit them more precisely to sit in that qualities. Whatever and so to the point where then I really content much? Anybody else.

Salma Hayek Sally Potter Javier Bardem L. Fanning frontal lobe dementia Jenny Curtis Malibu Film Society Hollywood producer Laura Linney Dourson ELLE FANNING United States Nick Lee Joyce Heart Vr BARDEM Russell shelley T.
"sally potter" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 4 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on KCRW

"Elle fanning Salma Hayek and Laura Linney from Sally potter comes a journey into one man's mind envisions of two lives he never lived starts Friday it's seven fifty one for the second time this week trading is paused as stocks plummet marketplace morning report is supported by progressive insurance comparing car insurance rates from multiple insurers so shoppers can evaluate options in one place now that's progressive comparisons available a progressive dot com or one eight hundred progressive in New York I'm Sabri vanished or in for David Brancaccio markets are in free fall after an address by president trump left last night in which the president tried to calm concerns over coronavirus and after a stimulus announcement by the European central bank that fell short of expectations for the second time this week major stock indices fell so far so fast they had a circuit breaker and trading was frozen for fifteen minutes the S. and P. five hundred and the nasdaq are officially in a bear market in his address last night the president announced a travel ban from Europe covering twenty six countries not including UK and Ireland it does does not apply to US citizens trying to get home the ban takes effect tomorrow night it took investors by surprise in his address the president also promised help for businesses and taxpayers marketplaces Nancy Marshall cancer has this update president trump stopped short of sweeping measures he did not declare a national disaster because of the new coronavirus and there's no new economic stimulus package but last night the president did announce that insurers have agreed to waive co payments for testing for the corona virus he told the treasury department to defer tax payments from people and businesses affected by the virus and he says the small business administration will step in with new loans these low interest loans will help small businesses overcome temporary economic disruptions caused by the virus.

"sally potter" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

15:19 min | 7 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Amanpour

"Of age in the aftermath of American civil war. It's a film Greta. Greta going to write and direct and Michelle. Martin sat down with her to find out. Why what is it about your films that make grown women cry? Oh we're not going to be the first question I will i. I don't know exactly I mean I do when I'm when I'm writing and directing I keep thinking about what am I passionate about passionate about. What moves me? What do I want to see and they keep trying to be honest with myself about what is it that excites me and I always know that I'm on the right track when I have this feeling of cabling we know ones made this movie? Like there's sort of this this feeling of like has this not been done because I don't know why it hasn't been. I think it should be and I think that there's there's something of that but I also I don't know I remember really emotional person so I think they have. That's one of my Do you agree with me because when I asked my friends about. Yeah the the friends that I work with like yes. The question is not you know. Did you cry. The question is when did you cry. When did that make you cry when and we're comparing notes and I'm thinking wow you know we are women who cover wars and we are women who cover engagement and you were talking about when this movie made us cry and I just said had you know I wish I had a more a better analysis of? I don't know I'm glad it does. I'm glad it moves people. It moves me so I think you're always trying to transmit that to the audience. I mean I always say. Movies are empathy machines. Why did you start making films to begin with first of all I just wanted to be part of it because they loved films? I Love Cinema and I just wanted to be part of it anyway. I could so I started really doing everything I was. I was writing. I was co directing. It was Holding the boom. I was editing. It was because I was working on such low budget films that everyone had to do everything all the time. Anyway and then I I moved into knowing that I wanted to direct later mm-hmm because I loved it so much. There was a feeling of wanting to be qualified and wanting to know enough that I felt that I could responsibly responsibly. Take charge of the set and also responsibly. Get all of these people to donate their time and talents or or use their time and talents rather for for the movie. Because I think income I think it just didn't WanNa go off half baked. Wanted to really know that I was ready so I spent about ten years working in movies before I hey directed and it was after I had finished my script of Lady Bird that I thought I think this is the one and I think I think at this point. I've gotten all the experience I'm going to be able to get without actually doing. I was GONNA ask about that because you know you know like a lot of people who cover politics you know. I'm really interested in this question when women run and themselves permission to run and there is some research that shows that women need to be asked three times before the old commit to running whereas men. It's it's once or even ever asked them and I was just wondering for you. When did you give yourself permission to say I am going to be in charge? I am. I'm going to tell the stories that I want to tell in this way. Do you remember when that Click didn't for you that you had that right to do that. Well well It wasn't it wasn't One lightbulb moment it was a key accumulation of moments I would say it was around thirty around thirty thirty one that have felt that it was that it was time and it was it was mostly because I had a script that I felt very passionately about and that I felt that I knew how to make and that was Lebron and that was lady bird but a but and then after that I actually interestingly in the chronology of my of my story I had the script for a lady bird I knew I wanted to make it but it takes time to make movies just getting financing dancing getting actors together figuring it out so In the interim I had heard that they were interested. That Sony was interested in making little women and I told my agent. He had to get me in the room because I actually had already had an idea for what I wanted to do. A little women so before I even directed Lady Bird. I went in to talk to the folks at Sony and I said I have to write this movie and a half to direct it and I end directed anything at that point and I think it was it was actually those two things that little women lady bird for me came together at the same time and I was and and I started to be more certain of it. I think when I told them I was going to direct a little women before I directed anything in a way I was imagining more brave person than I am and in pretending to be them for the amount of time that I was talking to them and then I left the room and thought do I really have that in me. I'm not sure but I see your point of being asked just three times. I have been there had been a number of things I had had three different female directors. Say something to me I had Miranda July Rebecca Miller and Sally Potter had said something to me about directing. And what did they say. Well Sally Potter was asking her as she's great British actor and she you writer director and I was asking her about writing because I had been writing films uh-huh and she stopped me and she said why don't you ask me what you really want to ask me and I said what do I want to ask you. And she said you really asked me about directing it was like how did you know. Oh she said you're a terrible liar. I mean she was basically like it's written all over you. You want to direct. This is why you're asking. And then the other two it it was more symbolic we'd talked about directing and then they both Sort of mystical. But why not I'm allowed to be biblical. They both give me pairs of shoes that that had it didn't fit them that they thought might fit me and I thought if I was writing this in a script that's way too obvious of a Metaphor that would be like that. It's too much but when by the time Miranda gave me a pair of shoes I and Rebecca gave me a pair of shoes and I was like this is is incredible so I felt like their shoes. Go fill these shoes. So I'd gotten signs and then I had written the script gripped and then the the synchronicity of Them being interested in little women and So by the time I was directing lady bird. Yeah I really feel like it was an accumulation of of years of building up to that point but I you know I can't I can't speak to. I have only ever lived as a woman. I don't know but I felt the pressure of of wanting to make sure I had groundwork for For doing this art form that I love and Trying to do it as best as they could. Central to the book than in central to your film now is the question of what a women allowed to do. What are women and girls aloud to do? What are they allowed to dream? This is a clip sir. Shirt ruin as JOE is talking to her on March coach played by formidable Meryl Streep and Meryl Streep is basically schooling her as she thinks she should inherit as. Let's watch. Aw Josephine yes here. Is there a reason you stop reading. Belgium I'm sorry. Continue Yourself deary someday. You'll need me. You'll wish you have behaved. Thank you so much for your employment and your many kindnesses but I intend to make my own way in the world. No one makes their own way. Not really we st- of all women you'll need to marry. Well you're not married. Don't because I'm rich. How tell me about that? I mean it feels very fresh. Real women are basically you know. How often is it that you know women are telling other women what they're allowed to be in do? I mean that's still happens doesn't it yes sort of minds yourself but the whole question of what women and their what's the word I'm looking for constraints. Yes is very much a part of this. It's very much a part of this in You know the the character aunt March which Meryl Streep did tell me she was going to be in this movie and she told me she's going to play out March. which was one of the best things anybody's ever? Yeah that's how it works out to lunch. And she said that book a lot to me. I would like to play the battleaxe. Please write me some good lines and I but she she had some police incredibly smart things to say. She's not only a brilliant actress. WHO's one of the best actress who's ever lived? She's also a wildly intelligent and really understands what the heart of something the heart of story is and we had an incredibly productive conversations about this book and what it means and I think you know. It's obviously funny. When at March says I I didn't have to get married because because I'm rich but I also think aunt March aunt march isn't wrong about the world and I think one of the lines that always moves me is she says nobody makes their own way? Not really and I think that there is particularly this illusion of and everyone is able to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. And that's just not true. And it isn't particularly for the nineteenth century wasn't true a woman and And I think that her her constant pointing out the reality versus the ideal of them of Joe. I don't don't think either one of them is wrong. I think that that's what is so fascinating to me. I think I can't remember which writer said this but I I. It's true a a conversation between a person where one of them's definitely right and one of the Stephanie. Wrong isn't that interesting conversation between two people who have a point is interesting because then there's something to talk about if if there's a rightness wrongness and it's just over why why did you want to make little woman as a film so badly. I was so important to you well. There were few reasons when I when I reread the book and I read it so much when I was young but I probably haven't read it since I was fifteen and then I read it again at thirty so twice as much time had passed fifteen years had passed and when I read it at around thirty I was completely shocked by how modern it was. And how many lines. I hadn't remembered and how much of the story I had completely cer- blocked out in my in my recollection of what the story was and I felt that take my memory of it is a lot of people's memory of it which is the girlhood section. It's it's when they're all together and they're young and actually the book keeps going and it's really interesting and fascinating and it's then it's about just what do you do with all that ambition of your girlhood..

Meryl Streep Miranda Lady Bird JOE writer Sony Rebecca Miller Sally Potter Greta Michelle Martin Belgium Josephine Lebron director
"sally potter" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

09:18 min | 7 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"That's what you tell the money people anyway. Oh I tell everyone but so but I was trying to be you know well good student and cut my pages And but I what I ended up doing is I ended up feeding the actors. All these pages Either the night before or on the day because then it was too late for anyone to do anything about it because by the time it's in the dailies what are you GonNa do. Tell me I can't have the lines. They're already in there and So Oh I had given the speech to Florence the day we were shooting and and I remember saying there's so many things that I said with utter confidence which I had no idea but remember saying while arguing for this To be in the movie I said this will be the clip people play breath and they said because it's because it straight because I was because she does she does it amazing and also she's not angry as a character she's she's just explaining the world which I think is compelling because that sort of explaining the world is almost more heartbreaking than saying all the ways you want to change it just saying. Here's how I've gotta get along. And and she she doesn't she doesn't fabulously but so in any case it's it's from Meryl Streep that I stole and then gave to fluence the day of because I knew I wanted to sneak it in but I remember I was like mark. Goodbye words this loopy. The moment i WanNa know what else you know. She said so many things I feel like I quote her all the a time She said I for her. She said it was one of the precious few books. Where the the the we the girls had of girlhood and of sisterhood and of of growing up in that way and she said that it women have all kinds of practice imagining themselves as men and men have very little practice imagining themselves as women which is just such such an obvious thing to say but it's completely correct? I want to ask you about the activity of directing you. I've I became aware of you when you were in movies at Netflix known as Mumble core films so quite a while ago and then as a writer so an actor actor writer and then being a being director seems like you gotta be Polian directly. I once watched Lena Dunham come do a short film for The New Yorker. It just thing that went went for three three minutes. It's very young at the time very young now and it was amazing. I was watching her. Not boss around but direct You know set people and actors and this one and that one electrocutions and they were all doing exactly what she said. There were about forty people there right and she had command of the room. It was really interesting to watch right. How do you learn how to do that? When you're activity before was being directed ed or being alone in a room with a with a blinking screen? Right Well to be honest I think that's who I always have been. I think I am more than a writer or were He. Yes well writing was always a way to get to that moment for me I mean this is kind of maybe. This is too much just personal wrong information but I think Up until I was around thirteen I'd say I was the the Bossi's control free government. I mean I remember I want. My Dad had a business trip in New York and we all went and we went and saw we saw Remember we saw starlight express which I just loved the roller skating on Broadway. Yes it's Andrew. Lloyd Webber's Starlight Starlight Express. It's about trains and his unroll skates and I can still recite every single word but I remember I came back to make into garden and I told everyone that I would be putting sitting on a production of starlight express and everyone better start working on their roller skating which I did stuff like that up until assigned to do a group project and I completely took it over in seventh grade and I was like explaining how everyone was going to do everything and I I I remember some some kid made fun of me and said like just you know that I was annoying and did and I. I then was considered kind of a bossy unappealing girl You tamped down a tamped down. I deliberately tamped it down. But he didn't really it didn't go away just kind of went underground and then I think in high school and college. It kind of simmered and then it started really coming out again and I think It's the person who I tried to crush. When did you give you an? How did you give yourself permission to let this thing resurface and in your cell free? Because I wanted to do it so badly just it was. It was the desire that was bigger than my my person and I I think actually this is. This is strange but true thing that happened to me. I was I met Sally Potter the Director and I asked her about writing and I said you know what's your process. How do you write it? Was You know a corner dern asking questions and then she grabbed me by the hand and said why. Don't you ask me what you really want to ask me about. I was like Oh my Mike. Oh what do I really want to ask you about. And she said you really want to ask me about directing and I said how do you know that. And she said it's written all over you lay. Ah That's what you WanNa ask me about and then I did ask her about it and Then four years after that she came up to me at an event in London and for Lady Bird and she said you did it was like. Oh my God a mystic and I love you but I felt like there were a number of things. There was also I was given a pair of shoes by not one two women directors Rebecca Miller and Miranda July both gave issues That never happens to me. No.

writer Starlight Starlight Express director Meryl Streep Lena Dunham Florence Netflix Lloyd Webber Sally Potter New York The New Yorker ed mark Rebecca Miller London dern Lady Bird Polian Miranda
"sally potter" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:01 min | 7 months ago

"sally potter" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"New year's hi Hey I write my book I gave up writing after new years even when we had written thirty screenplays and ten books I published a book with penguin USA was their big book of the summer I was driving a taxi wow okay we sold ninety thousand copies that book and I was driving a cab attacked a cab anyway then I I took ten years off from writing and I just got fat and happy building real estate selling body butter Sally potter and houses and made a lot of money but I was obese I was I couldn't even bend over time my shoes that's how I known getting too fat as a I like try to I try to cut back on my food when I can't bend over tight with if it's getting hard to tie my shoes I known to fat because that's where I was I could not even been over into my shoes and then it came to be two thousand eight October or the world nothing down I went to the Mann self a campfire and what happens the shaman you know he he yeah I mean I owe so much to that guy let me say that he's probably might look I've had some I had a lot of mentors in my life and I'm so grateful to all every single one of the mentors and I think when you're writing down your gratitude it's very important for you to think about the people who have helped you to become better who have helped you to you know we start out as basically mock and then somehow we evolve out of the muck and we become a blob it's crying in a bottle and then we become an a little infant no no no I remember when I gave my daughter I'm like do you want some he wants some chocolate milk it's it's got it's delicious you could now it is Ron milk I know when Ron milk I'm like it's delicious and she goes not to me he said it's like five years it raw milk you would think talk to the causes may with raw milk it's like what the heck is wrong what is wrong what is wrong it's not pasteurized all you know kind of brilliant in in a way what I like because it looks brown it must be it wasn't around it was chocolate milk yeah but because it's brown maybe it's not clean she was drinking regular chocolate milk are you I know I know you know what this plan then we involved we keep involved we have these mentors who teach us you have to learn how to live a successful life and at the end of this episode Amon reveal to you I'm gonna reveal what I learned in the past the most important thing I ever learned in any class was from one of my top five in the professors at when I was an undergrad toward business school I had one of the top professors Digby bought cell and he started out one of his classes innings talking talking talking was like the last class he ever taught and he goes you wanna know how you know if you've lived a successful life that's gonna come at the end of this episode okay so stay tuned and by the way this is the last one hour episode is that right that's right this is my last we're moving to a new time slot we're moving to nine thirty PM on Sunday nights and it's going to be thirty minutes yeah so I hope I hope you enjoy these one hours but we're moving to thirty minutes because I think thirty minutes is gonna be tighter and better yeah yeah exciting yeah very exciting because you know last week's episode yeah all those experts it was amazing just great flew by flew a daily a really done great job thank you yeah yeah my first real good mentor who who helped me in my aspirations of becoming successful as an author was Jack Canfield now obviously before him I had Justin sterling for the men's weekend he would always say when you drink the water remember to thank you the man who dug the well right that's that's he was one of my mentors very important mentor Justin sterling help me break through my fears of men I was afraid of men can you believe I was afraid of men I I definitely can you can believe that I can yeah why are you afraid of men the in certain situations I feel like yeah yeah like it's important to have your guard up sometimes I was I I did not realize that hi I was thirty years old and I was afraid of men yeah that's tough way to live to be afraid of half the population it's it's yeah this is insane and by going to the sterling men's weekend I conquered my fear of men and I grew to trust men and to appreciate mental love men amazing really really important instrumental to me however he's he was not a mentor in my career he was really more of.

penguin USA milk thirty minutes thirty years five years one hours ten years one hour
"sally potter" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"You know, things that were just kinda like solid w the astronauts wife like right before this ninth gay right before this. Thrillers like that. So, you know, there's another obvious one. Now, not really actually I mean Benny in June and Don Juan DeMarco there's other and then dead man, which rules made no money and fear and loathing. He had done the year before this. But you can kinda that into like clear passion projects for him with interactions. He gets to be kinda Kook year. He doesn't do a lot of paycheck movies, though. No. But he does have these alley now, he he does have visualizes sort of program thrillers. Yeah. Like, astronauts, rife and stuff like that where you sort of trying to hit. I I need to be the movie star that can get these timber movies. Exact. So he's taking the roles. Hopefully, they just never click. Yes. And he's playing very fucking straight. You know, but his legacy at this time. I mean the excitement around him when he goes into his weird directions. And I think this was a victory for everyone that it was like, okay, he's doing that. In a big blockbuster that is successful. And he's not. Saying wrote, he's not tempering down his thing watching it. Now, I was surprised by how relatively restrained. He is. Because you watch it imagine with this performance. He doesn't wear a single hat and the hit. No hats. I mean, it's like a parody of fucking, Johnny Depp. But the thing I read is that he really wanted to wear statics wanted to look like the cartoon character from the way you wanted it to be all like sort of hook long nose and long fingers and big ears in an Adam's, apple and shit. You've looked like the g we're not paying you. Not look like, Johnny Depp. Moron. We're already a little mad that you look like gonna. Yeah. Right. But that was like he would be able to get on these lists because he was so fucking handsome, and everyone greedy was a compelling screen presence. But when he went weird it never worked for box office. And then parts of Caribbean was the thing to change it. But I also think this movie holds a very specific place as the last film where Burton had to fight for Depp. Rather than? That's getting made because Depp wanted to work with Burton again precisely when when was the first pirate was two thousand one two thousand three three. Yeah. A couple years away still because after this with the depth does from hell, which is a weird humid Haitian of what he's doing. But that's completely played straight. He does blow. He right. He does shuck Alah. Let's not forget show takes up. That's banished. Guitar some child that was the same years of this that's thousand you're after before night falls, but she's actually good in not a big role the to small demand ride, which is a bunkers the Sally Potter movie, then blow in from hell and he takes ear off. And then he got the two one two once upon a time in Mexico and parts of the Caribbean..

Johnny Depp Caribbean shuck Alah Don Juan DeMarco Sally Potter Burton Benny Mexico apple Adam
"sally potter" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A best which to connect is on our facebook page facebookcom nick show monday morning needs monday morning movie reviews colin suitor is under the weather he won't be joining us this morning but air childress is here and we've got some movies to talk about ansa box office as well a eric welcome back they give i do have collins reviews here and did you see the party because i did not i did not owner well let's just zero read would collins said about the party now this is the new movie from sally potter with timothy spall kristin scott thomas patricia clark's yep in here's what colin would coincide or says about the party which is playing it three theaters in the in the chicago area apparently i'm supposed to love this sorry but i just don't maybe i just isn't always my thing especially when is populated by people i don't care about because they're all just amped up onedimensional characters each with their own weird psychosis repeating their annoying behaviour ad nauseam i really wanted to like this great cast interesting director but it rubbed me the wrong way still it's only seventy one minutes it only seventy one minutes really yom looking at the at the i am devi pedro now why yelled one hour eleven minutes any fill eight or that any still hated there you go silly potter reserve of has made some interesting movies in the past with orlando and yes lift joan allen movie asia mmhmm yeah orlando is it i actually think orleans a terrific movie um so all right well there you go so did collins callan did not like the party of art air tell us about game night okay oh this is a new pill from uh john printed daily and generally goldfine who are responsible for writing the horrible boss was film and also gave us uh that really bad vacation reboot a few years ago uh michelin stars jason bateman rachel mcadam a.

colin suitor childress sally potter patricia clark director devi pedro orlando rachel mcadam facebook timothy spall kristin scott chicago joan allen collins callan michelin seventy one minutes eleven minutes one hour
"sally potter" Discussed on We Paid To See This

We Paid To See This

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on We Paid To See This

"No one because i want to leave silence and jim orphanages carry the mall that's fine so i just left and i was in i you are gonna walk out of their your profession i know i don't fucking walkout him i wouldn't have walked out that seed stan wicked bad marriage now the high definitely i definitely will i went and got twenty minutes into this thing you are how you higher i'm not quitting i i refused to quit you yet i quit the party so you better walkout that don't work is i'm staying here so you can talk about who is the director her name is your name is sally potter he wrote directed this she did a movie in ninety two called orlando very very delaying this very old lien claimed she's done a couple movies every five years throughout their she did something that few years ago with el fanning but it's kind of like it's a place style movie in that's kind of what attracted me to it your breath is fine i just two two years strongly and i had a veggie role either way you want to talk about what happened in their restaurant guys with the reason between is this because this movie which took me it was so bad yes let's talk about what happened in the restaurant oh my god there were these it's just a restaurant in the middle of the day this we're talking like four o'clock we went at four thirty for light on and it's just kind of an american bistro kind of thing and there's these two girls and a guy roughly my age yeah one girl third wheel yup.

stan director sally potter jim orlando el fanning twenty minutes two two years five years
"sally potter" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Here & Now

"Found feeling besson on they went in it's an interesting film it's a fun film and i'm still thinking about it thank you for making it sally potter and patricia clarkson thank you both again and we have some news that involves npr and wbur here announce home station thomas brooke the host of on point will not be returning to the program as according to boston university which owns wbur which produces on point ashsharq has been on leave since december when various allegations against him surfaced and pure media correspondent david full conflict joins us now with the latest uh david there were two investigations that were going on one involving sexual harassment one involving an abusive workplace environment what did the investigators find so uh they work day in parallel de uh investigation of sexual harassment allegations found that his conduct did not constitute sexual harassment under a boston university's codes of conduct an policies there have been allegations of certain kinds of unwanted touching or or uh remarks that they found in rice that level uh second lead there was a law from conducted an allegation question of an abusive uh uh workplace environment that acp recalled them not technically the boss as the defining feature of the program was alleged to have created and they said that was the case that it was clearly uh demeaning hostile a deleterious to a lot of folks there a number of folks uh i got to say wbur i commend its reporting on this i did some reporting as well uh but a number of folks came four to reporters and i think this is appears been reflected in what the investigators found to say that date they left the show because of the demeaning environment that he was not simply a demanding but but abusive in his behavior now the report says the wbur management was aware of ash bricks behavior and repeatedly talked to him about it but was unsuccessful in changing his behavior what does this mean for the management.

besson npr boston university harassment sally potter patricia clarkson thomas brooke david full acp
"sally potter" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Here & Now

"Provisions for dreamers daca recipients but it also has funding for the wall it ends chain migration and also uh really re revamps the visa lottery programme so i think it's a it's going to be difficult and as of now than look very likely we'll have to see what happens with immigration we've also got mitt romney apparently about to expect tomorrow that he's going to run for the senate in utah bob corker might be back we'll have to watch them all simmons democratic strategist in alastair were republican strategists thanks to both of you thank you thank you two the new filmed the party begins with a gun pointed at the camera it then leaves backward in time a cocktail parties about to begin the hostess janet is making appetizers and she's fielding calls from admirers because she's just become a health official in the british government and she celebrating janet is played by kristin scott thomas in this seen her acerbic best friend april enables boyfriend gottfried arrive at the party you did it my condolences ted because once you have reached the top of mount or shatah gottfried fairest the after his you're a story jim and how does he even though i think democracy is finishing off curate from soup consistent but underneath at all there are secrets that emerge as the other guests arriving in the evening degenerates into recriminations had revelations and even so it's really funny the party opens in theaters this friday and joining me are the writer director sally potter and the actress who plays april patricia clarkson sally potter i want to start off with you how did the film come to mind for you on the page in on the screen how it came to mind is always a mystery when i start writing something but i think it's like having the heir to the ground and feeling rumblings and goram links that need to be expressed when i started rushing it was during a general election in the uk when the political parties the rightwing party in the differing party had moved sort of into a center area and will using very very similar language to describe supposedly the things that they believed in which gave on the impression nobody really believed in anything so this story was about exploring the.

romney senate bob corker alastair official british government janet kristin scott thomas jim director sally potter uk utah gottfried ted writer
"sally potter" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And they were teaching and that's how they were able to make their films completely freely without any intervention and they didn't have the burden of thinking about themselves as commercial filmmakers earth or narrative filmmakers and yet this was an interesting moment where experimental film was moving away from the formalist purely like just stamp wreckage just images on the screen and starting to incorporate genre and references to narrative in it as examples in your mind to films dollar sally potter made a film early on called thriller and it was a film with on like a feminist film class at brown but it was like using the thriller in the context the feminists film theory don't haven't seen that film in many many years so don't remember that well but that was one example at the same time david lynch was making blue velvet and so all of a sudden there was a sense of the experimental language and infusing into in influencing narrative filmmaking feature film making commercial foaming and so i felt like there was this interesting cross pollination going on where one culture was informing the other which is always sort of what you want you want to see the arts affect popular art and you want to see that and there are interesting moments historically were that seems to be more true and others and i felt that at the time and then suicide was actually the first time i made when i left college move to new york and made an independent film on my own i had made a film before that about arthur rambeau the poet.

new york arthur rambeau sally potter brown david lynch
"sally potter" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"There is a sense that he is a different person sally potter is she not doing that with highs in the pa now i think i think this is much more as it also laugh at the marvat stories whereas in the party to me if i like like watching sort of great jazz also mira or something we eat is new at one point somebody was going to get this solomin moment and they were you're going to have this murder grandstanding ending and delivering this monologue via the marmo sources much more about the interaction between the characters arabic changing dynamic takes place over the course of these of the film say we are not agreed on these films thoughts data and see them that out now and then live at stories is of course on net flex as well as incident cinemas this week on the podcast we have in your elements i'll what was it that track to detail his back he's an amazing guy he can't be pigeonholed in any way you can't say i'm he's just to play right or performer or as we'll hit a walking told guide or just a graphic artist or a visual artists he's all of these things and you can't say that he's a exactly from one particular price because he's from so many different places a he in a way he sort of belongs in every box but also in non he's an outsider it he seems comfortable in that and that's sort of ugly inspiring it's nice to be around it was a very warm encounter a line in one of his place in the an evening with an immigrant i think he says i come from a long line of troublemakers and he very much sees himself as a troublemaker instead of disrupt yeah he's of autistic elite disruptive and i think that's cool sown evening with an immigrant was at the edinburgh festival this year.

sally potter murder edinburgh
"sally potter" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Oh you mean really don't know where he was wrecked okay almazy you know the guy goes behind the window here that's val kilmer i need to know under a gosh i think it was princess let but it would see anywhere yet so it was it was a film which lost lost my attention and that i think is a real shame because we needed more thriller a murder mystery something dealing with you know dark subject matter something dealing with a freezing environment and all the rest of it with content what you want is something which plays like an an icicle to the heart and this just felt like a melting pops icl and the are that wasn't the best analogy been with the arrest that came to mind at the time and ian hopkins or possibly and the help and into his and when on now man that hemel hempstead refurbish cinema on a big screen backdrop breathtaking plot very confusing and jumpy not as good as the trail is made out in the post as look fantastic in of and it does look beautiful we'll yes he does but you know and yet and i mean as i've said a million times heaven's gate looks beautiful yeah not a good film so it says it and giving the constituent parts yeah i think this is going to be it's a classic case of the some of the the whole is less than the sum of the parts and asked the semi which is at this week it's 19 minutes past three what else is neuralises are the party which is this a strippeddown tragicomedy falls by sally potter kristin scott thomas his janet who's just become made a shadow minutes of health for an unnamed opposition party she's preparing nivelles in the kitchen walls fielding congratulates refund calls me while timothy spall who is her morose academic husband he's sitting in the living room nursing a glass of wine and listening to arm a man on the stereo looking as emasculated as it is possible to look a series of guests turn up all of whom all theoretically coming to to praise and to you know and and to be happy about this appointment we get patricia clarkson's acid tongue.

val kilmer ian hopkins kristin scott janet timothy spall patricia clarkson murder hemel hempstead sally potter 19 minutes
"sally potter" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"sally potter" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Coming in today we were talking as you said into your seats and switched off your phone about the puts it you just finished working on the policy lindh directed by sally potter she's she somebody who worked with before and your trotting of to berlin next week with it this is something nice having your traveling cases you go to berlin well i had such fund making a film from beginning when i i read it was just a totally obvious that this film is gonna be great they had brilliant characters in all seven characters and that all really well written very very funny very dark there were two characters i couldn't quite choose which one i want to play but i ended up doing the one that i well that is perhaps more of a passive character looks i just felt had more to act but there are some fantastic said of one liners and brilliant moments of of whitten dog dog comedy in it but it's also very kind of meaningful about the things that we talk about today um the freedom that we will have about being liberal about being supposedly leftleaning i it's really interesting about all these things i mean there's a little fear is that yes you're right it is a great play on the words near the party my character is basically holding a party because she's just been made shatter health minister and she's giving a party she's find it all her lovely friends in from her past from now from what has student days from husband's student days and then all goes horribly wrong in the dot dot dot yet i gotta and it sounds like a fascinating interesting project exam almost like something that could be written for the stage as well in the sense that it happens in a room it happens in in one in the ground floor of a house mainly three rooms a kitchen and the drawing room and it it is a lot of people talking to each other and there are other things you've already mentioned the baath ahead for up i'm this sounds like an interesting departure also working with sally pas2 whose john opera and orlando was fantastic thing as well a not on the trickle movie as well as you careers progressed you won't work with directors who have a bit more of an understanding.

lindh sally pas2 orlando sally potter berlin whitten